Discussion:
Perils of Cruising Part 3
(too old to reply)
krw
2018-08-05 12:23:56 UTC
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Having spent about 5 hours being sick my oesophagus was failing to calm
down even though my stomach must have been emptied many times.
Perfectly flat sea - so it must be food poisoning, probably the small
bits of lobster with the escargots.

Silhouette was mooring in Rostock and later in the day we were going to
see the Molli (the local steam railway; Rostock is pretty boring).

Anyway about 8am just as the medical centre was due to open the centre
of my chest burst into acute pain. I mean it really hurt (see later for
the female viewpoint).

Jackie gets me down to the medical centre (how she did that I don't know
- she was refusing to let people in the lift and all sorts) and some
bloods are taken and after what seemed like an infinite period of time
the doctor hooked me up to saline drip, then started a flow of morphine,
plus something to stop the muscles trying to be sick and something else
to calm the stomach down. ECG, blood tests. Anyway the pain eventually
started to ease and the doctor felt that I needed a scan (not available)
and confirmation from land based authorities that I was fit to travel.

Jackie rushes back to the cabin and grabs a few essentials - our helpful
cabin dolly Nicol found me some clothes and insisted Jackie take all the
different power chargers! Jackie claims she could not fund her way to
the medical centre and it had moved.

Ambulance turns up - they want €150 before moving, Jackie heads up to
the ATM and it disgorges cash. Then apparently they moved the medical
centre again and it took Jackie a while to find it. A rough 30 minute
transit to Rostock hospital. Why have tram tracks in the middle of the
road - they really shake you up! Why have the hospital so far from the
ship?

Some obviously dedicated and hard working medical people in Germany
decided that more pain relief was a good idea (I am not arguing) plus a
second bag of saline are administered. Wonderful German ECG machine -
like cow milking machine the heads are not "taped" on but use suction
and just drop off at the end of the process - no pain at all. I suppose
they cost more! I think we are in some form of emergency dept and the
lady doctor looks about 20 (I know). She went through the normal
questions now I was feeling human and went away. Then she came back -
the first time to ask if I still had my gall bladder and the second time
for an extra blood sample. Now it is time for an abdominal scan which
was why we came in the first case. (In all of this much time could be
saved if doctors felt that could rely on each other).

A good hour then upstairs and Jackie could see the screen - nothing
unusual except a couple of gallstones, one a centimetre long. The scan
people reckon that an operation later today or sometime tomorrow should
sort me out.

Back downstairs and nice "young" doctor has to write a report (c 1 hour)
and arrange transport to another department (which confusingly we are
told is A&E but was probably more of surgical assessment unit. 1 hour
waiting transport - it is the same hospital but a good five minutes,
stretcher transfer and they refuse to allow me to walk (did I mention it
was very hot outside - indeed it was pretty hot everywhere).

White coated surgeon read the papers carefully (but little Miss Hitler
made Jackie sit in the waiting room). Once again excellent spoken
English. He felt that getting me home would be good and prescribed pain
killers (yes yes) and some pretty strong wide spectrum antibiotics and
fit to travel certificate. (During the waits Jackie and I had discussed
her returning home, me staying and coming back by myself. Did you know
you can leave Rostock at 9am (local time) and be at St Pancras
International by 9pm the same day - you do now!).

Taxi back to the ship and Thursday was spent mostly asleep and Friday
(both sea days) taken very gently. Off the ship by 7:45 I was in
Frimley Park at about 9am. I escaped about 6pm. More antibiotics,
surgeon visit on 13/8 and a date to be fixed for the operation and I
must be careful it does not flare up in the meantime. Jackie went home
to do four loads of washing and ironing and sorting out things I could
eat and drink in the near future.

In terms of the two medical teams (here and in Germany) there was little
difference, although I was surprised how well the Germans spoke English.
The UK was let down by systems in getting from Emergency Dept (Frimley
does not have Accidents), then into SAU and then to xray and to the
scan. In this day and age a porter to be given a handwritten note to
"collect" me and "deliver" me to an xray technician is wrong (and
Frimley Park it is really silly to spend money on a "sign" apologising
for the poor direction signing - spend the same amount on good signing).
I believe that using systems efficiently would have moved me through
Frimley Park some 4 hours faster than was achieved. I can even tell you
how it would work off the existing database - but you would need to fix
the wifi first (please).

On the ship a fellow traveller had experienced both gall bladder pain
and childbirth and the world will no doubt be relieved to know that
childbirth is worse. Katie says kidney stones are worse than
childbirth, so you have been warned.

So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.

--
K Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2018-08-05 12:50:21 UTC
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krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
> Having spent about 5 hours being sick my oesophagus was failing to calm
> down even though my stomach must have been emptied many times.
> Perfectly flat sea - so it must be food poisoning, probably the small
> bits of lobster with the escargots.
>
> Silhouette was mooring in Rostock and later in the day we were going to
> see the Molli (the local steam railway; Rostock is pretty boring).
>
> Anyway about 8am just as the medical centre was due to open the centre
> of my chest burst into acute pain. I mean it really hurt (see later for
> the female viewpoint).
>
> Jackie gets me down to the medical centre (how she did that I don't know
> - she was refusing to let people in the lift and all sorts) and some
> bloods are taken and after what seemed like an infinite period of time
> the doctor hooked me up to saline drip, then started a flow of morphine,
> plus something to stop the muscles trying to be sick and something else
> to calm the stomach down. ECG, blood tests. Anyway the pain eventually
> started to ease and the doctor felt that I needed a scan (not available)
> and confirmation from land based authorities that I was fit to travel.
>
> Jackie rushes back to the cabin and grabs a few essentials - our helpful
> cabin dolly Nicol found me some clothes and insisted Jackie take all the
> different power chargers! Jackie claims she could not fund her way to
> the medical centre and it had moved.
>
> Ambulance turns up - they want €150 before moving, Jackie heads up to
> the ATM and it disgorges cash. Then apparently they moved the medical
> centre again and it took Jackie a while to find it. A rough 30 minute
> transit to Rostock hospital. Why have tram tracks in the middle of the
> road - they really shake you up! Why have the hospital so far from the
> ship?
>
> Some obviously dedicated and hard working medical people in Germany
> decided that more pain relief was a good idea (I am not arguing) plus a
> second bag of saline are administered. Wonderful German ECG machine -
> like cow milking machine the heads are not "taped" on but use suction
> and just drop off at the end of the process - no pain at all. I suppose
> they cost more! I think we are in some form of emergency dept and the
> lady doctor looks about 20 (I know). She went through the normal
> questions now I was feeling human and went away. Then she came back -
> the first time to ask if I still had my gall bladder and the second time
> for an extra blood sample. Now it is time for an abdominal scan which
> was why we came in the first case. (In all of this much time could be
> saved if doctors felt that could rely on each other).
>
> A good hour then upstairs and Jackie could see the screen - nothing
> unusual except a couple of gallstones, one a centimetre long. The scan
> people reckon that an operation later today or sometime tomorrow should
> sort me out.
>
> Back downstairs and nice "young" doctor has to write a report (c 1 hour)
> and arrange transport to another department (which confusingly we are
> told is A&E but was probably more of surgical assessment unit. 1 hour
> waiting transport - it is the same hospital but a good five minutes,
> stretcher transfer and they refuse to allow me to walk (did I mention it
> was very hot outside - indeed it was pretty hot everywhere).
>
> White coated surgeon read the papers carefully (but little Miss Hitler
> made Jackie sit in the waiting room). Once again excellent spoken
> English. He felt that getting me home would be good and prescribed pain
> killers (yes yes) and some pretty strong wide spectrum antibiotics and
> fit to travel certificate. (During the waits Jackie and I had discussed
> her returning home, me staying and coming back by myself. Did you know
> you can leave Rostock at 9am (local time) and be at St Pancras
> International by 9pm the same day - you do now!).
>
> Taxi back to the ship and Thursday was spent mostly asleep and Friday
> (both sea days) taken very gently. Off the ship by 7:45 I was in
> Frimley Park at about 9am. I escaped about 6pm. More antibiotics,
> surgeon visit on 13/8 and a date to be fixed for the operation and I
> must be careful it does not flare up in the meantime. Jackie went home
> to do four loads of washing and ironing and sorting out things I could
> eat and drink in the near future.
>
> In terms of the two medical teams (here and in Germany) there was little
> difference, although I was surprised how well the Germans spoke English.
> The UK was let down by systems in getting from Emergency Dept (Frimley
> does not have Accidents), then into SAU and then to xray and to the
> scan. In this day and age a porter to be given a handwritten note to
> "collect" me and "deliver" me to an xray technician is wrong (and
> Frimley Park it is really silly to spend money on a "sign" apologising
> for the poor direction signing - spend the same amount on good signing).
> I believe that using systems efficiently would have moved me through
> Frimley Park some 4 hours faster than was achieved. I can even tell you
> how it would work off the existing database - but you would need to fix
> the wifi first (please).
>
> On the ship a fellow traveller had experienced both gall bladder pain
> and childbirth and the world will no doubt be relieved to know that
> childbirth is worse. Katie says kidney stones are worse than
> childbirth, so you have been warned.
>
> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>

UGH! Get well very soon. I think wofe might ban you from travelling
altogether!

Sincerely Chris
krw
2018-08-05 12:57:03 UTC
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On 5/8/18 13:50, Chris McMillan wrote; my response is lower down:
> I think wofe might ban you from travelling
> altogether!

Wofe ecstatic. She did not have to go on a steam railway.

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
LFS
2018-08-05 13:17:52 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 13:57, krw wrote:
> On 5/8/18 13:50, Chris McMillan wrote; my response is lower down:
>>   I think wofe might ban you from travelling
>> altogether!
>
> Wofe ecstatic.  She did not have to go on a steam railway.
>

<giggle>

Poor you! Hope you get sorted out speedily. I have a friend who was
diagnosed with gallstones after suffering great pain. She refused to
have any treatment but tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge
quantities of olive oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad
dressing). The pain went away. She later had a scan for something else
and there were no gallstones visible. I suspect that the original
diagnosis was wrong but she is hale and hearty twenty years later.

You'll need another holiday to recover.

Were the ship medical staff South African? They usually are IME and very
efficient.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
krw
2018-08-05 13:57:25 UTC
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On 5/8/18 14:17, LFS wrote; my response is lower down:
> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge quantities of olive oil
> and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad dressing).

I am tempted to try it as preferable to an operation.


The pain went
> away. She later had a scan for something else and there were no
> gallstones visible. I suspect that the original diagnosis was wrong but
> she is hale and hearty twenty years later.
>
> You'll need another holiday to recover.

Bad news there big gourmet trip to northern climes in September but
operation cannot be before we go.

>
> Were the ship medical staff South African? They usually are IME and very
> efficient.

Doctor was English on the grounds that the majority of travellers were
English.


--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
LFS
2018-08-05 14:39:54 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 14:57, krw wrote:
> On 5/8/18 14:17, LFS wrote; my response is lower down:
>> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge quantities of olive
>> oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad dressing).
>
> I am tempted to try it as preferable to an operation.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gallstones/expert-answers/gallbladder-cleanse/faq-20058134

Can't they zap them without surgery?

>
>
> The pain went
>> away. She later had a scan for something else and there were no
>> gallstones visible. I suspect that the original diagnosis was wrong
>> but she is hale and hearty twenty years later.
>>
>> You'll need another holiday to recover.
>
> Bad news there big gourmet trip to northern climes in September but
> operation cannot be before we go.

:(

>
>>
>> Were the ship medical staff South African? They usually are IME and
>> very efficient.
>
> Doctor was English on the grounds that the majority of travellers were
> English.
>
>

As they were on the two cruises when I needed medical attention.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2018-08-05 14:53:44 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 16:39, LFS wrote:
> On 05/08/2018 14:57, krw wrote:
>> On 5/8/18 14:17, LFS wrote; my response is lower down:
>>> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge quantities of olive
>>> oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad dressing).
>>
>> I am tempted to try it as preferable to an operation.
>
> https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gallstones/expert-answers/gallbladder-cleanse/faq-20058134
>
>
> Can't they zap them without surgery?

I think the resulting "sand" can be just as bad as a big one, oo er Missus.

That's my experience anyway...
Nick Odell
2018-08-05 22:33:51 UTC
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On 05/08/18 15:39, LFS wrote:
> On 05/08/2018 14:57, krw wrote:
>> On 5/8/18 14:17, LFS wrote; my response is lower down:
>>> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge quantities of olive
>>> oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad dressing).
>>
>> I am tempted to try it as preferable to an operation.
>
> https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gallstones/expert-answers/gallbladder-cleanse/faq-20058134
>
>
> Can't they zap them without surgery?

AIUI they can do that in certain circumstances but an acquaintance of
mine in BsAs had to go into hospital for an op. Mind you, it's all done
by keyhole surgery these days and she was out of hospital and back at
home the following day. They'd actually intended to send her back the
same afternoon but delays in the operating theatre left it too late for
them to do that.

Nick
BrritSki
2018-08-05 14:48:35 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 15:57, krw wrote:
> On 5/8/18 14:17, LFS wrote; my response is lower down:
>> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge quantities of olive
>> oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad dressing).
>
> I am tempted to try it as preferable to an operation.
>
I was told organic cider vinegar which included the "mother" and
anecdotally it seemed to help.
>
> The pain went
>> away. She later had a scan for something else and there were no
>> gallstones visible. I suspect that the original diagnosis was wrong
>> but she is hale and hearty twenty years later.
>>
>> You'll need another holiday to recover.
>
> Bad news there big gourmet trip to northern climes in September but
> operation cannot be before we go.

Just keep off the fat - very difficult I know...
Penny
2018-08-06 17:36:37 UTC
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On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 14:17:52 +0100, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...

> tried a folk remedy which involved drinking huge
>quantities of olive oil and lemon juice (which sounded to me like salad
>dressing).

I tried that - it just made me feel sick in a slightly different way.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-08-05 15:15:09 UTC
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krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
> On 5/8/18 13:50, Chris McMillan wrote; my response is lower down:
>> I think wofe might ban you from travelling
>> altogether!
>
> Wofe ecstatic. She did not have to go on a steam railway.
>

I don’t know that your wofe would enjoy my company! Vicenta, wofe of the
late Roger, non-netted umrat remembered last night that they took us and
Wunderkind, aged about 8 to Didcot Railway centre for a day.

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2018-08-05 13:47:00 UTC
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On 05/08/18 13:23, krw wrote:
> Having spent about 5 hours..... ....So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>

Ooops! Apologies for the massive foot-in-mouth of my earlier post and
may I offer extreme sympathy for your situation. Get well soon.

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-05 14:43:40 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 13:23, krw wrote:
> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.

That doesn't sound any fun - I hope everything stays calm between now
and then and that it isn't too long before all is well.

--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. What do get if you walk under a cow?
A. A pat on the head.
BrritSki
2018-08-05 14:46:34 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 14:23, krw wrote:

> On the ship a fellow traveller had experienced both gall bladder pain
> and childbirth and the world will no doubt be relieved to know that
> childbirth is worse.  Katie says kidney stones are worse than
> childbirth, so you have been warned.

I haven't experienced childbirth (except as the child), but gallstones
can be excruciating. I've had 2 major attacks in Italy (the first I
thought was a heart attack- no sickness involved just tremendous back
pain and chest pain, pale (but ambulance doc. said I would have been
white if it had been my heart) and cold sweats) and 2 in UK, but all
they can see on the scan is "sand" - I'm not sure if this is worse or
better than a big one, but you have my utmost sympathy either way.

Next attack I'm going to insist on an op.

PS Jackie sounds like a star....
krw
2018-08-05 16:07:26 UTC
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On 5/8/18 15:46, BrritSki wrote; my response is lower down:
> On 05/08/2018 14:23, krw wrote:
>
>> On the ship a fellow traveller had experienced both gall bladder pain
>> and childbirth and the world will no doubt be relieved to know that
>> childbirth is worse.  Katie says kidney stones are worse than
>> childbirth, so you have been warned.
>
> I haven't experienced childbirth (except as the child), but gallstones
> can be excruciating. I've had 2 major attacks in Italy (the first I
> thought was a heart attack- no sickness involved just tremendous back
> pain and chest pain, pale (but ambulance doc. said I would have been
> white if it had been my heart) and cold sweats) and 2 in UK, but all
> they can see on the scan is "sand" - I'm not sure if this is worse or
> better than a big one, but you have my utmost sympathy either way.
>
> Next attack I'm going to insist on an op.
>
> PS  Jackie sounds like a star....
>
>
The pain was bad and I am told that is common. I certainly have two
stones - there is a smaller one so zapping is not being suggested. I am
suspicious that a little food poisoning happened and the whole "system"
got uncomfortable and "kicked off". I also have a suspicion that what I
thought was food poisoning some 7 - 8 years ago might have been a less
painful attack. I was knocked sideways and was off work for a week as I
felt too weak.

Where would any of be withoutour wives (/husbands) behind us?

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jenny M Benson
2018-08-06 16:35:08 UTC
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On 05-Aug-18 03:46 PM, BrritSki wrote:
>
> I haven't experienced childbirth (except as the child), but gallstones
> can be excruciating. I've had 2 major attacks in Italy (the first I
> thought was a heart attack- no sickness involved just tremendous back
> pain and chest pain, pale (but ambulance doc. said I would have been
> white if it had been my heart) and cold sweats) and 2 in UK, but all
> they can see on the scan is "sand" - I'm not sure if this is worse or
> better than a big one, but you have my utmost sympathy either way.

You're the second umrat to have mention scanning for gallstones. When I
had my one and only (thank goodness) gallstone attack (followed within 2
or 3 weeks by removal of gall bladder and 16 stones the size of
processed peas) the diagnosis was achieved by means of an x-ray. This
was in 1968 (so I was far from 40 and not at all fat, then, but still
fertile!) and I don't think scanning had been invented then. Presumably
it's now considered preferable because avoiding x-rays is always A Good
Thing.

--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Sid Nuncius
2018-08-06 07:05:29 UTC
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On 05/08/2018 13:23, krw wrote:

> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.

Cripes! Sorry to hear all that, MOPMOB. Fingers crossed that you'll be
sorted soon.



--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2018-08-06 10:38:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 05/08/2018 13:23, krw wrote:
>
>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>
> Cripes! Sorry to hear all that, MOPMOB. Fingers crossed that you'll be
> sorted soon.
>
>
>

Yes indeed. Keep us in the loop.

--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
krw
2018-08-06 16:47:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 6/8/18 11:38, Btms wrote; my response is lower down:
> Keep us in the loop.

The next bits are far less dramatic; immediately I am bit limited on
things to eat. I have to have low sugar and now I have to have low fat.
Which does not leave much.

There is some residual discomfort but I cannot judge if that is the
disruption to the chest from repeatedly being sick or (more likely) from
the inflamed gall bladder.

Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Btms
2018-08-06 17:11:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
> On 6/8/18 11:38, Btms wrote; my response is lower down:
>> Keep us in the loop.
>
> The next bits are far less dramatic; immediately I am bit limited on
> things to eat. I have to have low sugar and now I have to have low fat.
> Which does not leave much.
>
> There is some residual discomfort but I cannot judge if that is the
> disruption to the chest from repeatedly being sick or (more likely) from
> the inflamed gall bladder.
>
> Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
> I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?
>

Not your fever. We had a reason to reluctantly travel to Reading & shelter
in Ikea. When we left, it was like walking into an oven. Now laying on
the bed with floor standing fan wafting a breeze. I may have to go to the
pub soon..

--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-07 02:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message
<1587899276.555267877.268293.poppy-***@news.eternal-september.
org>, Btms <***@thetames.me.uk> writes:
>krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
>> On 6/8/18 11:38, Btms wrote; my response is lower down:
>>> Keep us in the loop.
>>
>> The next bits are far less dramatic; immediately I am bit limited on
>> things to eat. I have to have low sugar and now I have to have low fat.
>> Which does not leave much.
>>
>> There is some residual discomfort but I cannot judge if that is the
>> disruption to the chest from repeatedly being sick or (more likely) from
>> the inflamed gall bladder.
>>
>> Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
>> I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?
>>
>
>Not your fever. We had a reason to reluctantly travel to Reading & shelter
>in Ikea. When we left, it was like walking into an oven. Now laying on
>the bed with floor standing fan wafting a breeze. I may have to go to the
>pub soon..
>
Out of curiosity: do anyrats have air-conditioning, as such, in the
home? (I mean actual aircon units, not just fans.) I tell my American
correspondents that, though they may have higher temperatures (in some
states, anyway), there's a fair chance they have aircon, whereas the
only place most Brits have it is in their car (if a relatively new one),
and maybe in the workplace if they're lucky. But maybe I'm wrong.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A sleekzorp without a tornpee is like a quop without a fertsneet (sort of).
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-13 21:45:10 UTC
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Raw Message
On 07-Aug-18 3:54, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
> In message
> <1587899276.555267877.268293.poppy-***@news.eternal-september.
> org>, Btms <***@thetames.me.uk> writes:
>> krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
>>> On 6/8/18 11:38, Btms wrote; my response is lower down:
>>>> Keep us in the loop.
>>>
>>> The next bits are far less dramatic; immediately I am bit limited on
>>> things to eat.  I have to have low sugar and now I have to have low fat.
>>>  Which does not leave much.
>>>
>>> There is some residual discomfort but I cannot judge if that is the
>>> disruption to the chest from repeatedly being sick or (more likely) from
>>> the inflamed gall bladder.
>>>
>>> Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
>>> I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?
>>>
>>
>> Not your fever.  We had a reason to reluctantly travel to Reading &
>> shelter
>> in Ikea.  When we left, it was like walking into an oven.  Now laying on
>> the bed with floor standing fan wafting a breeze.  I may have to go to
>> the
>> pub soon..
>>
> Out of curiosity: do anyrats have air-conditioning, as such, in the
> home? (I mean actual aircon units, not just fans.) I tell my American
> correspondents that, though they may have higher temperatures (in some
> states, anyway), there's a fair chance they have aircon, whereas the
> only place most Brits have it is in their car (if a relatively new one),
> and maybe in the workplace if they're lucky. But maybe I'm wrong.

I suspect that more people in the UK have air conditioning in their
caravans[1] than in their homes.

[1] People who have this expensive option installed, most likely do so
because they take the caravan to warmer climates.

--
Sam Plusnet
Fenny
2018-08-06 17:17:13 UTC
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Raw Message
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 17:47:13 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:

>
>Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
>I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?

I can't make an informed comment on the temperature while you were
walking the dog this afternoon, but it has certainly been quite warm
in our office today. My cow-orker put the AC on and managed to push
all the wrong buttons so it didn't work. After he left, I restored it
to its proper function, so I was alright from 4pm onwards. But there
were plenty of farenheits flying as I walked home at 5.45.
--
Fenny
Mike
2018-08-06 17:42:20 UTC
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Raw Message
Fenny <***@removethis.gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 17:47:13 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
>
>>
>> Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
>> I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?
>
> I can't make an informed comment on the temperature while you were
> walking the dog this afternoon, but it has certainly been quite warm
> in our office today. My cow-orker put the AC on and managed to push
> all the wrong buttons so it didn't work. After he left, I restored it
> to its proper function, so I was alright from 4pm onwards. But there
> were plenty of farenheits flying as I walked home at 5.45.

There would have been a high grade of centis too.;-)

--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-06 17:25:09 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 17:47:13 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:

>On 6/8/18 11:38, Btms wrote; my response is lower down:
>> Keep us in the loop.
>
>The next bits are far less dramatic; immediately I am bit limited on
>things to eat. I have to have low sugar and now I have to have low fat.
> Which does not leave much.
>
>There is some residual discomfort but I cannot judge if that is the
>disruption to the chest from repeatedly being sick or (more likely) from
>the inflamed gall bladder.
>
>Having been away has anyone noticed that it seems to be a bit warm when
>I walked the dog this afternoon - or is that just my fever?

Afternoon is probably not so good for walks as it gets hotter then. I
usually walk the dog in the morning anyway, before 11. B does the
afternoon short walk and they are very short at present.

I'm glad you are up and about and hope the disomfort goes and you feel
better and things get sorted.
krw
2018-08-07 09:35:23 UTC
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Raw Message
On 6/8/18 18:25, Vicky Ayech wrote; my response is lower down:
> Afternoon is probably not so good for walks as it gets hotter then.

Agreed - but I was in London yesterday morning having a meeting in the
open air and was surprised by how little some women seem to think they
can wear.

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-07 11:54:56 UTC
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Raw Message
In message <pkbp4q$h1n$***@gioia.aioe.org>, krw <***@whitnet.uk> writes:
>On 6/8/18 18:25, Vicky Ayech wrote; my response is lower down:
>> Afternoon is probably not so good for walks as it gets hotter then.
>
>Agreed - but I was in London yesterday morning having a meeting in the
>open air and was surprised by how little some women seem to think they
>can wear.
>
Less than some men?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Grammar is there to help, not hinder."
-- Mark Wallace, APIHNA, 2nd December 2000 (quoted by John Flynn 2000-12-6)
LFS
2018-08-07 15:41:38 UTC
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Raw Message
On 07/08/2018 10:35, krw wrote:
> On 6/8/18 18:25, Vicky Ayech wrote; my response is lower down:
>> Afternoon is probably not so good for walks as it gets hotter then.
>
> Agreed - but I was in London yesterday morning having a meeting in the
> open air and was surprised by how little some women seem to think they
> can wear.
>

They have to show off their tattoos, don't they? Waiting for a bus
yesterday at Waterloo, I was trying to read the text that a young woman
standing next to me had tattooed on her calf. It looked like a complete
sonnet. I would have liked to discuss the point of such an exercise with
her but it was too hot to engage in conversation.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
SODAM
2018-08-06 09:42:57 UTC
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Raw Message
krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
> Having spent about 5 hours being sick my oesophagus was failing to calm
> down even though my stomach must have been emptied many times.

<snip tragic tale of ruined health and holiday >
> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.

You poor soul! The whole episode sounds horrendous, apart from the staunch
wofe taking charge. Sincere good wishes for a steady recovery.

--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-06 11:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message
<1782916310.555241042.632719.kemp_m-***@news.eternal-september.o
rg>, SODAM <***@talktalk.net> writes:
>krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
>> Having spent about 5 hours being sick my oesophagus was failing to calm
>> down even though my stomach must have been emptied many times.
>
><snip tragic tale of ruined health and holiday >
>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>
>You poor soul! The whole episode sounds horrendous, apart from the staunch
>wofe taking charge. Sincere good wishes for a steady recovery.
>
+1 (or +10 if it's supposed to be sequential). Glad all went well
(reasonably), and hope all goes well in the near future.

Not that it's important compared to your health, but will you get your
150 euros ambulance-fare back, either from the tour (cruise? whatever)
company, or your travel insurance?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

> > Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you. -Richard
krw
2018-08-06 16:49:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 6/8/18 12:00, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote; my response is lower down:
> Not that it's important compared to your health, but will you get your
> 150 euros ambulance-fare back, either from the tour (cruise? whatever)
> company, or your travel insurance?

Interestingly I had just spoken to the insurers. The policy excess is
£50 and I ahve been told to send them a copy of the receipt. They will
contact Rostock hospital and settle up and other items. Celebrity will
probably raise on invoice and send to us direct which we then pass on to
insurers.

So hopefully it will all get sorted at some point.

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-08-06 17:30:05 UTC
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Raw Message
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...


--8<--

>So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.

Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months after
diagnosis.

The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I think,
as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and crying. I
ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.

The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to distract
me :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2018-08-06 21:45:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
> dust...
>
>
> --8<--
>
>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>
> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months after
> diagnosis.
>
> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I think,
> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and crying. I
> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>
> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to distract
> me :)
>
TMI

N.
LFS
2018-08-07 15:42:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>> dust...
>>
>>
>> --8<--
>>
>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>
>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months after
>> diagnosis.
>>
>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I think,
>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and crying. I
>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>
>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>> distract
>> me :)
>>
> TMI
>
> N.

On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mike
2018-08-07 15:54:00 UTC
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Raw Message
LFS <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>>> dust...
>>>
>>>
>>> --8<--
>>>
>>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>>
>>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
>>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months after
>>> diagnosis.
>>>
>>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I think,
>>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and crying. I
>>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>>
>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>> distract
>>> me :)
>>>
>> TMI
>>
>> N.
>
> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>

Darling, you look as though you are in extreme pain, perhaps you would like
me to ‘distract’ you? Fnarr-fnarr.

--
Toodle Pip
LFS
2018-08-07 16:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 07/08/2018 16:54, Mike wrote:
> LFS <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>>>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>>>> dust...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --8<--
>>>>
>>>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>>>
>>>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
>>>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months after
>>>> diagnosis.
>>>>
>>>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I think,
>>>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and crying. I
>>>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>>>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>>>
>>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
>>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>>> distract
>>>> me :)
>>>>
>>> TMI
>>>
>>> N.
>>
>> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>>
>
> Darling, you look as though you are in extreme pain, perhaps you would like
> me to ‘distract’ you? Fnarr-fnarr.
>

<giggle>

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2018-08-07 18:18:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 07/08/2018 17:42, LFS wrote:
> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>>> dust...
>>>
>>>
>>> --8<--
>>>
>>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>>
>>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13 months
>>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months
>>> after
>>> diagnosis.
>>>
>>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I
>>> think,
>>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and
>>> crying. I
>>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>>
>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable -
>>> but
>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>> distract
>>> me :)
>>>
>> TMI
>>
>> N.
>
> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>
I'm sure it's MV, but funny, so BTN !
LFS
2018-08-07 18:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 07/08/2018 19:18, BrritSki wrote:
> On 07/08/2018 17:42, LFS wrote:
>> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>>>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>>>> dust...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --8<--
>>>>
>>>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>>>
>>>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13
>>>> months
>>>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months
>>>> after
>>>> diagnosis.
>>>>
>>>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I
>>>> think,
>>>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and
>>>> crying. I
>>>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>>>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>>>
>>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable
>>>> - but
>>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>>> distract
>>>> me :)
>>>>
>>> TMI
>>>
>>> N.
>>
>> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>>
> I'm sure it's MV, but funny, so BTN !
>

<grin>

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Jenny M Benson
2018-08-07 18:42:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 07-Aug-18 07:18 PM, BrritSki wrote:
> On 07/08/2018 17:42, LFS wrote:
>> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>>>> On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 13:23:56 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
>>>> dust...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --8<--
>>>>
>>>>> So hopefully by the end of September all will be well again.
>>>>
>>>> Good, at least you don't have to wait too long. Mine was about 13
>>>> months
>>>> from 1st attack (misdiagnosed as food poisoning) and about 4 months
>>>> after
>>>> diagnosis.
>>>>
>>>> The worst thing was working out what I could eat - worse for you I
>>>> think,
>>>> as a diabetic. I remember reading labels in the supermarket and
>>>> crying. I
>>>> ended up living mostly on tinned salmon and tinned chillie, washed down
>>>> with ice-lollies to keep me cheerful.
>>>>
>>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable
>>>> - but
>>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>>> distract
>>>> me :)
>>>>
>>> TMI
>>>
>>> N.
>>
>> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>>
> I'm sure it's MV, but funny, so BTN !

Agree, agree, don't accept!

--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-08-07 18:30:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 16:42:36 +0100, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
>On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:

>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>> distract
>>> me :)
>>>
>> TMI
>>
>> N.
>
>On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.

Glad you agree.

I'd actually forgotten about that incident until the subject of gallstones
came up. My usual distraction trick for things like toothache is to pinch
myself somewhere else or pull out a hair or two. In other words cause brief
pain which I know will stop as soon as I do IYSWIM.

In many ways the brain is stupid. There is a point to pain signals but when
they just go on and on after the message has got through it's just annoying
and can sometimes be switched off.

Sadly it doesn't seem to work for arthritis or cramp - I was reduced to
shouting at cramp the other day, it wasn't very effective :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2018-08-07 19:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> wrote:
> On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 16:42:36 +0100, LFS <***@gmail.com>
> scrawled in the dust...
>> On 06/08/2018 22:45, Nick Odell wrote:
>>> On 06/08/18 18:30, Penny wrote:
>
>>>> The best thing was discovering the horrendous pain was distractable - but
>>>> maybe that was down to the way my boyfriend of the time decided to
>>>> distract
>>>> me :)
>>>>
>>> TMI
>>>
>>> N.
>>
>> On the contrary, a useful tip IMO.
>
> Glad you agree.
>
> I'd actually forgotten about that incident until the subject of gallstones
> came up. My usual distraction trick for things like toothache is to pinch
> myself somewhere else or pull out a hair or two. In other words cause brief
> pain which I know will stop as soon as I do IYSWIM.
>
> In many ways the brain is stupid. There is a point to pain signals but when
> they just go on and on after the message has got through it's just annoying
> and can sometimes be switched off.
>
> Sadly it doesn't seem to work for arthritis or cramp - I was reduced to
> shouting at cramp the other day, it wasn't very effective :(

My method is very slowly and carefully to stroke an imaginary cat (well,
it's a real cat but not actually with me). So for instance at the dentist
(where I am wimp personified), I stroke her head, then that soft bit under
her chin, and down to her tummy and round her flanks, then her back and
along her tail, then start again depending on the length of the
appointment. I do this for pain too and it takes my mind away beautifully
from what's happening.

--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2018-08-07 20:09:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7 Aug 2018 19:34:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
<***@gmail.com.invalid> scrawled in the dust...

>My method is very slowly and carefully to stroke an imaginary cat (well,
>it's a real cat but not actually with me). So for instance at the dentist
>(where I am wimp personified), I stroke her head, then that soft bit under
>her chin, and down to her tummy and round her flanks, then her back and
>along her tail, then start again depending on the length of the
>appointment. I do this for pain too and it takes my mind away beautifully
>from what's happening.

I once found two perfect distractions in a dentist's waiting room. One was
a real cat who decided to sit on my lap to be stroked. The other was a
plasterer who was skillfully smoothing an external corner in the room and
was fascinating to watch.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2018-08-07 20:29:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> wrote:
> On 7 Aug 2018 19:34:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
> <***@gmail.com.invalid> scrawled in the dust...
>
>> My method is very slowly and carefully to stroke an imaginary cat (well,
>> it's a real cat but not actually with me). So for instance at the dentist
>> (where I am wimp personified), I stroke her head, then that soft bit under
>> her chin, and down to her tummy and round her flanks, then her back and
>> along her tail, then start again depending on the length of the
>> appointment. I do this for pain too and it takes my mind away beautifully
>> from what's happening.
>
> I once found two perfect distractions in a dentist's waiting room. One was
> a real cat who decided to sit on my lap to be stroked. The other was a
> plasterer who was skillfully smoothing an external corner in the room and
> was fascinating to watch.

It's important in those circumstances not to confuse the two:-)

--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
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