Discussion:
Who Do You Think You Are?
(too old to reply)
Sid Nuncius
2017-08-31 17:31:38 UTC
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I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended. I can claim no credit whatever for his subsequent
success as an actor and filmmaker - I didn't even know that he had any
talent or aspiration in that area - but I do remember him well as a
student whom I liked a lot.

I've no idea whether the programme will be any good and umrats probably
aren't interested in my tedious reminiscences anyway, but I just thought
I'd mention it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris McMillan
2017-08-31 18:02:13 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended. I can claim no credit whatever for his subsequent
success as an actor and filmmaker - I didn't even know that he had any
talent or aspiration in that area - but I do remember him well as a
student whom I liked a lot.
I've no idea whether the programme will be any good and umrats probably
aren't interested in my tedious reminiscences anyway, but I just thought
I'd mention it.
:)

Sincerely Chris
Btms
2017-08-31 18:10:31 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended. I can claim no credit whatever for his subsequent
success as an actor and filmmaker - I didn't even know that he had any
talent or aspiration in that area - but I do remember him well as a
student whom I liked a lot.
I've no idea whether the programme will be any good and umrats probably
aren't interested in my tedious reminiscences anyway, but I just thought
I'd mention it.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is. I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Peter Percival
2017-08-31 18:18:55 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's
Noel Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively
comprehensive school he attended. I can claim no credit whatever
for his subsequent success as an actor and filmmaker - I didn't
even know that he had any talent or aspiration in that area - but I
do remember him well as a student whom I liked a lot.
I've no idea whether the programme will be any good and umrats
probably aren't interested in my tedious reminiscences anyway, but
I just thought I'd mention it.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is.
Where Do We Live.
Post by Btms
I guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Sid Nuncius
2017-08-31 18:25:09 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is. I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noel_Clarke
may help.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2017-08-31 19:08:15 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is. I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noel_Clarke
may help.
Thank you. Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sid Nuncius
2017-09-01 06:01:00 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is. I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noel_Clarke
may help.
Thank you. Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man. I'm delighted that he has been so
successful. One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's students
happy and doing well years later. They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way. She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life. Just as good to know.

Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now a
very nice man. I don't think he was putting on any sort of act for the
camera. I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings as the
admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the programme. I
found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly evocative and rather moving
in a way I can't quite describe.

Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully appalling and
upsetting I find descriptions of slavery. Just the idea that one person
should regard another person as their property... Sorry. Mustn't go on.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2017-09-01 06:29:09 UTC
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[] snipped to context
Post by Sid Nuncius
He is - and a very nice man. I'm delighted that he has been so
successful. One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's students
happy and doing well years later. They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way. She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life. Just as good to know.
[]
[]

From the other side; we entertained my old Head to lunch a few years ago.
I could bore for England on how much I owe him. When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel. Peel had mentioned him in
his biography. The feedback was that Peel (tho this was not his real name)
was barely memorable and as a pupil rather a dry orange. Head added that
in his whole career I had been the most inspired pupil he had experienced.
If there is any truth in this, then I am sure he released something in me
that continues to benefit me. He certainly encouraged me to think outside
the box. Good teachers (which is rather more than a focus on exam success)
are rare but oh so valuable.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
NexuSki
2017-09-01 10:24:08 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
He is - and a very nice man. I'm delighted that he has been so
successful. One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's
students
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
happy and doing well years later. They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way. She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life. Just as good to know.
You can keep these sort of stories going for as long as you want Sid,
very nice to read.

I blame the teachers, esp. the good ones... 
Post by Btms
From the other side; we entertained my old Head to lunch a few
years ago.
Post by Btms
I could bore for England on how much I owe him. When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel. Peel had mentioned him in
his biography. The feedback was that Peel (tho this was not his real name)
was barely memorable and as a pupil rather a dry orange.
Not sure I understand this anecdote bottoms old bean ? Was it that
John peel or not ? And what is a dry orange ???

Head added that
Post by Btms
in his whole career I had been the most inspired pupil he had
experienced.

I bet he said that to all the girls [1]. 

[1] and boys possibly...
Btms
2017-09-01 13:24:50 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Btms
From the other side; we entertained my old Head to lunch a few
years ago.
Post by Btms
I could bore for England on how much I owe him. When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel. Peel had mentioned
him in
Post by Btms
his biography. The feedback was that Peel (tho this was not his
real name)
Post by Btms
was barely memorable and as a pupil rather a dry orange.
Not sure I understand this anecdote bottoms old bean ? Was it that
John peel or not ? And what is a dry orange ???
Head added that
Post by Btms
in his whole career I had been the most inspired pupil he had
experienced.
I bet he said that to all the girls [1]. 
[1] and boys possibly...
Yes it was "the John Pell" and I thought it interesting he had left such a
non impression at school but become notable, whereas the opposite was true
for me.

The Teacher in question was certainly left field. I would have expected
him to find JP more interesting.

Dry orange is a metaphor.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
NexuSki
2017-09-01 15:02:05 UTC
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Post by Btms
Dry orange is a metaphor.
Not one I'm familiar with... and I hadn't made the link with peel as
I was still puzzling about his real name 

Thanks! :)
Penny
2017-09-01 14:41:01 UTC
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On Fri, 01 Sep 2017 12:24:08 +0200, NexuSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by NexuSki
You can keep these sort of stories going for as long as you want Sid,
very nice to read.
I blame the teachers, esp. the good ones... 
I agree - good to read.

Martin Clarke (absent umrat) taught Elyes Gabel at primary school and felt
personally proud when he turned up in Casualty (Dr. Gupreet "Guppy" Sandhu)
and then a little disturbed but no less proud about some of his later
roles.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2017-09-01 13:45:49 UTC
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Post by Btms
When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel.
I thought JP went to Shrewsbury?
--
Best wishes, Serena
Never attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by stupidity.
Peter Percival
2017-09-01 14:10:48 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel.
I thought JP went to Shrewsbury?
I know he ended up in St Mungo's, Caldbeck.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Penny
2017-09-01 16:46:37 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 14:45:49 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel.
I thought JP went to Shrewsbury?
He did, at the same time as Michael Palin. Maybe he went to Millfield Prep
first, though he is not listed among their notable former pupils
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millfield_Preparatory_School#Notable_former_pupils>
they seem to be hot on sport from that list.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2017-09-01 18:30:16 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 14:45:49 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel.
I thought JP went to Shrewsbury?
He did, at the same time as Michael Palin. Maybe he went to Millfield Prep
first, though he is not listed among their notable former pupils
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millfield_Preparatory_School#Notable_former_pupils>
they seem to be hot on sport from that list.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport!
Steve
Fenny
2017-09-01 18:59:35 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 19:30:16 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport!
Apparently Prince George is reported not to like foopball "because
it's a contact sport"! I'm sure he'll change his mind when he starts
school in the next week or so.
--
Fenny
Penny
2017-09-01 19:07:52 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 19:30:16 +0100, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 14:45:49 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
When he taught at
Mill(field)?, one of his pupils was John Peel.
I thought JP went to Shrewsbury?
He did, at the same time as Michael Palin. Maybe he went to Millfield Prep
first, though he is not listed among their notable former pupils
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millfield_Preparatory_School#Notable_former_pupils>
they seem to be hot on sport from that list.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport!
I suspect the young Mr Ravenscroft was such a boy.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-09-01 19:26:30 UTC
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[]
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
they seem to be hot on sport from that list.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport!
Steve
If that is said in a light-hearted manner, please skip the rest of this
post.


.

.

.

.

.

.

.

If it wasn't: it saddens me that such a view might still exist.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

After I'm dead I'd rather have people ask why I have no monument than why I
have one. -Cato the Elder, statesman, soldier, and writer (234-149 BCE)
Penny
2017-09-01 20:08:16 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 20:26:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
they seem to be hot on sport from that list.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport!
Steve
If that is said in a light-hearted manner, please skip the rest of this
post.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
If it wasn't: it saddens me that such a view might still exist.
It's a Bonzo Dog lyric.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2017-09-01 20:15:31 UTC
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On Fri, 01 Sep 2017 21:08:16 +0100, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
It's a Bonzo Dog lyric.
Bonzo Dog Band – Sport (the Odd Boy) Lyrics
Let's go back to your childhood [echo]...

The odd boy lay down by the football field
Took out a slim volume of Mallarme.
The centre-forward called him an imbecile.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport.

Sport, Sport, masculine sport.
Equips a young man for society.
Yes, sport turns out a jolly good sort.
It's an odd boy who doesn't like sport.

Dear Mr. Poxham, would you kindly excuse Steven from
Games today? He has had a nasty cold over the weekend and
Still has headaches and feels a bit snotty. I don't feel
He should be outside with the rougher type of boy, as he
Is a little delicate. Hoping you will understand, yours
Sincerely, Nellie Maynard, Mrs.

Give him a nice, cold shower.

Chorus
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2017-09-01 19:56:44 UTC
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Post by Btms
the box. Good teachers (which is rather more than a focus on exam success)
are rare but oh so valuable.
Good teachers aren't teachers, they're educators. My father had many
experiences like Sid's, former pupils who remembered him fondly. He
taught in primary, what would now be year 5, and when people asked
what he taught he invariably said "children".
Vicky
2017-09-01 08:35:07 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Sep 2017 07:01:00 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively comprehensive
school he attended.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is. I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noel_Clarke
may help.
Thank you. Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man. I'm delighted that he has been so
successful. One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's students
happy and doing well years later. They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way. She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life. Just as good to know.
Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now a
very nice man. I don't think he was putting on any sort of act for the
camera. I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings as the
admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the programme. I
found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly evocative and rather moving
in a way I can't quite describe.
Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully appalling and
upsetting I find descriptions of slavery. Just the idea that one person
should regard another person as their property... Sorry. Mustn't go on.
I didn't know who he was until I looked at the wikkilink; Mickey! One
of my favourite Dr Who companions. Rose's bf. I liked her best of them
and disliked quite a few of them. And he wrote an episode of
Torchwood, but nobody's perfect :).

We enjoy WDYTYA and will definitely watch it. It'll be nice knowing
you taught hi. He seems like a decent bloke.
--
Vicky
Steve Hague
2017-09-01 08:53:48 UTC
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Thank you.  Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man.  I'm delighted that he has been so
successful.  One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's students
happy and doing well years later.  They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way.  She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life.  Just as good to know.
Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now a
very nice man.  I don't think he was putting on any sort of act for the
camera.  I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings as the
admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the programme.  I
found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly evocative and rather moving
in a way I can't quite describe.
Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully appalling and
upsetting I find descriptions of slavery.  Just the idea that one person
should regard another person as their property...  Sorry.  Mustn't go on.
I've never really had any black friends until the last couple of years.
A few weeks ago a black American friend told me his great-great-great
grandmother had been a slave. I didn't realise how much this had
affected me until I watched the film 'Tewlve Years a Slave', and found
myself in tears. I'd seen it before and I didn't have anything like that
reaction. I suppose it's the personal connection.
Steve
Peter Percival
2017-09-01 10:10:52 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Thank you. Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man. I'm delighted that he has been so
successful. One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's
students happy and doing well years later. They don't have to make
it big; I once recognised one of the hospital administration staff
when I visited as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped
in a small way. She gave me a huge hug and told me that she was
now settled with a partner and a son and living a contented,
fulfilled life. Just as good to know.
Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now
a very nice man. I don't think he was putting on any sort of act
for the camera. I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings
as the admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the
programme. I found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly
evocative and rather moving in a way I can't quite describe.
Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully
appalling and upsetting I find descriptions of slavery. Just the
idea that one person should regard another person as their
property... Sorry. Mustn't go on.
I've never really had any black friends until the last couple of
years. A few weeks ago a black American friend told me his
great-great-great grandmother had been a slave. I didn't realise how
much this had affected me until I watched the film 'Tewlve Years a
Slave', and found myself in tears. I'd seen it before and I didn't
have anything like that reaction. I suppose it's the personal
connection. Steve
There are far more slaves in the world now than there were at the height
of the transatlantic slave trade. And some of them are working in
Britain right now.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Steve Hague
2017-09-01 10:16:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Steve Hague
Thank you.  Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man.  I'm delighted that he has been so
successful.  One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's
students happy and doing well years later.  They don't have to make
it big; I once recognised one of the hospital administration staff
when I visited as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped
in a small way.  She gave me a huge hug and told me that she was
now settled with a partner and a son and living a contented,
fulfilled life.  Just as good to know.
Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now
a very nice man.  I don't think he was putting on any sort of act
for the camera.  I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings
as the admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the
programme.  I found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly
evocative and rather moving in a way I can't quite describe.
Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully
appalling and upsetting I find descriptions of slavery.  Just the
idea that one person should regard another person as their
property...  Sorry. Mustn't go on.
I've never really had any black friends until the last couple of
years. A few weeks ago a black American friend told me his
great-great-great grandmother had been a slave. I didn't realise how
much this had affected me until I watched the film 'Tewlve Years a
Slave', and found myself in tears. I'd seen it before and I didn't
have anything like that reaction. I suppose it's the personal
connection. Steve
There are far more slaves in the world now than there were at the height
of the transatlantic slave trade.  And some of them are working in
Britain right now.
Yes, I know. A woman in our church runs an organisation dedicated to
helping such people get out from under.
LFS
2017-09-01 09:47:33 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
I don't usually watch WDYTYA, but I wanted to say that tonight it's Noel
Clarke whom I taught for GCSE Science at the...er...lively
comprehensive
school he attended.
I am interested in you but regret I have no idea who Noel Clarke is.  I
guess this is my loss as the programme doesn't foreground unknowns.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noel_Clarke
may help.
Thank you.  Still don't know him but sounds like he is talented.
He is - and a very nice man.  I'm delighted that he has been so
successful.  One of the rewards of teaching is seeing one's students
happy and doing well years later.  They don't have to make it big; I
once recognised one of the hospital administration staff when I visited
as a very difficult former student whom I'd helped in a small way.  She
gave me a huge hug and told me that she was now settled with a partner
and a son and living a contented, fulfilled life.  Just as good to know.
One of the great joys of teaching IME. I was blessed with some excellent
teachers and wish I'd had a chance to thank them. And I have always
thought that it's a great privilege to do a job where you can make a
difference to people's lives. I was delighted when some of my former
students found me on FB and I was able to catch up with their lives.
Noel seemed very much as I remembered him, as a very nice boy - now a
very nice man.  I don't think he was putting on any sort of act for the
camera.  I also remembered his mum from parents' evenings as the
admirably firm but likeable good egg she seemed in the programme.  I
found seeing her and Noel again surprisingly evocative and rather moving
in a way I can't quite describe.
I had to look him up - I really liked him in Dr Who. I think WDYTYA is
an excellent programme, I admire the bravery of those who sign up for it.
Honestly, I find that the older I get, the more painfully appalling and
upsetting I find descriptions of slavery.  Just the idea that one person
should regard another person as their property...  Sorry.  Mustn't go on.
The experience of the retelling of the Passover story every year has
quite a profound influence on one's view of slavery. The retelling
describes in some detail what the lives of our ancestors were like under
Egyptian oppression and we are urged to imagine ourselves there. For a
small child, this can make an indelible impression.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky
2017-09-01 10:22:51 UTC
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Post by LFS
The experience of the retelling of the Passover story every year has
quite a profound influence on one's view of slavery. The retelling
describes in some detail what the lives of our ancestors were like under
Egyptian oppression and we are urged to imagine ourselves there. For a
small child, this can make an indelible impression.
I hadn't thought of it as early conditioning. I should make more
effort with grandson. I did get him a Harry Potter Hagadah, trying to
make it all relevant to his interests. It compares the slaves to
Dobby.
--
Vicky
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