Discussion:
post omnibus comment
(too old to reply)
Chris McMillan
2017-06-25 18:09:12 UTC
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The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-26 05:09:56 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?


Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Sally Thompson
2017-06-26 07:42:07 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Only umra gives me the opportunity to laugh at Latin jokes!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
vk
2017-06-26 09:59:00 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Only umra gives me the opportunity to laugh at Latin jokes!
People called Romans they go the house.
krw
2017-06-26 10:20:45 UTC
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Post by vk
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Only umra gives me the opportunity to laugh at Latin jokes!
People called Romans they go the house.
Romans are the local estate agents - who wants to buy a house - is it Sid?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
vk
2017-06-26 10:57:35 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by vk
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Only umra gives me the opportunity to laugh at Latin jokes!
People called Romans they go the house.
Romans are the local estate agents - who wants to buy a house - is it Sid?
Romanes eunt domus.
Hail Caesar and everything.
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-26 14:03:11 UTC
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Post by vk
Post by krw
Post by vk
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Only umra gives me the opportunity to laugh at Latin jokes!
People called Romans they go the house.
Romans are the local estate agents - who wants to buy a house - is it Sid?
Romanes eunt domus.
Hail Caesar and everything.
And don't do it again!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris McMillan
2017-06-26 13:29:39 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Whatever Sid's on, don't give it to me

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-26 13:57:13 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Whatever Sid's on, don't give it to me
Oh - temper! (O mores.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2017-06-26 14:53:46 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Whatever Sid's on, don't give it to me
Oh - temper! (O mores.)
:-)
--
Jenny M Benson
John Ashby
2017-06-26 20:07:48 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 14:57:13 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
Whatever Sid's on, don't give it to me
Oh - temper! (O mores.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Oh Times, oh Daily Mirror.

John
Fenny
2017-06-26 19:11:17 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 06:09:56 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
*applause*

President Bartlet approves :-)
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-06-26 19:15:50 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Sarcasm: Barbed ire
Fenny
2017-06-26 21:21:03 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 20:15:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
--
Fenny
Marjorie
2017-06-27 10:43:49 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 20:15:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-06-27 19:16:17 UTC
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Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 20:15:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I
never studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not
saying "of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Can you open your mind without it falling out?
steveski
2017-06-27 21:45:32 UTC
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[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-06-27 21:52:30 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Who came first? Adam or Eve?" "Adam of course; men always do."
Victoria Wood (via Peter Hesketh)
Fenny
2017-06-27 22:42:04 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.

If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.

Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
--
Fenny
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-28 07:11:03 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
Wow - like, you had to watch that much Thunderbirds for O Level Latin?
Cool!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2017-06-28 07:53:08 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Fenny
Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
Wow - like, you had to watch that much Thunderbirds for O Level Latin?
Cool!
Yeah, and there was strings attached....
--
Toodle Pip
Mike Headon
2017-06-28 07:18:51 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
"meus" is an adjective meaning "my" so the genitive is implied. Being an
adjective it agrees with the noun, so "tunicam meam" is correct.
(O-level, 1958).
--
Mike Headon
R69S R850R
IIIc IIIg FT FTn FT2 EOS450D
e-mail: mike dot headon at enn tee ell world dot com

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Marjorie
2017-06-28 13:26:37 UTC
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Post by Mike Headon
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
"meus" is an adjective meaning "my" so the genitive is implied. Being an
adjective it agrees with the noun, so "tunicam meam" is correct.
(O-level, 1958).
Sorry, I posted my reply before seeing your (much more succinct) one.
Agreed.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Fenny
2017-06-28 17:01:09 UTC
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Post by Mike Headon
"meus" is an adjective meaning "my" so the genitive is implied. Being an
adjective it agrees with the noun, so "tunicam meam" is correct.
(O-level, 1958).
Ta
--
Fenny
Marjorie
2017-06-28 13:25:34 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).

Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Fenny
2017-06-28 17:00:49 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 14:25:34 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).
Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
See, I knew there was a reason I only got a C. Thanks for the
explanation.
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-06-28 18:59:10 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 14:25:34 +0100, Marjorie
[]
Post by Fenny
Post by Marjorie
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).
Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
See, I knew there was a reason I only got a C. Thanks for the
explanation.
Likewise. I couldn't remember whether the Romans had "my", or whether
they just used "of me". (I knew other languages, as you illustrate, _do_
have "my"; I just wasn't sure about Latin - it could have been one of
those things they just didn't have, like "a", "the", and to some extent
"yes" and "no".)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said the Borg, "we assimilated a Pooh."
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-28 18:22:07 UTC
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On 28/06/2017 14:25, Marjorie wrote:

<mega-snippage>
Post by Marjorie
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).
Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
Mea culpa. :o)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Fenny
2017-06-28 19:43:11 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 19:22:07 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
<mega-snippage>
<beam>
--
Fenny
Btms
2017-06-28 21:00:13 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 19:22:07 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
<mega-snippage>
<beam>
But now the context has gorn!
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Jenny M Benson
2017-06-29 09:54:25 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 19:22:07 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
<mega-snippage>
<beam>
But now the context has gorn!
The context for Fenny's post is there. What more do you want?
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky
2017-06-28 20:44:26 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 14:25:34 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).
Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
Although I am bilingual and speak good German I have always had a
problem with declensions. I got A Level and did the first year of
German Honours but still get confused about them. I think you need to
have done Latin to really understand them.
--
Vicky
Rosalind Mitchell
2017-06-29 15:51:32 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 14:25:34 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
No. It's not the genitive case of ego, it's a possesive adjective, which
agrees in number and case with the noun it modifies. My coat, mon
manteau, meinen Mantel - all accusative, not genitive. The possessive
aspect is, if you like, built into the adjective because it already
means "my". The genitive case would be needed if it meant "of my" (e.g.
the buttons of my coat).
Sheesh, Sid, you don't know what you've started!
Although I am bilingual and speak good German I have always had a
problem with declensions. I got A Level and did the first year of
German Honours but still get confused about them. I think you need to
have done Latin to really understand them.
Durex
Durex
Duricem
Duricis
Durici
Durice

Durices
Durices
Durices
Duricium
Duricibus
Duricibus

Silly I know but because of it I can still do Latin third declension
nouns fifty years on.

Gaelic also declines. Like Latin it has a vocative case too, which is
how one venerable Umrat, Peanaidh, becomes another venerable Umrat who I
see is still around, a Pheanaidh. Who would be Feanaidh in the
nominative and a Fheanaidh in the vocative with the initial consonant
disappearing altogether or reduced to the faintest of aspirations.
Masculine names may be mutated at both ends hence Seumas, pronounced
'shaymus' becomes a Sheumais in the vocative which sounds like, well,
work it out for yourself, a Dhubhghall (which doesn't mutate at the end,
if you follow).

Rosqb
Vicky
2017-06-29 17:15:55 UTC
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On Thu, 29 Jun 2017 16:51:32 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 28 Jun 2017 14:25:34 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Although I am bilingual and speak good German I have always had a
problem with declensions. I got A Level and did the first year of
German Honours but still get confused about them. I think you need to
have done Latin to really understand them.
Durex
Durex
Duricem
Duricis
Durici
Durice
Durices
Durices
Durices
Duricium
Duricibus
Duricibus
Silly I know but because of it I can still do Latin third declension
nouns fifty years on.
Gaelic also declines. Like Latin it has a vocative case too, which is
how one venerable Umrat, Peanaidh, becomes another venerable Umrat who I
see is still around, a Pheanaidh. Who would be Feanaidh in the
nominative and a Fheanaidh in the vocative with the initial consonant
disappearing altogether or reduced to the faintest of aspirations.
Masculine names may be mutated at both ends hence Seumas, pronounced
'shaymus' becomes a Sheumais in the vocative which sounds like, well,
work it out for yourself, a Dhubhghall (which doesn't mutate at the end,
if you follow).
Rosqb
Actually Czech has names which change for m/f. My father's surname
was Roth but his mother's name was Rothova, the female form.
--
Vicky
Penny
2017-06-29 18:06:33 UTC
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On Thu, 29 Jun 2017 18:15:55 +0100, Vicky <***@gmail.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Vicky
Actually Czech has names which change for m/f. My father's surname
was Roth but his mother's name was Rothova, the female form.
Isn't that like Russian?
To show the difference between 'son of' and 'daughter of'. Several
languages do that.

Is it time for the Icelandic telephone directory again already?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Anne B
2017-07-10 17:53:37 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 22:52:30 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Marjorie
Post by Fenny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
The genetive of ego is mei.
But you don't want a genitive, you want an accusative. You're not saying
"of my tunic/coat"
Ah, but I think Fenny is right: the coat is in the accusative, "I" am in
the genitive: "the coat of me". Genitive used as possessive.
My very knowledgeable SO says it's the accusative case - who am I to
quibble?
I think "coat" is accusative, but "me" is genitive. It depends if they
had an adjective corresponding to "my" (which the OP and I had sort of
assumed they did, in my case without thinking), or whether they just
used the genitive of the owner. Fenny?
I took O level Latin in 1980 (grade C) and the A level in French I
took in 1982 and 1983 didn't add any further knowledge of grammar.
If the sentence was "I'll fetch *the* coat", I would happily go with
the accusative. But as I'm fetching *my* coat, surely the case is
possessive and as the coat belongs to me, there's got to be a genitive
in there somewhere and it needs to reflect that it's the coat that
belongs to me.
I disagree. 'My' in this context is an adjective qualifying the coat,
and there is indeed a perfectly valid Latin adjective 'meus/a/um'
meaning 'my' or 'mine' which is the appropriate word to use in this
context - hence 'tunicam meam'. 'Tunicam mei' would be as clumsy in
Latin as 'the coat of me' would be in English.
Post by Fenny
Happy for someone to provide an alternative explanation, as it might
give me a better idea why I only got a C in Latin (apart from the
obvious and not really bothering with most of the 400 lines of Virgil
that was our set piece!)
Anne B

steveski
2017-06-27 00:11:37 UTC
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[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperado?
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-27 05:08:09 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperado?
An outlaw in rehab?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2017-07-01 21:38:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperado?
An outlaw in rehab?
Not a barrel of laughs.
--
Sam
Nick Odell
2017-06-29 11:01:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperado?
Why don't you come to your senses?

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-29 17:42:39 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam". (And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too. And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperado?
Why don't you come to your senses?
:o))
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Anne B
2017-07-10 17:47:42 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I
never studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Thinking about it, it's more like _forty_ than the thirty years I had
been thinking since I did it, so this may well be wrong, but I _think_
it should be "tunicam meam".
Yes. Even 53 years on from my last Latin lessonI think it has to be
accusative.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(And I'm not sure if they had a better word
for coat - probably not, as I've seen that one used for T-shirt too.
Pallium? I don't think they did coats as we know them in them days.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And
I'm not _sure_ about Recuperabo, but I certainly don't have any better
suggestions!)
Recuperabo is fine if you mean to get it back, or retrieve it, but I
don't have any better alternative either.

Anne B
John Ashby
2017-06-26 20:09:23 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 06:09:56 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I never
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Small typo, should be propter, not procter.

John
Sid Nuncius
2017-06-27 05:01:41 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Mon, 26 Jun 2017 06:09:56 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
The way Neil Nunes said 'Matt Crawford'. Creepy!
Post omnibus comment ergo procter omnibus comment?
Recuperabo tunica mea.[1]
[1]Someone will almost certainly be along soon to correct this. I
never
Post by Sid Nuncius
studied Latin so it's even worse than my French.
Small typo, should be propter, not procter.
Nugger - thanks John. This is what comes of watching Arthur Miller plays.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2017-06-27 05:07:34 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 06:01:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Small typo, should be propter, not procter.
Nugger - thanks John. This is what comes of watching Arthur Miller plays.
I was disappointed, thought it was going to be about snooker.

John
Mike
2017-06-27 07:39:26 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
On Tue, 27 Jun 2017 06:01:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Small typo, should be propter, not procter.
Nugger - thanks John. This is what comes of watching Arthur Miller
plays.
I was disappointed, thought it was going to be about snooker.
John
Cue: That's a load of balls.
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2017-06-26 16:53:17 UTC
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"Damn! I missed it!"
--
Steveski (Not in Clapham.)
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