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from bbc online news.
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Btms
2017-08-04 13:31:19 UTC
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Fyi in you are interested.

The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
O'Connor announced in June that he would be leaving the BBC soap after a
year in the job, in order to concentrate on his film career.
The Sun admitted a front page article "wrongly suggested" the producer had
been sacked for bullying cast members.
The apology appeared online and on page two of the newspaper on Friday.
Referring to a front page article from 23 June, the paper said: "We wrongly
suggested that Mr O'Connor had been sacked as a result of bullying the cast
of the show, and to such an extent that the actors had complained to the
BBC.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"We apologise to Mr O'Connor for the distress caused, and have agreed to
pay him substantial damages and legal costs."
■ EastEnders boss leaves programme
Before joining the square in Walford, O'Connor was the editor of BBC Radio
4's The Archers, and was responsible for the domestic abuse story between
Helen Archer and Rob Titchener.
Speaking of his decision to leave Eastenders, O'Connor said working with
the cast and crew at Elstree had been "an absolute privilege".
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
krw
2017-08-04 13:57:49 UTC
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Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
O'Connor announced in June that he would be leaving the BBC soap after a
year in the job, in order to concentrate on his film career.
The Sun admitted a front page article "wrongly suggested" the producer had
been sacked for bullying cast members.
The apology appeared online and on page two of the newspaper on Friday.
Referring to a front page article from 23 June, the paper said: "We wrongly
suggested that Mr O'Connor had been sacked as a result of bullying the cast
of the show, and to such an extent that the actors had complained to the
BBC.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"We apologise to Mr O'Connor for the distress caused, and have agreed to
pay him substantial damages and legal costs."
■ EastEnders boss leaves programme
Before joining the square in Walford, O'Connor was the editor of BBC Radio
4's The Archers, and was responsible for the domestic abuse story between
Helen Archer and Rob Titchener.
Speaking of his decision to leave Eastenders, O'Connor said working with
the cast and crew at Elstree had been "an absolute privilege".
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
I wonder if he made more from his pay off from the BBC or the money from
the Sun?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
John Ashby
2017-08-04 14:43:53 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
O'Connor announced in June that he would be leaving the BBC soap after a
year in the job, in order to concentrate on his film career.
The Sun admitted a front page article "wrongly suggested" the producer had
been sacked for bullying cast members.
The apology appeared online and on page two of the newspaper on Friday.
Referring to a front page article from 23 June, the paper said: "We wrongly
suggested that Mr O'Connor had been sacked as a result of bullying the cast
of the show, and to such an extent that the actors had complained to the
BBC.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"We apologise to Mr O'Connor for the distress caused, and have agreed to
pay him substantial damages and legal costs."
■ EastEnders boss leaves programme
Before joining the square in Walford, O'Connor was the editor of BBC Radio
4's The Archers, and was responsible for the domestic abuse story between
Helen Archer and Rob Titchener.
Speaking of his decision to leave Eastenders, O'Connor said working with
the cast and crew at Elstree had been "an absolute privilege".
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
I wonder if he made more from his pay off from the BBC or the money from
the Sun?
And how much less would he have got if he had been female?

john
Hbunnet
2017-08-05 09:56:53 UTC
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Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.

"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"


Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in London
immediately after the end of WW11.
--
Hbunnet
Btms
2017-08-05 09:57:07 UTC
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Post by Hbunnet
Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.
"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"
Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in London
immediately after the end of WW11.
Sounds like he is drawn to stories of brutalised women. Don't quite know
what this may mean but it does seem to be saying something.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
krw
2017-08-05 14:09:25 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Hbunnet
Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.
"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"
Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in London
immediately after the end of WW11.
Sounds like he is drawn to stories of brutalised women. Don't quite know
what this may mean but it does seem to be saying something.
I went to check the Amazon description and can see exactly the same
link. Why endlessly repeat the same? If a good story teller then tell
lots of different stories; not repeat one idea many times over. Implies
the man is flawed.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
BrritSki
2017-08-05 10:05:57 UTC
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Post by Hbunnet
Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.
"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"
Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in London
immediately after the end of WW11.
WW11 ? So a far-future dystopia then ? ;)
Hbunnet
2017-08-05 13:37:50 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Hbunnet
Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.
"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"
Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in London
immediately after the end of WW11.
WW11 ? So a far-future dystopia then ? ;)
Yes I realised that too late. "WWII" is better than "WW11", I seldom
have the occasion to type Roman Numerals. I don't suppose I needed to,
since "WW2" would be clearer.
--
Hbunnet
BrritSki
2017-08-05 13:44:10 UTC
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Post by Hbunnet
Post by BrritSki
Post by Hbunnet
Post by Btms
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
S O'C has written an excellent book about Neville Heath. I was
recommended it by a friend with an interest in the subject.
"Handsome Brute: The true story of a Ladykiller, by Sean O'Connor
published by Simon & Schuster"
Well written. I particularly enjoyed where he sets the scene in
London immediately after the end of WW11.
WW11 ? So a far-future dystopia then ? ;)
Yes I realised that too late. "WWII" is better than "WW11", I seldom
have the occasion to type Roman Numerals. I don't suppose I needed to,
since "WW2" would be clearer.
Oh it was clear, but too good an opportunity :)
Marjorie
2017-08-05 10:04:43 UTC
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Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
O'Connor announced in June that he would be leaving the BBC soap after a
year in the job, in order to concentrate on his film career.
The Sun admitted a front page article "wrongly suggested" the producer had
been sacked for bullying cast members.
The apology appeared online and on page two of the newspaper on Friday.
Referring to a front page article from 23 June, the paper said: "We wrongly
suggested that Mr O'Connor had been sacked as a result of bullying the cast
of the show, and to such an extent that the actors had complained to the
BBC.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"We apologise to Mr O'Connor for the distress caused, and have agreed to
pay him substantial damages and legal costs."
■ EastEnders boss leaves programme
Before joining the square in Walford, O'Connor was the editor of BBC Radio
4's The Archers, and was responsible for the domestic abuse story between
Helen Archer and Rob Titchener.
Speaking of his decision to leave Eastenders, O'Connor said working with
the cast and crew at Elstree had been "an absolute privilege".
He is now working with Sherlock writer Mark Gatiss on a big screen feature
on the murderer Neville Heath.
So he's vindicated - he's not a bully, just a crap producer. I'm glad
they've cleared that up.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Btms
2017-08-05 10:35:57 UTC
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Post by Marjorie
Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
[]
Post by Marjorie
Post by Btms
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"We apologise to Mr O'Connor for the distress caused, and have agreed to
pay him substantial damages and legal costs."
■ EastEnders boss leaves programme
[]
Post by Marjorie
So he's vindicated - he's not a bully, just a crap producer. I'm glad
they've cleared that up.
Pithy and right on. 😊
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
DavidK
2017-08-07 07:31:39 UTC
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Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"him bullying them" ... am I correct in thinking this should have been
"his bullying them"? I don't know how to look it up.

If anyrat says that they are both acceptable and that the first is
acceptable because the "him" is the indirect object and the "bullying
them" is a modifier then I'll accept the correction.
Sally Thompson
2017-08-07 09:12:39 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"him bullying them" ... am I correct in thinking this should have been
"his bullying them"? I don't know how to look it up.
If anyrat says that they are both acceptable and that the first is
acceptable because the "him" is the indirect object and the "bullying
them" is a modifier then I'll accept the correction.
I would have put "his" as in "his bullying (of) them". However I note the
newspaper source!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
John Ashby
2017-08-07 19:38:27 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by DavidK
Post by Btms
Fyi in you are interested.
The Sun newspaper is to pay "substantial damages" to former EastEnders boss
Sean O'Connor, after wrongly accusing him of bullying.
"We now accept that this was wrong. Mr O'Connor had not been accused of
bullying anyone, none of the cast complained to the BBC about him bullying
them, and his decision to leave the BBC had nothing to do with any claims
of bullying.
"him bullying them" ... am I correct in thinking this should have been
"his bullying them"? I don't know how to look it up.
If anyrat says that they are both acceptable and that the first is
acceptable because the "him" is the indirect object and the "bullying
them" is a modifier then I'll accept the correction.
I would have put "his" as in "his bullying (of) them". However I note the
newspaper source!
It's confusing because "bullying" could be either a participle (verb) or
a gerund (noun). In the first case you'd use "him" so the verb has a
subject doing it (but in a object form as part of the main sentence), in
the second the gerund takes a genitive "his".

This is quite advanced stuff, and I could be quite wrong.

john

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