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airhead
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Chris McMillan
2017-05-15 18:15:58 UTC
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18 going on 50. Yuck!

Sincerely Chris
steveski
2017-05-15 18:17:56 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 18:15:58 +0000, Chris McMillan wrote:

> 18 going on 50. Yuck!

More like 60 or 70 with 'Smoke On The Water' :-)

--
Steveski
Chris McMillan
2017-05-16 11:11:26 UTC
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steveski <***@invalid.com> wrote:
> On Mon, 15 May 2017 18:15:58 +0000, Chris McMillan wrote:
>
>> 18 going on 50. Yuck!
>
> More like 60 or 70 with 'Smoke On The Water' :-)
>

Whoosh, Steve, I don't know the music to which you refer.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2017-05-16 12:34:13 UTC
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On 16/05/2017 12:11, Chris McMillan wrote; my response is lower down:
> steveski <***@invalid.com> wrote:
>> On Mon, 15 May 2017 18:15:58 +0000, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>
>>> 18 going on 50. Yuck!
>>
>> More like 60 or 70 with 'Smoke On The Water' :-)
>>
>
> Whoosh, Steve, I don't know the music to which you refer.
>
> Sincerely Chris
>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUwEIt9ez7M

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2017-05-16 18:13:02 UTC
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krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:
> On 16/05/2017 12:11, Chris McMillan wrote; my response is lower down:
>> steveski <***@invalid.com> wrote:
>>> On Mon, 15 May 2017 18:15:58 +0000, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>>
>>>> 18 going on 50. Yuck!
>>>
>>> More like 60 or 70 with 'Smoke On The Water' :-)
>>>
>>
>> Whoosh, Steve, I don't know the music to which you refer.
>>
>> Sincerely Chris
>>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUwEIt9ez7M
>

Don't do Youtube, krw.

:)

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2017-05-16 18:17:46 UTC
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On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
> Don't do Youtube, krw.

Why not? If I may ask.

I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)

--
Jenny M Benson
Chris McMillan
2017-05-17 08:29:43 UTC
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Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>> Don't do Youtube, krw.
>
> Why not? If I may ask.
>
> I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
> I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
> useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)
>

It messes with my eye movements, or at least I *think* it does. Its
probably my imagination. Clearly most of my friends don't have this problem
even with a similar eye movement. TV does it sometimes. On scene changes
I often lose a second on two - imagine the camera shutter on a slow speed.
Video enhances this disturbing effect making me feel I've missed things.
But often I still miss the perceived things on replay, and video often
seems faster than a tv programme. If this stems from the dislike of films
and cine films, it's definitely peculiar to me as all my friends were dead
keen on the cinema, lots still are and bought large tv screens long before
the rest of you for that purpose.

No one has ever explained this phenomenon and I'm missing out more and more
information as all on line content is becoming less words and more video
with speech which really is inclusion at its best. The occasional you tube
clips I see are those being watched where I have to. Occasionally there's
the excitement of seeing friends in China on tv or Ted-talks, but still I
feel I've missed something.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky
2017-05-17 09:59:00 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 08:29:43 GMT, Chris McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>> On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>> Don't do Youtube, krw.
>>
>> Why not? If I may ask.
>>
>> I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
>> I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
>> useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)
>>
>
>It messes with my eye movements, or at least I *think* it does. Its
>probably my imagination. Clearly most of my friends don't have this problem
Chris, I think many conditions are very variable and that could be
your individual variation. Nobody has exactly the same eyes and
differences.

>even with a similar eye movement. TV does it sometimes. On scene changes
>I often lose a second on two - imagine the camera shutter on a slow speed.
>Video enhances this disturbing effect making me feel I've missed things.
>But often I still miss the perceived things on replay, and video often
>seems faster than a tv programme. If this stems from the dislike of films
>and cine films, it's definitely peculiar to me as all my friends were dead
>keen on the cinema, lots still are and bought large tv screens long before
>the rest of you for that purpose.
>
>No one has ever explained this phenomenon and I'm missing out more and more
>information as all on line content is becoming less words and more video
>with speech which really is inclusion at its best. The occasional you tube
>clips I see are those being watched where I have to. Occasionally there's
>the excitement of seeing friends in China on tv or Ted-talks, but still I
>feel I've missed something.
>
>Sincerely Chris

I very much dislike being forced to watch a video instead of seeing
text. In my case this is because for some combination of software and
connection videos often hang and go slow and take ages and are
irritating. Also it takes longer to watch the same information that
way and it's often not possible to share it.

--

Vicky
Chris McMillan
2017-05-17 13:24:19 UTC
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Vicky <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Wed, 17 May 2017 08:29:43 GMT, Chris McMillan
> <***@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>> Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>>> On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>>> Don't do Youtube, krw.
>>>
>>> Why not? If I may ask.
>>>
>>> I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
>>> I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
>>> useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)
>>>
>>
>> It messes with my eye movements, or at least I *think* it does. Its
>> probably my imagination. Clearly most of my friends don't have this problem
> Chris, I think many conditions are very variable and that could be
> your individual variation. Nobody has exactly the same eyes and
> differences.
>
>> even with a similar eye movement. TV does it sometimes. On scene changes
>> I often lose a second on two - imagine the camera shutter on a slow speed.
>> Video enhances this disturbing effect making me feel I've missed things.
>> But often I still miss the perceived things on replay, and video often
>> seems faster than a tv programme. If this stems from the dislike of films
>> and cine films, it's definitely peculiar to me as all my friends were dead
>> keen on the cinema, lots still are and bought large tv screens long before
>> the rest of you for that purpose.
>>
>> No one has ever explained this phenomenon and I'm missing out more and more
>> information as all on line content is becoming less words and more video
>> with speech which really is inclusion at its best. The occasional you tube
>> clips I see are those being watched where I have to. Occasionally there's
>> the excitement of seeing friends in China on tv or Ted-talks, but still I
>> feel I've missed something.
>>
>> Sincerely Chris
>
> I very much dislike being forced to watch a video instead of seeing
> text. In my case this is because for some combination of software and
> connection videos often hang and go slow and take ages and are
> irritating. Also it takes longer to watch the same information that
> way and it's often not possible to share it.
>

While its absolutely true nystagmus is unique in each person, even in
identical siblings I haven't met anyone on line across several forums
worldwide who dislikes moving images as much as I do. There are children
who don't use tv the way most people do as children, but one never learns
if the child grows into tv as they mature and start to share the interests.
Penny
2017-05-17 10:35:08 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 08:29:43 GMT, Chris McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> scrawled in the dust...

>Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>> On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>> Don't do Youtube, krw.
>>
>> Why not? If I may ask.
>>
>> I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
>> I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
>> useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)
>>
>
>It messes with my eye movements, or at least I *think* it does. Its
>probably my imagination. Clearly most of my friends don't have this problem
>even with a similar eye movement. TV does it sometimes. On scene changes
>I often lose a second on two - imagine the camera shutter on a slow speed.
>Video enhances this disturbing effect making me feel I've missed things.
>But often I still miss the perceived things on replay, and video often
>seems faster than a tv programme. If this stems from the dislike of films
>and cine films, it's definitely peculiar to me as all my friends were dead
>keen on the cinema, lots still are and bought large tv screens long before
>the rest of you for that purpose.

But for sound only you could always close your eyes :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2017-05-17 13:24:20 UTC
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Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> wrote:
> On Wed, 17 May 2017 08:29:43 GMT, Chris McMillan
> <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled in the dust...
>
>> Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
>>> On 16-May-17 07:13 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>>>> Don't do Youtube, krw.
>>>
>>> Why not? If I may ask.
>>>
>>> I don't do Facebook (or anything similar) for all the usual reasons, but
>>> I'd have thought YouTube was harmless enough. I actually find it very
>>> useful for knitting tutorials (machine and hand.)
>>>
>>
>> It messes with my eye movements, or at least I *think* it does. Its
>> probably my imagination. Clearly most of my friends don't have this problem
>> even with a similar eye movement. TV does it sometimes. On scene changes
>> I often lose a second on two - imagine the camera shutter on a slow speed.
>> Video enhances this disturbing effect making me feel I've missed things.
>> But often I still miss the perceived things on replay, and video often
>> seems faster than a tv programme. If this stems from the dislike of films
>> and cine films, it's definitely peculiar to me as all my friends were dead
>> keen on the cinema, lots still are and bought large tv screens long before
>> the rest of you for that purpose.
>
> But for sound only you could always close your eyes :)

That's a very obvious thing to do but I'm not an audio user. I remember
going to Glynn Greenwood's funeral with one of his rellies or a friend.
Kathy arranged it so I didn't have to faff about as I didn't know how to
get to where they lived. The lady liked driving with audio books - fair
enough. She was enthusing over Captain Corelli's Mandolin and set it so I
could hear it from the beginning. Very rude of me but I nearly fell asleep
with the effort of concentration. Much much harder than listening to radio
- any radio!

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2017-05-17 13:48:38 UTC
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On 17-May-17 02:24 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
> That's a very obvious thing to do but I'm not an audio user. I remember
> going to Glynn Greenwood's funeral with one of his rellies or a friend.
> Kathy arranged it so I didn't have to faff about as I didn't know how to
> get to where they lived. The lady liked driving with audio books - fair
> enough. She was enthusing over Captain Corelli's Mandolin and set it so I
> could hear it from the beginning. Very rude of me but I nearly fell asleep
> with the effort of concentration. Much much harder than listening to radio
> - any radio!

Perhaps did not apply in your particular circumstances in the car, but I
find the beauty of audiobooks or downloaded radio, as opposed to live
radio, is that I can rewind every time I fall asleep or concentration
lapses.

I mostly listen to downloaded radio, but I do have R4X on all night.
Rarely get to hear any prog right through and usually find with long
things (recent broadcast of This Happy Breed, for examples) I am awake
for almost exactly the same section with every broadcast, so there are
various serials or dramas where I know *part* really well and the rest
not at all!

--
Jenny M Benson
Btms
2017-05-17 13:57:01 UTC
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Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 17-May-17 02:24 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>> That's a very obvious thing to do but I'm not an audio user. I remember
>> going to Glynn Greenwood's funeral with one of his rellies or a friend.
>> Kathy arranged it so I didn't have to faff about as I didn't know how to
>> get to where they lived. The lady liked driving with audio books - fair
>> enough. She was enthusing over Captain Corelli's Mandolin and set it so I
>> could hear it from the beginning. Very rude of me but I nearly fell asleep
>> with the effort of concentration. Much much harder than listening to radio
>> - any radio!
>
> Perhaps did not apply in your particular circumstances in the car, but I
> find the beauty of audiobooks or downloaded radio, as opposed to live
> radio, is that I can rewind every time I fall asleep or concentration
> lapses.
>
> I mostly listen to downloaded radio, but I do have R4X on all night.
> Rarely get to hear any prog right through and usually find with long
> things (recent broadcast of This Happy Breed, for examples) I am awake
> for almost exactly the same section with every broadcast, so there are
> various serials or dramas where I know *part* really well and the rest
> not at all!
>

Sort of you and me both 🌜. I have certain Podcasts I rely upon sending me
to sleep. More effective when listening to them on something like the
fifth time.

The News Quiz and Now Show usually require a couple of listens for me to
get to the end.

We have tickets for the Vote Now Show on Sunday. So it is overnight in
town and the Carole King thing to make it werfit on Saturday.

And of course a restock of tea at Fortnums; though now they have finally
launched their online store this will no longer be essential shopping.

--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Jenny M Benson
2017-05-17 14:11:10 UTC
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On 17-May-17 02:57 PM, Btms wrote:
> And of course a restock of tea at Fortnums; though now they have finally
> launched their online store this will no longer be essential shopping.

We found a really super tea shop in Lyndhurst (1) - scores of different
fancy teas, as well as the basics. So taken with the special pot (2)
which, as my daughter put it "wees into the cup" that I bought one and 3
bags of tea to bring home. Then went back another day and bought one
and 2 packs of tea for my son's birthday present.

(1) https://www.widgety.co.uk/places/tea-total-lyndhurst
(2) http://www.adagiotea.co.uk/teaware/ingenuiTEA_teapot.html?

--
Jenny M Benson
Penny
2017-05-17 14:20:14 UTC
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 15:11:10 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...

>So taken with the special pot (2)
>which, as my daughter put it "wees into the cup" that I bought one and 3
>bags of tea to bring home. Then went back another day and bought one
>and 2 packs of tea for my son's birthday present.

Hm, I see it says it makes 2 cups* so presumably when you lift it the valve
closes - how do you see when the cup is full?

*generally speaking my favoured 'cup' of tea is larger than 235ml but
that's a different problem.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2017-05-17 15:01:52 UTC
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>
> Hm, I see it says it makes 2 cups* so presumably when you lift it the valve
> closes - how do you see when the cup is full?

At Tea Total they served it in glass mugs. I have some glasses (free
from Tassimo and intended for coffee) which might be suitable but
haven't yet made the considerable effort required to bring them into
use. When I made my first cup with the infuser yesterday I relied on
the sound as I poured to know when my mug was full.
>
> *generally speaking my favoured 'cup' of tea is larger than 235ml but
> that's a different problem.
>
There are 2 sizes. I got the smaller one for myself which was described
by the lady selling it as "one person size" and the "two person size"
for my son.

--
Jenny M Benson
Chris J Dixon
2017-05-17 15:39:30 UTC
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Jenny M Benson wrote:

>At Tea Total they served it in glass mugs. I have some glasses (free
>from Tassimo and intended for coffee) which might be suitable but
>haven't yet made the considerable effort required to bring them into
>use.

As I'm sure I have mentioned before, I was amused by the beverage
routine at the glass factory where I spent a few weeks between
leaving school and starting college, coming up for 50 years ago.

From time to time during the shift somebody was sent to the
canteen with a large cardboard box, and a list of requirements
along the lines of "2 pints and 2 halves of tea, 3 pints and 2
halves of coffee".

In the canteen, which was a greasy a dive as ever I have come
across, the order was fulfilled in the following manner.

Bottles, this being a factory producing them, were taken from a
stack, usually squash, or pop designs, depending on what was
being made that day.

Into the first bottle went a green plastic funnel. The brew
machine tap was opened and tea run into an aged 1 pint enamel
mug. Milk and sugar were added as required, and stirred briskly
with a dessert spoon worn triangular by years of use. This was
then tipped into the funnel. Whilst the first bottle filled, the
next brew was prepared.

When it came to coffee, the hot water tap on the brew machine was
used, and the (same) spoon used to measure out a quantity of Camp
Essence (http://www.sybertooth.com/camp/) into the same mug and
thence into the funnel.

The order, when complete, was then taken back to the office in
the cardboard box.

The custom was to swig direct from the bottle, though the
fastidious could use a jam jar, as these were coming off the line
at 2 per second.

It was fine once one was used to it, but initially lifting a
familiar pop bottle to swig a hot brown liquid felt really
strange.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Peter Percival
2017-05-17 15:48:21 UTC
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Chris J Dixon wrote:
> Jenny M Benson wrote:
>
>> At Tea Total they served it in glass mugs. I have some glasses (free
>>from Tassimo and intended for coffee) which might be suitable but
>> haven't yet made the considerable effort required to bring them into
>> use.
>
> As I'm sure I have mentioned before, I was amused by the beverage
> routine at the glass factory where I spent a few weeks between
> leaving school and starting college, coming up for 50 years ago.
>
> From time to time during the shift somebody was sent to the
> canteen with a large cardboard box, and a list of requirements
> along the lines of "2 pints and 2 halves of tea, 3 pints and 2
> halves of coffee".
>
> In the canteen, which was a greasy a dive as ever I have come
> across, the order was fulfilled in the following manner.
>
> Bottles, this being a factory producing them, were taken from a
> stack, usually squash, or pop designs, depending on what was
> being made that day.
>
> Into the first bottle went a green plastic funnel. The brew
> machine tap was opened and tea run into an aged 1 pint enamel
> mug. Milk and sugar were added as required, and stirred briskly
> with a dessert spoon worn triangular by years of use. This was
> then tipped into the funnel. Whilst the first bottle filled, the
> next brew was prepared.
>
> When it came to coffee, the hot water tap on the brew machine was
> used, and the (same) spoon used to measure out a quantity of Camp
> Essence (http://www.sybertooth.com/camp/)

Major General Sir Hector Archibald MacDonald!

> into the same mug and
> thence into the funnel.
>
> The order, when complete, was then taken back to the office in
> the cardboard box.
>
> The custom was to swig direct from the bottle, though the
> fastidious could use a jam jar, as these were coming off the line
> at 2 per second.
>
> It was fine once one was used to it, but initially lifting a
> familiar pop bottle to swig a hot brown liquid felt really
> strange.
>
> Chris
>


--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Btms
2017-05-17 16:56:55 UTC
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Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk> wrote:

[]

>
> The custom was to swig direct from the bottle, though the
> fastidious could use a jam jar, as these were coming off the line
> at 2 per second.
>
> It was fine once one was used to it, but initially lifting a
> familiar pop bottle to swig a hot brown liquid felt really
> strange.
>
> Chris

Interesting but more than strange 😏. As you say though, once you get used
to it....

--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Peter Percival
2017-05-17 14:21:22 UTC
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Jenny M Benson wrote:
> On 17-May-17 02:57 PM, Btms wrote:
>> And of course a restock of tea at Fortnums; though now they have finally
>> launched their online store this will no longer be essential shopping.
>
> We found a really super tea shop in Lyndhurst (1) - scores of different
> fancy teas, as well as the basics. So taken with the special pot (2)
> which, as my daughter put it "wees into the cup" that I bought one and 3
> bags of tea to bring home. Then went back another day and bought one
> and 2 packs of tea for my son's birthday present.
>
> (1) https://www.widgety.co.uk/places/tea-total-lyndhurst
> (2) http://www.adagiotea.co.uk/teaware/ingenuiTEA_teapot.html?

Seven pounds for a glass mug!

--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
LFS
2017-05-17 15:54:38 UTC
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On 17/05/2017 15:11, Jenny M Benson wrote:
> On 17-May-17 02:57 PM, Btms wrote:
>> And of course a restock of tea at Fortnums; though now they have finally
>> launched their online store this will no longer be essential shopping.
>
> We found a really super tea shop in Lyndhurst (1) - scores of different
> fancy teas, as well as the basics. So taken with the special pot (2)
> which, as my daughter put it "wees into the cup" that I bought one and 3
> bags of tea to bring home. Then went back another day and bought one
> and 2 packs of tea for my son's birthday present.
>
> (1) https://www.widgety.co.uk/places/tea-total-lyndhurst
> (2) http://www.adagiotea.co.uk/teaware/ingenuiTEA_teapot.html?
>

A bit like the Aeropress uses for his coffee.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Btms
2017-05-17 16:52:01 UTC
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Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 17-May-17 02:57 PM, Btms wrote:
>> And of course a restock of tea at Fortnums; though now they have finally
>> launched their online store this will no longer be essential shopping.
>
> We found a really super tea shop in Lyndhurst (1) - scores of different
> fancy teas, as well as the basics. So taken with the special pot (2)
> which, as my daughter put it "wees into the cup" that I bought one and 3
> bags of tea to bring home. Then went back another day and bought one
> and 2 packs of tea for my son's birthday present.
>
> (1) https://www.widgety.co.uk/places/tea-total-lyndhurst
> (2) http://www.adagiotea.co.uk/teaware/ingenuiTEA_teapot.html?
>

Crikey..... this looks like it could be a day out. Husbad and I are so
fussy about tea. But know idea when a brew one day can taste different in
a brew the next day or even the same day at a different time. Think it
must be the water.

--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris McMillan
2017-05-17 18:15:32 UTC
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Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 17-May-17 02:24 PM, Chris McMillan wrote:
>> That's a very obvious thing to do but I'm not an audio user. I remember
>> going to Glynn Greenwood's funeral with one of his rellies or a friend.
>> Kathy arranged it so I didn't have to faff about as I didn't know how to
>> get to where they lived. The lady liked driving with audio books - fair
>> enough. She was enthusing over Captain Corelli's Mandolin and set it so I
>> could hear it from the beginning. Very rude of me but I nearly fell asleep
>> with the effort of concentration. Much much harder than listening to radio
>> - any radio!
>
> Perhaps did not apply in your particular circumstances in the car, but I
> find the beauty of audiobooks or downloaded radio, as opposed to live
> radio, is that I can rewind every time I fall asleep or concentration
> lapses.
>
> I mostly listen to downloaded radio, but I do have R4X on all night.
> Rarely get to hear any prog right through and usually find with long
> things (recent broadcast of This Happy Breed, for examples) I am awake
> for almost exactly the same section with every broadcast, so there are
> various serials or dramas where I know *part* really well and the rest
> not at all!
>

I've lost the habit of just listening. At least I think I paid attention
to all the R4 plays or maybe I day dreamed my way through them!

Sincerely Chris
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