Discussion:
Mum
(too old to reply)
the Omrud
2018-05-11 09:30:20 UTC
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Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.

Last night, she rang at 8:20, clearly armed with her copy of the Radio
Times, although it could be for any week in the last month or so (I
throw the old ones out when I remember).

Mum: Hello, can you help me, I've got in a muddle. I'm trying to get
ready for my programme, but I can't work out what to do.

Me: OK, what do you want to watch?

Mum: University Challenge.

Me: I don't think that's on today.

Mum: Yes, it is. It's on on Mondays.

Me: But it's Thursday today.

Mum: No, it's Monday. It says "Monday" at the top of this page.

/Eccles
--
David
Chris McMillan
2018-05-11 10:31:51 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.
Last night, she rang at 8:20, clearly armed with her copy of the Radio
Times, although it could be for any week in the last month or so (I
throw the old ones out when I remember).
Mum: Hello, can you help me, I've got in a muddle. I'm trying to get
ready for my programme, but I can't work out what to do.
Me: OK, what do you want to watch?
Mum: University Challenge.
Me: I don't think that's on today.
Mum: Yes, it is. It's on on Mondays.
Me: But it's Thursday today.
Mum: No, it's Monday. It says "Monday" at the top of this page.
/Eccles
Mine isn’t capable of that. Here’s a gem yesterday.

Mum. Can you give me dad’s work number?

Me. No, mum. The building was pulled down two years ago. (The huge
building opposite the Three Guineas pub for bbq umrats: anyone else, a
tower block visible from trains standing at Reading.)

A. Dad retired in 1982, me redundant in 1984, when everyone currntly there
decamped to Swindon and other people and companies rented till 2015.

B. There are only so many times a day I can or should upset her saying dad
died in 2005 and its now 2018!

Sincerely Chris (one photo of building as it started to be pulled down led
to over 200!)

Sincerely Chris
Vicky
2018-05-11 12:50:47 UTC
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On Fri, 11 May 2018 10:31:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.
Last night, she rang at 8:20, clearly armed with her copy of the Radio
Times, although it could be for any week in the last month or so (I
throw the old ones out when I remember).
Mum: Hello, can you help me, I've got in a muddle. I'm trying to get
ready for my programme, but I can't work out what to do.
Me: OK, what do you want to watch?
Mum: University Challenge.
Me: I don't think that's on today.
Mum: Yes, it is. It's on on Mondays.
Me: But it's Thursday today.
Mum: No, it's Monday. It says "Monday" at the top of this page.
/Eccles
Mine isn’t capable of that. Here’s a gem yesterday.
Mum. Can you give me dad’s work number?
Me. No, mum. The building was pulled down two years ago. (The huge
building opposite the Three Guineas pub for bbq umrats: anyone else, a
tower block visible from trains standing at Reading.)
A. Dad retired in 1982, me redundant in 1984, when everyone currntly there
decamped to Swindon and other people and companies rented till 2015.
B. There are only so many times a day I can or should upset her saying dad
died in 2005 and its now 2018!
Sincerely Chris (one photo of building as it started to be pulled down led
to over 200!)
Sincerely Chris
My mum forgot things like that too. Her younger brother, who lived in
Austria, died. She was already unable to stay in touch herself by
then. She forgot she'd been told he died and as you say one doesn't
want to keep tellingit and upsetting the person.
--
Vicky
Serena Blanchflower
2018-05-11 14:39:34 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On Fri, 11 May 2018 10:31:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.
Last night, she rang at 8:20, clearly armed with her copy of the Radio
Times, although it could be for any week in the last month or so (I
throw the old ones out when I remember).
Mum: Hello, can you help me, I've got in a muddle. I'm trying to get
ready for my programme, but I can't work out what to do.
Me: OK, what do you want to watch?
Mum: University Challenge.
Me: I don't think that's on today.
Mum: Yes, it is. It's on on Mondays.
Me: But it's Thursday today.
Mum: No, it's Monday. It says "Monday" at the top of this page.
/Eccles
Mine isn’t capable of that. Here’s a gem yesterday.
Mum. Can you give me dad’s work number?
Me. No, mum. The building was pulled down two years ago. (The huge
building opposite the Three Guineas pub for bbq umrats: anyone else, a
tower block visible from trains standing at Reading.)
A. Dad retired in 1982, me redundant in 1984, when everyone currntly there
decamped to Swindon and other people and companies rented till 2015.
B. There are only so many times a day I can or should upset her saying dad
died in 2005 and its now 2018!
Sincerely Chris (one photo of building as it started to be pulled down led
to over 200!)
Sincerely Chris
My mum forgot things like that too. Her younger brother, who lived in
Austria, died. She was already unable to stay in touch herself by
then. She forgot she'd been told he died and as you say one doesn't
want to keep tellingit and upsetting the person.
I remember being told that my aunt, on being told that her eldest son
had died reacted by asking who was going to tell his father - who had
died more than thirty years earlier :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains
a fool forever. (Old Chinese saying)
Penny
2018-05-11 19:41:31 UTC
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On Fri, 11 May 2018 15:39:34 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I remember being told that my aunt, on being told that her eldest son
had died reacted by asking who was going to tell his father - who had
died more than thirty years earlier :(
I recall a time when my grandmother and her elder-by-two-years sister came
to stay. Granny was pretty with 'it' at the time but Great Aunt Dora was
definitely losing 'it' and kept calling her little sister Mother and asking
where Winnie (my grandmother) was.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Rosemary Miskin
2018-05-11 17:11:36 UTC
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Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays. 
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!

Rosemary
the Omrud
2018-05-12 16:25:50 UTC
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Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah. I didn't know that. No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
--
David
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-12 20:27:33 UTC
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Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."

Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?

No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.

Lots more of the same sort of thing.

Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky
2018-05-12 20:52:37 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I do that a lot now. I get very annoyed when people don't make the
effort to think of what I want to say.
--
Vicky
Kate B
2018-05-12 21:40:00 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I do that a lot now. I get very annoyed when people don't make the
effort to think of what I want to say.
Shurely 'umbrella' is the only word one really needs?
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-05-13 08:27:25 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I do that a lot now. I get very annoyed when people don't make the
effort to think of what I want to say.
Shurely 'umbrella' is the only word one really needs?
.... if you can remember it.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-12 22:17:05 UTC
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[]
Post by Vicky
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I do that a lot now. I get very annoyed when people don't make the
effort to think of what I want to say.
I've known people with that problem - and my natural inclination _is_ to
help them out; however, _some_ people get cross if you finish their
sentences too often. (As, of course, parodied well by many comedians: I
think the Two Ronnies were among the best at that.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. - Oscar Wilde
Vicky
2018-05-13 08:33:36 UTC
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On Sat, 12 May 2018 23:17:05 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I do that a lot now. I get very annoyed when people don't make the
effort to think of what I want to say.
I've known people with that problem - and my natural inclination _is_ to
help them out; however, _some_ people get cross if you finish their
sentences too often. (As, of course, parodied well by many comedians: I
think the Two Ronnies were among the best at that.)
No, I don't get cross if I am asking for help. I forget words and
names. Some names or words seem a special problem. I am n ot sure why.
Then sometimes I can remember them. And often B can't help as he gets
fribro fog. People with fibromyalgia have a huge variety of things go
wrong. And then we both get grumpy with the other for not helping!
--
Vicky
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-13 09:07:59 UTC
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And often B can't help as he gets fribro fog.
Well, if he made the mistake of getting their second album...
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sally Thompson
2018-05-12 22:24:02 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Nick Odell
2018-05-12 23:26:00 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather than
in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread, okay?
But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to have
written about it here.

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-14 00:55:26 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather than
in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread, okay?
But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to have
written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2018-05-14 08:08:43 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather than
in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread, okay?
But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to have
written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
Can only recall a ‘Ratch’ in S.H. m’self.
--
Toodle Pip
Fred
2018-05-14 08:14:25 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
Can only recall a ‘Ratch’ in S.H. m’self.
Can't remember the title offhand, but the story is about a son charged with murder of his father. Turns out that the father was a rotter and the actual murderer was a reformed rotter and dying of ooh nasties and died before he could be charged.
Hope that jogs someones memory.
Fred
Flop
2018-05-14 08:16:50 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather than
in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread, okay?
But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to have
written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
The Boscombe Valley Mystery.


"At the hotel Holmes explains to Watson that "Cooee" is an Australian
cry and that the apparent reference to "a rat", overheard by James, in
fact comprised the last syllables of "Ballarat", a place in Australia. "

(From Wiki)
--
Flop

“I needed a password eight characters long so I picked Snow White and
the Seven Dwarves.”
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-14 22:08:34 UTC
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Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather
than in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread,
okay? But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to
have written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
The Boscombe Valley Mystery.
"At the hotel Holmes explains to Watson that "Cooee" is an Australian
cry and that the apparent reference to "a rat", overheard by James, in
fact comprised the last syllables of "Ballarat", a place in Australia. "
(From Wiki)
Thank you for doing the research. Desperate chaps these antipodeans.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2018-05-15 06:54:33 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather
than in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier
thread, okay? But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I
ought to have written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
The Boscombe Valley Mystery.
"At the hotel Holmes explains to Watson that "Cooee" is an Australian
cry and that the apparent reference to "a rat", overheard by James, in
fact comprised the last syllables of "Ballarat", a place in Australia. "
(From Wiki)
Thank you for doing the research.  Desperate chaps these antipodeans.
Watson should have pointed out that the words could have been "Giant
Sumatran Rat".
Nick Odell
2018-05-14 23:58:44 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
I rather think I ought to have written about Ballarat here rather
than in the earlier thread. Please don't ask me which earlier thread,
okay? But if you come across it, you'll know why I think I ought to
have written about it here.
Wasn't "Ballarat" a 'clue' is some Sherlock Holmes story?
Dying man's last words?
The Boscombe Valley Mystery.
"At the hotel Holmes explains to Watson that "Cooee" is an Australian
cry and that the apparent reference to "a rat", overheard by James, in
fact comprised the last syllables of "Ballarat", a place in Australia. "
(From Wiki)
Thank goodness you found that. For a while I feared that we might only
have resolved this matter by crossposting the sub-thread to uk.d-i-y.

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-13 06:36:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-14 00:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
that one occasion, you will be forever ***@mned for failing in the
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sally Thompson
2018-05-14 09:04:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
<grin>
Well, I have the advantage of knowing how her mind works. I have downloaded
manuals for her tablet and her phone system which means I can search while
she talks, although the above was The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing
Cursor on her PC.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2018-05-14 09:18:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 14 May 2018 09:04:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
<grin>
Well, I have the advantage of knowing how her mind works. I have downloaded
manuals for her tablet and her phone system which means I can search while
she talks, although the above was The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing
Cursor on her PC.
I look forward (I think) to the day when d#2, who often seems to be able to
read my mind and asks me questions related to something I've only been
thinking about, even from 250 miles away, can give me the same sort of
service.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-14 12:54:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
I look forward (I think) to the day when d#2, who often seems to be able to
read my mind and asks me questions related to something I've only been
thinking about, even from 250 miles away, can give me the same sort of
service.
My daughter and I have a sort of running joke where one of us will ring
the other (usually her ringing me) and say something like "Well, I think
it's disgraceful!" to which the other replies "I quite agree." And the
conversation will continue in similar vein for some time before the
"answerer" is forced to ask "What's disgraceful?"

And talking of things being disgraceful, my sis's and my latest
catchphrase is "the government should do something about that"! It
started because of her getting so annoyed about the nanny state doing
what she considers parents should be doing, eg stopping children eating
too many sweets or not exercising enough.

Now we declare "the government should do something about that" whenever
we are inconvenienced or annoyed by anything.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-14 15:37:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Jenny M Benson
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
And talking of things being disgraceful, my sis's and my latest
catchphrase is "the government should do something about that"! It
started because of her getting so annoyed about the nanny state doing
what she considers parents should be doing, eg stopping children eating
too many sweets or not exercising enough.
Now we declare "the government should do something about that" whenever
we are inconvenienced or annoyed by anything.
Makes a change from blaming the teachers ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni Vidi Vacuum [I came, I saw, It sucked] - ***@saslimited.demon.co.uk, 1998
Btms
2018-05-14 17:55:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
And talking of things being disgraceful, my sis's and my latest
catchphrase is "the government should do something about that"! It
started because of her getting so annoyed about the nanny state doing
what she considers parents should be doing, eg stopping children eating
too many sweets or not exercising enough.
Now we declare "the government should do something about that" whenever
we are inconvenienced or annoyed by anything.
Makes a change from blaming the teachers ...
In Scotland it seems to be the convention to blame the Government, as in:
The Government should do something about it.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sally Thompson
2018-05-14 13:06:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
On 14 May 2018 09:04:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
<grin>
Well, I have the advantage of knowing how her mind works. I have downloaded
manuals for her tablet and her phone system which means I can search while
she talks, although the above was The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing
Cursor on her PC.
I look forward (I think) to the day when d#2, who often seems to be able to
read my mind and asks me questions related to something I've only been
thinking about, even from 250 miles away, can give me the same sort of
service.
I’m not sure I look forward to that since it implies I need it. Mind you,
son who visited at Easter was kind enough to tell me how long to roast a
chicken for! He lived to tell the tale, but only just..
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2018-05-14 13:54:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 14 May 2018 09:04:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
<grin>
Well, I have the advantage of knowing how her mind works. I have downloaded
manuals for her tablet and her phone system which means I can search while
she talks, although the above was The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing
Cursor on her PC.
I look forward (I think) to the day when d#2, who often seems to be able to
read my mind and asks me questions related to something I've only been
thinking about, even from 250 miles away, can give me the same sort of
service.
I’m not sure I look forward to that since it implies I need it. Mind you,
son who visited at Easter was kind enough to tell me how long to roast a
chicken for! He lived to tell the tale, but only just..
I learnt the basic skills of food preparation and cooking at my mother’s
apron strings from the age of three; this did not stop my late mum from
referring to me for cooking temperatures and times in her retired lifetime.
Mum must have known what was required so I think really it was just for
reassurance rather than lack of confidence; as far as I know, she never
asked either of my sisters for such advice.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-05-15 08:21:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 14 May 2018 09:04:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
I have a sister like that who relies on me for technical advice. My
favourite was when she phoned to say “the thing’s disappeared” (on her
computer). She was very impressed that I worked out what she meant and told
her how to fix the problem.
She's not the only one!
The trouble with that is, having made such a huge leap of intuition on
simplest task - when you can't repeat it on each & every occasion.
<grin>
Well, I have the advantage of knowing how her mind works. I have downloaded
manuals for her tablet and her phone system which means I can search while
she talks, although the above was The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing
Cursor on her PC.
I look forward (I think) to the day when d#2, who often seems to be able to
read my mind and asks me questions related to something I've only been
thinking about, even from 250 miles away, can give me the same sort of
service.
I’m not sure I look forward to that since it implies I need it. Mind you,
son who visited at Easter was kind enough to tell me how long to roast a
chicken for! He lived to tell the tale, but only just..
I learnt the basic skills of food preparation and cooking at my mother’s
apron strings from the age of three; this did not stop my late mum from
referring to me for cooking temperatures and times in her retired lifetime.
Mum must have known what was required so I think really it was just for
reassurance rather than lack of confidence; as far as I know, she never
asked either of my sisters for such advice.
She did ask Fran as well who used to say the same as you did.

Sincerely Chris
Fenny
2018-05-13 11:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that. She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about. Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".

I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
--
Fenny
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-14 00:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that. She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about. Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well! If you're going to be difficult dear!"
--
Sam Plusnet
Steve Hague
2018-05-14 15:23:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you pass
me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the room. If
I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail to
comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a voice
implying I'm barely organic.
Steve

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
krw
2018-05-14 15:40:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you pass
me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the room. If
I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail to
comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a voice
implying I'm barely organic.
Not just me then? Like mine is she incapable of saying please?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-14 15:39:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <pdc9ld$rv5$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Steve Hague
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Steve Hague
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you pass
me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the room. If
I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail to
comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a voice
implying I'm barely organic.
Steve
Start making a habit of passing her some large and/or heavy object that
obviously can't be what she's asking for. She will get furious with you
- but, hopefully, will eventually start to specify the right article.
Post by Steve Hague
---
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(What email?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni Vidi Vacuum [I came, I saw, It sucked] - ***@saslimited.demon.co.uk, 1998
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-14 22:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you pass
me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the room. If
I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail to
comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a voice
implying I'm barely organic.
Perhaps we should both pop over to soc.genealogy.britain in order do
some research to find out quite _how_ your Wofe & my Wofe are related.

Mine will talk of "this" or "it" or "they", and it seems evident that
the referent has changed - perhaps several times - in the course of her
disquisition.
Any failure to detect the current meaning, at any point, is met with
some blend of pity & scorn.
--
Sam Plusnet
krw
2018-05-14 22:39:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you
pass me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the
room. If I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail
to comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a
voice implying I'm barely organic.
Perhaps we should both pop over to soc.genealogy.britain in order do
some research to find out quite _how_ your Wofe & my Wofe are related.
Mine will talk of "this" or "it" or "they", and it seems evident that
the referent has changed - perhaps several times - in the course of her
disquisition.
Any failure to detect the current meaning, at any point, is met with
some blend of pity & scorn.
That does sound terribly familiar.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Flop
2018-05-15 10:03:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you
pass me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the
room. If I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail
to comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a
voice implying I'm barely organic.
Perhaps we should both pop over to soc.genealogy.britain in order do
some research to find out quite _how_ your Wofe & my Wofe are related.
Mine will talk of "this" or "it" or "they", and it seems evident that
the referent has changed - perhaps several times - in the course of her
disquisition.
Any failure to detect the current meaning, at any point, is met with
some blend of pity & scorn.
My version is for her to say "Put it down somewhere"

"No. Not there"

"No. Dont put it there"

"Well; where then"

"Anywhere - but not there".

Go back to start.

--

Also,

"Dont put the milk in the fridge there. That's not my system."

"Well, what is your system?"

"I haven't got one but that's not it"
--
Flop

“I needed a password eight characters long so I picked Snow White and
the Seven Dwarves.”
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-15 21:09:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you
pass me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the
room. If I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail
to comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a
voice implying I'm barely organic.
Perhaps we should both pop over to soc.genealogy.britain in order do
some research to find out quite _how_ your Wofe & my Wofe are related.
Mine will talk of "this" or "it" or "they", and it seems evident that
the referent has changed - perhaps several times - in the course of
her disquisition.
Any failure to detect the current meaning, at any point, is met with
some blend of pity & scorn.
My version is for her to say "Put it down somewhere"
"No. Not there"
"No. Dont put it there"
    "Well; where then"
"Anywhere - but not there".
Go back to start.
--
Also,
"Dont put the milk in the fridge there. That's not my system."
    "Well, what is your system?"
"I haven't got one but that's not it"
<throws up hands and celebrates the new winner in this competition that
we're not having>
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2018-05-15 08:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
Ma does that.  She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about.  Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
"Well!  If you're going to be difficult dear!"
My wife will often do something along the lines of saying "Can you pass
me that?", whilst making a vague gesture encompassing half the room. If
I reply "Pass you what?", she says "That!" When I still fail to
comprehend and obey, I get "Never mind, I'll get it myself" in a voice
implying I'm barely organic.
Steve
---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
She is me, unfortunately I don’t point accurately either - which I know I
can’t. Drives McT *nuts*.

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2018-05-14 15:49:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
Ma does that. She'll call me and go on about something without
actually mentioning what it is she's going on about. Or she'll say
"Oh, I was in town today and I saw <a noise like bleugh, but not
quite>".
I've got to the point now where I'll say "My psychic powers are on the
blink so unless you use actuall words, I have no idea what you mean!"
From time to time BOFE will leave a sentence somewhat hanging, at
which point I generally request that she gives me a noun. Luckily
she is not aware of the umbrella convention.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-14 12:37:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Your Mum's biggest problem is that the series of
UC finished a week or two ago!
Ah.  I didn't know that.  No matter, she'll have forgotten that she asked.
Wofe phoned her mother tonight.
She (mother of Wofe) was puzzled because
"the light on her... wottzit... dish dryer is on."
Having determined that dish dryer is actually the dish washer (not as
safe a guess as you might imagine), Wofe asked what light was on, and
did it have any words or a symbol close to it?
No sensible reply, but "perhaps she should put some water in it."
Wofe suggested that it isn't necessary to add water to a dish washer.
Lots more of the same sort of thing.
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her, when she was in her
early 40s.
My late broil - who rarely called anything by it's proper name when he
was fully with it - was frequently "lost for words" in his last couple
of years. He would get furious with my sis for not knowing what he was
talking about and insist that of course she knew.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
krw
2018-05-14 12:50:07 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her
Wofe seems to have moved to permanently expecting me to know what she is
talking about. She has been thinking about something and I get told the
end result with inadequate detail to guess what actually needs doing.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-05-14 14:41:14 UTC
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On Mon, 14 May 2018 13:50:07 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her
Wofe seems to have moved to permanently expecting me to know what she is
talking about. She has been thinking about something and I get told the
end result with inadequate detail to guess what actually needs doing.
Ray tended to do that with other people - he would talk to them about
something we had been discussing without giving any related background
subject. I picked him up on it a few times but he either didn't believe me
really couldn't see the problem.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-05-15 08:21:34 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Sam Plusnet
Incidentally, not being able to recall what something is called, and
expecting her audience to guess what the $%^&* she's talking about has
been a feature of her speech since I first met her
Wofe seems to have moved to permanently expecting me to know what she is
talking about. She has been thinking about something and I get told the
end result with inadequate detail to guess what actually needs doing.
Ray tended to do that with other people - he would talk to them about
something we had been discussing without giving any related background
subject. I picked him up on it a few times but he either didn't believe me
really couldn't see the problem.
There are those of us who can follow intricate stories but cannot tell them
clearly ourselves. I am one.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2018-05-15 14:34:46 UTC
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On Tue, 15 May 2018 08:21:34 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
Ray tended to do that with other people - he would talk to them about
something we had been discussing without giving any related background
subject. I picked him up on it a few times but he either didn't believe me
really couldn't see the problem.
There are those of us who can follow intricate stories but cannot tell them
clearly ourselves. I am one.
It wasn't that he couldn't tell a story, rather he would start in the
middle to folk who had missed the beginning - leading to misunderstandings.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-05-16 10:03:41 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Tue, 15 May 2018 08:21:34 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
Ray tended to do that with other people - he would talk to them about
something we had been discussing without giving any related background
subject. I picked him up on it a few times but he either didn't believe me
really couldn't see the problem.
There are those of us who can follow intricate stories but cannot tell them
clearly ourselves. I am one.
It wasn't that he couldn't tell a story, rather he would start in the
middle to folk who had missed the beginning - leading to misunderstandings.
Older people are beginning to get cross with me. Too long winded, too
complicated, and no one here actually knows any of my friends or family
anyway!

Sincerely Chris

Btms
2018-05-14 17:55:06 UTC
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Post by krw
Wofe seems to have moved to permanently expecting me to know what she is
talking about. She has been thinking about something and I get told the
end result with inadequate detail to guess what actually needs doing.
Your wofe may be related to my husbad! He majors on words like: it, they,
then......while I shout: what’s it, who, when 😤
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Flop
2018-05-11 17:59:37 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.
Last night, she rang at 8:20, clearly armed with her copy of the Radio
Times, although it could be for any week in the last month or so (I
throw the old ones out when I remember).
Mum: Hello, can you help me, I've got in a muddle.  I'm trying to get
ready for my programme, but I can't work out what to do.
Me: OK, what do you want to watch?
Mum: University Challenge.
Me: I don't think that's on today.
Mum: Yes, it is.  It's on on Mondays.
Me: But it's Thursday today.
Mum: No, it's Monday.  It says "Monday" at the top of this page.
/Eccles
Mum [in a care home]: "I think my memory is getting better"

Me: "How do you know?"

Mum: "How do I know what?"
--
Flop

“I needed a password eight characters long so I picked Snow White and
the Seven Dwarves.”
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-11 20:58:34 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Mum is very hard work, but occasionally provides a moment of laughter.
[]
Post by the Omrud
Me: But it's Thursday today.
Mum: No, it's Monday. It says "Monday" at the top of this page.
/Eccles
(Or Ginger in the Just William stories.) LOLAL! I really appreciate your
hardship, and am glad you're able to find things amusing occasionally.

I/we was/were fortunate to some extent, in that my parents and
grandparents died well before any such. (Well, Grandma lived to 98½ (the
half was important!), but wasn't noticeably dottier than she always was.
Which wasn't of the demented kind, just normally dotty, if you get what
I mean.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Kylie may have the world's most beautiful bottom, but the important thing is -
she never, ever talks out of it. - Kathy Lette, RT 2014/1/11-17
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