Discussion:
OT - which way up do you eat chocolate biscuits?
(too old to reply)
DavidK
2018-02-24 10:45:54 UTC
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I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.

Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Sid Nuncius
2018-02-24 10:57:49 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Er...chocolate side up. Who doesn't?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Fenny
2018-02-24 11:05:24 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Feb 2018 10:57:49 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Er...chocolate side up. Who doesn't?
This got a mention on the Simon Mayo show last Wednesday. Apparently,
babies don't understand that the chocolate side goes up, but as they
get older, it becomes obvious!
--
Fenny
Kate B
2018-02-24 11:07:48 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Current biscuits of choice are those plain ones with a slab of dark
chocolate on top. I nibble the overhang first. With jaffa cakes I eat
all the choc'n'jammy stuff first. I have also been known to eat
neapolitan wafers one layer at a time. This is usually because I would
otherwise cram in the whole packet in one go. A little mindfulness (not
the yogic variety, just focus) stops the lifetime on the hips effect.
Mostly.
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2018-02-24 13:16:04 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Feb 2018 11:07:48 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Current biscuits of choice are those plain ones with a slab of dark
chocolate on top. I nibble the overhang first. With jaffa cakes I eat
all the choc'n'jammy stuff first. I have also been known to eat
neapolitan wafers one layer at a time. This is usually because I would
otherwise cram in the whole packet in one go. A little mindfulness (not
the yogic variety, just focus) stops the lifetime on the hips effect.
Mostly.
Interesting.
I rarely eat chocolate biscuits, I stick to just chocolate.
For jaffa-style things (I avoid orange for headache reasons), I eat the
sponge side first, to better enjoy the choc-coated fruit jelly.
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-02-24 14:18:21 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Not sure which way I _eat_ them; I suspect I keep them the same as on
the plate, which is choc up, as otherwise choc tends to come off on the
plate (and fingers). (Beard also may influence the choice.)

Interestingly, there was a prog. on over the Christmas break - can't
remember if it was one of the short BBC series called something like "in
the factory", or just one of channel 37's "How it's made" - that showed
that when the chocolate is _applied_, that side is down: they're on a
wire mesh, which is why the characteristic pattern.
[]
Post by Penny
Interesting.
I rarely eat chocolate biscuits, I stick to just chocolate.
Me too. I've currently been working my way through some boxes I've been
given the last few years though, as otherwise they'll go off. (They do,
eventually.)
Post by Penny
For jaffa-style things (I avoid orange for headache reasons), I eat the
sponge side first, to better enjoy the choc-coated fruit jelly.
Take some heart (assuming you _like_ orange that is): my blind friend
used to get "heads" (migraines), and one of the triggers she thought was
certain foods, which she thought included alcohol, cheese, chocolate,
and oranges (except satsumas for some reason). And she liked all of
these, particularly choc and orange. But - quite suddenly, it seems -
these stopped when she was around 60: she now hasn't had a "head" for
well over two years, and eats chocolate and oranges with impunity. [You
can get impunity in little jars ... (-:]
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

(please reply to group - they also serve who only look and lurk)
(William Allen, 1999 - after Milton, of course)
Mike
2018-02-24 14:50:50 UTC
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J. P. Gilliver (John) <G6JPG-***@255soft.uk> wrote:
. [You
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
can get impunity in little jars ... (-:]
Oh, is that with or without the pips? ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2018-02-24 14:50:53 UTC
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J. P. Gilliver (John) <G6JPG-***@255soft.uk> wrote:
. [You
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
can get impunity in little jars ... (-:]
Oh, is that with or without the pips? ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2018-02-24 16:34:03 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
I liked the oyster wafers from the vans better, they clamped more
effectively. However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-02-24 16:39:42 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
I liked the oyster wafers from the vans better, they clamped more
effectively. However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
But, but, butttt.... shirley a discussion of matters chocolatey must
involve the chocky bunker - in which case, should not boudoir biscuits
figure as a top option???
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2018-02-24 16:47:50 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
I liked the oyster wafers from the vans better, they clamped more
effectively. However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
But, but, butttt.... shirley a discussion of matters chocolatey must
involve the chocky bunker - in which case, should not boudoir biscuits
figure as a top option???
Only if at least half-coated in best Belgian.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-02-24 17:04:36 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
I liked the oyster wafers from the vans better, they clamped more
effectively. However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
But, but, butttt.... shirley a discussion of matters chocolatey must
involve the chocky bunker - in which case, should not boudoir biscuits
figure as a top option???
Only if at least half-coated in best Belgian.
Would I even suggest otherwise???!!!! 😳 :-]
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-02-24 17:52:19 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
I also tend to eat wafers by the layer - but haven't had any for ages.
Me neither - decades I think, assuming we're talking ice cream ones. I
don't think I've even seen them offered by ice cream vans for a while.
(A rather impractical thing anyway, IIRR - danger of the inside shooting
off if you tried to bite the whole construction. Plus teeth into block
of ice cream a bit risky.)
I liked the oyster wafers from the vans better, they clamped more
effectively. However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
But, but, butttt.... shirley a discussion of matters chocolatey must
involve the chocky bunker - in which case, should not boudoir biscuits
figure as a top option???
I used to be addicted to those (and a cheesy variety) break off he top
wafer and eat first in both cases.

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2018-02-26 10:43:09 UTC
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Post by Kate B
However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
We used to have those at home, though the M&S own brand version.
I generally nibbled the chocolate off first, and was intrigued to
find the wafers embossed "Gray Dunn", so fairly confident we were
eating genuine Blue Riband.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-02-26 17:09:04 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Kate B
However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
We used to have those at home, though the M&S own brand version.
I generally nibbled the chocolate off first, and was intrigued to
find the wafers embossed "Gray Dunn", so fairly confident we were
eating genuine Blue Riband.
Chris
Or that both Riband and M&S bought their wafer ingredient from the same
source (presumably Gray Dunn)!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A waist is a terrible thing to mind.
Btms
2018-02-26 17:21:11 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Kate B
However, I wasn't talking ice-cream, but neapolitan wafer
biscuits - Blue Riband or Manner-type wafers, filled with chocolate or
hazelnut cream.
We used to have those at home, though the M&S own brand version.
I generally nibbled the chocolate off first, and was intrigued to
find the wafers embossed "Gray Dunn", so fairly confident we were
eating genuine Blue Riband.
Chris
Or that both Riband and M&S bought their wafer ingredient from the same
source (presumably Gray Dunn)!
Except M&S don’t actually manufacture. So it would be who has that
contract.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-02-26 17:55:03 UTC
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In message
[]
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
We used to have those at home, though the M&S own brand version.
I generally nibbled the chocolate off first, and was intrigued to
find the wafers embossed "Gray Dunn", so fairly confident we were
eating genuine Blue Riband.
Chris
Or that both Riband and M&S bought their wafer ingredient from the same
source (presumably Gray Dunn)!
Except M&S don’t actually manufacture. So it would be who has that
contract.
Though apparently they _do_ sell gas. I switched to them for a gas
supply quite a few years ago, and most of the bills and other
correspondence have sse on them, and I corresponded with SSE on various
matters. But when I asked them if I could have a smart meter, SSE told
me "not for M&S customers" or words to that effect.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
Vicky
2018-02-24 11:10:09 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
We both think chocolate down, even after dunking.
--
Vicky
Fred
2018-02-24 11:37:03 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them.
Makes sense.
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
debate on which way up chocolate biscuits
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
We both think chocolate down, even after dunking.
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?

Fred
Nick Odell
2018-02-24 12:28:11 UTC
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Post by Fred
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them.
Makes sense.
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
debate on which way up chocolate biscuits
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
We both think chocolate down, even after dunking.
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Who dunks biscuits? Full Stop.

N
Chris McMillan
2018-02-24 17:52:18 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Fred
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them.
Makes sense.
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
debate on which way up chocolate biscuits
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
We both think chocolate down, even after dunking.
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Who dunks biscuits? Full Stop.
N
When I ate biscuits dunking doesn’t happen to anything, not even gingers my
teeth can’t crack. Bread, on the other hand, is for soup dunking. Any
home made soup, and canned Tomato soup.

Sincerely Chris
Fenny
2018-02-24 17:45:20 UTC
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Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
--
Fenny
the Omrud
2018-02-24 17:50:22 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me. I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it as
Common.
--
David
Mike
2018-02-24 18:02:09 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me. I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it as
Common.
It is indeed a skill to be able to dunk to choccie softening point but
without further development arriving at the point of jeopardy for the
integrity of the biscuit’s structure.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2018-02-24 21:18:02 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me.  I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it as
Common.
It's OK to rebel from time to time.

It's better to start off gently with a malted milk or arrowroot.
--
Sam Plusnet
the Omrud
2018-02-25 11:05:16 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me.  I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it
as Common.
It's OK to rebel from time to time.
It's better to start off gently with a malted milk or arrowroot.
Arrowroot. What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit? Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea? I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.

I rarely eat biscuits (or anything else sweetened) but when I do, I
don't want one which tastes of nothing.
--
David
Chris McMillan
2018-02-25 14:02:26 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me.  I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it
as Common.
It's OK to rebel from time to time.
It's better to start off gently with a malted milk or arrowroot.
Arrowroot. What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit? Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea? I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
I rarely eat biscuits (or anything else sweetened) but when I do, I
don't want one which tastes of nothing.
Rich tea is for those who need plain biscuits for dietary needs, they’re a
relatively low calorie one. I’ve actually got used to them now after 11
years as a diabetic diet controlled person. I saw at church this morning
we had a plate of choc bourbons, custard creams and shortbread fingers. I
wasn’t tempted by the bourbons, too sweet these days.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-02-25 14:16:16 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me.  I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it
as Common.
It's OK to rebel from time to time.
It's better to start off gently with a malted milk or arrowroot.
Arrowroot. What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit? Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea? I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
I rarely eat biscuits (or anything else sweetened) but when I do, I
don't want one which tastes of nothing.
Rich tea is for those who need plain biscuits for dietary needs, they’re a
relatively low calorie one. I’ve actually got used to them now after 11
years as a diabetic diet controlled person. I saw at church this morning
we had a plate of choc bourbons, custard creams and shortbread fingers. I
wasn’t tempted by the bourbons, too sweet these days.
Sincerely Chris
One solution to the dilemma is shirley to each two biccies back to bach;
the chocolate side could face in or out to taste.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky
2018-02-25 18:32:52 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me.  I suspect I don't do this because Mum would have classed it
as Common.
It's OK to rebel from time to time.
It's better to start off gently with a malted milk or arrowroot.
Arrowroot. What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit? Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea? I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
I rarely eat biscuits (or anything else sweetened) but when I do, I
don't want one which tastes of nothing.
Rich tea is for those who need plain biscuits for dietary needs, they’re a
relatively low calorie one. I’ve actually got used to them now after 11
years as a diabetic diet controlled person. I saw at church this morning
we had a plate of choc bourbons, custard creams and shortbread fingers. I
wasn’t tempted by the bourbons, too sweet these days.
Sincerely Chris
One solution to the dilemma is shirley to each two biccies back to bach;
the chocolate side could face in or out to taste.;-)))
Weightwatchers do their own version of several kn own biscuits, points
counted on the packet for easy dieting. The bourbons are a single, not
double biscuit with some chocolate in a dip in the middle and are
rubbish.

The shortbreads are not buttery and very dry and are rubbish. A theme
is developing :). I still had ones from Xmas and ate those and took
the weight gain hit.

I don't like custard creams so haven't tried them but bet they are
rubbish, howver, the chocolate digestives are acceptable and come as
milk or plain ones.
--
Vicky
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-25 17:00:36 UTC
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Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes! The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.


(Sorry, Omrud - one of these days I might remember that this lapdog
requires "follow up", not "reply.")
--
Jenny M Benson
the Omrud
2018-02-26 12:31:16 UTC
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Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes!  The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.
Fair enough (although I thought current advice was for people with
diabetes to eat ordinary food under control) but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
(Sorry, Omrud - one of these days I might remember that this lapdog
requires "follow up", not "reply.")
No probs :)
--
David
Btms
2018-02-26 12:38:13 UTC
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Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-02-26 17:07:51 UTC
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Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A waist is a terrible thing to mind.
Mike
2018-02-26 17:19:00 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
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Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
Used to buy bags of Winalot, but cannot remember receiving a single prize!
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-02-26 17:21:11 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
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Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
Yes but MY point is that the dog thinks she entitled to a RT whenever I
have one! Recently she has taken to asking for one at bedtime. We must
have had one for supper a couple of times. Sense of entitlement has Poppy.
*


*I do sometimes wonder about the Ambridge Poppy Sprog.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris McMillan
2018-02-27 10:16:51 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
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Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!

Sincerely Chris
Vicky
2018-02-27 11:00:43 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 10:16:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Hopefully the biscuit wasn't given to a working dog. One shouldn't
interact with them without asking the owner. They mustn't be
distracted, although I suppose in a library they might be off duty,
but I don't believe they should ever be given treats.
--
Vicky
Fenny
2018-02-27 18:03:41 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 10:16:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Hopefully the biscuit wasn't given to a working dog. One shouldn't
interact with them without asking the owner. They mustn't be
distracted, although I suppose in a library they might be off duty,
but I don't believe they should ever be given treats.
Especially not chocolate.
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2018-02-28 11:17:14 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 10:16:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Hopefully the biscuit wasn't given to a working dog. One shouldn't
interact with them without asking the owner. They mustn't be
distracted, although I suppose in a library they might be off duty,
but I don't believe they should ever be given treats.
Especially not chocolate.
That was the point of the story, and the speed at which tot performed it.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky
2018-02-28 11:57:31 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Feb 2018 11:17:14 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 10:16:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don?t want to patronise a cafe when you?ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can?t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child?s hands and pushed at a dog?s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Hopefully the biscuit wasn't given to a working dog. One shouldn't
interact with them without asking the owner. They mustn't be
distracted, although I suppose in a library they might be off duty,
but I don't believe they should ever be given treats.
Especially not chocolate.
That was the point of the story, and the speed at which tot performed it.
Sincerely Chris
With Molly, no longer with us now, the transfer went the other way.
Walking along B and Molly passed a mother pushing a toddler in a
buggy. The child was holding a chocolate biscuit and,with one speedy
movement as they passed, Molly took it. No toddler was harmed in this
action. There was a shout of outrage though and B had to apologise
lots. Trying not to laugh.
--
Vicky
Chris McMillan
2018-02-28 11:17:13 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 10:16:51 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Hopefully the biscuit wasn't given to a working dog. One shouldn't
interact with them without asking the owner. They mustn't be
distracted, although I suppose in a library they might be off duty,
but I don't believe they should ever be given treats.
They were puppies with puppy walkers.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-02-27 11:02:53 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Yes, but come on, which way up was the choccie biccy???! ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-02-28 11:17:13 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Btms
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
I am fond of Rich Tea bickies..........and so it the dog.
Yes, but is there _any_ variety of biscuit that most dog's _don't_ like?
(I mean the ones intended for humans; it wouldn't surprise me if there
are varieties of _dog_ biscuit that some dogs don't like.)
A story told to me the other day by a very elderly friend with poor sight.
She uses a local mobility bus to go to our local shopping centre and if you
don’t want to patronise a cafe when you’ve finished your shopping, everyone
congregates in the library, most take advantage of reading the paper
apparently. Jean can’t see much of anything and on this particular morning
the toddler area was *heaving* and noisy. A friend told her there were
young dogs there and she guessed they might be to do with guide dogs in
some way: their HQ is here. Suddenly a young child saw a plate of biscuits
being handed round the parents, quick as a flash, the choccy biscuit was in
child’s hands and pushed at a dog’s mouth. Obviously well used to feeding a
dog with a biscuit. I firmly blame the parents! Jean comes from a family
of dog owners and has grand and great grandchildren, she more than
appreciated the description and the laughter around her!
Sincerely Chris
Yes, but come on, which way up was the choccie biccy???! ;-)
You could’ve asked her yerself! Lol

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2018-02-27 09:55:05 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes!  The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.
Fair enough (although I thought current advice was for people with
diabetes to eat ordinary food under control)
Hence why Rich tea or similar if we must have a biscuit. The inference is
if you’re solely diet controlled to be very strict with yourself if you
can, its your choice. With medication it seems it depends who your
advisers are as much as what your body needs, but if you have a ‘treat’ it
has to be thought about carefully. Now it’s possible if you can deny
yourself the food pleasures of yore that you might lose weight enough that
your blood sugars return to acceptable levels over a long period and
medications can be reduced or rarely removed. We’re only human though and
it takes a lot of self control to be in those positions, which we two are.
In my case being psychologically scared of injections and blood, let alone
testing myself, I’m very relieved to be regarded as a diet controlled
diabetic, and have found after a decade my taste buds have changed so that
plain biscuits and shop bought bread isn’t at all appealing when or if I
need to eat them.

but my comment was really
Post by the Omrud
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm? My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
Post by the Omrud
(Sorry, Omrud - one of these days I might remember that this lapdog
requires "follow up", not "reply.")
No probs :)
Vicky
2018-02-27 10:58:30 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 09:55:05 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or,
for that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people
who don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes!  The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.
Fair enough (although I thought current advice was for people with
diabetes to eat ordinary food under control)
Hence why Rich tea or similar if we must have a biscuit. The inference is
if you’re solely diet controlled to be very strict with yourself if you
can, its your choice. With medication it seems it depends who your
advisers are as much as what your body needs, but if you have a ‘treat’ it
has to be thought about carefully. Now it’s possible if you can deny
yourself the food pleasures of yore that you might lose weight enough that
your blood sugars return to acceptable levels over a long period and
medications can be reduced or rarely removed. We’re only human though and
it takes a lot of self control to be in those positions, which we two are.
In my case being psychologically scared of injections and blood, let alone
testing myself, I’m very relieved to be regarded as a diet controlled
diabetic, and have found after a decade my taste buds have changed so that
plain biscuits and shop bought bread isn’t at all appealing when or if I
need to eat them.
I agree with lots of that. If one can control diet by trade-offs in
order to avoid health things it is better, and weighing the outcomes
of eating too many wrong things v a lesser wrong and not having
injections, or aggravating arthritis and increasing the danger of
cancer coming back, plus varioius other ills being made worse in my
case and then surviving to enjoy grandchildren is an incentive.

I think my taste buds have changed a little and my stomach capacity
definitely has. Did your parents scold you and say eyes bigger than
tummy if you wanted more than you could finish? My eyes now want
mopre. I see a portion and am worried but struggle to finish it.

And I like plain biscuits too. Actually right now, recovering from
chest/cold/cough etc, I'd quite like a rich tea biscuit and cuppa. We
haven't got any. Now you mentions it the choc digestives I've got are
too sweet. I have been having one or two anyway and not enjoying them
as much. We've still got shortbread left from Xmas but that's too
rich too.
Post by Chris McMillan
but my comment was really
Post by the Omrud
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm? My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
Post by the Omrud
(Sorry, Omrud - one of these days I might remember that this lapdog
requires "follow up", not "reply.")
No probs :)
--
Vicky
the Omrud
2018-02-27 14:05:04 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm? My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things. He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream in
large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much to his
surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring himself
to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he absolutely
loves puddings. It's just biscuits - he only really likes Rich Tea,
Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
--
David
BrritSki
2018-02-27 15:21:32 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm?  My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream in
large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much to his
surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring himself
to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he absolutely
loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes Rich Tea,
Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
the Omrud
2018-02-27 16:40:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the
norm?  My grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met
and even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream
in large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much
to his surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring
himself to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he
absolutely loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes
Rich Tea, Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
I know, I know. We watch in horror as he tips vast quantities of salt
over any main mean placed in front of him. Curry, sausages, pizza, it
makes no difference, all are drenched with salt without tasting. But
who are we to comment, considering.

My Dad was 89 when he died and Mum is now 88, but even so I suspect Wife
is going to outlive me.
--
David
Paul Herber
2018-02-27 17:12:49 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm?  My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream in
large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much to his
surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring himself
to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he absolutely
loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes Rich Tea,
Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike
2018-02-27 17:17:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm?  My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream in
large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much to his
surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring himself
to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he absolutely
loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes Rich Tea,
Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
He asked, witha glazed expression....
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2018-02-27 17:59:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 16:21:32 +0100, BrritSki
[]
Post by BrritSki
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream
in large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much
to his surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring
himself to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he
absolutely loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes
Rich Tea, Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
BTN?
--
Steveski (It made Oi larf, anyway).
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-27 22:09:00 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 16:21:32 +0100, BrritSki
[]
Post by BrritSki
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream
in large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much
to his surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring
himself to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he
absolutely loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes
Rich Tea, Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
BTN?
Yes, i think so.
--
Jenny M Benson
steveski
2018-02-27 23:32:49 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 16:21:32 +0100, BrritSki
[]
Post by BrritSki
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream
in large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much
to his surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't
bring himself to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee,
he absolutely loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really
likes Rich Tea, Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
BTN?
Yes, i think so.
'n'kew . . .
--
Steveski
Kate B
2018-02-27 18:52:07 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
but my comment was really
about people like my FiL who has no medical reason to choose Rich Tea
but for some reason prefers to do so.
He’s of the generation where plain biscuits and coffee were the norm?  My
grandparents both worked for Huntley and Palmers, it’s where they met and
even though it was years after they’d both left he company, it was the
biscuit of choice and I don’t remember anything but plain ones with
elevenses.
I don't know - he's 90 but he certainly likes sweet things.  He buys
toffees in bulk and eats some after every meal, he devours ice cream in
large quantities - cheap ice cream (which I politely refuse, much to his
surprise) because despite having penty of money, he can't bring himself
to spend more on such things - he has sugar in coffee, he absolutely
loves puddings.  It's just biscuits - he only really likes Rich Tea,
Arrowroot and Ginger Nuts.
With that diet he'll eat himself into an early grave ;)
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
Bravo! Bis! Bis!
--
Kate B
London
Fenny
2018-02-27 20:34:30 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
With the new fangled chemical cremation, you just dunk them in
tea/coffee then wash the sludge down the drain.
--
Fenny
steveski
2018-02-27 23:35:37 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Paul Herber
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
With the new fangled chemical cremation, you just dunk them in
tea/coffee then wash the sludge down the drain.
Another BTN? - Akchully no (I'm censoring myself [1]).
--
Steveski

[1] Ooo-er, missus.
Mike
2018-02-28 09:01:49 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Paul Herber
Does a biscuit eater have to be cremated twice?
With the new fangled chemical cremation, you just dunk them in
tea/coffee then wash the sludge down the drain.
Nice and easily digested then?
--
Toodle Pip
Fenny
2018-02-27 18:07:12 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 17:00:36 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes! The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.
Since when? I'm actually very partial to arrowroot and rich tea
biscuits. In the days when the parentals used to buy biscuits on a
weekly basis, we each got to pick one packet. I always had either
rich tea or morning coffee and Bro had picked iced sports or "bomb"
biscuits (I think they were shortbread, round with a raised chequered
pattern so they looked like handgrenades!).

Granny had arrowroot biscuits and as long as there were some in the
tin, we were allowed to eat them without restriction.
--
Fenny
Mike
2018-02-27 18:16:12 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 17:00:36 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Arrowroot.  What on earth is the point of an arrowroot biscuit?  Or, for
that matter, a Rich Tea?  I suspect they're biscuits for people who
don't like biscuits.
No, they're biscuits for people with Type II Diabetes! The nurse at my
last diabetic clinic was quite happy that I was very fond of Rich Tea
biccies.
Since when? I'm actually very partial to arrowroot and rich tea
biscuits. In the days when the parentals used to buy biscuits on a
weekly basis, we each got to pick one packet. I always had either
rich tea or morning coffee and Bro had picked iced sports or "bomb"
biscuits (I think they were shortbread, round with a raised chequered
pattern so they looked like handgrenades!).
Granny had arrowroot biscuits and as long as there were some in the
tin, we were allowed to eat them without restriction.
Did you have to be a little more circumspect if restriction was at home?
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2018-02-24 18:19:34 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
Not me! I happily dunk non-chocolatey biscuits but not chocolate ones.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Depression is merely anger without enthusiasm.
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-24 20:13:54 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
No, no, no! Ginger biscuits ONLY for dunking!
--
Jenny M Benson
LFS
2018-02-25 09:57:43 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me. I can't imagine why anyone would want to. Dunking is reserved
for livening up the boring plain biscuits that get left at the end of
the assortment tin.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Penny
2018-02-25 10:02:34 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 09:57:43 +0000, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Fenny
Post by Fred
No, no, no! Definitely choc side up - and who dunks chocolate biscuits?
Pretty much everyone except Mary Berry and you!
And me. I can't imagine why anyone would want to.
Lack of teeth.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-02-24 12:01:34 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Chocolate side up, every time. When it comes to Jaffa Cakes, I would
leave them on the plate.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. What do ghosts play at parties?
A. Haunt and seek.
LFS
2018-02-25 09:54:49 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them
so that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that
there is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and
jaffa cakes) should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt
and even more surprised that consensus on a radio programme was
against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up
do you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Chocolate side up, every time.  When it comes to Jaffa Cakes, I would
leave them on the plate.
I'll eat your share of the Jaffa cakes, then.

If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers. Which may be part of the pleasure for
some people, I suppose. But if you want something really messy and
delicious, get yourself a glass of port and a Cadbury's chocolate finger
biscuit and use the latter as a straw through which to drink the former.
It probably works just as well with other drinks.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Penny
2018-02-25 10:12:28 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 09:54:49 +0000, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
But if you want something really messy and
delicious, get yourself a glass of port and a Cadbury's chocolate finger
biscuit and use the latter as a straw through which to drink the former.
It probably works just as well with other drinks.
That sounds like an interesting variation on the Australian practice of
sucking a hot drink through a Tim Tam.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-02-25 10:46:52 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
But if you want something really messy and
delicious, get yourself a glass of port and a Cadbury's chocolate finger
biscuit and use the latter as a straw through which to drink the former.
It probably works just as well with other drinks.
That sounds like an interesting variation on the Australian practice of
sucking a hot drink through a Tim Tam.
That was my thought too but I can't imagine either the port or the
biscuit being improved by the process.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them. (A.A. Milne)
Nick Odell
2018-02-25 14:00:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
But if you want something really messy and
delicious, get yourself a glass of port and a Cadbury's chocolate finger
biscuit and use the latter as a straw through which to drink the former.
It probably works just as well with other drinks.
That sounds like an interesting variation on the Australian practice of
sucking a hot drink through a Tim Tam.
..and my practice of sucking an ice cream down through a hole in the
bottom of the cone.

Sorry, it's probably not tactful to mention ice cream in the UK right
now. He he he.

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-25 16:57:23 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
..and my practice of sucking an ice cream down through a hole in the
bottom of the cone.
My bro and i used to get into trouble from Ma for doing that. I don't
know whether he still does itm but I do!
--
Jenny M Benson
Paul Herber
2018-02-25 17:34:39 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
..and my practice of sucking an ice cream down through a hole in the
bottom of the cone.
My bro and i used to get into trouble from Ma for doing that. I don't
know whether he still does itm but I do!
Me too.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Penny
2018-02-26 00:03:50 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 14:00:05 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
..and my practice of sucking an ice cream down through a hole in the
bottom of the cone.
Messy :( or it certainly would be if you tried it with the cones I eat*
which are full from about an inch above the top down to the half inch plug
of solid chocolate-like substance at the bottom.
Post by Nick Odell
Sorry, it's probably not tactful to mention ice cream in the UK right
now. He he he.
* all year round
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2018-02-26 10:51:03 UTC
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Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?

I find that sometimes it is necessary to nibble a bit out of the
edge on diametrically opposite points to get chocolate-free
gripping.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
LFS
2018-02-26 14:32:38 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
Post by Chris J Dixon
I find that sometimes it is necessary to nibble a bit out of the
edge on diametrically opposite points to get chocolate-free
gripping.
I cannot imagine such refinement...
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Sally Thompson
2018-02-26 15:21:52 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
Post by Chris J Dixon
I find that sometimes it is necessary to nibble a bit out of the
edge on diametrically opposite points to get chocolate-free
gripping.
I cannot imagine such refinement...
Choc digestives, when I eat them, definitely choc side up. Thumb
underneath, index finger on top. However it doesn’t stay in my fingers and
out of my mouth long enough for me to get chocolate on my fingers.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky
2018-02-26 17:25:20 UTC
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On 26 Feb 2018 15:21:52 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
Post by Chris J Dixon
I find that sometimes it is necessary to nibble a bit out of the
edge on diametrically opposite points to get chocolate-free
gripping.
I cannot imagine such refinement...
Choc digestives, when I eat them, definitely choc side up. Thumb
underneath, index finger on top. However it doesn’t stay in my fingers and
out of my mouth long enough for me to get chocolate on my fingers.
Because of being a Weightwatcher, I try to eat things like chocolate
biscuits slowly. Eating treat things slowly and not unrestraindly is
one of the things that helps with the weight loss, or to prevent
regain. Previous to WW I used to just stuff biscuit after biscuit
quite quickly :).
--
Vicky
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-02-26 17:50:44 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On 26 Feb 2018 15:21:52 GMT, Sally Thompson
[]
Post by Vicky
Post by Sally Thompson
Choc digestives, when I eat them, definitely choc side up. Thumb
underneath, index finger on top. However it doesn’t stay in my fingers and
out of my mouth long enough for me to get chocolate on my fingers.
Because of being a Weightwatcher, I try to eat things like chocolate
biscuits slowly. Eating treat things slowly and not unrestraindly is
one of the things that helps with the weight loss, or to prevent
regain. Previous to WW I used to just stuff biscuit after biscuit
quite quickly :).
I caught something on the rajo this morning (WHour?), where they had two
people on, one from WW, and the other was saying it has been shown that
calorie-counting doesn't work. This irritated me, as does any such
inaccurate statement. What I _think_ she meant - from what she went on
to say - was that it doesn't work _as a behaviour modifier_; it clearly
_does_ work (well, calorie _limiting_ does anyway, not just counting
them!) as a slimming practice - it just (perhaps) doesn't work after you
stop doing it. (Not that I'm a fan of WW as a company - I think it's too
willing to make money out of the subject - but to me, calorie limiting
is the only thing that _does_ work.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
Vicky
2018-02-26 21:52:56 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Feb 2018 17:50:44 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I caught something on the rajo this morning (WHour?), where they had two
people on, one from WW, and the other was saying it has been shown that
calorie-counting doesn't work. This irritated me, as does any such
inaccurate statement. What I _think_ she meant - from what she went on
to say - was that it doesn't work _as a behaviour modifier_; it clearly
_does_ work (well, calorie _limiting_ does anyway, not just counting
them!) as a slimming practice - it just (perhaps) doesn't work after you
stop doing it. (Not that I'm a fan of WW as a company - I think it's too
willing to make money out of the subject - but to me, calorie limiting
is the only thing that _does_ work.)
--
WW doesn't do calorie counting. The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.

The system does limit calories but is intended to steer people towards
healthy and filling foods, so they don't feel hungry and have a
certain amount of foods they would miss. so I can have WW chocolate
digestives or real ones as long as I look at the
protein/carb/fat/fibre content of the non ww ones and count them into
my points. The www ones have the points on the packet so ww foods are
easier.

The idea is to permanently change eating habits. After the weight has
been lost there is a system and advice to maintain. I've been gold,
that is below my goal weight, since 2009. I know quite a few gold
members who go back and check their weight at meetings. You no longer
have to pay once you get to gold.
--
Vicky
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-26 21:58:35 UTC
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Post by Vicky
WW doesn't do calorie counting. The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.
Points ... just another word for calories, innit?
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky
2018-02-26 22:14:54 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Feb 2018 21:58:35 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
WW doesn't do calorie counting. The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.
Points ... just another word for calories, innit?
Well, not quite. I didn't change system when the change 3 years ago
happened and on the old system a slice of wholemeal bread, Hovis for
instance, is 2 points. One of the WW chocolate digestives, of which
I'm currently eating one, is 1 point. A huge bowl of salad is free,
null points, as is most fruit (not avocados). You get a certain number
of points a day or week, depending on what you choose and depending on
age/height/sex.

If you go for the no count version then lean meats are free, as are
many other foods, but you have to stop eating when full :) Biscuits
still count on that one but you get some points allowed for those.
There is advice and recipes for having many foods that one would miss
but having them with fewer points.
--
Vicky
Nick Odell
2018-02-27 00:42:24 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
WW doesn't do calorie counting.  The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.
Points ... just another word for calories, innit?
<ISIHAC> I thought Points was just another word for Prizes </>

Nick
steveski
2018-02-27 01:49:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Jenny M Benson
WW doesn't do calorie counting.  The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.
Points ... just another word for calories, innit?
<ISIHAC> I thought Points was just another word for Prizes </>
<Change At Oglethorpe> "Points" is Phillippa Wilson </>

Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2018-02-27 10:58:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Jenny M Benson
WW doesn't do calorie counting.  The system updates every couple of
years and currently there is a choice of two ways, which can be mixed
for different meals. You can count points, where points for some foods
are higher and fruit and vegetables are 'free' or you can not count
points but eat anything from a wide list of foods, eating sensibly and
then foods not on the lists have points.
Points ... just another word for calories, innit?
<ISIHAC> I thought Points was just another word for Prizes </>
This week's prize will delight any weight-watcher who wants to see
themselves looking more slender in the mirror; it's this handy pair of
slimming goggles.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky
2018-02-26 17:22:49 UTC
Permalink
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Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
It seems to me this means your hand is twisted at an unnatural angle.
No matter which side of the biscuit is up or down, the natural way to
hold it seems to be thumb underneath.
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
I find that sometimes it is necessary to nibble a bit out of the
edge on diametrically opposite points to get chocolate-free
gripping.
I cannot imagine such refinement...
--
Vicky
Chris J Dixon
2018-02-26 17:59:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
It seems to me this means your hand is twisted at an unnatural angle.
No matter which side of the biscuit is up or down, the natural way to
hold it seems to be thumb underneath.
I'm glad it wasn't just me miming the motions to see how this
might work.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2018-02-26 18:04:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
It seems to me this means your hand is twisted at an unnatural angle.
No matter which side of the biscuit is up or down, the natural way to
hold it seems to be thumb underneath.
I'm glad it wasn't just me miming the motions to see how this
might work.
Chris
No, I think it was Btms who mentioned ‘motions’ oh sorry! were you having a
meal?
--
Toodle Pip
LFS
2018-02-26 18:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by LFS
If you eat chocolate biscuits with the chocolate side down, you get
chocolate all over your fingers.
I'm not quite sure how that works. Do you perch the biscuit on
your fingers without touching the top?
<heads to biscuit tin to check> I hold the biscuit with my thumb on top
and fingers beneath. Only my thumb comes into contact with the chocolate.
It seems to me this means your hand is twisted at an unnatural angle.
No matter which side of the biscuit is up or down, the natural way to
hold it seems to be thumb underneath.
I'm glad it wasn't just me miming the motions to see how this
might work.
In another ng this discussion would have immediately led to arrangements
for a meeting for experimentation. It was at one such event that I
learned about drinking port through chocolate fingers.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Btms
2018-02-25 20:42:03 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Chocolate side up, every time. When it comes to Jaffa Cakes, I would
leave them on the plate.
I would leave them in the shop
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-02-26 12:52:20 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Chocolate side up, every time. When it comes to Jaffa Cakes, I would
leave them on the plate.
I would leave them in the shop
You should try the new e-version, Java Cakes....
--
Toodle Pip
the Omrud
2018-02-24 16:09:59 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them.
Of course. How else?
Post by DavidK
A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
Chocolate up. Nobody could be so perverse as to eat them upside down.
--
David
Jenny M Benson
2018-02-24 20:25:33 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Nobody could be so perverse as to eat them upside down.
I've just realised that I wouldn't even consider eating a Rich Tea
"upside down". Or any other biccy which has an obvious right and wrong
side. Not usually a problem with Custard Creams, but occasionally one
gets one with one side the wrong way, in which ase that side is
definitely the bottom side. Thankfully, I haven't yet come across a CC
with BOTH sides wrong!
--
Jenny M Benson
carolet
2018-02-24 18:29:47 UTC
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Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them so
that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that there
is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and jaffa cakes)
should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt and even more
surprised that consensus on a radio programme was against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up do
you eat chocolate biscuits please?
You didn't say which way up you eat chocolate biscuits, were you trying
not to influence our answers?

I would eat a chocolate biscuit chocolate side up, otherwise I wouldn't
know that it was a chocolate biscuit. Actually, being able to see the
chocolate means that it is easier to hold it without getting chocolatey
fingers. With jaffa cakes, though, that is not a problem, I'm happy to
not eat them either way up.

I have always eaten cheese biscuits salt side up, as that is the pretty
side, the side that is clearly meant to be looked at. There is something
in what you say though, so i may experimnt with eating them that way up.
--
CaroleT
DavidK
2018-02-25 10:25:22 UTC
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Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them
so that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that
there is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and
jaffa cakes) should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt
and even more surprised that consensus on a radio programme was
against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up
do you eat chocolate biscuits please?
You didn't say which way up you eat chocolate biscuits, were you trying
not to influence our answers?
I would eat a chocolate biscuit chocolate side up, otherwise I wouldn't
know that it was a chocolate biscuit. Actually, being able to see the
chocolate means that it is easier to hold it without getting chocolatey
fingers. With jaffa cakes, though, that is not a problem, I'm happy to
not eat them either way up.
I have always eaten cheese biscuits salt side up, as that is the pretty
side, the side that is clearly meant to be looked at. There is something
in what you say though, so i may experimnt with eating them that way up.
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.

The argument that eating them chocolate side up stops getting chocolate
on fingers makes no sense to me; do people balance the biscuits
delicately on their fingers instead of holding them firmly?

I'll concede that the salt would sparkle prettily in the sunlight if it
weren't covered in cheese.

It's a mystery to me how so many people can be wrong.
Penny
2018-02-25 11:02:49 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2018 10:25:22 +0000, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.
Makes sense to me, how else do you actually taste the chocolate?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
carolet
2018-02-25 13:43:45 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them
so that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that
there is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and
jaffa cakes) should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any
doubt and even more surprised that consensus on a radio programme was
against me.
It is true that the tongue is the organ of taste, and that it will
initially be in contact with the bottom of whatever comes into the
mouth, but within moments of that happening, the food is generally
chomped up and mixed around, so that the salt/chocolate could be
anywhere. Are you saying that you just let the piece of biscuit sit on
your tongue until it dissolves?
Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up
do you eat chocolate biscuits please?
You didn't say which way up you eat chocolate biscuits, were you
trying not to influence our answers?
I would eat a chocolate biscuit chocolate side up, otherwise I
wouldn't know that it was a chocolate biscuit. Actually, being able to
see the chocolate means that it is easier to hold it without getting
chocolatey fingers. With jaffa cakes, though, that is not a problem,
I'm happy to not eat them either way up.
I have always eaten cheese biscuits salt side up, as that is the
pretty side, the side that is clearly meant to be looked at. There is
something in what you say though, so I may experiment with eating them
that way up.
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.
The argument that eating them chocolate side up stops getting chocolate
on fingers makes no sense to me; do people balance the biscuits
delicately on their fingers instead of holding them firmly?
That depends on the extent of the chocolate coating. If it is a generous
covering which can not be avoided, then I may well balance the biscuit
on my finger nails for much of the time, thus minimizing the time and
area of chocolate that is in contact with the melting warmth of my
fingers. If enough of the edge of the biscuit is uncovered, I would
probably hold that, but I still need to be able to see where the edge of
the chocolate is, so that I can avoid it.
Post by DavidK
I'll concede that the salt would sparkle prettily in the sunlight if it
weren't covered in cheese.
It isn't aways covered in cheese. Sometimes I eat them uncovered, but
even when I do cover them in cheese, there is still a certain amount of
time when they are sat sparkling on the plate, before the cheese slice
is lowered into place.
Post by DavidK
It's a mystery to me how so many people can be wrong.
--
CaroleT
Vicky
2018-02-25 18:28:20 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
I always make sure that my favourite cheese biscuits (Carr's Cheese
Melts) are salty side down when I put the cheese (cambozola) on them
so that I can taste the salt when I eat them. A brother tells me that
there is a similar debate on which way up chocolate biscuits (and
jaffa cakes) should be eaten. I was surprised that there was any doubt
and even more surprised that consensus on a radio programme was
against me.
Maybe it was sampling bias so I'll do a poll on umra ... which way up
do you eat chocolate biscuits please?
You didn't say which way up you eat chocolate biscuits, were you trying
not to influence our answers?
I would eat a chocolate biscuit chocolate side up, otherwise I wouldn't
know that it was a chocolate biscuit. Actually, being able to see the
chocolate means that it is easier to hold it without getting chocolatey
fingers. With jaffa cakes, though, that is not a problem, I'm happy to
not eat them either way up.
I have always eaten cheese biscuits salt side up, as that is the pretty
side, the side that is clearly meant to be looked at. There is something
in what you say though, so i may experimnt with eating them that way up.
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.
No, I was first responder on theis tread I think and said we both eat
them chocolate side down. Until you replied it was just us, alone,
with everyone else commenting in a rather hostile way.
(Ok, am currently fighting cold, cough, fever, misery so a bit
sensitive)
Post by DavidK
The argument that eating them chocolate side up stops getting chocolate
on fingers makes no sense to me; do people balance the biscuits
delicately on their fingers instead of holding them firmly?
I quite often get chocolate on my fingers. I then lick them.
Post by DavidK
I'll concede that the salt would sparkle prettily in the sunlight if it
weren't covered in cheese.
It's a mystery to me how so many people can be wrong.
--
Vicky
DavidK
2018-02-26 11:00:45 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.
No, I was first responder on theis tread I think and said we both eat
them chocolate side down. Until you replied it was just us, alone,
with everyone else commenting in a rather hostile way.
(Ok, am currently fighting cold, cough, fever, misery so a bit
sensitive)
You're right. I must have been biased in my thinking by the universal
vote against me by my mother's carers. On umra, if we allow your 2
votes, it is a close 5 votes for chocside up and 4 votes for chocside down.
Kate B
2018-02-26 11:16:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by Vicky
Post by DavidK
I seem to be alone in eating my biscuits chocolate side down. The
subject raised considerable interest with my mother's carers, and they
haven't found anyone of my persuasion either.
No, I was first responder on theis tread I think and said we both eat
them chocolate side down. Until you replied it was just us, alone,
with everyone else commenting in a rather hostile way.
(Ok, am currently fighting cold, cough, fever, misery so a bit
sensitive)
You're right. I must have been biased in my thinking by the universal
vote against me by my mother's carers. On umra, if we allow your 2
votes, it is a close 5 votes for chocside up and 4 votes for chocside down.
Just to be clear, it's choc-side down when eating the
slab-of-choc-on-rich-tea biscuits, but choc-side up for jaffa cakes and
chocolate digestives and those very delicious choccy Biscoff ones.
--
Kate B
London
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