Discussion:
Latin (unimportant Friday spoiler)
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J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-03-03 23:22:44 UTC
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Jennifer: [something like] Have you tried some of our cornucopias?

Jim (quietly): cornucopiae.

1. If they _are_ simple nouns of that declension, wouldn't it be either
accusative plural - which _would_ be cornucopias, though pronounced with
a long a - or even genitive plural, cornucopiarum (!)?
2. I have a feeling it's a compound noun, with the -copia part being an
adjective or "noun in apposition", and the corn- part (fifth
declension?) also varying.

In short, I don't think Jim would have made that "correction".

(It's probably closer to 40 than 30 years since I did the Latin, but it
jarred ...)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Farc gorillas who live in the plains of the undies ..." - automatic
subtitling seen on BBC one o'clock news, 2016-8-25, by Cynthia Hollingworth.
Flop
2017-03-04 11:06:32 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Jennifer: [something like] Have you tried some of our cornucopias?
Jim (quietly): cornucopiae.
1. If they _are_ simple nouns of that declension, wouldn't it be either
accusative plural - which _would_ be cornucopias, though pronounced with
a long a - or even genitive plural, cornucopiarum (!)?
2. I have a feeling it's a compound noun, with the -copia part being an
adjective or "noun in apposition", and the corn- part (fifth
declension?) also varying.
In short, I don't think Jim would have made that "correction".
(It's probably closer to 40 than 30 years since I did the Latin, but it
jarred ...)
Unless the SW has a very subtle plan for Jennifer to unhinge Jim :-)

You are correct in that 'cornu' is 'horn' and 'copia' is plenty/abundance.


Thus noun and adjective similar to Court-martial which becomes
Courts-martial. But you cannot insert a plural into a portmanteau word.

http://chambers.co.uk/search/?query=cornucopia&title=21st

http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/cornucopia
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
Mike McMillan
2017-03-04 11:13:26 UTC
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Post by Flop
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Jennifer: [something like] Have you tried some of our cornucopias?
Jim (quietly): cornucopiae.
1. If they _are_ simple nouns of that declension, wouldn't it be either
accusative plural - which _would_ be cornucopias, though pronounced with
a long a - or even genitive plural, cornucopiarum (!)?
2. I have a feeling it's a compound noun, with the -copia part being an
adjective or "noun in apposition", and the corn- part (fifth
declension?) also varying.
In short, I don't think Jim would have made that "correction".
(It's probably closer to 40 than 30 years since I did the Latin, but it
jarred ...)
Unless the SW has a very subtle plan for Jennifer to unhinge Jim :-)
You are correct in that 'cornu' is 'horn' and 'copia' is plenty/abundance.
Thus noun and adjective similar to Court-martial which becomes
Courts-martial. But you cannot insert a plural into a portmanteau word.
http://chambers.co.uk/search/?query=cornucopia&title=21st
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/cornucopia
I suspect that Jim may be tempted to unhinge Effer, but is too much of a
gentlemen to spill the beans after she attempted to take the credit for the
theme's outcome.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-03-04 11:23:29 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Flop
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Jennifer: [something like] Have you tried some of our cornucopias?
Jim (quietly): cornucopiae.
1. If they _are_ simple nouns of that declension, wouldn't it be either
accusative plural - which _would_ be cornucopias, though pronounced with
a long a - or even genitive plural, cornucopiarum (!)?
2. I have a feeling it's a compound noun, with the -copia part being an
adjective or "noun in apposition", and the corn- part (fifth
declension?) also varying.
In short, I don't think Jim would have made that "correction".
(It's probably closer to 40 than 30 years since I did the Latin, but it
jarred ...)
Unless the SW has a very subtle plan for Jennifer to unhinge Jim :-)
You are correct in that 'cornu' is 'horn' and 'copia' is plenty/abundance.
Thus noun and adjective similar to Court-martial which becomes
Courts-martial. But you cannot insert a plural into a portmanteau word.
Hmm, not usually in English (though you've given an example - perhaps
you distinguish as it's still hyphenated). Brings up the usual (and
never resolvable) question of should we apply strictly Latin (and Greek,
and ...) rules to adopted words (cacti), or use English ones (cactuses).
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Flop
http://chambers.co.uk/search/?query=cornucopia&title=21st
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/cornucopia
I suspect that Jim may be tempted to unhinge Effer, but is too much of a
gentlemen to spill the beans after she attempted to take the credit for the
theme's outcome.
My point was that if you _are_ going to apply Latin rules, then Jim's
"correction" was questionable*. But as you say, he's mostly a gentleman
- he did say it almost under his breath, I think out of J's hearing as
she dashed off to deal with something else. Though he can be mischievous

(* Latin does decline compounds - the one I remember being that "of
republics" comes out something like rerumpublicarum.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's
money."
Mike McMillan
2017-03-04 11:35:14 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Flop
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Jennifer: [something like] Have you tried some of our cornucopias?
Jim (quietly): cornucopiae.
1. If they _are_ simple nouns of that declension, wouldn't it be either
accusative plural - which _would_ be cornucopias, though pronounced with
a long a - or even genitive plural, cornucopiarum (!)?
2. I have a feeling it's a compound noun, with the -copia part being an
adjective or "noun in apposition", and the corn- part (fifth
declension?) also varying.
In short, I don't think Jim would have made that "correction".
(It's probably closer to 40 than 30 years since I did the Latin, but it
jarred ...)
Unless the SW has a very subtle plan for Jennifer to unhinge Jim :-)
You are correct in that 'cornu' is 'horn' and 'copia' is plenty/abundance.
Thus noun and adjective similar to Court-martial which becomes
Courts-martial. But you cannot insert a plural into a portmanteau word.
Hmm, not usually in English (though you've given an example - perhaps
you distinguish as it's still hyphenated). Brings up the usual (and
never resolvable) question of should we apply strictly Latin (and Greek,
and ...) rules to adopted words (cacti), or use English ones (cactuses).
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Flop
http://chambers.co.uk/search/?query=cornucopia&title=21st
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/cornucopia
I suspect that Jim may be tempted to unhinge Effer, but is too much of a
gentlemen to spill the beans after she attempted to take the credit for the
theme's outcome.
My point was that if you _are_ going to apply Latin rules, then Jim's
"correction" was questionable*. But as you say, he's mostly a gentleman
- he did say it almost under his breath, I think out of J's hearing as
she dashed off to deal with something else. Though he can be mischievous
(* Latin does decline compounds - the one I remember being that "of
republics" comes out something like rerumpublicarum.)
' rerumpublicarum ' sounds like something FAL and Justin get up to!
--
Toodle Pip
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