Discussion:
Veal: To buy or not to buy
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EllTee
2011-08-12 18:35:10 UTC
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This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.

The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.

I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.

Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.

Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
--
Btms
Serena Blanchflower
2011-08-12 18:53:21 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Yes, I do occasionally. I wouldn't buy veal which had been raised in
the old crate system but that has been outlawed in the UK. If you buy
veal which is either British raised or marketed as "rose veal", the
calves should have been raised reasonably humanely (or at least, no
less humanely than their elder brethren).

It seems better, to me, to allow them to be raised for veal - as long
as it's done humanely, not shutting them in the dark, as used to be
done, than to slaughter them at birth.
--
Cheers, Serena

The greatest glory of living lies not in never falling but in rising
every time you fall. (Nelson Mandela)
EllTee
2011-08-12 19:19:38 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Yes, I do occasionally. I wouldn't buy veal which had been raised in
the old crate system but that has been outlawed in the UK. If you buy
veal which is either British raised or marketed as "rose veal", the
calves should have been raised reasonably humanely (or at least, no
less humanely than their elder brethren).
It seems better, to me, to allow them to be raised for veal - as long
as it's done humanely, not shutting them in the dark, as used to be
done, than to slaughter them at birth.
This was the argument of the TV article. I am now thinking I must write
to Vicky and encourage her veal enterprise.
--
Btms
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-12 19:32:55 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Yes, I do occasionally. I wouldn't buy veal which had been raised in
the old crate system but that has been outlawed in the UK. If you buy
veal which is either British raised or marketed as "rose veal", the
calves should have been raised reasonably humanely (or at least, no less
humanely than their elder brethren).
It seems better, to me, to allow them to be raised for veal - as long as
it's done humanely, not shutting them in the dark, as used to be done,
than to slaughter them at birth.
Languid wave.

We used to have veal when I was a child and it was my favourite meat. I
would love to eat it now but can't afford it.
--
Jenny M Benson
Dumrat
2011-08-14 07:03:26 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Yes, I do occasionally. I wouldn't buy veal which had been raised in
the old crate system but that has been outlawed in the UK. If you buy
veal which is either British raised or marketed as "rose veal", the
calves should have been raised reasonably humanely (or at least, no less
humanely than their elder brethren).
It seems better, to me, to allow them to be raised for veal - as long as
it's done humanely, not shutting them in the dark, as used to be done,
than to slaughter them at birth.
Languid wave.
We used to have veal when I was a child and it was my favourite meat. I
would love to eat it now but can't afford it.
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic veal
whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when we lived
in Geneva.
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
badriya
2011-08-14 08:35:20 UTC
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Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic veal
whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when we lived
in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.



--
Vicky
Steve Hague
2011-08-14 09:04:10 UTC
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Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me. All
meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Steve
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-14 09:18:18 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
But low in calories. How does that work?
Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me. All
meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Calve's liver appears to have about 3 gr. per 100 gr., which is more or less a
serving. Is that really high? It's very nutritious in other ways.
--
Jo
Steve Hague
2011-08-14 09:29:59 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:04:10 +0100, "Steve Hague"
Post by Steve Hague
Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
But low in calories. How does that work?
Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me.
All meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Calve's liver appears to have about 3 gr. per 100 gr., which is more
or less a serving. Is that really high? It's very nutritious in other
ways.
6gm in 100gm according to my book, which is nearly a third of my daily carb
intake.
Steve
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-14 09:46:30 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:04:10 +0100, "Steve Hague"
Post by Steve Hague
Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
But low in calories. How does that work?
Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me.
All meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Calf's liver appears to have about 3 gr. per 100 gr., which is more
or less a serving. Is that really high? It's very nutritious in other
ways.
6gm in 100gm according to my book, which is nearly a third of my daily carb
intake.
Googling around is quite frustrating, as the US sites obviously don't beleive
anybody is interested in offal, and the Australian GI site I sometimes use
doesn't have meat listed at all.
Steve Hague
2011-08-14 09:36:57 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:04:10 +0100, "Steve Hague"
Post by Steve Hague
Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
But low in calories. How does that work?
Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me.
All meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Calve's liver appears to have about 3 gr. per 100 gr., which is more
or less a serving. Is that really high? It's very nutritious in other
ways.
It's surprising what contains high carb levels, even amongst ostensibly the
same product. I'm fond of a cup of cocoa before I go to bed and was
surprised to see that whilst Morrison's or Tesco own brand cocoa contains
almost negligible carb, Cadbury's, Fairtrade and other branded types are
prohibitively high.
Steve
badriya
2011-08-14 12:16:35 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:36:57 +0100, "Steve Hague"
Post by Steve Hague
On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 10:04:10 +0100, "Steve Hague"
Post by Steve Hague
Post by badriya
Post by Dumrat
Calf's liver pan-fried in butter and raspberry vinegar and parsley.
Divine. Oh, sorry, to answer the original question - I eat organic
veal whenever I can find any, which used to be quite often in when
we lived in Geneva.
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
But low in calories. How does that work?
Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me.
All meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Calve's liver appears to have about 3 gr. per 100 gr., which is more
or less a serving. Is that really high? It's very nutritious in other
ways.
It's surprising what contains high carb levels, even amongst ostensibly the
same product. I'm fond of a cup of cocoa before I go to bed and was
surprised to see that whilst Morrison's or Tesco own brand cocoa contains
almost negligible carb, Cadbury's, Fairtrade and other branded types are
prohibitively high.
Steve
The high ones are probably nicer. Everything nice is illegal, immoral
or fattening, innit.

--
Vicky
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2011-08-14 13:34:23 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, badriya
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by badriya
The high ones are probably nicer. Everything nice is illegal, immoral
or fattening, innit.
--
Vicky
or causes cancer in rats.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)***@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... "Peter and out." ... "Kevin and out." (Link episode)
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-14 11:01:27 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
It's also high in carbs, which rather surprised and disappointed me. All
meat and most fish is zero carbs, but liver is offaly high.
Not what you want if you want to keep fit an'trim then.

Roske
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-14 10:17:58 UTC
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Post by badriya
Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
When I was engaged to my latex husband, I was going to do lamb's liver
for dinner one night and he told me he hated liver. He then tasted some
of what I'd cooked and said it was nothing like what his mother served
and he really liked it. I told him it was possibly not lamb's which she
served and doubtless she overcooked it.

Sometime after we married ma-in-law asked me one day what we were going
to have for dinner and I said liver. "Our Leslie doesn't like liver"
she stated. I thought it politic not to say "he doesn't like the liver
you serve but he loves it when I do it".
--
Jenny M Benson
Serena Blanchflower
2011-08-14 11:55:09 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by badriya
Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
When I was engaged to my latex husband, I was going to do lamb's liver
for dinner one night and he told me he hated liver. He then tasted
some of what I'd cooked and said it was nothing like what his mother
served and he really liked it. I told him it was possibly not lamb's
which she served and doubtless she overcooked it.
Sometime after we married ma-in-law asked me one day what we were
going to have for dinner and I said liver. "Our Leslie doesn't like
liver" she stated. I thought it politic not to say "he doesn't like
the liver you serve but he loves it when I do it".
That sounds very much like my latex husbad and his mum! In his case
it was roast lamb which gave him a problem, when he went home raving
about the lamb I'd cooked him, only to be reminded that he didn't like
lamb. I don't think he was as tactful as you; I think he did say
that he loved it the way I cooked it, which was very different from
when his mum cooked it.

We both very much enjoyed offal although in the end I gave up cooking
kidneys for him[1]. He was working in a path lab at the time and I
always seemed to cook kidneys on days he'd been dealing with renal
biopsies! Understandably, he wasn't too keen on eating them just
then, however much he enjoyed them on other occasions.

[1] Note to Rosie, I generally preferred lambs kidneys and I don't
remember using Encona Hot Sauce on them, although I did like devilling
them.
--
Cheers, Serena

"Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of
throwing it at someone else; you are the one getting burned." (Buddha)
Rosemary Miskin
2011-08-15 18:31:50 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
He was working in a path lab at the time and I
always seemed to cook kidneys on days he'd been dealing with renal
biopsies!
Hmmm. My pathologist Father wasn't keen on any offal...


Rosemary
--
Rosemary Miskin ZFC Sm ***@orpheusmail.co.uk
Loughborough, UK http://miskin.orpheusweb.co.uk
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-14 10:58:46 UTC
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Post by badriya
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?

Roske
Jane Vernon
2011-08-14 11:43:06 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied by
umrats
Steve Hague
2011-08-14 13:37:50 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash
of Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
I have, which is why I don't.
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2011-08-14 13:49:12 UTC
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[]
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jane Vernon
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
I have, which is why I don't.
Steve
Don't read on if you supermarket shop with the big trolleys.











You know those supermarket trolleys with the side that's towards you,
that can hinge towards the centre of the trolley, until it's held by the
two plastic platforms, which are intended for the placement of a toddler
or large baby, with its legs sticking out towards you? Well, it occurred
to me that they are probably sometimes urine-soaked.

It's probably very rarely true, but once the thought had occurred to me,
I couldn't continue to use these trolleys. I use the high shallow ones.
(Which suit my shopping method better anyway: I shop using a shallow
wide box, originally taken from the fruit and veg. area though I use the
same box for some months [until it comes unglued at the seams], which
fits well into that sort of trolley. But whether I've developed that way
of shopping because of the trolleys, I'm not sure.)

Well, I did warn you ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)***@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... "Peter and out." ... "Kevin and out." (Link episode)
nicktravel2002
2011-08-15 07:04:20 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash
of Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them.  I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though.  Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared.  I'd never noticed it before :(
I have, which is why I don't.
I haven't. Which is why I do.

I say - you don't suppose it's one of those genetic things like
asparagus, do you?

Nick
Mike Ruddock
2011-08-14 14:41:59 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm not
sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the last
time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up cooking
them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're being
prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog
http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied by
umrats
If I remember correctly Joyce has Leonard Bloom noticing the uric smell of
kidneys. Ah, yes here it is Chapter 4: "Most of all he liked grilled mutton
kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine."


Mike Ruddock
vk
2011-08-14 15:55:52 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog
http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied
by umrats
If I remember correctly Joyce has Leonard Bloom noticing the uric smell
of kidneys. Ah, yes here it is Chapter 4: "Most of all he liked grilled
mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented
urine."
Leopold...
Mike Ruddock
2011-08-14 18:21:54 UTC
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Post by vk
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?
I do like kidneys though I wouldn't add hot pepper sauce to them. I'm
not sure I'll cook them again, though. Just before I cooked them the
last time I had a conversation with my mum, who told me she'd given up
cooking them because of the inescapable smell of urine when they're
being prepared. I'd never noticed it before :(
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog
http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied
by umrats
If I remember correctly Joyce has Leonard Bloom noticing the uric smell
of kidneys. Ah, yes here it is Chapter 4: "Most of all he liked grilled
mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented
urine."
Leopold...
Yes, I realised as soon as I pressed "send".

Mike Ruddock
Dumrat
2011-08-14 12:22:05 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by badriya
Please can I come and live with you? Oh, hang on. That would really
finish me as a WW. I love calves liver. Liver is another thing B
won't eat so I don't cook it and anyway it is high in points.
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash of
Encona hot pepper sauce?
I like kidneys in sherry, but I think I prefer lamb's kidney to pig's,
as the latter is too strong a taste for my stomach. BIMBAM.
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-14 18:41:21 UTC
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Post by Dumrat
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash
of Encona hot pepper sauce?
I like kidneys in sherry, but I think I prefer lamb's kidney to pig's,
as the latter is too strong a taste for my stomach. BIMBAM.
I've only ever had lamb's kidneys (as far as I know) and my mummy
brought me up to believe that only lamb's liver is really nice to eat.
--
Jenny M Benson
badriya
2011-08-15 06:37:32 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 19:41:21 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Dumrat
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with a dash
of Encona hot pepper sauce?
I like kidneys in sherry, but I think I prefer lamb's kidney to pig's,
as the latter is too strong a taste for my stomach. BIMBAM.
I've only ever had lamb's kidneys (as far as I know) and my mummy
brought me up to believe that only lamb's liver is really nice to eat.
I don't like the taste much of kidneys, they are too strong, and I
don't like lights because of all the tubes in them, but my mum and
gran used to do a sweet and sour dish with those. I liked the taste
and think they did it with liver too occasionally. They also cooked
brains which I didn't like the taste of either and I was sick once
after those. They were offal cooks.

--
Vicky
Anne Burgess
2011-08-14 20:56:16 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Am I AOU in relishing a pig's kidney, gently sautéed and with
a dash of Encona hot pepper sauce?
Roske
Probably not, though I have yet to sample it. Sounds good.

Anne B
the Omrud
2011-08-12 19:11:01 UTC
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Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I don't actively boycott veal, but there doesn't seem to be much around,
so I rarely eat it. I would have no problems with eating UK veal.
--
David
EllTee
2011-08-12 19:23:04 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I don't actively boycott veal, but there doesn't seem to be much around,
so I rarely eat it. I would have no problems with eating UK veal.
Gosh! Two takers in no time at all. I am really thinking I should be
doing more for the UK veal industry.

Of course, I think I am only a pork chop away from becoming a vegatarian
but when I mentioned this to my butcher (I may have already told umra
this) he said: "That's OK - I am only a glass of wine away from
becoming tee total".
--
Btms
Steve Hague
2011-08-12 21:32:51 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Post by the Omrud
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I don't actively boycott veal, but there doesn't seem to be much around,
so I rarely eat it. I would have no problems with eating UK veal.
Gosh! Two takers in no time at all. I am really thinking I should be
doing more for the UK veal industry.
Of course, I think I am only a pork chop away from becoming a vegatarian
but when I mentioned this to my butcher (I may have already told umra
this) he said: "That's OK - I am only a glass of wine away from
becoming tee total".
--
Btms
I've never eaten it and can't recall ever having seen it for sale, but I'd
be willing to try it if it was humanely produced.
Steve
badriya
2011-08-12 21:51:58 UTC
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Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Austrian mother, love veal. Shnitzel, osso Buco, braised veal. B
never wanted to eat it for ethical reasons so never buy it but eat it
if in Italian restaurants. #1 daugther vegan. #2 daughter loves
schnitzel. Sadly schnitzel not WW compliant but before WW we used to
make it for each other if a special occasion.



--
Vicky
Kate Brown
2011-08-12 22:01:54 UTC
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Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I love it, a nice schnitzel or a veal chop. But happy veal is very
expensive, and I don't quite understand why that should be so, since it
is essentially a waste product of the dairy system. We eat it here when
we're feeling flush - English Rose veal; and in France - eleve sous la
mere; which in both cases, I think, means the calf was allowed to suckle
from its mother until going to the slaughterhouse. No crates.
--
Kate B

PS nospam means nospam. But umra at cockaigne dot org dot uk will get through!
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2011-08-13 07:16:42 UTC
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In message <S$vB15ISLaROFwK$@nospam.demon.co.uk>, Kate Brown
<***@nospam.demon.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Kate Brown
is essentially a waste product of the dairy system. We eat it here when
we're feeling flush - English Rose veal; and in France - eleve sous la
mere; which in both cases, I think, means the calf was allowed to
suckle from its mother until going to the slaughterhouse. No crates.
Glad you explained: I assumed it meant British veal that had come
through the chunnel!

I can't remember having it here - not for ethical reasons, I just think
I've never seen it offered. But I loved Schnitzel when a lad in Germany,
so if that's veal I like it.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)***@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... "Peter and out." ... "Kevin and out." (Link episode)
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 08:32:54 UTC
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Post by Kate Brown
Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I'm another, though I hardly ever buy it. An occasional saltimbocca in a
restaurant is about it. I much prefer eating baby sheep to baby cows.
Post by Kate Brown
I love it, a nice schnitzel or a veal chop. But happy veal is very
expensive, and I don't quite understand why that should be so, since it
is essentially a waste product of the dairy system. We eat it here when
we're feeling flush - English Rose veal; and in France - eleve sous la
mere; which in both cases, I think, means the calf was allowed to suckle
from its mother until going to the slaughterhouse. No crates.
Crates have been illegal for some time in Switzerland, but the new animal
protection law also insists that the calf gets a proper amount of iron in its
diet. You can no longer feed them only on mother's milk and straw, to keep the
meat white. I think it's the crate/anaemia system that put the Brits off eating
veal, years ago.
--
Jo
EllTee
2011-08-13 09:40:11 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
Crates have been illegal for some time in Switzerland, but the new animal
protection law also insists that the calf gets a proper amount of iron in its
diet. You can no longer feed them only on mother's milk and straw, to keep the
meat white. I think it's the crate/anaemia system that put the Brits off eating
veal, years ago.
Oddly, down in Cornwall, where I come from veal is a general no, no and
yet we all seem very happy to munch on baby lambs. A sort of double
standard that I acknowledge but irrationally follow.
--
Btms
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-13 10:16:53 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Oddly, down in Cornwall, where I come from veal is a general no, no and
yet we all seem very happy to munch on baby lambs. A sort of double
standard that I acknowledge but irrationally follow.
Yet the Real Veal Company hails from Bocaddon Farm near Looe.
--
Jenny M Benson
EllTee
2011-08-13 11:02:26 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
Oddly, down in Cornwall, where I come from veal is a general no, no and
yet we all seem very happy to munch on baby lambs. A sort of double
standard that I acknowledge but irrationally follow.
Yet the Real Veal Company hails from Bocaddon Farm near Looe.
Really? That's interesting. But perhaps like their fish; the Cornish
don't eat it!*

*I am not Cornish.
--
Btms
Serena Blanchflower
2011-08-13 11:10:25 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Post by Jo Lonergan
Crates have been illegal for some time in Switzerland, but the new animal
protection law also insists that the calf gets a proper amount of iron in its
diet. You can no longer feed them only on mother's milk and straw, to keep the
meat white. I think it's the crate/anaemia system that put the Brits off eating
veal, years ago.
Oddly, down in Cornwall, where I come from veal is a general no, no and
yet we all seem very happy to munch on baby lambs. A sort of double
standard that I acknowledge but irrationally follow.
I think that's a left over from the days when veal was raised in
crates and on a very inadequate diet (to cause anaemia). Veal became
generally unacceptable to a lot of people and it's only in recent
years,I think, that Rose Veal, which is more humanely raised (and so
is pink, rather than white), has become more available.
--
Cheers, Serena

One doesn't discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the
shore for a very long time. (Andre Gide)
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 14:42:07 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 12:10:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by EllTee
Post by Jo Lonergan
Crates have been illegal for some time in Switzerland, but the new animal
protection law also insists that the calf gets a proper amount of iron in its
diet. You can no longer feed them only on mother's milk and straw, to keep
the meat white. I think it's the crate/anaemia system that put the Brits
off eating veal, years ago.
Oddly, down in Cornwall, where I come from veal is a general no, no and
yet we all seem very happy to munch on baby lambs. A sort of double
standard that I acknowledge but irrationally follow.
I think that's a left over from the days when veal was raised in
crates and on a very inadequate diet (to cause anaemia). Veal became
generally unacceptable to a lot of people and it's only in recent
years,I think, that Rose Veal, which is more humanely raised (and so
is pink, rather than white), has become more available.
That was definitely the case in the 50s and 60s. People didn't eat veal for
moral reasons, long before other animal protection considerations came to be
recognised.

The other thing people wouldn't eat in those days was rabbit, because of the
recent epidemic of myxomatosis.

The slow food restaurant of which I'm to have the pleasure next month serves
fox, but only in the season. I don't know when that would be.
--
Jo
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-13 14:53:59 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
The other thing people wouldn't eat in those days was rabbit, because of the
recent epidemic of myxomatosis.
That and recent memory of other animals sold on the black market as
"rabbit", including cat as "roof rabbit" or "roof hare".

Roske
a l l y
2011-08-12 23:14:49 UTC
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Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
--
I am embarrassed to admit I've never tried it, but not for any ethical
reason, simply because I can't remember having seen it offered for sale.
Maybe it's even rarer in Scotland and the north of England than down south?
I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic things (none of which
tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I should search some out.

ally
nicktravel2002
2011-08-13 00:00:36 UTC
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On Aug 13, 12:14 am, "a l l y"
Post by a l l y
Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now.  I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too.  However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ?  My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
--
I am embarrassed to admit I've never tried it, but not for any ethical
reason, simply because I can't remember having seen it offered for sale.
Maybe it's even rarer in Scotland and the north of England than down south?
I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic things (none of which
tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I should search some out.
I eat it in Argentina where there's no stigma attached and in my mind
there's no difference between eating baby cows and eating baby sheep -
and I love eating baby sheep! I would eat veal in England now that
there are strict controls on production methods but the only time I
have seen it for sale was at a price way beyond that of ordinary beef
and way beyond that which I was prepared to pay.

Incidentally, the price of bananas here in Oz is about the equivalent
of GBP10 per kilo. No that is not a typo. That's because of cyclone
damage to the banana plantations and the unwillingness to import.

Nick
a l l y
2011-08-13 08:00:18 UTC
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"nicktravel2002" <***@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news:28fd9a0c-a75f-4add-9354->
Post by nicktravel2002
Incidentally, the price of bananas here in Oz is about the equivalent
of GBP10 per kilo. No that is not a typo. That's because of cyclone
damage to the banana plantations and the unwillingness to import.
Bananas are one of the bedrocks of my diet. I'd be in deep despair if I
couldn't afford them any more. Poor Aussies!

ally
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 08:47:16 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 09:00:18 +0100, "a l l y"
Post by a l l y
news:28fd9a0c-a75f-4add-9354->
Post by nicktravel2002
Incidentally, the price of bananas here in Oz is about the equivalent
of GBP10 per kilo. No that is not a typo. That's because of cyclone
damage to the banana plantations and the unwillingness to import.
Bananas are one of the bedrocks of my diet. I'd be in deep despair if I
couldn't afford them any more. Poor Aussies!
<Languid wave>. Sliced with yoghurt and sunflower seeds, or squashed on toast, a
treat at any time.

Our local supermarkets charge about GBP 2.30 a kilo for Fair Trade, a bit more
for Bio. Really one of the cheapest things you can buy.
--
Jo
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2011-08-13 07:21:24 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, a l l y
<***@situponTAKETHEDOGGIEOUTseats.co.uk> writes:
[]
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic things
(none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I should search
some out.
ally
I tried Ostrich when Sainsburys offered it a couple of decades ago:
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.

(Now idly wondering what happens to the emus I saw in Wickham wildlife
park - and others in similar situations - when they reach the end of
their life.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)***@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... "Peter and out." ... "Kevin and out." (Link episode)
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 08:20:42 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 08:21:24 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
More like game than chicken, IMO, and allegedly very healthy.
--
Jo
EllTee
2011-08-13 09:38:09 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 08:21:24 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
More like game than chicken, IMO, and allegedly very healthy.
Yes because it v. low fat. Texture v. similar to fillet steak but of
course the lack of fat makes it less tasty. Very acceptable but not if
it is expensive!
--
Btms
Mark Williams
2011-08-15 14:18:02 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 08:21:24 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
More like game than chicken, IMO, and allegedly very healthy.
Healthy? I would hope it was dead.
Jane Vernon
2011-08-13 11:09:20 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic
things (none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I
should search some out.
ally
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
We loved ostrich when we had it in a restaurant once but I've never seen
it in Waitrose. Not that I expect we could afford it if I did.
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied by
umrats
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-13 11:27:52 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic
things (none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I
should search some out.
ally
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
We loved ostrich when we had it in a restaurant once but I've never seen
it in Waitrose. Not that I expect we could afford it if I did.
One used to get ostrich on Reading farmers market when I lived there.
Probably still can. There's a rhea farm at North Scale on Walney but
I've never seen the meat on sale. The rheas look at you curiously over
the fence when you walk by.

Roske
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-13 12:31:13 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic
things (none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I
should search some out.
ally
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might have still
had it occasionally.
We loved ostrich when we had it in a restaurant once but I've never seen
it in Waitrose. Not that I expect we could afford it if I did.
One used to get ostrich on Reading farmers market when I lived there.
Probably still can. There's a rhea farm at North Scale on Walney but
I've never seen the meat on sale. The rheas look at you curiously over
the fence when you walk by.
There's a place near Dinbych that has banners outside proclaiming that
it sells Ostrich, Crocodile and a few other "exotic" meats, but I've
never been in.
--
Jenny M Benson
Steve Hague
2011-08-14 09:06:49 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic
things (none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I
should search some out.
ally
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually no fat
on it at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't
willing to pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR).
I liked it, though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though
might have still had it occasionally.
We loved ostrich when we had it in a restaurant once but I've never
seen it in Waitrose. Not that I expect we could afford it if I did.
One used to get ostrich on Reading farmers market when I lived there.
Probably still can. There's a rhea farm at North Scale on Walney but
I've never seen the meat on sale. The rheas look at you curiously
over the fence when you walk by.
There's a place near Dinbych that has banners outside proclaiming that
it sells Ostrich, Crocodile and a few other "exotic" meats, but I've
never been in.
I think I'd have to go in, just for the possibility of saying "I'll have a
crocodile sandwich, and make it snappy."
Steve
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-14 10:21:47 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
I think I'd have to go in, just for the possibility of saying "I'll have a
crocodile sandwich, and make it snappy."
That would Alligator, shirley? Oh, you said "snappy", not "Snappy." As
you were!
--
Jenny M Benson
K Richard Whitbread
2011-08-15 23:18:37 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
One used to get ostrich on Reading farmers market when I lived there.
I think the ostrich farm near Crowthorne has given up on ostriches.
--
Kosmo Richard W
SNELLSS
Nick Leverton
2011-08-16 00:32:20 UTC
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Post by K Richard Whitbread
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
One used to get ostrich on Reading farmers market when I lived there.
I think the ostrich farm near Crowthorne has given up on ostriches.
I suppose they're just sticking their heads in the sand.

Nick
--
Serendipity: http://www.leverton.org/blosxom (last update 29th March 2010)
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Anne Burgess
2011-08-14 20:49:34 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I tried Ostrich when Sainsburys offered it a couple of
definitely not like chicken, actually a red meat, virtually
no fat on it
at all. It disappeared, though - presumably people weren't
willing to
pay the price (which was more than fillet steak, IIRR). I
liked it,
though wasn't bowled over enough to pay that, though might
have still
had it occasionally.
J P Gilliver
We loved ostrich when we had it in a restaurant once but I've
never seen it in Waitrose. Not that I expect we could afford
it if I did.
Jane
Yes, I liked it too. There was an ostrich farm not far from here
but last time I was there, ther was just one lonely male who was
desperate enough to display vigorously to me as I walked past,
carefully ensuring he and I were on opposite sides of the stout
fence. See http://www.geograph.org.uk/gridref/NJ2865

Anne B
Paul Wolff
2011-08-13 11:31:17 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Now idly wondering what happens to the emus I saw in Wickham wildlife
park - and others in similar situations - when they reach the end of
their life.)
Rod Hull had a hand in that...
--
Paul
Not emused, really.
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-13 11:44:18 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Now idly wondering what happens to the emus I saw in Wickham wildlife
park - and others in similar situations - when they reach the end of
their life.)
Rod Hull had a hand in that...
... and it brought him down to earth.

Roske
Serena Blanchflower
2011-08-13 09:33:43 UTC
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Post by a l l y
Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
--
I am embarrassed to admit I've never tried it, but not for any ethical
reason, simply because I can't remember having seen it offered for
sale. Maybe it's even rarer in Scotland and the north of England than
down south? I've tried reindeer, kangaroo and a few other exotic
things (none of which tasted like chicken) but not veal. Maybe I
should search some out.
The veal I occasionally eat comes from the Lake District, via
<http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk/Page/productDetail.aspx?ProductID=13>.
I don't know if they sell much of it locally though.
--
Cheers, Serena

=Cat Haiku=
I want to be close
To you. Can I fit my head
inside your armpit?
Kirsten Watson
2011-08-13 08:10:54 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I do sometimes. Not very often, it's expensive and difficult to find,
but occasionally I'll see it anmd get some. I don't really see the
difference between eating veal and eating lamb. I mean, the rose veal
that's available now.

Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)

Kirsten
a l l y
2011-08-13 09:25:41 UTC
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Post by Kirsten Watson
Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)
Farmers' markets often stock it. Well, around here they do, anyway! I
created the website for one of our local sheep farmers who sells Herdwick
mutton, and wonderful, tasty stuff it is, too. They sell it mail order if
you're interested http://wasdalefellmeats.co.uk/index.htm (always happy to
get a plug in for my website clients ...)

ally
Kirsten Watson
2011-08-13 13:02:11 UTC
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Post by a l l y
Post by Kirsten Watson
Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)
Farmers' markets often stock it. Well, around here they do, anyway! I
created the website for one of our local sheep farmers who sells Herdwick
mutton, and wonderful, tasty stuff it is, too. They sell it mail order if
you're interested http://wasdalefellmeats.co.uk/index.htm (always happy to
get a plug in for my website clients ...)
That's very useful, thankyou. I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.

Kirsten, who is cooking stuffed mutton for tea tonight
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 14:45:46 UTC
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On 13 Aug 2011 14:02:11 +0100 (BST), Kirsten Watson
Post by Kirsten Watson
I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.
Why is that, does it taste different, or is there an objection to the
slaughtering method?
--
Jo
Chris Brown
2011-08-14 10:18:58 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
On 13 Aug 2011 14:02:11 +0100 (BST), Kirsten Watson
Post by Kirsten Watson
I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.
Why is that, does it taste different, or is there an objection to the
slaughtering method?
Not to speak for otherrats, let alone their friends, but I'd suspect the
latter. There was some controversy when Harrow looked like hiring a school
catering supplier who only did halal meat. We got on the front page of the
Daily Mail and everything.

Chris
--
"Back next week with another ridiculous tie knot"

http://nowthats.blogspot.com

http://jottingsbythescribe.blogspot.com
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-14 10:32:23 UTC
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Post by Chris Brown
Post by Jo Lonergan
Post by Kirsten Watson
I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.
Why is that, does it taste different, or is there an objection to the
slaughtering method?
Not to speak for otherrats, let alone their friends, but I'd suspect the
latter. There was some controversy when Harrow looked like hiring a
school catering supplier who only did halal meat. We got on the front
page of the Daily Mail and everything.
That doesn't account for Kirsten's children preferring Halal, though.
That would suggest there is a difference in taste. Kirsten?
--
Jenny M Benson
badriya
2011-08-14 12:22:40 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 11:32:23 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris Brown
Post by Jo Lonergan
Post by Kirsten Watson
I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.
Why is that, does it taste different, or is there an objection to the
slaughtering method?
Not to speak for otherrats, let alone their friends, but I'd suspect the
latter. There was some controversy when Harrow looked like hiring a
school catering supplier who only did halal meat. We got on the front
page of the Daily Mail and everything.
That doesn't account for Kirsten's children preferring Halal, though.
That would suggest there is a difference in taste. Kirsten?
When I was a young housewife and my mum still shopped and cooked we
had a 'continental' butcher, called George, in N Finchley. He wasn't
quite kosher but his shop was The Golden Star and he had sort of
kosher meat. It wasn't under the Beth Din I think but he was Austrian
and knew what cuts his Jewish Austrian not very orthodox customers
wanted.

He also knew if I said the dish what meat to give me or if the meat
was sold how to cook it. Then he retired, in not more than his 40s.
We had to use another similar butcher much further away. Not kosher
though because they don't have all the cuts. But the meat was nicer.
I now find the Freedom or some such make, corn-fed chicken and
probably organic is much nicer tasting than cheaper chicken and it is
worth paying and having it less often. I think halal meaat or
chicken, which I've bought now and then, tastes stronger.

--
Vicky
Kirsten Watson
2011-08-14 13:01:03 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris Brown
Post by Jo Lonergan
Post by Kirsten Watson
I actually tend to buy halal - the
children prefer it, and my local butcher is lovely - but I do have
friends who won't eat halal, so it's nice to have an alternative.
Why is that, does it taste different, or is there an objection to the
slaughtering method?
Not to speak for otherrats, let alone their friends, but I'd suspect the
latter. There was some controversy when Harrow looked like hiring a
school catering supplier who only did halal meat. We got on the front
page of the Daily Mail and everything.
For my friends, yes it is squeamishness about the slaughter method
Post by Jenny M Benson
That doesn't account for Kirsten's children preferring Halal, though.
That would suggest there is a difference in taste. Kirsten?
For the children, it's the taste. I can't really taste a difference
between a halal chicken breast and a locally reared organic but
traditionally slaughtered chicken breast, but Judith will eat more of
the first and make more encouraging comments. Benedict says he just
prefers the taste, too.

Kirsten
EllTee
2011-08-13 09:37:06 UTC
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In article
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I do sometimes. Not very often, it's expensive and difficult to find,
but occasionally I'll see it anmd get some. I don't really see the
difference between eating veal and eating lamb. I mean, the rose veal
that's available now.
Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)
Kirsten
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal; but interesting
too. I didn't know it was expensive but if you just have thin slices I
guess is isn't quite so bad?

Elsewhere, reference to "suckled" veal is not - I think - the same
conditions placed on veal production here. Here the calves are around
seven months before slaughter - which is why the meat is pink (rose).
The white veal is the more expensive and preferred on the continent and
those calves are killed v. quickly.

Personally I am not entirely comfortable with eating lambs but I am so
used to it that I just steel my mind against giving it much thought.
But I am now thinking I *ought* to eat veal - when and if affordable.
--
Btms
Kate Brown
2011-08-13 10:00:03 UTC
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Post by EllTee
In article
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I do sometimes. Not very often, it's expensive and difficult to find,
but occasionally I'll see it anmd get some. I don't really see the
difference between eating veal and eating lamb. I mean, the rose veal
that's available now.
Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)
Kirsten
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal; but interesting
too. I didn't know it was expensive but if you just have thin slices I
guess is isn't quite so bad?
Elsewhere, reference to "suckled" veal is not - I think - the same
conditions placed on veal production here. Here the calves are around
seven months before slaughter - which is why the meat is pink (rose).
The white veal is the more expensive and preferred on the continent and
those calves are killed v. quickly.
Cannot answer for Dutch veal, which used to be very white and a product
of the infamous crate system, but the French veal we eat in France is
actually quite pink, same as the English rose veal, and rather less
expensive than the English kind. It has all sorts of approval labels on
it. We're off to France next week (mother permitting) so will report in
due course!
Post by EllTee
Personally I am not entirely comfortable with eating lambs but I am so
used to it that I just steel my mind against giving it much thought.
But I am now thinking I *ought* to eat veal - when and if affordable.
We also eat small pigs and chickens and all sorts of baby things. I
don't see any difference in eating baby animals or adult animals, as
long as it was raised on decent food in reasonably natural surroundings
and was slaughtered without terror and pain.
--
Kate B

PS nospam means nospam. But umra at cockaigne dot org dot uk will get through!
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-13 10:24:06 UTC
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Post by Kate Brown
We also eat small pigs and chickens and all sorts of baby things. I
don't see any difference in eating baby animals or adult animals, as
long as it was raised on decent food in reasonably natural surroundings
and was slaughtered without terror and pain.
Languid wave.
--
Jenny M Benson
Serena Blanchflower
2011-08-13 11:11:18 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Kate Brown
We also eat small pigs and chickens and all sorts of baby things. I
don't see any difference in eating baby animals or adult animals, as
long as it was raised on decent food in reasonably natural surroundings
and was slaughtered without terror and pain.
Languid wave.
and one from me.
--
Cheers, Serena

Turn your face to the Sun and the shadows fall behind you. (Maori proverb)
vk
2011-08-13 15:49:01 UTC
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Post by EllTee
In article
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I do sometimes. Not very often, it's expensive and difficult to find,
but occasionally I'll see it anmd get some. I don't really see the
difference between eating veal and eating lamb. I mean, the rose veal
that's available now.
Mind, I prefer mutton over lamb, and that's almost impossible to find
in conventional butchrs (but the halal butchers still have it)
Kirsten
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
EllTee
2011-08-13 16:44:48 UTC
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Post by vk
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question :-)
--
Btms
Sebastian Lisken
2011-08-16 10:00:17 UTC
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Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question :-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought. :-)

Sebastian
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-16 11:22:52 UTC
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Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie:)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question:-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought.:-)
"We veggies ..." *pleeeease*! (Well, you veggies, actually, seeing I am
not one myself.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Sebastian Lisken
2011-08-16 13:03:15 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie:)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question:-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought.:-)
"We veggies ..." *pleeeease*! (Well, you veggies, actually, seeing I am
not one myself.)
That was deliberate. ;-)

Sebastian
EllTee
2011-08-16 13:32:44 UTC
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Post by Sebastian Lisken
Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question :-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought. :-)
Sebastian
Au contraire Sebastian, au contraire! I experience veggies as one the
least impolite of minority* groups - I wasn't addressing my observation
only to the umra veggies; it was more generalised.

*actually I think veggies are a growing minority but not maintstream -
couldn't think of a better word though.
--
Btms
Sebastian Lisken
2011-08-16 13:41:22 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Post by Sebastian Lisken
Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question :-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought. :-)
Sebastian
Au contraire Sebastian, au contraire! I experience veggies as one the
least impolite
Well, I won't try to argue with that as it's a very subjective issue
and veggies are a diverse group. I only hope that the politeness
exercised by "them veggies here" can somewhat offset your regrettable
experience elsewhere.

Sebastian
Ralph B
2011-08-16 17:37:32 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Post by Sebastian Lisken
Post by EllTee
[missing attribution]
Post by EllTee
I am really surprised that umra is so accepting of veal;
I'm not. I'm a veggie :)
Nor me but I have gained the impression that a large percentage of umra
are and even more have issues relating to all things ethical in a rather
black and white form, which would lead them to boycot veal. But clearly
IAM - no question :-)
Us veggies are just more polite than you thought. :-)
Sebastian
Au contraire Sebastian, au contraire! I experience veggies as one the
least impolite of minority* groups - I wasn't addressing my observation
only to the umra veggies; it was more generalised.
*actually I think veggies are a growing minority but not maintstream -
couldn't think of a better word though.
Is "growing minority" a euphemism for "fat"?
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-16 21:37:01 UTC
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Post by EllTee
*actually I think veggies are a growing minority but not maintstream -
couldn't think of a better word though.
A minority, but a mainstream minority IMO
--
Jo.
Rosalind Mitchell
2011-08-13 10:08:57 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I'd have no problem with eating veal if I had access to a supply of
reasonable quality. Unfortunately it isn't easy to find. I'm sure
there'd be a market if it became available at a decent price.

Roske
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 10:13:35 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Aug 2011 11:08:57 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I'd have no problem with eating veal if I had access to a supply of
reasonable quality. Unfortunately it isn't easy to find. I'm sure
there'd be a market if it became available at a decent price.
Especially if marketed with an emphasis on the "pink is good" aspect.

What I find better is "Natura" beef, which is a one-year-old animal which has
led a natural life (milk, pasture, hay). If you've ever had a bistecca alla
fiorentina you'll know how good that can be, with the tenderness of veal and a
lot of the flavour of beef.
--
Jo
EllTee
2011-08-13 11:01:21 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
What I find better is "Natura" beef, which is a one-year-old animal which has
led a natural life (milk, pasture, hay). If you've ever had a bistecca alla
fiorentina you'll know how good that can be, with the tenderness of veal and a
lot of the flavour of beef.
oooh? Sounds v.g. will look out for it.
--
Btms
Kate Brown
2011-08-13 11:56:22 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by EllTee
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I'd have no problem with eating veal if I had access to a supply of
reasonable quality. Unfortunately it isn't easy to find. I'm sure
there'd be a market if it became available at a decent price.
Have just been to butchers, actually for sausages, but noticed that the
excellent rose veal they sell comes from Cumbria. Heaves Farm:
http://www.heavesfarmveal.co.uk/Heaves_Farm_Veal/Home.html

Not cheap, though :(
--
Kate B

PS nospam means nospam. But umra at cockaigne dot org dot uk will get through!
EllTee
2011-08-13 12:09:16 UTC
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Post by Kate Brown
Have just been to butchers, actually for sausages, but noticed that the
http://www.heavesfarmveal.co.uk/Heaves_Farm_Veal/Home.html
Not cheap, though :(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
--
Btms
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-13 12:33:37 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Not cheap, though:(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
Partly because there isn't much of it, I suppose. Compare the size of
an average 6-month-or so calf to an average beef bullock.
--
Jenny M Benson
EllTee
2011-08-13 13:25:52 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
Not cheap, though:(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
Partly because there isn't much of it, I suppose. Compare the size of
an average 6-month-or so calf to an average beef bullock.
I see. Does the same economy apply to goats - do you know? They don't
have much meat on them I believe.
--
Btms
Jo Lonergan
2011-08-13 14:44:30 UTC
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Post by EllTee
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
Not cheap, though:(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
Partly because there isn't much of it, I suppose. Compare the size of
an average 6-month-or so calf to an average beef bullock.
But you don't have to feed and house it for so long, do you? There must be an
economy there.
Post by EllTee
I see. Does the same economy apply to goats - do you know? They don't
have much meat on them I believe.
No, they don't. But that doesn't stop them being expensive. I think only the
kids are really considered edible.
--
Jo
Dumrat
2011-08-14 12:33:45 UTC
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Post by Jo Lonergan
Post by EllTee
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
Not cheap, though:(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
Partly because there isn't much of it, I suppose. Compare the size of
an average 6-month-or so calf to an average beef bullock.
But you don't have to feed and house it for so long, do you? There must be an
economy there.
Post by EllTee
I see. Does the same economy apply to goats - do you know? They don't
have much meat on them I believe.
No, they don't. But that doesn't stop them being expensive. I think only the
kids are really considered edible.
An old goat is to mutton as a kid is to lamb.
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
Jim Easterbrook
2011-08-14 21:04:37 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by EllTee
Not cheap, though:(
So others have said. I wonder why it is expensive - I think we should
be told.
Partly because there isn't much of it, I suppose. Compare the size of
an average 6-month-or so calf to an average beef bullock.
Yes, but the older, larger animal will have consumed a lot more feed. I
suppose white veal's diet of milk is more expensive than normal cattle
feed, and the handling and killing of a small animal is not much less
than that of a larger one, which might justify it costing more than beef.

Originally veal was consumed in poor mountainous areas where there wasn't
enough stored feed to keep a calf over winter, so it was slaughtered and
consumed prematurely at the end of summer when the cattle were brought
down from the highland pastures.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Anne Burgess
2011-08-14 20:43:55 UTC
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Post by EllTee
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a
bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our
resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days
instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a
short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too.
However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about
baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very
likely not or
certainly only one or two.
Btms
I very much like veal, and provided I can be persuaded that it
was humanely raised I have no qualms about eating it, any more
than I would have about eating roast sucking piglet, or young
lamb. Calves are to some extent a by-product of the dairy
industry, and it seems perfectly reasonable to eat them young
rather than expend resources on prolonging their lives to the
point where the meat is too expensive for the market.

Anne B
the Omrud
2011-08-16 15:46:57 UTC
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Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.

<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/fiche-produit.aspx?ProductId=e301e156-b740-457e-a562-05ed9a0240d7>
--
David
Jenny M Benson
2011-08-16 16:04:09 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
I think most Brits would not find Calf Bottom appealing!
--
Jenny M Benson
the Omrud
2011-08-16 17:29:39 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by the Omrud
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
I think most Brits would not find Calf Bottom appealing!
I prefer to think of it as Calf Base.
--
David
Jane Vernon
2011-08-17 07:18:16 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/fiche-produit.aspx?ProductId=e301e156-b740-457e-a562-05ed9a0240d7>
Oh? I've never noticed that. What do you use it for?
--
Jane
The potter in the purple socks
email jane at cloth and clay dot co dot uk
http://twitter.com/purplepotter for Twitter and
http://clothandclay.blogspot.com/ for blog

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm for recipes supplied by
umrats
the Omrud
2011-08-17 08:50:44 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/fiche-produit.aspx?ProductId=e301e156-b740-457e-a562-05ed9a0240d7>
Oh? I've never noticed that. What do you use it for?
Quick stock base, for soups, casseroles, etc, mostly. There are others
in the range - I always buy the Volaille although there are plenty of
alternatives in cube form. I've never tried the Fumet de Poisson.

<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/catalogue-produit.aspx?CurrentCategoryId=3&CurrentSubCategoryId=11>

They're in all the supermarkets, and there are other makes - there's one
in a glass jar but I can't remember who makes it.
--
David
the Omrud
2011-08-17 09:06:14 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/fiche-produit.aspx?ProductId=e301e156-b740-457e-a562-05ed9a0240d7>
Oh? I've never noticed that. What do you use it for?
Quick stock base, for soups, casseroles, etc, mostly. There are others
in the range - I always buy the Volaille although there are plenty of
alternatives in cube form. I've never tried the Fumet de Poisson.
<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/catalogue-produit.aspx?CurrentCategoryId=3&CurrentSubCategoryId=11>
They're in all the supermarkets, and there are other makes - there's one
in a glass jar but I can't remember who makes it.
Oh yes I can. It's Knorr:

http://www.corsinet.fr/o-fond-veau-secrets-grand-mere-knorr-knorr.htm
--
David
Dumrat
2011-08-17 09:44:51 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by the Omrud
Post by EllTee
This is TA related if you recall the s/l with Vicky last year.
The One Show tonight (Fri) had an item on veal (well I was a bit in and
out of the room but I think it was the One Show) and how our resistance
to eating it means calves are slaughtered at just a few days instead of
being allowed a longer life.
I am left in a quandry now. I admit to eating veal during a short
period when we lived in Holland and jolly nice it was too. However, on
returning to UK I have followed my heart and feelings about baby calves.
Now I am not so sure this is the best thing to be doing.
Do we have any veal eaters at all in umra ? My guess very likely not or
certainly only one or two.
I should have mentioned my fondness for Fond de Veau, which contains
(according to the web site) 2% calf meat. It's one of the items I bring
back from France after every visit because it's not apparently available
in the UK.
<http://www.maggi.fr/nos-produits-vos-reductions/fiche-produit.aspx?ProductId=e301e156-b740-457e-a562-05ed9a0240d7>
Oh? I've never noticed that. What do you use it for?
Beef and veal stews? I find it overwhelmingly salty (and I love salt)
and had it in my larder but never really used it when I had access to it
in Geneva (bought it in France). <Swerve> Can't find Kallo organic
chicken or beef stock cubes here, though 57 different other varieties
that I'd never heard of are easily available..
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
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