Discussion:
Scam??
(too old to reply)
Mike Ruddock
2018-05-16 11:06:50 UTC
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I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."

I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.

Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?

Mike Ruddock
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-16 11:33:12 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
It's a scam:
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741

If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.

Persoanlly, I just ignore them. I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 11:59:48 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741
If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.
I would - though it does occur to me to wonder who sets up such sites,
why, and how they're funded. That one - who-called.co.uk - is one set up
using GoDaddy. OK, call me paranoid, but it costs _something_ to not
only register a domain but also run it.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Persoanlly, I just ignore them. I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
See previous post - there isn't, really. I too ignore them - though I
don't hang up until I get the beeep, on the basis of (a) costing them as
much as possible [though that's probably fractions of a penny] (b) at
least tying up one of their lines to reduce how many other people they
can bother.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is.
Penny
2018-05-16 12:28:19 UTC
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On Wed, 16 May 2018 12:33:12 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741
If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.
Persoanlly, I just ignore them. I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
I was going to suggest Action Fraud but it seems they only do email scams,
not telephone.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike Ruddock
2018-05-16 16:59:18 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741
If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.
Persoanlly, I just ignore them.  I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
Thanks for that, Sid. I see that others have had exactly the same
experience.

Thanks too to other folk who made comments.

I used to think that if a call came from outside these islands it would
be registered as such, but a BT man told me that it is simple for an
overseas user to route his call through a BT number. Can't that be stopped?


Mike Ruddock
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 18:41:30 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Mike Ruddock
<***@btinternet.com> writes:
[]
Post by Mike Ruddock
I used to think that if a call came from outside these islands it would
be registered as such, but a BT man told me that it is simple for an
overseas user to route his call through a BT number. Can't that be stopped?
[]
They can't "route their call through a" UK number, but they can spoof a
UK number to come up as if that's what is calling, which I think is what
you meant.

It should certainly be possible to prevent that from happening: at the
international gateway, where calls from abroad enter the UK system, any
falsely UK CLI ought to be detectable, and thus blockable. But unless
you can persuade enough MPs to pass something - or, actually get through
to OfCom and get them to do a Statutory Instrument - it won't happen.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Quantity is no substitute for quality, but it's the only one we've got.
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-16 19:27:06 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It should certainly be possible to prevent that from happening: at the
international gateway, where calls from abroad enter the UK system, any
falsely UK CLI ought to be detectable, and thus blockable. But unless
you can persuade enough MPs to pass something - or, actually get through
to OfCom and get them to do a Statutory Instrument - it won't happen.
I assume there are international treaties about this sort of thing. We
might not be too keen on other governments (e.g. Turkey) declaring that
phone calls from British journalists are nuisance calls and blocking them
at the border.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 19:41:58 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It should certainly be possible to prevent that from happening: at the
international gateway, where calls from abroad enter the UK system, any
falsely UK CLI ought to be detectable, and thus blockable. But unless
you can persuade enough MPs to pass something - or, actually get through
to OfCom and get them to do a Statutory Instrument - it won't happen.
I assume there are international treaties about this sort of thing. We
might not be too keen on other governments (e.g. Turkey) declaring that
phone calls from British journalists are nuisance calls and blocking them
at the border.
I'm talking about calls coming _into_ Britain, *with fake British CLIs
attached*. And them being blocked on the British side of the interface.
I don't think (e. g.) journalist calls would have such.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

By the very definition of "news," we hear very little about the dominant
threats to our lives, and the most about the rarest, including terror.
"LibertyMcG" alias Brian P. McGlinchey, 2013-7-23
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-16 21:12:52 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It should certainly be possible to prevent that from happening: at the
international gateway, where calls from abroad enter the UK system,
any falsely UK CLI ought to be detectable, and thus blockable. But
unless you can persuade enough MPs to pass something - or, actually
get through to OfCom and get them to do a Statutory Instrument - it
won't happen.
I assume there are international treaties about this sort of thing. We
might not be too keen on other governments (e.g. Turkey) declaring that
phone calls from British journalists are nuisance calls and blocking
them at the border.
I'm talking about calls coming _into_ Britain, *with fake British CLIs
attached*. And them being blocked on the British side of the interface.
I don't think (e. g.) journalist calls would have such.
Yes, I know that. But we should not give authorities in any country the
power to block incoming phone calls.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-17 00:45:10 UTC
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[]
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
I assume there are international treaties about this sort of thing. We
might not be too keen on other governments (e.g. Turkey) declaring that
phone calls from British journalists are nuisance calls and blocking
them at the border.
I'm talking about calls coming _into_ Britain, *with fake British CLIs
attached*. And them being blocked on the British side of the interface.
I don't think (e. g.) journalist calls would have such.
Yes, I know that. But we should not give authorities in any country the
power to block incoming phone calls.
I take your point, but I can't think of any situation where a _valid_
(e. g. journalist) call would come _into_ the UK, bearing a UK CLI (in
other words appearing to have come from a UK number).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

That's how he [Dr. Who] seems to me. He's always been someone who gets the
/Guardian/. There are some parts of the universe where it's harder to get hold
of. - Peter Capaldi (current incumbent Doctor), RT 2016/11/26-12/2
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-17 00:16:05 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741
If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.
Persoanlly, I just ignore them.  I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
Since it's quite easy to spoof that number, I'm surprised that the
scammers don't just throw up a random number - that would prevent
"who-called", and similar websites, from being any use.

On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-17 05:35:23 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that. Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity." Does anyone really
fall for that?

(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere. I have never done this before. I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2018-05-17 06:58:15 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this before.  I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I've been getting many calls of the "We understand you've been in an
accident that wasn't your fault" type. Yesterday, by agreeing that I had
(well, how was I to know the cat would be right under my feet?) I was
transferred to 'a supervisor'. Unfortunately when I asked him to give me
details of the accident they were ringing me about, he hung up on me.

john
Btms
2018-05-17 07:37:46 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this before.  I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I've been getting many calls of the "We understand you've been in an
accident that wasn't your fault" type. Yesterday, by agreeing that I had
(well, how was I to know the cat would be right under my feet?) I was
transferred to 'a supervisor'. Unfortunately when I asked him to give me
details of the accident they were ringing me about, he hung up on me.
john
The Watermill Theatre in Newbury are currently touring a clever and new
play about Burke and Hare. They have a brilliant joke about accidents that
are not yeour fault, which can be counted upon to raise laughter in the
house. Well it did every time I saw it. Catch it if you can.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Kate B
2018-05-17 10:39:29 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I've been getting many calls of the "We understand you've been in an
accident that wasn't your fault" type. Yesterday, by agreeing that I had
(well, how was I to know the cat would be right under my feet?) I was
transferred to 'a supervisor'. Unfortunately when I asked him to give me
details of the accident they were ringing me about, he hung up on me.
john
My husband once kept the supervisor gripped for about fifteen minutes
describing the dreadful nature of his accident and how someone should be
made to pay for his various injuries. You could practically hear the
supervisor salivate. However, the supervisor eventually clocked that he
was being sent up and terminated with rather extreme prejudice.
--
Kate B
London
Btms
2018-05-17 12:58:45 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I've been getting many calls of the "We understand you've been in an
accident that wasn't your fault" type. Yesterday, by agreeing that I had
(well, how was I to know the cat would be right under my feet?) I was
transferred to 'a supervisor'. Unfortunately when I asked him to give me
details of the accident they were ringing me about, he hung up on me.
john
My husband once kept the supervisor gripped for about fifteen minutes
describing the dreadful nature of his accident and how someone should be
made to pay for his various injuries. You could practically hear the
supervisor salivate. However, the supervisor eventually clocked that he
was being sent up and terminated with rather extreme prejudice.
Can we nominate for a BAFTA?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Fenny
2018-05-17 17:28:59 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
I've been getting many calls of the "We understand you've been in an
accident that wasn't your fault" type. Yesterday, by agreeing that I had
(well, how was I to know the cat would be right under my feet?) I was
transferred to 'a supervisor'. Unfortunately when I asked him to give me
details of the accident they were ringing me about, he hung up on me.
I used to get a lot of SMS messages along the lines of "You are owed
£lots for your PPI claim". Sometimes I would reply and say "Thank
goodness you've finally got my information and sorted this. Just make
the payment into my bank account. You must already have the details
along with all my other info." Sadly, none of them ever coughed up.
--
Fenny
the Omrud
2018-05-17 08:05:06 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this before.  I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I decided years ago not to answer. Does wonders for the blood pressure.
These days, I've got phones which don't ring for most scam calls, and
if they do then I add the number to the don't-ring list.
--
David
Nick Odell
2018-05-17 09:21:32 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I decided years ago not to answer.  Does wonders for the blood pressure.
Likewise.

I have CLI and Voicemail.

If I recognise the number as friendly, I pick up. Otherwise I ignore it.
A genuine caller will leave a message and I can call them back.
 These days, I've got phones which don't ring for most scam calls, and
if they do then I add the number to the don't-ring list.
Do your scamfinder phones send the rogue caller into a sort-of POTS
dev-null? I find that consistently ignoring the unwanted ones leads to a
reduced number of calls as their systems learn its a waste of time.
Accidentally picking up an unwanted call usually leads to a flurry of
activity from that - and other - numbers.

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-17 09:40:37 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
Interesting speculation.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24
hours all on different numbers, so they may be doing that. 
Normally, I pick up and tell them I know it's a scam because that
usually stops them ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently,
who claim to be from the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat,
I had a "TPS" one the other day. Indian-sounding.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
they eventually ask for your credit card details to "check your
identity."  Does anyone really fall for that?
Presumably enough for it to be worth while.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I decided years ago not to answer.  Does wonders for the blood pressure.
Likewise.
I have CLI and Voicemail.
If I recognise the number as friendly, I pick up. Otherwise I ignore
it. A genuine caller will leave a message and I can call them back.
Unfortunately, unless you check the voicemail immediately. that is
problematical in the case of genuine emergency - "your mother's house is
on fire", "there's water coming through from your mother's flat". (Plus,
under those circumstances, the caller may not leave a message if they
think you're out anyway.)
Post by Nick Odell
 These days, I've got phones which don't ring for most scam calls,
and if they do then I add the number to the don't-ring list.
Perhaps these should be provided by the NHS, in the interests of
reducing national stress levels? No, I'm not seriously suggesting that;
however, were such a suggestion to start to get any traction, then the
cost - on the already overstretched NHS - _might_ make
legislators/regulators finally do something. I hesitate to even suggest
it, though, because with the perversity of how things happen, it might
actually happen. Resulting in a whole new layer of (made in China, of
course) new wasted technology being in place, once the scammers work out
a way round them. (I can't think how, but I'm sure they're working on it
- and would, faster, if they became common.)
Post by Nick Odell
Do your scamfinder phones send the rogue caller into a sort-of POTS
dev-null? I find that consistently ignoring the unwanted ones leads to
a reduced number of calls as their systems learn its a waste of time.
How do you identify them as unwanted though - or do you just do that
with _any_ you don't recognise?
Post by Nick Odell
Accidentally picking up an unwanted call usually leads to a flurry of
activity from that - and other - numbers.
Interesting. If they're storing - and sharing - data on who picks up,
that's probably illegal abuse of such data. Though if they're abroad
that doesn't help.
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of
them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for
science intact. - Carl Sagan (interview w. Psychology Today published '96-1-1)
Nick Odell
2018-05-17 12:55:31 UTC
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<snip>
Post by Nick Odell
I have CLI and Voicemail.
If I recognise the number as friendly, I pick up. Otherwise I ignore
it. A genuine caller will leave a message and I can call them back.
Unfortunately, unless you check the voicemail immediately. that is
problematical in the case of genuine emergency - "your mother's house is
on fire", "there's water coming through from your mother's flat". (Plus,
under those circumstances, the caller may not leave a message if they
think you're out anyway.)
(In which case it wasn't that important after all.)
Let's tactfully skirt by the probability that I'm rapidly approaching
the age where I'm likely to be the emergency. A real emergency needs to
be dealt with by professionals: if it doesn't need professionals it's
not a real emergency. Interested parties should be informed as soon as
is reasonably practicable.

One hundred years ago it might have taken three or four weeks or more
for someone to let a family know that their son was blown up by a shell
on No Man's Land: now, if you haven't been told that somebody
three-hundred-and forty places down your list of Facebook friends got a
paper cut on their finger within three-and-a-half seconds of the event
taking place then there's been a catastrophic breakdown in communications.

There's got to be a middle way
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
Do your scamfinder phones send the rogue caller into a sort-of POTS
dev-null? I find that consistently ignoring the unwanted ones leads to
a reduced number of calls as their systems learn its a waste of time.
How do you identify them as unwanted though - or do you just do that
with _any_ you don't recognise?
People I want to hear from will normally email or Skype. Anybody else
will need to prove that I want to hear from them by leaving a voicemail
- if I don't already recognise their number.
Post by Nick Odell
Accidentally picking up an unwanted call usually leads to a flurry of
activity from that - and other - numbers.
Interesting. If they're storing - and sharing - data on who picks up,
that's probably illegal abuse of such data. Though if they're abroad
that doesn't help.
I imagine boiler houses full of call centre workers all using different
company fronts and fake phone numbers and all working from a huge
central database. But I'm probably wrong about that. You are probably
not wrong about it all being illegal anyway.

Nick
Sally Thompson
2018-05-17 21:05:08 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
Interesting speculation.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24
hours all on different numbers, so they may be doing that. 
Normally, I pick up and tell them I know it's a scam because that
usually stops them ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently,
who claim to be from the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat,
I had a "TPS" one the other day. Indian-sounding.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
they eventually ask for your credit card details to "check your
identity."  Does anyone really fall for that?
Presumably enough for it to be worth while.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I decided years ago not to answer.  Does wonders for the blood pressure.
Likewise.
I have CLI and Voicemail.
If I recognise the number as friendly, I pick up. Otherwise I ignore
it. A genuine caller will leave a message and I can call them back.
Unfortunately, unless you check the voicemail immediately. that is
problematical in the case of genuine emergency - "your mother's house is
on fire", "there's water coming through from your mother's flat". (Plus,
under those circumstances, the caller may not leave a message if they
think you're out anyway.)
We get round that one by an answerphone message which says “we don’t answer
calls from numbers we don’t recognise, so leave your number and we’ll call
you back”. Then callers don’t necessarily think we’re out.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
the Omrud
2018-05-17 16:08:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24
hours all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally,
I pick up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops
them ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to
be from the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually
ask for your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does
anyone really fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and
loudly invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this
before.  I must be getting even older and grumpier.)
I decided years ago not to answer.  Does wonders for the blood pressure.
Likewise.
I have CLI and Voicemail.
If I recognise the number as friendly, I pick up. Otherwise I ignore it.
A genuine caller will leave a message and I can call them back.
  These days, I've got phones which don't ring for most scam calls,
and if they do then I add the number to the don't-ring list.
Do your scamfinder phones send the rogue caller into a sort-of POTS
dev-null? I find that consistently ignoring the unwanted ones leads to a
reduced number of calls as their systems learn its a waste of time.
Accidentally picking up an unwanted call usually leads to a flurry of
activity from that - and other - numbers.
Don't know, sorry. I only clock them when they're new and I have to add
them to the list.
--
David
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-18 13:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I decided years ago not to answer.  Does wonders for the blood pressure.
 These days, I've got phones which don't ring for most scam calls, and
if they do then I add the number to the don't-ring list.
My sister gets loads of nuisance calls and was complaining recently that
she has used up all the "slots" on her 'phone for blocked numbers and
didn't see why she should have to pay again for a more expensive 'phone
with more "slots." I hardly ever get nuisance calls. Then I found out
to-day that I have something called Call Protect from BT and they have a
list of known nuisance numbers which they block automatically, but I
could add numbers to this list if I wanted to. Apparently they have
blocked 6 calls to my number in the last ?week!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-05-17 08:45:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 17 May 2018 06:35:23 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere. I have never done this before. I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
The last time I did that (a call from 'The Electricity Board' who could not
give me a UK address that made any sense - necessary for reports to TPS)
the female caller called me back and swore at me in a similar fashion.

I've asked 'Windows' scammers if their mother knows they steal from people
for a living and suggested she would be ashamed of them. One chap got quite
upset by the suggestion but continued to insist his call was genuine to the
point I decided he really thought it was.

All in all I'd rather not engage and am pleased with Call Protect.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-05-17 17:49:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
I've asked 'Windows' scammers if their mother knows they steal from people
for a living and suggested she would be ashamed of them. One chap got quite
upset by the suggestion but continued to insist his call was genuine to the
point I decided he really thought it was.
I really upset one of those by pointing out how many laws he would have
been breaking, if he really knew what was going on with my computer and
asked him whether he was a hacker or a liar, as there wasn't any other
option. In a very hurt voice, he denied the possibility of being a
hacker - the implication that he was a liar didn't seem to bother him in
the least!

With people concerned that I may have been injured in an accident, I
tend to ask, in outraged tones, how they have obtained my personal
information. They invariably hang up immediately.
--
Best wishes, Serena
When you get a bladder infection, urine trouble.
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-17 19:58:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
On the other hand, scammers are interested in people who wouldn't
suspect a scam & hence bother to check.
I've had three calls from the same bunch of pests in the last 24 hours
all on different numbers, so they may be doing that.  Normally, I pick
up and tell them I know it's a scam because that usually stops them
ringing again, but not with this lot, apparently, who claim to be from
the TPS. According to the Who-Calls-Me chat, they eventually ask for
your credit card details to "check your identity."  Does anyone really
fall for that?
(I'm afraid I involuntarily lost my temper with the third one and loudly
invited him to copulate elsewhere.  I have never done this before.  I
must be getting even older and grumpier.)
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".

No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-17 20:10:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <***@brightview.co.uk>, Sam
Plusnet <***@home.com> writes:
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Can a blue man sing the whites?
Chris J Dixon
2018-05-18 07:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
I've had ones claiming to be from BT, to discuss my Internet. As
I'm on Virgin they don't get very far.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2018-05-18 11:26:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 18 May 2018 08:42:12 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
I've had ones claiming to be from BT, to discuss my Internet. As
I'm on Virgin they don't get very far.
Last time I got one of those I asked why and they hung up.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-18 12:22:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
I've had ones claiming to be from BT, to discuss my Internet. As
I'm on Virgin they don't get very far.
Last time I got one of those I asked why and they hung up.
I just got one about an accident in January. So proud! This is the
first time I managed to asnwer the phone! We had such a nice chat :)
Btms
2018-05-18 14:01:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
I've had ones claiming to be from BT, to discuss my Internet. As
I'm on Virgin they don't get very far.
Irta......Im a virgin.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
DavidK
2018-05-18 09:09:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards but
they seem to be only available in the far-east market. I did find a
little fiddly gadget that fits inside the phone that does the trick but
I don't find the need now, perhaps more suitable contracts are available
now.

PS. Even Freddy doesn't seem to know how to block numbers that he
doesn't want to receive calls from.
BrritSki
2018-05-18 10:13:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards but
they seem to be only available in the far-east market....
We've been using them for a long time, so see below if you're still
interested. Some of them have a second slot (F'r'Us have not gone out of
business) that is used either for an SD card OR a 2nd SIM, so if you
need lots of memory they need to be avoided.

<https://www.godualsim.co.uk/>

Tell them I sent you to prove that I don't hold any grudges over the
last purchase which was a bit of a cock-up that eventually was resolved
satisfactorily :)
Nick Odell
2018-05-18 19:53:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards but
they seem to be only available in the far-east market....
We've been using them for a long time, so see below if you're still
interested. Some of them have a second slot (F'r'Us have not gone out of
business) that is used either for an SD card OR a 2nd SIM, so if you
need lots of memory they need to be avoided.
<https://www.godualsim.co.uk/>
Tell them I sent you to prove that I don't hold any grudges over the
last purchase which was a bit of a cock-up that eventually was resolved
satisfactorily  :)
I have a quad-band, dual-sim featurephone whose main feature is that has
no features save its dual-sim-quadbandiness. Handy for using in fornpars
though I believe smartphones these days are quad band by default.

Nick
DavidK
2018-05-18 20:12:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more than
one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards
but they seem to be only available in the far-east market....
We've been using them for a long time, so see below if you're still
interested. Some of them have a second slot (F'r'Us have not gone out
of business) that is used either for an SD card OR a 2nd SIM, so if
you need lots of memory they need to be avoided.
<https://www.godualsim.co.uk/>
Tell them I sent you to prove that I don't hold any grudges over the
last purchase which was a bit of a cock-up that eventually was
resolved satisfactorily  :)
I have a quad-band, dual-sim featurephone whose main feature is that has
no features save its dual-sim-quadbandiness. Handy for using in fornpars
though I believe smartphones these days are quad band by default.
Nick
That was interesting browsing; I hadn't realised there were so many now.
The Wikipedia article says it is a new phenomenon and used to be
resisted by phone ISPs. I've recently upgraded from a Galaxy Note 1 to a
Note 2; I hadn't realised that a Note 4 would have given me dual sim
capability. To be honest, I have less need now; it used to be that I
would have liked umpteen MB of data but want to pay for each text
individually.
the Omrud
2018-05-19 07:45:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more
than one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards
but they seem to be only available in the far-east market....
We've been using them for a long time, so see below if you're still
interested. Some of them have a second slot (F'r'Us have not gone out
of business) that is used either for an SD card OR a 2nd SIM, so if
you need lots of memory they need to be avoided.
<https://www.godualsim.co.uk/>
Tell them I sent you to prove that I don't hold any grudges over the
last purchase which was a bit of a cock-up that eventually was
resolved satisfactorily  :)
I have a quad-band, dual-sim featurephone whose main feature is that
has no features save its dual-sim-quadbandiness. Handy for using in
fornpars though I believe smartphones these days are quad band by
default.
That was interesting browsing; I hadn't realised there were so many now.
The Wikipedia article says it is a new phenomenon and used to be
resisted by phone ISPs. I've recently upgraded from a Galaxy Note 1 to a
Note 2; I hadn't realised that a Note 4 would have given me dual sim
capability. To be honest, I have less need now; it used to be that I
would have liked umpteen MB of data but want to pay for each text
individually.
Moto G4 Plus here, partly for the dual-SIMness for use in Abroad, and
partly for the massive memory which means I can add as many apps as I
want without it even noticing.
--
David
DavidK
2018-05-19 08:52:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by DavidK
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
My most recent call (earlier today) "I am calling from your ISP".
No mention of the name of that ISP, of course.
So did you say "which one?" [I think it's possible to have more
than one; even if it isn't, I'd expect them not to know that.]
Some time ago I looked for a phone that would accept two sim-cards
but they seem to be only available in the far-east market....
We've been using them for a long time, so see below if you're still
interested. Some of them have a second slot (F'r'Us have not gone
out of business) that is used either for an SD card OR a 2nd SIM, so
if you need lots of memory they need to be avoided.
<https://www.godualsim.co.uk/>
Tell them I sent you to prove that I don't hold any grudges over the
last purchase which was a bit of a cock-up that eventually was
resolved satisfactorily  :)
I have a quad-band, dual-sim featurephone whose main feature is that
has no features save its dual-sim-quadbandiness. Handy for using in
fornpars though I believe smartphones these days are quad band by
default.
That was interesting browsing; I hadn't realised there were so many
now. The Wikipedia article says it is a new phenomenon and used to be
resisted by phone ISPs. I've recently upgraded from a Galaxy Note 1 to
a Note 2; I hadn't realised that a Note 4 would have given me dual sim
capability. To be honest, I have less need now; it used to be that I
would have liked umpteen MB of data but want to pay for each text
individually.
Moto G4 Plus here, partly for the dual-SIMness for use in Abroad, and
partly for the massive memory which means I can add as many apps as I
want without it even noticing.
It might be too late now, but the best use of dual sims I can think of
now is to maintain one sim for friends and family and one for the
commercial companies that have reasonable need for a phone contact
(deliveries, hotel bookings, etc).
BrritSki
2018-05-19 09:33:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by the Omrud
Moto G4 Plus here, partly for the dual-SIMness for use in Abroad, and
partly for the massive memory which means I can add as many apps as I
want without it even noticing.
It might be too late now, but the best use of dual sims I can think of
now is to maintain one sim for friends and family and one for the
commercial companies...
We each have phone with a UK SIM and an Italian SIM permanently on. We
both pay €10/month to Vodafone Italia for more than enough minutes and
data (but strangely only 1 SMS) and we can also use those minutes to
call the UK.

Now that roaming is free we hardly ever need to top up the UK PAYG SIM,
but it's there for incoming calls, and when we go back we'll probably
stop paying the Italian SIM and top up the UK one instead.

Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
Chris J Dixon
2018-05-20 08:11:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.

I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Sally Thompson
2018-05-20 08:53:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.
I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Btms
2018-05-20 09:45:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.
I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
Same here. Only two folk use it to speak with us now. The rest are
nuisances despite TPS, before anyone suggests this.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
DavidK
2018-05-20 10:14:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you pay now, how much data do you use/need, and what do you call
high cost?

Three/3 don't have any good offers at the moment
<http://store.three.co.uk/view/searchTariff?priceplan=&deviceType=SIM_ONLY_MBB&greatForServices=&availableContractLength=1>,
they want £30 per month for 40GB; I'm only paying £17 for the same from
them.

EE don't either and there are better offers on eBay. For example, you
can pay ~£60 one-off for 24GB that lasts for 12 months
<https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EE-24GB-SIM-4G-Mobile-Broadband-Prepaid-Data-SIM-Card-Nano-Micro-Standard/221818042049?epid=1054458691&hash=item33a562b6c1:g:XCUAAOxyYSJSATRc>
or £17 for half a GB per month for 12 months
<https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EE-24GB-SIM-4G-Mobile-Broadband-Prepaid-Data-SIM-Card-Nano-Micro-Standard/221818042049?epid=1054458691&hash=item33a562b6c1:g:XCUAAOxyYSJSATRc>
Fenny
2018-05-20 12:31:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DavidK
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you pay now, how much data do you use/need, and what do you call
high cost?
Three/3 don't have any good offers at the moment
<http://store.three.co.uk/view/searchTariff?priceplan=&deviceType=SIM_ONLY_MBB&greatForServices=&availableContractLength=1>,
they want £30 per month for 40GB; I'm only paying £17 for the same from
them.
EE don't either and there are better offers on eBay. For example, you
can pay ~£60 one-off for 24GB that lasts for 12 months
<https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EE-24GB-SIM-4G-Mobile-Broadband-Prepaid-Data-SIM-Card-Nano-Micro-Standard/221818042049?epid=1054458691&hash=item33a562b6c1:g:XCUAAOxyYSJSATRc>
or £17 for half a GB per month for 12 months
<https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EE-24GB-SIM-4G-Mobile-Broadband-Prepaid-Data-SIM-Card-Nano-Micro-Standard/221818042049?epid=1054458691&hash=item33a562b6c1:g:XCUAAOxyYSJSATRc>
Not very easy to hook the household network up to.

I recently switched ISP and got a new router with only 2 LAN sockets,
rather than the previous 4 [1]. This meant I was short of sockets and
had to buy a new 8 port switch.

I really need to rearrange my cabling and split things between the
10/100 switch and the gigabit switch. Last night I made a list of all
the devices that are currently attached to my wired network and came
up with more than a dozen. I want to wire in 2 or 3 more and still
have room for the new computer.

I could run a lot of them wirelessly, but I'd prefer the reassurance
of a wired connection, especially the back up storage units.


[1] I seem to understand that Sky and Now TV's new gigabit routers
have only 2 LAN sockets. I'm not sure if other providers are going
down the same route.
--
Fenny
Fenny
2018-05-20 13:12:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 20 May 2018 08:53:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you call enormous cost? Unlimited fibre broadband for under
£30 is pretty reasonable. You don't actually have to use the phone
and these days, most broadband is priced as including line rental but
not calls.

I pay anything up to £32/month for broadband and unlimited anytime
calls. The calls element is about £8.

So for under £25, you can get as much internet as you want. You can
leave a phone plugged in for people to call you and for emergency use,
or you can just leave the phone unplugged and not bother with it at
all.
--
Fenny
Sally Thompson
2018-05-20 17:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On 20 May 2018 08:53:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you call enormous cost? Unlimited fibre broadband for under
£30 is pretty reasonable. You don't actually have to use the phone
and these days, most broadband is priced as including line rental but
not calls.
I pay anything up to £32/month for broadband and unlimited anytime
calls. The calls element is about £8.
So for under £25, you can get as much internet as you want. You can
leave a phone plugged in for people to call you and for emergency use,
or you can just leave the phone unplugged and not bother with it at
all.
I wasn’t clear enough that I would prefer not to have a landline at all,
which I think means using some mobile phone dongle which i believe is
dearer than having a landline.

However I’m paying more than you are. I’m with Plusnet and pay £22.49 for
unlimited fibre and £18.99 for line rental, so £41.48 total. I really must
look into cheaper options when I get time.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Fenny
2018-05-20 17:27:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 20 May 2018 17:00:44 GMT, Sally Thompson
However I’m paying more than you are. I’m with Plusnet and pay £22.49 for
unlimited fibre and £18.99 for line rental, so £41.48 total. I really must
look into cheaper options when I get time.
You can get unlimited fibre plus unlimited anytime calls with Plusnet
for £32. But have a look at the MSE broadband finder thingy and it
will tell you what the latest decent deals are in your area.
--
Fenny
krw
2018-05-20 21:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
You can get unlimited fibre plus unlimited anytime calls with Plusnet
for £32.
Only for new customers. They will not offer that to existing customers.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jane Vernon
2018-05-22 09:38:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On 20 May 2018 08:53:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you call enormous cost? Unlimited fibre broadband for under
£30 is pretty reasonable. You don't actually have to use the phone
and these days, most broadband is priced as including line rental but
not calls.
I pay anything up to £32/month for broadband and unlimited anytime
calls. The calls element is about £8.
So for under £25, you can get as much internet as you want. You can
leave a phone plugged in for people to call you and for emergency use,
or you can just leave the phone unplugged and not bother with it at
all.
I would recommend that whatever you do, you create an answerphone or
call minder message which states "This line is no longer in use."

I had no idea a friend didn't have a phone plugged into his landline and
left a message when Mike died. I heard nothing, which wasn't totally
surprising. Then the following year I tried getting in touch again and
left a message on the mobile number. I received an almost immediate
reply with the question, "And how's Mike?"
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Sally Thompson
2018-05-22 13:17:54 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Fenny
On 20 May 2018 08:53:06 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
What do you call enormous cost? Unlimited fibre broadband for under
£30 is pretty reasonable. You don't actually have to use the phone
and these days, most broadband is priced as including line rental but
not calls.
I pay anything up to £32/month for broadband and unlimited anytime
calls. The calls element is about £8.
So for under £25, you can get as much internet as you want. You can
leave a phone plugged in for people to call you and for emergency use,
or you can just leave the phone unplugged and not bother with it at
all.
I would recommend that whatever you do, you create an answerphone or
call minder message which states "This line is no longer in use."
Good idea. I’ll remember that.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
the Omrud
2018-05-20 18:54:09 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.
I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
Not in the UK, but it's not a technical restriction: French broadband
comes across the phone wires with no requirement to have a POTS phone.
All French broadband boxes come with VoIP phones anyway, mostly bundled
with more free calls than you can use.
--
David
Btms
2018-05-20 19:17:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.
I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
Not in the UK, but it's not a technical restriction: French broadband
comes across the phone wires with no requirement to have a POTS phone.
All French broadband boxes come with VoIP phones anyway, mostly bundled
with more free calls than you can use.
Praps after we Brexit we will adopt this system.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
John Ashby
2018-05-21 07:04:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by the Omrud
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
Very reasonable imo, and we don't have a land line now at all.
I have to say that I am wondering about ditching the land line. I
make very few calls, and apart from BOFE, 95% of incoming calls
are scammers.
I suppose emergency calls with no power in the whole area could
be a problem, but what are the odds?
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
Not in the UK, but it's not a technical restriction: French broadband
comes across the phone wires with no requirement to have a POTS phone.
All French broadband boxes come with VoIP phones anyway, mostly bundled
with more free calls than you can use.
Praps after we Brexit we will adopt this system.
It is already on its way, with some god-awful acronym like SGOAS. The
downside is that line rental will switch to the Broadband service, so
the financial saving will be minimal.

john
Chris J Dixon
2018-05-20 19:25:15 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
I would gladly ditch our landline which is only used for incoming calls,
but we can’t have that there internet without it except at enormous cost -
or do you know a way?
From BT I just have a phone line. Virgin provide my broadband.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Chris McMillan
2018-05-17 15:09:00 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
https://who-called.co.uk/Number/01208418741
If get something like that, I google the number and usually a page like
this comes up, which I find comforting.
Persoanlly, I just ignore them. I don't know whether there's anyone to
whom you can report it.
Oh thanks, Sid! Mum was in bed when her phone rang but she has a 1571
facility unfortunately and because she would react to all calls, I rushed
to answer it. It was a heavy breathing call (never had one of those before
on her landline which had a synthetic sign off voice - creepy). I wrote
down its number, despite it looking like a U.K. code which I checked, it
didn’t come up as one. I shall bookmark the link. Ta muchly!

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 11:44:23 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
Mike Ruddock
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do about
unwanted calls, fake calls, and other such. And it's infuriating.

If not already, sign up with the telephone preference "service"; in
theory, this should block marketing calls. But to get round this,
companies just have to either use an overseas call centre, or pretend
they're not calling to sell, just to do a survey or "inform" you about
something; they usually do both. Once registered, you can report calls
to the TPS, but so far I've not yet had them acknowledge any report as
anything they can do anything about: either it falls at the first hurdle
(not a direct marketing call), or they're unable to identify the
company.

Often - almost certainly in the case of fake calls like yours - the CLI
is spoofed. Try googling the number - you'll probably find you are not
alone. It is my contention that the telecomm.s companies are
participating in the fraud by passing on such fake CLIs, but I've not
got anyone to consider this: obviously the telecomm.s companies aren't
going to unless forced.

OfCom are impossible to communicate with as a mere mortal; their website
forces you down lines that aren't appropriate for almost anything _I_ at
least want to talk to them about.

Sorry to be so negative; if you do find any avenue that has results or
even looks as if it might have, do share!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A. Top-posters.
Q. What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?
LFS
2018-05-16 11:50:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
Mike Ruddock
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do about
unwanted calls, fake calls, and other such. And it's infuriating.
If not already, sign up with the telephone preference "service"; in
theory, this should block marketing calls. But to get round this,
companies just have to either use an overseas call centre, or pretend
they're not calling to sell, just to do a survey or "inform" you about
something; they usually do both. Once registered, you can report calls
to the TPS, but so far I've not yet had them acknowledge any report as
anything they can do anything about: either it falls at the first hurdle
(not a direct marketing call), or they're unable to identify the company.
Often - almost certainly in the case of fake calls like yours - the CLI
is spoofed. Try googling the number - you'll probably find you are not
alone. It is my contention that the telecomm.s companies are
participating in the fraud by passing on such fake CLIs, but I've not
got anyone to consider this: obviously the telecomm.s companies aren't
going to unless forced.
OfCom are impossible to communicate with as a mere mortal; their website
forces you down lines that aren't appropriate for almost anything _I_ at
least want to talk to them about.
Sorry to be so negative; if you do find any avenue that has results or
even looks as if it might have, do share!
See my reply to Mike re BT Call Blocker.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 12:07:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
anywhere I can report this call?
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do
[]
Post by LFS
See my reply to Mike re BT Call Blocker.
That I find especially infuriating (I'm not cross with _you_, Laura!):
the cynicism of BT (and the other such companies), AND the regulators,
which instead of actually doing something about this problem - and yes,
something _could_ be done - actually devise a way of making more money
out of us, the victims: either an extra service we have to pay for, or a
special telephone we have to buy. (And - though I don't know, since I
refuse to pay for either - I don't see how either the service or 'phone
could stop a call such as Mike's getting through anyway. Yes, I think
_after_ you've received such a call, with those 'phones, you can block
that one number - but [a] it's probably spoofed anyway [b] they'll just
use another one.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is.
Penny
2018-05-16 12:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 16 May 2018 13:07:56 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
anywhere I can report this call?
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do
[]
Post by LFS
See my reply to Mike re BT Call Blocker.
the cynicism of BT (and the other such companies), AND the regulators,
which instead of actually doing something about this problem - and yes,
something _could_ be done - actually devise a way of making more money
out of us, the victims: either an extra service we have to pay for, or a
special telephone we have to buy. (And - though I don't know, since I
refuse to pay for either
Call Protect is free from both BT and Plusnet
https://www.plus.net/help/phone/stop-nuisance-calls/
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
- I don't see how either the service or 'phone
could stop a call such as Mike's getting through anyway. Yes, I think
_after_ you've received such a call, with those 'phones, you can block
that one number - but [a] it's probably spoofed anyway [b] they'll just
use another one.)
I've only had to add about 3 in the last 6 months (and it's quick and easy
if you actually answered the call). I've found it really useful - no more
annoying interruptions from people who make me really cross (which can't be
good for me).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-05-16 12:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
the cynicism of BT (and the other such companies), AND the regulators,
which instead of actually doing something about this problem - and yes,
something _could_ be done - actually devise a way of making more money
out of us, the victims: either an extra service we have to pay for, or a
special telephone we have to buy. (And - though I don't know, since I
refuse to pay for either - I don't see how either the service or 'phone
could stop a call such as Mike's getting through anyway. Yes, I think
_after_ you've received such a call, with those 'phones, you can block
that one number - but [a] it's probably spoofed anyway [b] they'll just
use another one.)
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.

I know my brother and sil got one of these for sil's mother, who was
liable to chat happily to scammers and agree that nice new double
glazing (or whatever was on offer) was just what she needed. This phone
seems to have solved that problem for them.
--
Best wishes, Serena
As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what
they do. (Andrew Carnegie)
Penny
2018-05-16 18:04:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 16 May 2018 13:53:15 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
A friend of mine got one but never did add my number to the 'accepted' list
(well, I had moved away). D#1 did the ringing round for me after Ray died
and would not leave an answer-phone message with the news. Consequently,
thinking that's what she'd got through to, she never did contact that
friend. Some time later when I did phone her she complained to me that
she'd found out 'through the grape vine' and wanted to know why I hadn't
told her :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-05-17 15:09:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
the cynicism of BT (and the other such companies), AND the regulators,
which instead of actually doing something about this problem - and yes,
something _could_ be done - actually devise a way of making more money
out of us, the victims: either an extra service we have to pay for, or a
special telephone we have to buy. (And - though I don't know, since I
refuse to pay for either - I don't see how either the service or 'phone
could stop a call such as Mike's getting through anyway. Yes, I think
_after_ you've received such a call, with those 'phones, you can block
that one number - but [a] it's probably spoofed anyway [b] they'll just
use another one.)
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
I know my brother and sil got one of these for sil's mother, who was
liable to chat happily to scammers and agree that nice new double
glazing (or whatever was on offer) was just what she needed. This phone
seems to have solved that problem for them.
Sounds ideal, but mum wouldn’t be able to understand why her phone has been
changed when it works. Unfortunately she doesn’t understand that her phone
is outdated (no loud speaker). If it didn’t have the # key I could do it
as it would be truly unusable by anyone!

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-17 18:37:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
I know my brother and sil got one of these for sil's mother, who was
liable to chat happily to scammers and agree that nice new double
glazing (or whatever was on offer) was just what she needed. This phone
seems to have solved that problem for them.
Sounds ideal, but mum wouldn’t be able to understand why her phone has been
changed when it works. Unfortunately she doesn’t understand that her phone
is outdated (no loud speaker). If it didn’t have the # key I could do it
as it would be truly unusable by anyone!
Sincerely Chris
Perhaps it (the existing, working 'phone) could be encouraged to develop
a fault ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You can be tough without being rude - Nick Clegg, 2014 July
Chris McMillan
2018-05-19 14:10:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
I know my brother and sil got one of these for sil's mother, who was
liable to chat happily to scammers and agree that nice new double
glazing (or whatever was on offer) was just what she needed. This phone
seems to have solved that problem for them.
Sounds ideal, but mum wouldn’t be able to understand why her phone has been
changed when it works. Unfortunately she doesn’t understand that her phone
is outdated (no loud speaker). If it didn’t have the # key I could do it
as it would be truly unusable by anyone!
Sincerely Chris
Perhaps it (the existing, working 'phone) could be encouraged to develop
a fault ...
Except she lives alone and only the carers touch it to log in and out apart
from her.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-19 23:02:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Sounds ideal, but mum wouldn’t be able to understand why her phone has been
changed when it works. Unfortunately she doesn’t understand that her phone
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Perhaps it (the existing, working 'phone) could be encouraged to develop
a fault ...
Except she lives alone and only the carers touch it to log in and out apart
from her.
[]
Ah. Perhaps a certain sound engineer could, er, engineer things so that
it _sounded_ like it had a fault.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Our enemies are inventive and resourceful. And so are we. They never stop
thinking of ways to harm out country and our people. And neither do we. -
George
W Bush, quoted by Rory Bremner in Radio Times, 10-16 January 2009
Mike
2018-05-20 08:47:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
With some of the specialist phones, if they get a call from a number
they don't recognise as friendly, they will invite the caller to
announce themselves. Only then will the phone ring and, having heard
who is calling, the recipient has the choice of accepting or rejecting
the call. Scammers never accept the invitation to announce themselves.
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Sounds ideal, but mum wouldn’t be able to understand why her phone has been
changed when it works. Unfortunately she doesn’t understand that her phone
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Perhaps it (the existing, working 'phone) could be encouraged to develop
a fault ...
Except she lives alone and only the carers touch it to log in and out apart
from her.
[]
Ah. Perhaps a certain sound engineer could, er, engineer things so that
it _sounded_ like it had a fault.
Naughty naughty Jpeg - but I like you, after all she is losing her Emery.
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2018-05-20 12:13:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Naughty naughty Jpeg - but I like you, after all she is losing her Emery.
Can she paper over it ?
Mike
2018-05-20 15:15:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Naughty naughty Jpeg - but I like you, after all she is losing her Emery.
Can she paper over it ?
No need to be so abrasive....
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-20 16:23:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Naughty naughty Jpeg - but I like you, after all she is losing her Emery.
Took a few seconds for the penny to drop. Then LOL.
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Can she paper over it ?
No need to be so abrasive....
VG
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The death of democracy is not likely to be an assassination from ambush.
It will be a slow extinction from apathy, indifference, and undernourishment.
-Robert Maynard Hutchins, educator (1899-1977)
Penny
2018-05-16 12:24:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 16 May 2018 12:50:17 +0100, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
See my reply to Mike re BT Call Blocker.
That hasn't arrived here but I was checking to see if anyone else had
suggested this.

BT have a free call-blocking service - you can use their list of known
problem numbers and also add your own. You can also divert 'withheld'
numbers but calls from the Dr's still get through. Plusnet have been
offering the same free service for about a year (though I didn't discover
this until about 6 months ago). It works well - diverting the call before
it rings. The caller can leave a message - retrievable by dialling 1571 or
1572 - but you get no notification of its existence so need to check once a
week in case you missed a genuine call.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-16 12:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
See my reply to Mike re BT Call Blocker.
That hasn't arrived here but I was checking to see if anyone else had
suggested this.
BT have a free call-blocking service - you can use their list of known
(Thanks to Penny for telling me it's free from PlusNet too. Going to
look at that in a moment!)
Post by Penny
problem numbers and also add your own. You can also divert 'withheld'
numbers but calls from the Dr's still get through.
I wonder how that works? The only way I can think of would be some way
for the Dr. to be able to register _their_ number in some way, which I
presume would be open to abuse.
Post by Penny
Plusnet have been
offering the same free service for about a year (though I didn't discover
this until about 6 months ago). It works well - diverting the call before
Yes, they've certainly not advertised it, have they!
Post by Penny
it rings. The caller can leave a message - retrievable by dialling 1571 or
1572 - but you get no notification of its existence so need to check once a
week in case you missed a genuine call.
That's why it is still infuriating that the abuse continues. Such calls
should be stopped at source (or at least national boundary)!

(I wonder: will it be no change, better, or worse, after Brexit? Both
internationally-originated and UK-originated calls?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Grief generates a huge energy in you and it's better for everybody if you
harness it to do something. - Judi Dench, RT 2015/2/28-3/6
John Ashby
2018-05-16 14:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I wonder: will it be no change, better, or worse, after Brexit? Both
internationally-originated and UK-originated calls?)
That depends. If you voted Leave, then it will be a triumph as we will
be completely in charge of our own telecommunications; if you voted
Remain, then the lack of international cooperation means it will be many
times worse. If you didn't vote at all in the referendum, then you only
have yourself to blame.

HTH, HAND

john
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-17 00:33:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's why it is still infuriating that the abuse continues. Such calls
should be stopped at source (or at least national boundary)!
Telecoms companies make money from phone calls.

The Royal Mail makes money by delivering paper-based spam.

Neither one is likely to make serious measures to cut their revenues.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-17 00:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's why it is still infuriating that the abuse continues. Such
calls should be stopped at source (or at least national boundary)!
Telecoms companies make money from phone calls.
The Royal Mail makes money by delivering paper-based spam.
Neither one is likely to make serious measures to cut their revenues.
Indeed. That's why we need legislation, or at least an OfCom "Statutory
Instrument" which has the same force.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

That's how he [Dr. Who] seems to me. He's always been someone who gets the
/Guardian/. There are some parts of the universe where it's harder to get hold
of. - Peter Capaldi (current incumbent Doctor), RT 2016/11/26-12/2
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-17 20:05:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sam Plusnet
 That's why it is still infuriating that the abuse continues. Such
calls  should be stopped at source (or at least national boundary)!
Telecoms companies make money from phone calls.
The Royal Mail makes money by delivering paper-based spam.
Neither one is likely to make serious measures to cut their revenues.
Indeed. That's why we need legislation, or at least an OfCom "Statutory
Instrument" which has the same force.
Whereupon the telecoms companies would wield their lobbying influence to
ensure the legislation (or instrument) was 'properly' worded.
--
Sam Plusnet
the Omrud
2018-05-16 15:15:51 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do about
unwanted calls, fake calls, and other such. And it's infuriating.
If not already, sign up with the telephone preference "service"; in
theory, this should block marketing calls. But to get round this,
companies just have to either use an overseas call centre, or pretend
they're not calling to sell, just to do a survey or "inform" you about
something; they usually do both. Once registered, you can report calls
to the TPS, but so far I've not yet had them acknowledge any report as
anything they can do anything about: either it falls at the first hurdle
(not a direct marketing call), or they're unable to identify the company.
And of course any scammers calling you are by their nature criminals and
are not likely to take any notice of the TPS.
--
David

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Mike
2018-05-16 15:39:42 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
To a first approximation: No, there's nothing you can actually do about
unwanted calls, fake calls, and other such. And it's infuriating.
If not already, sign up with the telephone preference "service"; in
theory, this should block marketing calls. But to get round this,
companies just have to either use an overseas call centre, or pretend
they're not calling to sell, just to do a survey or "inform" you about
something; they usually do both. Once registered, you can report calls
to the TPS, but so far I've not yet had them acknowledge any report as
anything they can do anything about: either it falls at the first hurdle
(not a direct marketing call), or they're unable to identify the company.
And of course any scammers calling you are by their nature criminals and
are not likely to take any notice of the TPS.
Yes, that is our experience too.
--
Toodle Pip
the Omrud
2018-05-16 15:19:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
On a slight tangent, I have this app on my Android phone:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.mistergroup.muzutozvednout&hl=en_GB

It uses crowd-sourced reviews of phone numbers to decide whether to let
a number ring your phone or to dump it to voice mail. Works very well -
you are expected to contribute by posting details of dodgy calls you
have received.
--
David

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DavidK
2018-05-17 08:59:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
Mike Ruddock
Anyone with nothing better to do may find searching YouTube for "Hello
this is Lenny" amusing for a while.
Chris McMillan
2018-05-17 15:09:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Ruddock
I just received a telephone call from a zombie-like voice which said
something like " . . . we are going to disconnect your internet
connection. Press 1 to acknowledge."
I hadn't heard the first few words and asked for a repeat. No reply,
despite my asking several times for a repeat message.
Needless to say I didn't press 1, but rang off.
The call came from 01208418741. What do I do about this? Is there
anywhere I can report this call?
I don't know but if you want to block such calls from reaching you the
BT Call blocker service seems quite efficient. We've been using it for
about a year and the number of nuisance calls we receive has reduced
markedly.
http://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/phones-tablets/bt-call-protect-free-service-crackdown-nuisance-calls-11364136279348
Unfortunately one needs to be on hand to do this or I would.

Sincerely Chris
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