Discussion:
caroline harrington
Add Reply
Btms
2017-08-04 20:53:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event for
Caroline..


Caroline Harrington
Scriptwriter


My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a non-religious
event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.

He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is a
season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world, seemed to
me equally appropriate for Caroline.

My friend also recommended the Wendy Cope poem "My Funeral" (its warning
ignored by some of Peter’s friends who talked for so long that we were
indeed very late for the crematorium!)

"I hope I can trust you, friends, not to use our relationship
As an excuse for an unsolicited ego-trip..."

Time was the biggest challenge in writing this episode: how can you
encapsulate nearly forty years of life in twelve and a half minutes?

I wanted the inevitable sadness of the occasion to be leavened by lots of
happy memories, so I spent hours trawling through the archives, searching
out amusing incidents and anecdotes about Caroline.
Sally Thompson
2017-08-05 06:49:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event for
Caroline..
Caroline Harrington
Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a non-religious
event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is a
season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world, seemed to
me equally appropriate for Caroline.
My friend also recommended the Wendy Cope poem "My Funeral" (its warning
ignored by some of Peter’s friends who talked for so long that we were
indeed very late for the crematorium!)
"I hope I can trust you, friends, not to use our relationship
As an excuse for an unsolicited ego-trip..."
Time was the biggest challenge in writing this episode: how can you
encapsulate nearly forty years of life in twelve and a half minutes?
I wanted the inevitable sadness of the occasion to be leavened by lots of
happy memories, so I spent hours trawling through the archives, searching
out amusing incidents and anecdotes about Caroline.
That's such a lovely thing to read. Thanks for tracking it down and sharing
it.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-08-05 07:26:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event for
Caroline..
Caroline Harrington
Scriptwriter
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Btms
I wanted the inevitable sadness of the occasion to be leavened by lots of
happy memories, so I spent hours trawling through the archives, searching
out amusing incidents and anecdotes about Caroline.
That's such a lovely thing to read. Thanks for tracking it down and sharing
it.
Thanks from me too.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A good pun is its own reword.
Vicky
2017-08-05 08:29:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 5 Aug 2017 08:26:43 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event for
Caroline..
Caroline Harrington
Scriptwriter
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Btms
I wanted the inevitable sadness of the occasion to be leavened by lots of
happy memories, so I spent hours trawling through the archives, searching
out amusing incidents and anecdotes about Caroline.
That's such a lovely thing to read. Thanks for tracking it down and sharing
it.
Thanks from me too.
MTAAW.

I did think it beautifully written and liked reading how she did it.
--
Vicky
Serena Blanchflower
2017-08-05 14:49:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event for
Caroline..
Caroline Harrington
Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a non-religious
event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is a
season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world, seemed to
me equally appropriate for Caroline.
My friend also recommended the Wendy Cope poem "My Funeral" (its warning
ignored by some of Peter’s friends who talked for so long that we were
indeed very late for the crematorium!)
"I hope I can trust you, friends, not to use our relationship
As an excuse for an unsolicited ego-trip..."
Time was the biggest challenge in writing this episode: how can you
encapsulate nearly forty years of life in twelve and a half minutes?
I wanted the inevitable sadness of the occasion to be leavened by lots of
happy memories, so I spent hours trawling through the archives, searching
out amusing incidents and anecdotes about Caroline.
That's such a lovely thing to read. Thanks for tracking it down and sharing
it.
<languid wave>
--
Best wishes, Serena
I hope to God the doctor finds something wrong with me because I'd hate
to feel like this if I was well! (Anon)
Peter Percival
2017-08-05 09:37:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Btms
2017-08-05 09:54:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Hmmm..... I think your certainty is challengeable; but you know what......
can't be ar***. 😊. You suffer with the reductionist attitudes of many in
this world when it comes to their beliefs.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Steve Hague
2017-08-07 09:31:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
Peter Percival
2017-08-07 14:25:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
It pleases me to know that I have been of some use to you.

[Enormous swerve coming up] When the Apartheid governments ruled in
South Africa, what was the Christian Church's attitude towards them? I
was aware of the work of Trevor Huddleston, but was he a one-man band or
a representative of a broader movement?
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
John Ashby
2017-08-07 19:48:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
It pleases me to know that I have been of some use to you.
[Enormous swerve coming up] When the Apartheid governments ruled in
South Africa, what was the Christian Church's attitude towards them? I
was aware of the work of Trevor Huddleston, but was he a one-man band or
a representative of a broader movement?
A story I may have told here before: A few years ago a friend of mine
was given the Freedom of the City of Oxford (for services to allotments,
basically) and a few of us were invited to the ceremony. Alos receiving
the Freedom was a woman who had been very big in the anti-racism
movement in the city. She was a South African of Indian heritage, and a
friend of my friend. When seh came over to talk to him one of our party
said "Oh, I used to live in South Africa."
"Whereabouts?" she asked, and he answered with a place whose name was
redolent of a Boer background.
"What on earth were you doing in that god-foresaken place?" she asked.
"I was..." But she had already turned and walked away, so she didn't
hear the rest of his sentence. "... working for Trevor Huddleston." He
had been a Anglican priest to the black community.

So the answer to your question is that there were at least two of them
in the movement.

john
Peter Percival
2017-08-07 19:51:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration
event for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some
experience of organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial,
Peter’s was a non-religious event, but conducted by a friend
who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything
there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the
heaven...”), which, describing as it does how we are all part
of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and
the Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural
world, most especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
It pleases me to know that I have been of some use to you.
[Enormous swerve coming up] When the Apartheid governments ruled
in South Africa, what was the Christian Church's attitude towards
them? I was aware of the work of Trevor Huddleston, but was he a
one-man band or a representative of a broader movement?
A story I may have told here before: A few years ago a friend of
mine was given the Freedom of the City of Oxford (for services to
allotments, basically) and a few of us were invited to the ceremony.
Alos receiving the Freedom was a woman who had been very big in the
anti-racism movement in the city. She was a South African of Indian
heritage, and a friend of my friend. When seh came over to talk to
him one of our party said "Oh, I used to live in South Africa."
"Whereabouts?" she asked, and he answered with a place whose name
was redolent of a Boer background. "What on earth were you doing in
that god-foresaken place?" she asked. "I was..." But she had already
turned and walked away, so she didn't hear the rest of his sentence.
"... working for Trevor Huddleston." He had been a Anglican priest to
the black community.
So the answer to your question is that there were at least two of
them in the movement.
john
Excellent story!
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Btms
2017-08-07 19:54:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
It pleases me to know that I have been of some use to you.
[Enormous swerve coming up] When the Apartheid governments ruled in
South Africa, what was the Christian Church's attitude towards them? I
was aware of the work of Trevor Huddleston, but was he a one-man band or
a representative of a broader movement?
A story I may have told here before: A few years ago a friend of mine
was given the Freedom of the City of Oxford (for services to allotments,
basically) and a few of us were invited to the ceremony. Alos receiving
the Freedom was a woman who had been very big in the anti-racism
movement in the city. She was a South African of Indian heritage, and a
friend of my friend. When seh came over to talk to him one of our party
said "Oh, I used to live in South Africa."
"Whereabouts?" she asked, and he answered with a place whose name was
redolent of a Boer background.
"What on earth were you doing in that god-foresaken place?" she asked.
"I was..." But she had already turned and walked away, so she didn't
hear the rest of his sentence. "... working for Trevor Huddleston." He
had been a Anglican priest to the black community.
So the answer to your question is that there were at least two of them
in the movement.
john
Folk so often hear what they want to hear, I find.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2017-08-08 06:55:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Btms
Explains her thinking when writing the memorial/celebration event
for Caroline..
Caroline Harrington Scriptwriter
My husband Peter died four years ago, so I have some experience of
organising a funeral. Like Caroline’s memorial, Peter’s was a
non-religious event, but conducted by a friend who is a priest.
He began with the reading from Ecclesiastes (“To everything there is
a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven...”), which,
describing as it does how we are all part of the natural world,
Yes, we are all part of the natural world, but the author of
Ecclesiastes did not believe that. Nor do Christians: they and the
Hebrews believe that we are all part of a supernatural world, most
especially when we are dead.
Thanks for putting me straight on what I believe : ).
It pleases me to know that I have been of some use to you.
[Enormous swerve coming up] When the Apartheid governments ruled in
South Africa, what was the Christian Church's attitude towards them? I
was aware of the work of Trevor Huddleston, but was he a one-man band or
a representative of a broader movement?
A story I may have told here before: A few years ago a friend of mine
was given the Freedom of the City of Oxford (for services to allotments,
basically) and a few of us were invited to the ceremony. Alos receiving
the Freedom was a woman who had been very big in the anti-racism
movement in the city. She was a South African of Indian heritage, and a
friend of my friend. When seh came over to talk to him one of our party
said "Oh, I used to live in South Africa."
"Whereabouts?" she asked, and he answered with a place whose name was
redolent of a Boer background.
"What on earth were you doing in that god-foresaken place?" she asked.
"I was..." But she had already turned and walked away, so she didn't
hear the rest of his sentence. "... working for Trevor Huddleston." He
had been a Anglican priest to the black community.
So the answer to your question is that there were at least two of them
in the movement.
Folk so often hear what they want to hear, I find.
I'll have a pint of Shires please.
Jim Easterbrook
2017-08-08 07:42:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Btms
Folk so often hear what they want to hear, I find.
I'll have a pint of Shires please.
https://xkcd.com/1860/
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
BrritSki
2017-08-08 08:41:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
Post by Btms
Folk so often hear what they want to hear, I find.
I'll have a pint of Shires please.
https://xkcd.com/1860/
:)

Loading...