Discussion:
Sniff - spoiler 23/1/18 Tuesday
(too old to reply)
Vicky
2018-01-23 21:34:39 UTC
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
--
Vicky
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-23 22:26:02 UTC
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Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
--
Vicky
Or are the script writers just trying to make us think that (about Peggy) and planning some entirely different twist.
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-23 22:47:13 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Or are the script writers just trying to make us think that (about Peggy) and planning some entirely different twist.
Where is the "edit" button? I failed to type a question mark.
Btms
2018-01-24 06:53:58 UTC
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Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Btms
2018-01-24 06:55:08 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sally Thompson
2018-01-24 08:27:34 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
I did:-)

And agree with the sentiment.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2018-01-24 08:38:52 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 06:55:08 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
I do and I liked that scene, if only because Peggy, unlike so many elderly
people did not upset her ggdaughter by saying she wouldn't live long enough
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.

*which reminds me, is Joe Grundy, still getting out and about with the
aging Bartleby, going to carry on for another 3.5 years and get his
'telegram' from whoever is monarch at the time?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
the Omrud
2018-01-24 11:45:41 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
I do and I liked that scene, if only because Peggy, unlike so many elderly
people did not upset her ggdaughter by saying she wouldn't live long enough
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting on
Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her many,
many annoying habits.
--
David
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-24 11:58:56 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
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v
v
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v
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v
v
v
v
v
v
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v
v
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
I do and I liked that scene, if only because Peggy, unlike so many
I thought it was a nice scene anyway. (Was/is the term Nol* kept using,
a South-African one?)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
elderly
people did not upset her ggdaughter by saying she wouldn't live long enough
Yes, they do tend to do it, don't they! Sometimes it's done in a joking
manner, which _may_ be OK - _once_.
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting
on Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her
many, many annoying habits.
Serious suggestions on how to discourage the habit? (I don't have any
such relations left, and the only person I can think of among my
friends, who was 80 earlier this month, is so full of beans that I
forget her age whenever I see her - she's a tiny bundle of energy. I
bought her a bird-box with camera [Lidl!], which she seemed delighted
with; she loves watching the birds.) If the "if I'm spared" _is_ done in
a jocular manner, you could take to replying something similarly jocular
about the will - but that could backfire badly.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Mike Jackson |\ _,,,---,,_
and Squeak /,`.-'`' -. ;-;;,_ Shame there's no snooze button
[1998] |,4- ) )-,_..;\ ( `'- on a cat who wants breakfast
zzz '---''(_/--' `-'\_)
Penny
2018-01-24 12:24:38 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 11:58:56 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting
on Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her
many, many annoying habits.
Serious suggestions on how to discourage the habit? (I don't have any
such relations left, and the only person I can think of among my
friends, who was 80 earlier this month, is so full of beans that I
forget her age whenever I see her - she's a tiny bundle of energy. I
bought her a bird-box with camera [Lidl!], which she seemed delighted
with; she loves watching the birds.) If the "if I'm spared" _is_ done in
a jocular manner, you could take to replying something similarly jocular
about the will - but that could backfire badly.
I'm not sure any sort of 'jocular' manner would make it any less
shocking/upsetting to a much younger person. In fact I've just remembered a
close friend, only 20 years my senior, who managed to upset me, or at least
stop conversation in its tracks every time he referred to his own
'expected' death. He wasn't in the best of health but lived for about 15
years after he first mentioned it and we did have a sensible conversation
(he had vascular dementia) a couple of months before he died.

I suppose the come back 'we can but hope' might shock the elderly person
out of it.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
LFS
2018-01-24 12:48:34 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 11:58:56 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting
on Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her
many, many annoying habits.
Serious suggestions on how to discourage the habit? (I don't have any
such relations left, and the only person I can think of among my
friends, who was 80 earlier this month, is so full of beans that I
forget her age whenever I see her - she's a tiny bundle of energy. I
bought her a bird-box with camera [Lidl!], which she seemed delighted
with; she loves watching the birds.) If the "if I'm spared" _is_ done in
a jocular manner, you could take to replying something similarly jocular
about the will - but that could backfire badly.
I'm not sure any sort of 'jocular' manner would make it any less
shocking/upsetting to a much younger person.
I have known a couple elderly people who have used the expression as a
kind of moral blackmail, which was quite in keeping with their rather
selfish personalities. I grew up with parents who had both survived
massive health challenges during WW2, constantly marvelled at their
survival (and my existence) and often discussed their ptential demise in
a very practical way. Their experiences seemed to engender a strong
tendency to black humour. Mum in her eighties would often say "I'm
really only sticking around until..(whatever event she was looking
forward to)" and would then follow this with some quip connected to the
idea of kicking the bucket.

After a preponderance of recent funerals, I now feel a need to address
the practicalities around my own death. Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...

Shortly after the distressing experience of our cat's death, Son-in-Law
made me laugh by reassuring me that when my time came he would be quite
willing to take me to the vet.


In fact I've just remembered a
Post by Penny
close friend, only 20 years my senior, who managed to upset me, or at least
stop conversation in its tracks every time he referred to his own
'expected' death. He wasn't in the best of health but lived for about 15
years after he first mentioned it and we did have a sensible conversation
(he had vascular dementia) a couple of months before he died.
I suppose the come back 'we can but hope' might shock the elderly person
out of it.
I think that's rather funny: my parents would have greatly appreciated
such a comment.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky
2018-01-24 14:43:51 UTC
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Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
--
Vicky
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-24 15:48:11 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
--
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.

I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
--
Jenny M Benson
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-24 15:55:39 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
(Excuse the bad form, please!)

I just goggled Dead Baby pudding and a lot of people remember something
called that, although one person said it was pink blancmange, which ours
definitely wasn't, and several said it was Jam Roly Poly which I don't
think ours was either. I'm sure we knew JRP as (Jam) Roly Poly or as
Baked Jam Roll and our JRP WAS always baked. I'm sure DB was boiled.

BTW, another fave was dumplings with syrup.

I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the oven
in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
--
Jenny M Benson
LFS
2018-01-24 18:38:16 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the oven
in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
Oh, do! They sound yummy!

My grandma used to make a delicious sponge pudding with beef bone marrow.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-24 19:31:06 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the
oven in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
Oh, do! They sound yummy!
My grandma used to make a delicious sponge pudding with beef bone marrow.
Well all I can say is "thank goodness I started that search just AFTER
finishing my dinner!" - Like the advice never to go shopping when you're
hungry.

Here it is - and feel free to copy to the Umra Cook Book if you wish, Jane.

2 oz Suet
4 oz SR Flour
Water
1 oz Caster Sugar
Rind of 1 Lemon
Make 6-8 dumplings.

4 Tbsp Lemon Curd
4 Tbps Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp Water.
Pour into a casserole dish. Put dumplings on. Cover & bake at
425F/220C/Mk7 for 25 mins.
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky
2018-01-24 21:49:55 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:31:06 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the
oven in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
Oh, do! They sound yummy!
My grandma used to make a delicious sponge pudding with beef bone marrow.
Well all I can say is "thank goodness I started that search just AFTER
finishing my dinner!" - Like the advice never to go shopping when you're
hungry.
Here it is - and feel free to copy to the Umra Cook Book if you wish, Jane.
2 oz Suet
4 oz SR Flour
Water
1 oz Caster Sugar
Rind of 1 Lemon
Make 6-8 dumplings.
4 Tbsp Lemon Curd
4 Tbps Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp Water.
Pour into a casserole dish. Put dumplings on. Cover & bake at
425F/220C/Mk7 for 25 mins.
My mother used to make dumplings with potatoes and flour and possibly
egg. Those were boiled and then covered with fried breadcrumbs,
cinnamon and sugar. The dough could also be wrapped around a plum or
apricot with the stone replaced with a lump of sugar, which was boiled
and then covered with breadcrumbs fried and sugar. She also made one
large dumpling to cut into slices with meat dishes too but I think
that was with bread not potato.
--
Vicky
Kate B
2018-01-25 18:38:25 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:31:06 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the
oven in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
Oh, do! They sound yummy!
My grandma used to make a delicious sponge pudding with beef bone marrow.
Well all I can say is "thank goodness I started that search just AFTER
finishing my dinner!" - Like the advice never to go shopping when you're
hungry.
Here it is - and feel free to copy to the Umra Cook Book if you wish, Jane.
2 oz Suet
4 oz SR Flour
Water
1 oz Caster Sugar
Rind of 1 Lemon
Make 6-8 dumplings.
4 Tbsp Lemon Curd
4 Tbps Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp Water.
Pour into a casserole dish. Put dumplings on. Cover & bake at
425F/220C/Mk7 for 25 mins.
My mother used to make dumplings with potatoes and flour and possibly
egg. Those were boiled and then covered with fried breadcrumbs,
cinnamon and sugar. The dough could also be wrapped around a plum or
apricot with the stone replaced with a lump of sugar, which was boiled
and then covered with breadcrumbs fried and sugar. She also made one
large dumpling to cut into slices with meat dishes too but I think
that was with bread not potato.
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and holidays.
Delicious.

The large ones were called Serviettenknoedeln, and were made out of old
bread rolls cut up, soaked and squeezed, seasoned, and then boiled in a
napkin, and then sliced and sometimes fried. In the mountains they
called them Tirolerknoedeln (with bits of bacon), sliced and fried for
breakfast before a day's walking or skiing, very sustaining.

Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese (quark)
dough, though he says you can use potato as well:

--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-01-25 18:58:30 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:31:06 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the
oven in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
Oh, do! They sound yummy!
My grandma used to make a delicious sponge pudding with beef bone marrow.
Well all I can say is "thank goodness I started that search just AFTER
finishing my dinner!" - Like the advice never to go shopping when you're
hungry.
Here it is - and feel free to copy to the Umra Cook Book if you wish, Jane.
2 oz Suet
4 oz SR Flour
Water
1 oz Caster Sugar
Rind of 1 Lemon
Make 6-8 dumplings.
4 Tbsp Lemon Curd
4 Tbps Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp Water.
Pour into a casserole dish. Put dumplings on. Cover & bake at
425F/220C/Mk7 for 25 mins.
My mother used to make dumplings with potatoes and flour and possibly
egg. Those were boiled and then covered with fried breadcrumbs,
cinnamon and sugar. The dough could also be wrapped around a plum or
apricot with the stone replaced with a lump of sugar, which was boiled
and then covered with breadcrumbs fried and sugar. She also made one
large dumpling to cut into slices with meat dishes too but I think
that was with bread not potato.
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and holidays.
Delicious.
The large ones were called Serviettenknoedeln, and were made out of old
bread rolls cut up, soaked and squeezed, seasoned, and then boiled in a
napkin, and then sliced and sometimes fried. In the mountains they
called them Tirolerknoedeln (with bits of bacon), sliced and fried for
breakfast before a day's walking or skiing, very sustaining.
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese (quark)
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0
How dare you Kate? Please wash your mouth out!
--
Toodle Pip
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-25 19:23:20 UTC
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A few years ago I bought in Germany a South Tyrolean book on dumplings, but all the recipes made prodigiously large quantities, so I have never yet made them up.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-25 18:59:30 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Kate B
<***@nospam.demon.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Kate B
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and
holidays. Delicious.
[]
Post by Kate B
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0
I thought Marillen meant apricots (lemons are Zitronen); I certainly had
a little round bottle of Marillenlikör someone brought me, which had
pictures of apricots on the label (and was very nice).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If vegetarians eat vegetables,..beware of humanitarians!
Kate B
2018-01-25 21:14:43 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and
holidays. Delicious.
[]
Post by Kate B
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0
I thought Marillen meant apricots (lemons are Zitronen); I certainly had
a little round bottle of Marillenlikör someone brought me, which had
pictures of apricots on the label (and was very nice).
Marillen does mean apricots - you've snipped the bit in Vicky's post
where she says how her mother made dumplings with plums or apricots.
Apricots are Marillen in Austrian, Aprikosen in German; Plums are
Pflaumen in German, Zwetschgen in Austrian.
--
Kate B
London
Vicky
2018-01-25 21:15:23 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:31:06 +0000, Jenny M Benson
.
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky
My mother used to make dumplings with potatoes and flour and possibly
egg. Those were boiled and then covered with fried breadcrumbs,
cinnamon and sugar. The dough could also be wrapped around a plum or
apricot with the stone replaced with a lump of sugar, which was boiled
and then covered with breadcrumbs fried and sugar. She also made one
large dumpling to cut into slices with meat dishes too but I think
that was with bread not potato.
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and holidays.
Delicious.
The large ones were called Serviettenknoedeln, and were made out of old
bread rolls cut up, soaked and squeezed, seasoned, and then boiled in a
napkin, and then sliced and sometimes fried. In the mountains they
called them Tirolerknoedeln (with bits of bacon), sliced and fried for
breakfast before a day's walking or skiing, very sustaining.
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese (quark)
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0
Thank you. I think you can make it with potatoes and then use soft
cheese inside instead of fruit too. And not sure about the vanilla
pods.
--
Vicky
Vicky
2018-01-25 21:20:50 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and holidays.
Delicious.
The large ones were called Serviettenknoedeln, and were made out of old
bread rolls cut up, soaked and squeezed, seasoned, and then boiled in a
napkin, and then sliced and sometimes fried. In the mountains they
called them Tirolerknoedeln (with bits of bacon), sliced and fried for
breakfast before a day's walking or skiing, very sustaining.
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese (quark)
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0


this one is with potato and no egg, so if you use vegan margarine they
are vegan I think.
--
Vicky
Kate B
2018-01-25 23:30:28 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by Kate B
Oh yes! I remember these in Austria. Marillenknoedeln. Or
Zwetschgenknoedeln. A bit complicated, so only on highdays and holidays.
Delicious.
The large ones were called Serviettenknoedeln, and were made out of old
bread rolls cut up, soaked and squeezed, seasoned, and then boiled in a
napkin, and then sliced and sometimes fried. In the mountains they
called them Tirolerknoedeln (with bits of bacon), sliced and fried for
breakfast before a day's walking or skiing, very sustaining.
Here is a YouTube of making Marillenknoedeln, with a soft cheese (quark)
http://youtu.be/gmR87wMzRd0
http://youtu.be/qMq65c7H0xA
this one is with potato and no egg, so if you use vegan margarine they
are vegan I think.
I like her kitchen :) And I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2018-01-26 09:42:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 23:30:28 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
I never peel potatoes before cooking, or afterwards, come to that.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-01-26 11:35:36 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
I never peel potatoes before cooking, or afterwards, come to that.
Nor I, sweet potatoes are another matter though.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky
2018-01-26 12:05:03 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
I never peel potatoes before cooking, or afterwards, come to that.
Nor I, sweet potatoes are another matter though.
I don't normally peel potatoes either but for making dumplings you
don't want the skins in the dough.
--
Vicky
Btms
2018-01-26 20:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
I never peel potatoes before cooking, or afterwards, come to that.
Nor I, sweet potatoes are another matter though.
I don't normally peel potatoes either but for making dumplings you
don't want the skins in the dough.
Do the non peelers in these parts remove the eyes?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Btms
2018-01-26 19:50:26 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
I never peel potatoes before cooking, or afterwards, come to that.
We return from Austria tomorrow but have not seen a dumpling here.

😳
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Clive Arthur
2018-01-26 10:54:05 UTC
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On 25/01/2018 23:30, Kate B wrote:

<snip>
I like her kitchen :)  And I had forgotten that Austrians boil potatoes
in their skins and then have to peel them - ok if they're cold, like
these, not so much fun when they're hot!
The first time I went to Ireland with SWMBO I was surprised that all her
large family peeled their boiled spuds at the table. Of course, they
were adept and I was fumbling.

Cheers
--
Clive
Serena Blanchflower
2018-01-24 18:54:20 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the oven
in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
That sounds like a variation of Sussex Pond Pudding, which was a suet
pudding with lemon and sauce inside it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Damn right I'm good in bed - I can sleep for days
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-25 02:25:55 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Jenny M Benson
I'm reminded of a recipe I have somewhere for dumplings done in the
oven in a lemon sauce - must seek that out again!
That sounds like a variation of Sussex Pond Pudding, which was a suet
pudding with lemon and sauce inside it.
That makes me wonder if they grow a lot of lemons in Sussex?
--
Sam Plusnet
Btms
2018-01-24 21:44:05 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
--
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Yes! We often had it on the breakfast table as a spread.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
the Omrud
2018-01-25 10:08:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Yes! We often had it on the breakfast table as a spread.
Oh dear, could you not afford bread?
--
David

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Btms
2018-01-25 20:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Btms
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Yes! We often had it on the breakfast table as a spread.
Oh dear, could you not afford bread?
What did you use as a base for your spread then?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Nick Odell
2018-01-25 21:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by the Omrud
Post by Btms
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Yes! We often had it on the breakfast table as a spread.
Oh dear, could you not afford bread?
What did you use as a base for your spread then?
I presumed one was using the table.

Nick
Btms
2018-01-26 07:07:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Btms
Post by the Omrud
Post by Btms
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Yes! We often had it on the breakfast table as a spread.
Oh dear, could you not afford bread?
What did you use as a base for your spread then?
I presumed one was using the table.
Nick
I see. You have not heard the expression to indicate the mise(sp) en seine
of a meal.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2018-01-26 10:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
I see. You have not heard the expression to indicate the mise(sp) en seine
of a meal.
I have heard it spelled like that, but written down it should be mise en
scène. So your (sp) was misplaced :)

DINTAFPOU ?
Kate B
2018-01-26 17:32:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
I see.  You have not heard the expression to indicate the mise(sp) en
seine
of a meal.
I have heard it spelled like that, but written down it should be mise en
scène. So your (sp) was misplaced :)
DINTAFPOU ?
I rather like the idea of a mise en seine of a meal. I have the image of
one of those outrageous seafood pyramids of oysters and lobsters
decorated with fake fishnets. No doubt subsequently to be chucked in the
river in a fit of pique...
--
Kate B
London
BrritSki
2018-01-26 18:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kate B
Post by BrritSki
I see.  You have not heard the expression to indicate the mise(sp) en
seine
of a meal.
I have heard it spelled like that, but written down it should be mise
en scène. So your (sp) was misplaced :)
DINTAFPOU ?
I rather like the idea of a mise en seine of a meal. I have the image of
one of those outrageous seafood pyramids of oysters and lobsters
decorated with fake fishnets. No doubt subsequently to be chucked in the
river in a fit of pique...
:) Seine nets of course....

Or fishnets a la Presidents Club ?
Btms
2018-01-26 20:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Btms
I see. You have not heard the expression to indicate the mise(sp) en seine
of a meal.
I have heard it spelled like that, but written down it should be mise en
scène. So your (sp) was misplaced :)
DINTAFPOU ?
Thank you for clarifying. I say it often enough but it must be some years
since I wrote it down. I have a poor memory for spillings wich are
unfamilliare to me. Thank you. Not sure I will remember but will try.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sally Thompson
2018-01-26 00:17:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
I'm wondering about themed food.....etc
--
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Oh, and did you have Dead Man’s Arm at school? Jam and suet roly-poly.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-26 04:15:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Jenny M Benson
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Oh, and did you have Dead Man’s Arm at school? Jam and suet roly-poly.
One thing I quite liked at school was referred to as elephant-shit; I
think it was meatloaf.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just as many people feel Christmas hasn't begun until they've heard the carols
at King's, or that the election campaign hasn't begun until some politician
lambasts the BBC ... - Eddie Mair, Radio Times 2013/11/16-22
Clive Arthur
2018-01-26 10:47:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Jenny M Benson
One of my favourites, as a child, was a pudding my mother called Dead Baby.
I think it was basically just a boiled suet pudding, served with syrup.
(See recent ref to Batter Pudding - we ate a lot of golden syrup, and
treacle, in those days!)
Oh, and did you have Dead Man’s Arm at school? Jam and suet roly-poly.
One thing I quite liked at school was referred to as elephant-shit; I
think it was meatloaf.
No, it was Chris Ofili - Meatloaf was the 'Bat out of Hell' bloke.

Cheers
--
Clive
Serena Blanchflower
2018-01-24 19:45:23 UTC
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Post by LFS
After a preponderance of recent funerals, I now feel a need to address
the practicalities around my own death. Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
Shortly after the distressing experience of our cat's death, Son-in-Law
made me laugh by reassuring me that when my time came he would be quite
willing to take me to the vet.
That sounds a wonderfully healthy attitude - on both sides. I have been
recently been hearing tales of someone I knew whose adult son was
completely unable to cope with either the prospect or reality of his
father's death. To the extent that he told his mother not to phone him,
as he got so stressed, thinking she was going to say that his father had
died :(

Your family's attitude sounds wonderful by comparison and is likely to
make any difficult times, in the future, much easier for all concerned.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Mobility is the enemy of beauty... (Fascinating Aida)
Nick Odell
2018-01-24 22:02:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
After a preponderance of recent funerals, I now feel a need to address
the practicalities around my own death. Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems
to have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they
have asked about keynote speakers and catering...
Shortly after the distressing experience of our cat's death,
Son-in-Law made me laugh by reassuring me that when my time came he
would be quite willing to take me to the vet.
That sounds a wonderfully healthy attitude - on both sides.  I have been
recently been hearing tales of someone I knew whose adult son was
completely unable to cope with either the prospect or reality of his
father's death.  To the extent that he told his mother not to phone him,
as he got so stressed, thinking she was going to say that his father had
died :(
Your family's attitude sounds wonderful by comparison and is likely to
make any difficult times, in the future, much easier for all concerned.
We seem to be at a crossroads with attitudes towards death as with so
many other things. The old taboos concerning not talking about it seem
to be breaking down and we are getting "Death Cafes" as well as
excellent radio programmes such as Joan Bakewell's We Need To Talk About
series. I notice that the term "excess deaths" is creeping into stories
of medical miracles.

On a personal note, when I bought a winter coat recently I remarked
"That'll see me out" for the first time - then corpsed at the startled
reaction of those around me.


Nick
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-24 22:45:40 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
On a personal note, when I bought a winter coat recently I remarked
"That'll see me out" for the first time - then corpsed at the startled
reaction of those around me.
But rose again from the dead, apparently, I'm pleased to see.

(Yes, I do know. As this is Umra I presume the pun was intentional.)
--
Jenny M Benson
the Omrud
2018-01-25 10:14:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
On a personal note, when I bought a winter coat recently I remarked
"That'll see me out" for the first time - then corpsed at the startled
reaction of those around me.
I have a beloved leather coat I bought about 35 years ago in the
Lakeland shop (leather, not kitchen stuff) in Chester, which I couldn't
afford and agonised over, but wisely chose to buy (it cost about £100).
It's still very serviceable and frequently worn but rather worn, IYSWIM.

When I got a long-service award from work a few years ago, I decided to
treat myself to a new one. Lakeland has changed hands many times in the
last decades and the shop has moved out of Chester to Cheshire Oaks, but
they still sell excellent leather coats. In the process of choosing
one, I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
--
David

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Chris J Dixon
2018-01-25 12:26:49 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2018-01-25 13:53:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Possibly not, but you probably won't be able to see it needs doing and
won't care either ;)
Mike
2018-01-25 14:45:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Possibly not, but you probably won't be able to see it needs doing and
won't care either ;)
Mine dew, you may feel happier about still being able to climb the stairs
and even more if you can *still* see it needs doing!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2018-01-25 15:04:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris J Dixon
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Possibly not, but you probably won't be able to see it needs doing and
won't care either ;)
Does that come from the same school of thought as "If you are
having trouble with reality, adjust your perception."?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2018-01-25 19:54:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Chris
Once we get back from Sri Lanka men are coming to refit the kitchen,
last done in 2001. Given the cost I hope it does not need doing it
again in 2035.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2018-01-26 16:12:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Chris
Once we get back from Sri Lanka men are coming to refit the kitchen,
last done in 2001. Given the cost I hope it does not need doing it
again in 2035.
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-01-26 16:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Chris
Once we get back from Sri Lanka men are coming to refit the kitchen,
last done in 2001. Given the cost I hope it does not need doing it
again in 2035.
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
Sincerely Chris
Shirley, there will be a temperature controlled wine cellar complete with
dumb waitor linked to the kitchen?
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-01-26 16:56:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Mike
2018-01-26 17:09:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
Can’t help feeling these systems must be prone to scaling up in hard water
areas and, surely they must be wasteful in delivering boiling or cold water
through the one outlet pipe.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky
2018-01-26 17:34:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
Can’t help feeling these systems must be prone to scaling up in hard water
areas and, surely they must be wasteful in delivering boiling or cold water
through the one outlet pipe.
For us boiling water on tap might be an accident waiting to happen. We
are both clumsy now. Actually I've always been nervous of potentially
dangerous appliances. I exchanged the electric knife I was given just
after we married for something less scary.
--
Vicky
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-26 19:43:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
I exchanged the electric knife I was given just
after we married for something less scary.
My sister has always enthused about her electric carving knife which she
has had for yonks. We both have bread machines and when she said how
easy it was to cut the bread with the electric knife I decided to buy
one and I LOVE it. Definitely one of my best ever purchases.
--
Jenny M Benson
Serena Blanchflower
2018-01-26 20:14:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
Can’t help feeling these systems must be prone to scaling up in hard water
areas and, surely they must be wasteful in delivering boiling or cold water
through the one outlet pipe.
For us boiling water on tap might be an accident waiting to happen. We
are both clumsy now. Actually I've always been nervous of potentially
dangerous appliances. I exchanged the electric knife I was given just
after we married for something less scary.
While, for me, the main attraction of a boiling water tap would be that
I think it might be safer than manhandling a full kettle, even with a
kettle tipper. I assume that, in a hard water area, a water softener
would be a pre-requisite to having a boiling water tap.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A dame that knows the ropes isn't likely to get tied up. (Mae West)
Btms
2018-01-26 20:01:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
Can’t help feeling these systems must be prone to scaling up in hard water
areas and, surely they must be wasteful in delivering boiling or cold water
through the one outlet pipe.
We have friends with one. Makes a horrible cup of tea. Like the machine
stuff in the workplace.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-01-26 17:10:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
If you need to enquire about the price - you can’t afford one!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-01-26 19:13:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
No wine cooler - not enough space. More upsetting is the lack of a
Jenny tap - you know boiling water, fizzy water and so on from one tap.
I really wanted one of those but apparently we cannot afford it.
Lol!

Sincerely Chris
Btms
2018-01-26 20:01:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by the Omrud
I mentioned to the assistant that I had a 30-year-old coat of
theirs which was still going strong, and wondered if this new one would
also last for 30 years or more. At which point I realised that I'll be
over 90, so I probably won't need another one.
I found myself thinking, when I decorated hall, stairs and
landing last summer, it is 17 years since I last did it, will I
be up to it in another 17?
Chris
Once we get back from Sri Lanka men are coming to refit the kitchen,
last done in 2001. Given the cost I hope it does not need doing it
again in 2035.
With the wine cooler I hope, got to keep up with the Aldridges.
Sincerely Chris
We have a wine cooler. They are not all that expensive iirc.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris McMillan
2018-01-25 13:58:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
After a preponderance of recent funerals, I now feel a need to address
the practicalities around my own death. Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
Shortly after the distressing experience of our cat's death, Son-in-Law
made me laugh by reassuring me that when my time came he would be quite
willing to take me to the vet.
That sounds a wonderfully healthy attitude - on both sides. I have been
recently been hearing tales of someone I knew whose adult son was
completely unable to cope with either the prospect or reality of his
father's death. To the extent that he told his mother not to phone him,
as he got so stressed, thinking she was going to say that his father had
died :(
Your family's attitude sounds wonderful by comparison and is likely to
make any difficult times, in the future, much easier for all concerned.
This is absolutely true, I defy anyone to stop laughing. My stepmum is now
so confused that she is not only convinced my dad is still alive but she
can’t find him, that when you finally think she understands he died 12
years ago, she says with perfect seriousness, he must have died twice.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-01-25 14:50:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
After a preponderance of recent funerals, I now feel a need to address
the practicalities around my own death. Our children were a little
surprised when I announced that we needed to have a family meeting for
the death conversation but they now think it's quite entertaining and
are eagerly anticipating what they call the Death Summit which seems to
have taken on the guise of something like the WEF in Davos - they have
asked about keynote speakers and catering...
Shortly after the distressing experience of our cat's death, Son-in-Law
made me laugh by reassuring me that when my time came he would be quite
willing to take me to the vet.
That sounds a wonderfully healthy attitude - on both sides. I have been
recently been hearing tales of someone I knew whose adult son was
completely unable to cope with either the prospect or reality of his
father's death. To the extent that he told his mother not to phone him,
as he got so stressed, thinking she was going to say that his father had
died :(
Your family's attitude sounds wonderful by comparison and is likely to
make any difficult times, in the future, much easier for all concerned.
This is absolutely true, I defy anyone to stop laughing. My stepmum is now
so confused that she is not only convinced my dad is still alive but she
can’t find him, that when you finally think she understands he died 12
years ago, she says with perfect seriousness, he must have died twice.
Sincerely Chris
That’s a dead cert.....
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-01-25 19:55:32 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
he must have died twice.
Is he James Bond?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Mike
2018-01-26 08:46:59 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
he must have died twice.
Is he James Bond?
No, but his wife was number 002!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2018-01-24 14:40:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 11:58:56 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting
on Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her
many, many annoying habits.
Serious suggestions on how to discourage the habit? (I don't have any
such relations left, and the only person I can think of among my
friends, who was 80 earlier this month, is so full of beans that I
forget her age whenever I see her - she's a tiny bundle of energy. I
bought her a bird-box with camera [Lidl!], which she seemed delighted
with; she loves watching the birds.) If the "if I'm spared" _is_ done in
a jocular manner, you could take to replying something similarly jocular
about the will - but that could backfire badly.
I'm not sure any sort of 'jocular' manner would make it any less
shocking/upsetting to a much younger person. In fact I've just remembered a
close friend, only 20 years my senior, who managed to upset me, or at least
stop conversation in its tracks every time he referred to his own
'expected' death. He wasn't in the best of health but lived for about 15
years after he first mentioned it and we did have a sensible conversation
(he had vascular dementia) a couple of months before he died.
I suppose the come back 'we can but hope' might shock the elderly person
out of it.
Or "With any luck ... <pause for effect?... that won't happen soon".
the Omrud
2018-01-24 12:38:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene.  And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear.  You know what I mean!
 I do and I liked that scene, if only because Peggy, unlike so many
I thought it was a nice scene anyway. (Was/is the term Nol* kept using,
a South-African one?)
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
elderly people did not upset her ggdaughter by saying she wouldn't live long
enough
Yes, they do tend to do it, don't they! Sometimes it's done in a joking
manner, which _may_ be OK - _once_.
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.".
I've heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting
on Thursday (or whatever).  However, this is the very least of her
many, many annoying habits.
Serious suggestions on how to discourage the habit? (I don't have any
such relations left, and the only person I can think of among my
friends, who was 80 earlier this month, is so full of beans that I
forget her age whenever I see her - she's a tiny bundle of energy. I
bought her a bird-box with camera [Lidl!], which she seemed delighted
with; she loves watching the birds.) If the "if I'm spared" _is_ done in
a jocular manner, you could take to replying something similarly jocular
about the will - but that could backfire badly.
We're way beyond any chance of reasoning with Mum. She has a mental
health problem, which is now overlaid with unrelated moderate to severe
dementia - this makes her easier to deal with, but means she'll never
remember a conversation about us feeling uncomfortable.
--
David
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-25 02:31:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
We're way beyond any chance of reasoning with Mum.  She has a mental
health problem, which is now overlaid with unrelated moderate to severe
dementia - this makes her easier to deal with, but means she'll never
remember a conversation about us feeling uncomfortable.
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the same
thing for the last 40 years.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2018-01-25 09:25:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
We're way beyond any chance of reasoning with Mum.  She has a mental
health problem, which is now overlaid with unrelated moderate to
severe dementia - this makes her easier to deal with, but means she'll
never remember a conversation about us feeling uncomfortable.
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the same
thing for the last 40 years.
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.

This is a very apt thread as last night I finished Three Things About
Elsie, recommended by Sid a month ago. Thanks once more Sid, absolutely
wonderful book and will bear re-reading in a year or two. Funny,
profound and moving. Brilliantly written, very real characters and an
intriguing mystery too.
the Omrud
2018-01-25 10:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
We're way beyond any chance of reasoning with Mum.  She has a mental
health problem, which is now overlaid with unrelated moderate to
severe dementia - this makes her easier to deal with, but means
she'll never remember a conversation about us feeling uncomfortable.
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the
same thing for the last 40 years.
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
--
David

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-25 10:35:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <49iaC.600552$***@fx38.am4>, the Omrud
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by the Omrud
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Certainly not unpopular with me; I sympathise, though not from personal
experience.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

What's awful about weird views is not the views. It's the intolerance. If
someone wants to worship the Duke of Edinburgh or a pineapple, fine. But don't
kill me if I don't agree. - Tim Rice, Radio Times 15-21 October 2011.
Chris McMillan
2018-01-25 14:08:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Certainly not unpopular with me; I sympathise, though not from personal
experience.
My step mum is turning from capable to manipulative to simply dig her heels
in so even the care staff hint she’s not one of their easiest living alone
clients. Dog and bones describes her.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2018-01-25 10:40:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 10:17:34 +0000, the Omrud <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-01-25 11:54:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Was this dislike based on the ‘No girl is good enough for my son.’ idea?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-25 12:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Post by the Omrud
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Was this dislike based on the ‘No girl is good enough for my son.’ idea?
Penny said stepmother, not mother-in-law ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Eddie [Waring] underook elocution lessons in Leeds. After four weeks he was
asked to leave - all members in his class had begun to speak like him.
Stuart Hall, RT 7-13 August 2010
Mike
2018-01-25 12:19:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Post by the Omrud
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Was this dislike based on the ‘No girl is good enough for my son.’ idea?
Penny said stepmother, not mother-in-law ...
Oooops! So she did!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-01-25 16:52:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 12:09:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
[]
Post by Penny
Post by the Omrud
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Was this dislike based on the ‘No girl is good enough for my son.’ idea?
Penny said stepmother, not mother-in-law ...
Thank you, I was completely thrown for a moment. I did meet her son once,
probably at the wedding. As he lives in his native America I've had no more
to do with him beyond being mildly amused to have two brothers called
David.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2018-01-25 20:39:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Were the feelings reciprocated?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2018-01-25 21:55:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 20:39:35 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Were the feelings reciprocated?
I wasn't alone in finding her difficult to like.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2018-01-26 07:07:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the time,
but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember the real
person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath. The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sounds like my stepmother who turned into quite a nice person once she'd
forgotten she didn't like me.
Were the feelings reciprocated?
I wasn't alone in finding her difficult to like.
I meant did you like her more after she became nicer, but your memory of
her feelings about you had not diminished.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2018-01-25 13:52:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
We went through this with my Mum and my MiL, very difficult at the
time, but somehow a few years on it's all forgotten and we remember
the real person who was still there underneath.
This may not be popular, but my sister and I are pleased to be losing
contact with the real person underneath.  The mother with dementia is
far less manipulative and a little less difficult.
Sorry to hear it. We were both fortunate in having wonderful parents.
a***@gmail.com
2018-01-25 10:09:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
We're way beyond any chance of reasoning with Mum.  She has a mental
health problem, which is now overlaid with unrelated moderate to severe
dementia - this makes her easier to deal with, but means she'll never
remember a conversation about us feeling uncomfortable.
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the same
thing for the last 40 years.
--
Sam Plusnet
As a little boy in Gloucester listening to the Coronation, I was surprised that the weather being described in London was not the same as at home.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-25 10:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <2627f48d-d53d-4e1e-8ed0-***@googlegroups.com>,
"***@gmail.com" <***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by a***@gmail.com
As a little boy in Gloucester listening to the Coronation, I was
surprised that the weather being described in London was not the same
as at home.
Welcome to UMRA! (With apologies if you've been here a while; I haven't
noticed your email before.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

What's awful about weird views is not the views. It's the intolerance. If
someone wants to worship the Duke of Edinburgh or a pineapple, fine. But don't
kill me if I don't agree. - Tim Rice, Radio Times 15-21 October 2011.
Jenny M Benson
2018-01-25 10:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sam Plusnet
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the same
thing for the last 40 years.
Whenever I'm travelling some distance and the weather changes I always
wonder whether it has changed because I've moved from one "weather area"
to another or because all the weather has changed.
--
Jenny M Benson
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-01-25 11:36:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what
she can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the
same thing for the last 40 years.
Whenever I'm travelling some distance and the weather changes I always
wonder whether it has changed because I've moved from one "weather
area" to another or because all the weather has changed.
YANA. (Also, when I was working, even though the distance was only 17-18
miles, I discovered that it often _did_ vary: my bit of Kent [Charing,
between Ashford and Maidstone] could have 1½-2 inches of snow, whereas
my workplace [Rochester/Chatham] had none.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hope you dream a pig.
Chris J Dixon
2018-01-25 12:34:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
YANA. (Also, when I was working, even though the distance was only 17-18
miles, I discovered that it often _did_ vary: my bit of Kent [Charing,
between Ashford and Maidstone] could have 1½-2 inches of snow, whereas
my workplace [Rochester/Chatham] had none.)
When I worked in Loughborough but lived about 10 miles away in
Whitwick (now over 35 years ago) the change in altitude was such
that the amount of snow was significantly different, and
sometimes a diversionary route was necessary to avoid the highest
and steepest section.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2018-01-25 16:58:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 10:50:07 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
That does complicate matters.
We have a relative who lives around 200 miles away from us.
She seems unable to accept that our weather isn't the same as what she
can see out of her window.
Understandable for a 90 year old perhaps, but she's been doing the same
thing for the last 40 years.
Whenever I'm travelling some distance and the weather changes I always
wonder whether it has changed because I've moved from one "weather area"
to another or because all the weather has changed.
I sometimes wonder if I am living in a gloomy grey bubble while just over
the hill the sun shines. I know this happens as, between buying this house
and moving into it we often 'commuted' into the gloom and out of it again
at the end of the day. I blame the river.

OTOH there are plenty of days when I see black clouds approaching from the
west and proceeding beyond the hills to the south, leaving us in glorious
sunshine.

My neighbour says she never bothers with the weather forecast - every
valley has its own weather.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-01-24 13:38:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Someone wrote:

All attributes vanished

What’s the S African word for grandma/Granny? I expected it to bevan
Afrikans word, but no.

Zulu word meaning grandmother/grandma. Became part of the iconic slogan
Yebo Gogo (Yes, Grandma) from the South African cellular service-provider
Vodacom

Sincerely Chris
Sally Thompson
2018-01-26 00:11:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
Well, if I was 90 I would think it unlikely this gr8 granddaughter would be
unlikely to return to uk in my lifetime.
Oh dear. You know what I mean!
I do and I liked that scene, if only because Peggy, unlike so many elderly
people did not upset her ggdaughter by saying she wouldn't live long enough
to see her again. My father*, only in his 80s at the time (he died aged
94), when invited to d#2's wedding said, "I might be dead by then.". I've
heard of other elderly chaps doing similar.
My mother says it every time I phone to let her know I'll be visiting on
Thursday (or whatever). However, this is the very least of her many,
many annoying habits.
Does she still buy green bananas?
<g>
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2018-01-24 08:48:52 UTC
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Post by Vicky
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Nolly is never going to see Peggy again, is she? She will go to SA and
Peggy will die soon. That was a sad scene. And I was right about
Alice. She is not doing Dry January. Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
I don't think there was any possibility of Alice doing Dry January. It
was clear, when she and Chrisduffer left Ambridge View, the other day,
that they were heading straight for the pub. I assume that the reason
that this colleague is constantly suggesting ways that Alice could do
the job better is because she's making frequent mistakes at work,
probably due to a combination of hangovers and long lunches. This would
be why her boss didn't support her complaint about said colleague.
--
Best wishes, Serena
What would men be without women? Scarce, sir... mighty scarce. (Mark Twain)
krw
2018-01-24 15:50:00 UTC
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I assume that the reason that this colleague is constantly suggesting
ways that Alice could do the job better is because she's making frequent
mistakes at work, probably due to a combination of hangovers and long
lunches.  This would be why her boss didn't support her complaint about
said colleague.
In which case I recant the recent post as I had not made the link.

I assumed we were simply heading for an infidelity story but perhaps we
are going to cover alcoholism again. Or is it simply that no-one knows
what to do with Alice (send her to Palace).
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Serena Blanchflower
2018-01-24 18:55:55 UTC
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Post by krw
I assume that the reason that this colleague is constantly suggesting
ways that Alice could do the job better is because she's making
frequent mistakes at work, probably due to a combination of hangovers
and long lunches.  This would be why her boss didn't support her
complaint about said colleague.
In which case I recant the recent post as I had not made the link.
I assumed we were simply heading for an infidelity story but perhaps we
are going to cover alcoholism again.  Or is it simply that no-one knows
what to do with Alice (send her to Palace).
I think they've been signposting an alcoholism story for some time but,
of course, this could easily incorporate a bit of infidelity on the side.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Why do they call this a word processor? It's simple, ... you've seen
what food processors do to food, right?
Vicky
2018-01-24 21:45:02 UTC
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Post by krw
I assume that the reason that this colleague is constantly suggesting
ways that Alice could do the job better is because she's making frequent
mistakes at work, probably due to a combination of hangovers and long
lunches.  This would be why her boss didn't support her complaint about
said colleague.
In which case I recant the recent post as I had not made the link.
I assumed we were simply heading for an infidelity story but perhaps we
are going to cover alcoholism again. Or is it simply that no-one knows
what to do with Alice (send her to Palace).
Hasn't she already had an infidelity story when she was in
Soughampton?
--
Vicky
krw
2018-01-24 23:00:59 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by krw
I assume that the reason that this colleague is constantly suggesting
ways that Alice could do the job better is because she's making frequent
mistakes at work, probably due to a combination of hangovers and long
lunches.  This would be why her boss didn't support her complaint about
said colleague.
In which case I recant the recent post as I had not made the link.
I assumed we were simply heading for an infidelity story but perhaps we
are going to cover alcoholism again. Or is it simply that no-one knows
what to do with Alice (send her to Palace).
Hasn't she already had an infidelity story when she was in
Soughampton?
As it was on R4X it is not cannon and anyway I thought it was never an
actual cormorant?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
krw
2018-01-24 15:45:29 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
There was a mention of something similar previously. Given that she is
working for a modern technological firm the behaviour indicated from the
manager has been unreasonable for about 20 years.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2018-01-24 18:58:53 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Vicky
Is the sstuff about the bloke at
work sudden? Is that why she is discontented there?
There was a mention of something similar previously. Given that she is
working for a modern technological firm the behaviour indicated from the
manager has been unreasonable for about 20 years.
I was thinking they were going for a "Me Too" storyline. But I think
it's just a bit of mansplaining and she needs to tell him to take a
long walk!
--
Fenny
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