Discussion:
Post continuity BIG spoiler. 5th Oct
(too old to reply)
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 21:36:49 UTC
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School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?

Sincerely Chris
DavidK
2017-10-06 11:05:23 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Mike
2017-10-06 11:25:17 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2017-10-06 12:11:55 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
In SA I assume. If here then presumably she is subject to our laws on
the matter?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Robin Stevens
2017-10-06 12:15:40 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law. What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?

I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
DavidK
2017-10-06 14:25:54 UTC
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Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law. What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British Embassy.
Would she have been that organised?
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-06 15:13:52 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British Embassy.
Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate. It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa. I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married), which
would also point to her having been given a British passport initially.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Are you open to new light, from whatever source it may come? Do you
approach new ideas with discernment? (Quaker Advices and Queries #7)
krw
2017-10-06 15:52:45 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British
Embassy. Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate.  It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa.  I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married), which
would also point to her having been given a British passport initially.
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it. Perhaps
anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Mike
2017-10-06 16:01:11 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British
Embassy. Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate.  It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa.  I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married), which
would also point to her having been given a British passport initially.
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it. Perhaps
anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
Not just me then....
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-06 18:39:34 UTC
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[]
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it. Perhaps
anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
Not just me then....
No.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Radio 4 is one of the reasons being British is good. It's not a subset of
Britain - it's almost as if Britain is a subset of Radio 4. - Stephen Fry, in
Radio Times, 7-13 June, 2003.
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-06 17:24:26 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British
Embassy. Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate.  It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa.  I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married),
which would also point to her having been given a British passport
initially.
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it.  Perhaps
anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
That's certainly when Noluthando was born (on the 19th) but I can't
remember when they got married. I suspect it was after they went back
to South Africa, with minimal impact on Ambridge.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory. (Steven Wright)
Mike
2017-10-06 17:37:43 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British
Embassy. Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate.  It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa.  I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married),
which would also point to her having been given a British passport
initially.
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it.  Perhaps
anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
That's certainly when Noluthando was born (on the 19th) but I can't
remember when they got married. I suspect it was after they went back
to South Africa, with minimal impact on Ambridge.
Another thing, never having listened to AMBRIDGE extra, I suspect that some
storylines may have passed me by - though I know we were told by Auntie
that we would not miss out by not following the AE bits.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-06 18:40:38 UTC
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In message <HbPBB.1729030$***@fx17.am4>, Mike
<***@ntlworld.com> writes:
[]
Post by Mike
Another thing, never having listened to AMBRIDGE extra, I suspect that some
storylines may have passed me by - though I know we were told by Auntie
that we would not miss out by not following the AE bits.
Yes. And lottery money was going to be _in addition_ to existing
government spending on good causes.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Radio 4 is one of the reasons being British is good. It's not a subset of
Britain - it's almost as if Britain is a subset of Radio 4. - Stephen Fry, in
Radio Times, 7-13 June, 2003.
Chris McMillan
2017-10-06 17:55:19 UTC
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thearchers/entries/851b9965-6b76-4755-bd9b-86e074bc27d9

Sincerely Chris
John Ashby
2017-10-06 19:47:22 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thearchers/entries/851b9965-6b76-4755-bd9b-86e074bc27d9
Sincerely Chris
"At the same time, Lucas had been offered a job in Durban but Kate was
loathed to move there.

Three words too many in that sentence.

john
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-06 20:31:20 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris McMillan
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thearchers/entries/851b9965-6b76-4755-bd9b-8
6e074bc27d9
Sincerely Chris
"At the same time, Lucas had been offered a job in Durban but Kate was
loathed to move there.
Three words too many in that sentence.
john
(-:

Also, the word should have been "loth" (sometimes spelt "loath").

But she certainly is loathed. I'm trying to remember when she last did
or said something nice, to or about anybody. There must have been
something.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The trouble with the death penalty has always been that nobody wanted it for
everybody, but everybody differed about who should get off. - Albert
Pierrepoint, in his 1974 autobiography.
Mike
2017-10-07 07:14:35 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris McMillan
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thearchers/entries/851b9965-6b76-4755-bd9b-8
6e074bc27d9
Sincerely Chris
"At the same time, Lucas had been offered a job in Durban but Kate was
loathed to move there.
Three words too many in that sentence.
john
Also, the word should have been "loth" (sometimes spelt "loath").
But she certainly is loathed. I'm trying to remember when she last did
or said something nice, to or about anybody. There must have been
something.
Possibly when she smiled at the Effer after farting in her nappy?
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2017-10-07 10:48:45 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/thearchers/entries/851b9965-6b76-4755-bd9b-86e074bc27d9
Sincerely Chris
Thank you Chris - that certainly helps a lot.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
carolet
2017-10-07 12:10:56 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Nollyandtherestofhername said that she had voluntarily stayed on at school
and was not obliged to carry on at the school.
But that's under South African law.  What's the position if she becomes
a UK resident?
I assume that she's got dual citizenship, by virtue of her parents.
I *think* Kate would have to have registered her at the British
Embassy. Would she have been that organised?
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a
British birth certificate.  It would also, probably, have been easier
for them to get her a British passport, before they took her back to
South Africa.  I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that
point (although I can't remember when, or where, they did get
married), which would also point to her having been given a British
passport initially.
Apparently in January 2001 but to be honest I do not recall it.
Perhaps anything to do with Kate gets blocked out.
That's certainly when Noluthando was born (on the 19th) but I can't
remember when they got married.  I suspect it was after they went back
to South Africa, with minimal impact on Ambridge.
According to my spreadsheets they were married in June 2001. Wherever I
got that from didn't specify an exact date.

As I previously reported, they returned to SA in March 2001, so the
wedding must have been there.
--
CaroleT
Penny
2017-10-06 18:44:53 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Oct 2017 16:13:52 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
No, Nolly was born in Borchester Hospital, so she would have a British
birth certificate. It would also, probably, have been easier for them
to get her a British passport, before they took her back to South
Africa. I don't *think* Kate and Lucas were married at that point
(although I can't remember when, or where, they did get married), which
would also point to her having been given a British passport initially.
Kate first appeared in the cast list as Kate Madikane for w/e 28th Jun 2002
which is when she turned up in Ambridge with Lucas. Certainly when she was
in Ambridge following Nolly's birth the previous year she was listed as
Kate Aldridge.

However, in my trawl of the archives I see I added
. Bolter, the - Kate Madikane
to the nicknames list on (or before) 1 May 2002 so someone must have talked
to or about her before she turned up in person.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2017-10-06 17:47:09 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Under UK law, yes. Presumably as she’s 16 she’s done whatever national
school exam they might take last term and has either not begun her next
stage or has bunked off.

Sincerely Chris
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-06 18:29:37 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by DavidK
Post by Chris McMillan
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Under UK law, yes. Presumably as she’s 16 she’s done whatever national
school exam they might take last term and has either not begun her next
stage or has bunked off.
I think, from what Jenny (or, maybe, Brian) said, she was due back next
week. That had been a factor in the timing of her visit.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Mankind must put an end to war or war will put an end to mankind (John F
Kennedy)
Nick Odell
2017-10-06 18:43:17 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Under UK law, yes.  Presumably as she’s 16 she’s done whatever national
school exam they might take last term and has either not begun her next
stage or has bunked off.
I think, from what Jenny (or, maybe, Brian) said, she was due back next
week.  That had been a factor in the timing of her visit.
The academic year in South Africa begins in late January and ends early
December so I'm not too sure what she's synchronised with here.

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-06 19:22:51 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Under UK law, yes.  Presumably as she’s 16 she’s done whatever national
school exam they might take last term and has either not begun her next
stage or has bunked off.
I think, from what Jenny (or, maybe, Brian) said, she was due back
next week.  That had been a factor in the timing of her visit.
The academic year in South Africa begins in late January and ends early
December so I'm not too sure what she's synchronised with here.
I assume that, under SA law, she would have been allowed to leave school
last December but she'd stayed on and should be back for the start of
the next term, next week.
--
Best wishes, Serena
People are forever calling me a hypochondriac and, let me tell you, that
makes me sick.
Nick Odell
2017-10-06 18:38:06 UTC
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Aren't they EETs? And those who aren't are NEETs?

Not in
Education
Employment or
Training

What you are not allowed is to do nothing. So I guess working at sixteen
is okay, or has that all changed?

Nick
Marjorie
2017-10-10 09:52:13 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Aren't they EETs? And those who aren't are NEETs?
Not in
Education
Employment or
Training
What you are not allowed is to do nothing. So I guess working at sixteen
is okay, or has that all changed?
Nick
I think even if you get a job, you have to include some training or
further education, e.g. apprenticeship, day-release etc until 18. She
would also need a NI number, but I suppose as she was born here, that
can be arranged.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Fenny
2017-10-06 22:06:20 UTC
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Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
https://www.classbase.com/Countries/South-Africa/Education-System

Edication (sic) is compulsory for ages 7 to 15.

Tertiary education seems to be mostly fee paying and I'd be surprised
if she wasn't at some kind of private school.
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2017-10-07 10:45:57 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian. She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
https://www.classbase.com/Countries/South-Africa/Education-System
Edication (sic) is compulsory for ages 7 to 15.
Tertiary education seems to be mostly fee paying and I'd be surprised
if she wasn't at some kind of private school.
Thanks. I do have an SA girlfriend married to an Englishman, currently
working in SA (she’s in primary teaching, he’s a bridge engineer) but I
can’t remember if her UK living years involved R4 listening, nor does she
ever get round to writing except at Christmas, so my questions to her and
her UK born children (Hazel’s age) would have gone unanswered.

Sincerely Chris
carolet
2017-10-07 12:22:00 UTC
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Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.

If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
--
CaroleT
Penny
2017-10-07 19:46:07 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 13:22:00 +0100, carolet <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
At what point would anyone notice she is 'resident'? She doesn't need a
visa to get in, she holds a British passport. As far as the world is
concerned she is visiting her mother while normally domiciled in SA.

She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-07 19:53:47 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
At what point would anyone notice she is 'resident'? She doesn't need a
visa to get in, she holds a British passport. As far as the world is
concerned she is visiting her mother while normally domiciled in SA.
She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
Or unless she tries (as she suggested) to get a job and her potential
employer asks for her NI number etc.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Have no fear of perfection - you will never achieve it! (Salvador Dali)
Penny
2017-10-07 23:25:14 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 20:53:47 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
At what point would anyone notice she is 'resident'? She doesn't need a
visa to get in, she holds a British passport. As far as the world is
concerned she is visiting her mother while normally domiciled in SA.
She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
Or unless she tries (as she suggested) to get a job and her potential
employer asks for her NI number etc.
Yes, of course, work or education would get her 'noticed' and registered in
some way. I don't know the rules in schools these days - we used to enroll
traveller (and diplomat's) children on a temporary basis but unless they
were there in early January they didn't count towards our funding so didn't
'count' in that respect. I don't recall sending details of new enrollments
anywhere but maybe that was the head teacher's job.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky
2017-10-08 08:53:26 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 20:53:47 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust.
She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
Or unless she tries (as she suggested) to get a job and her potential
employer asks for her NI number etc.
Yes, of course, work or education would get her 'noticed' and registered in
some way. I don't know the rules in schools these days - we used to enroll
traveller (and diplomat's) children on a temporary basis but unless they
were there in early January they didn't count towards our funding so didn't
'count' in that respect. I don't recall sending details of new enrollments
anywhere but maybe that was the head teacher's job.
When Captain Ex's brother's wife stayed with us years ago and had a 3
and a 6 year old with her we sent at least one and possibly both to
school with ...if mine were still in primary school they must have
been under 11 but I recall my #1 daughter was pretty grown up, so say
10, and then #2 was 8 and maybe older visitor 7...anyway they went
with ours, presumably into #2 daughter's class.

It was for a month or two max. I just asked and the school said yes,
fine. I think they went to Syria afterwards to family. Brother's wife
was from Eastern Europe, where they'd been living, and they all spoke
little English. It must have been difficult to blend them into the
class. Although the older one already spoke Rumanian and Arabic, so
had language skills, and probably picked English up quickly.
--
Vicky
Nick Odell
2017-10-08 16:54:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 20:53:47 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
At what point would anyone notice she is 'resident'? She doesn't need a
visa to get in, she holds a British passport. As far as the world is
concerned she is visiting her mother while normally domiciled in SA.
She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
Or unless she tries (as she suggested) to get a job and her potential
employer asks for her NI number etc.
Yes, of course, work or education would get her 'noticed' and registered in
some way. I don't know the rules in schools these days - we used to enroll
traveller (and diplomat's) children on a temporary basis but unless they
were there in early January they didn't count towards our funding so didn't
'count' in that respect. I don't recall sending details of new enrollments
anywhere but maybe that was the head teacher's job.
If you are wondering how the country manages to -erme- control its
borders when there are never enough Border Control Officers at the
airport when you need them, it's because the job has now been pushed out
to Medical Receptionists, School Secretaries, Landlords and Employers.
You probably need to add Bank Clerks and a few other professions and
trades to that list as well. It's a different world out there today.

Nick
Marjorie
2017-10-10 09:54:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 20:53:47 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Sat, 7 Oct 2017 13:22:00 +0100, carolet
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
At what point would anyone notice she is 'resident'? She doesn't need a
visa to get in, she holds a British passport. As far as the world is
concerned she is visiting her mother while normally domiciled in SA.
She's not old enough to vote, nor is she an adult for council tax purposes.
In fact unless she needs a doctor (and very possibly not even then) she
will be very much 'under the radar' as far as any 'authority' is concerned
Or unless she tries (as she suggested) to get a job and her potential
employer asks for her NI number etc.
Yes, of course, work or education would get her 'noticed' and
registered in
some way. I don't know the rules in schools these days - we used to enroll
traveller (and diplomat's) children on a temporary basis but unless they
were there in early January they didn't count towards our funding so didn't
'count' in that respect. I don't recall sending details of new enrollments
anywhere but maybe that was the head teacher's job.
If you are wondering how the country manages to -erme- control its
borders when there are never enough Border Control Officers at the
airport when you need them, it's because the job has now been pushed out
to Medical Receptionists, School Secretaries, Landlords and Employers.
You probably need to add Bank Clerks and a few other professions and
trades to that list as well. It's a different world out there today.
Yes, I think it would be up to the school or college, or employer, to
check her credentials and make sure that she had the right to be in the UK.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-07 20:03:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by carolet
Post by DavidK
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor or
a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another sort.
If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then she is
clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though it is
term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2 or 3
months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is British
(born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely that
edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm interested
in whether she would want to.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Radio 4 is one of the reasons being British is good. It's not a subset of
Britain - it's almost as if Britain is a subset of Radio 4. - Stephen Fry, in
Radio Times, 7-13 June, 2003.
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-07 20:11:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
 ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm interested
in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA. I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.

I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green
earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive.
(Thich Nhat Hanh)
Marjorie
2017-10-10 09:56:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
 ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Vicky
2017-10-10 10:42:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
 ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom. Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
--
Vicky
Nick Odell
2017-10-10 12:14:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
 ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom. Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.

Nick
Vicky
2017-10-10 12:25:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 13:14:43 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
In message <oragt6$c
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom. Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
Nick
Whoosh?
--
Vicky
Mike
2017-10-10 13:36:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
 ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom. Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
Nick
Or perhaps she would like to train in removing wine stains?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2017-10-10 15:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
  ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other 18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom.  Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN

YAHarveyWeinsteinAICM5castingcouches
Btms
2017-10-10 17:35:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
BrritSki <***@gmail.com> wrote:
And lotsofrats preceded him.....


Much snippage to ......
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom.  Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
YAHarveyWeinsteinAICM5castingcouches
I knew it; and you woz the front-runner of three.

Channelling Dme Judy......
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Jenny M Benson
2017-10-11 08:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
  ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other
18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom.  Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.

(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky
2017-10-11 09:12:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 09:19:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
  ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other
18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom.  Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.
(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
I still don't get it :(
--
Vicky
Mike
2017-10-11 09:52:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 09:19:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:56:15 +0100, Marjorie
Post by Marjorie
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
School boy error, Brian.  She’s staying till Xmas, but which one?
Sincerely Chris
  ITWWT she is sixteen. Is she obliged to be in education or a
apprenticeship for two more years?
Presumably that would depend on whether she was classed as a visitor
or a resident.
If she were to move here permanently, then, like other
18-and-unders,
she would be expected to go to school or into training of another
sort. If she went back after a week, as was initially planned, then
she is clearly not expected to spent that week in school, even though
it is term time. If, as the current plan seems to be, she stays for 2
or 3 months, it is not clear what the law would demand. As she is
British (born here of a British mother), it may make it more likely
that edcation of some sort is required.
Do we think she might _want_ to be in education? Not that I think that
would have _much_ to do with what authority decides, but I'm
interested in whether she would want to.
Well, we know that she doesn't want to go back to her school in SA.  I
think she vaguely suggested maybe getting a job or possibly going to
college, when she was talking to Kate but I didn't get the impression
there was anything she particularly wanted to do.
I think like a lot of people (and especially a lot of teenagers) she
sounded a lot clearer about what she didn't want to do than what she did
want.
She's not going to find it easy to get a college place for an
unspecified length of time (what, a few months? The college won't get
funding for that) and anyway most courses are full now and/or have
already started.
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom.  Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.
(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
I still don't get it :(
Such a pure mind!
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2017-10-11 09:58:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 09:19:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.
(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
I still don't get it :(
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/10/georgina-chapman-harvey-weinstein-wife-split
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike Ruddock
2017-10-11 13:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 09:19:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.
(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
I still don't get it :(
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/10/georgina-chapman-harvey-weinstein-wife-split
Just a passing thought/query: why is everyone pronouncing this fellow's
name as "Winesteen" when the spelling clearly indicates "Winestine"?

(I presume in the original German the name means the stuff thrown down
by some wines as they mature, potassium tartrate I think?)

Mike Ruddock
John Ashby
2017-10-11 14:11:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 09:19:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
If it's on-the-job training she's looking for, perhaps she ought to be
thinking about a career in Hollywood, fnar, fnar.
BTN
Granted.
(But I do wish people would wait until I'm back at my deskie before
uttering BT... grumble, grumble!)
I still don't get it :(
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/10/georgina-chapman-harvey-weinstein-wife-split
Just a passing thought/query: why is everyone pronouncing this fellow's
name as "Winesteen" when the spelling clearly indicates "Winestine"?
(I presume in the original German the name means the stuff thrown down
by some wines as they mature, potassium tartrate I think?)
Mike Ruddock
It's FrankenSTEEN!

john
Penny
2017-10-11 16:02:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 14:51:46 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Sid Nuncius
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/10/georgina-chapman-harvey-weinstein-wife-split
Just a passing thought/query: why is everyone pronouncing this fellow's
name as "Winesteen" when the spelling clearly indicates "Winestine"?
Normal American mispronunciation of such things - no idea how he pronounces
it himself but he does work in USA.
Post by Mike Ruddock
(I presume in the original German the name means the stuff thrown down
by some wines as they mature, potassium tartrate I think?)
Oh, I assumed it was a pottery vessel from which one drinks wine.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2017-10-11 16:49:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 14:51:46 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Sid Nuncius
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/10/georgina-chapman-harvey-weinstein-wife-split
Just a passing thought/query: why is everyone pronouncing this fellow's
name as "Winesteen" when the spelling clearly indicates "Winestine"?
Normal American mispronunciation of such things - no idea how he pronounces
it himself but he does work in USA.
Post by Mike Ruddock
(I presume in the original German the name means the stuff thrown down
by some wines as they mature, potassium tartrate I think?)
Oh, I assumed it was a pottery vessel from which one drinks wine.
Hence when drinking clumsily, this may result in wine stains.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2017-10-10 14:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Maybe someone will give her a job locally.
Gay Grables needs a restaurant manager I believe.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2017-10-10 17:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Vicky
Maybe someone will give her a job locally.
Gay Grables needs a restaurant manager I believe.
I think they're looking for someone who would be less hassle than
Joey, not more!
--
Fenny
steveski
2017-10-11 00:36:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Vicky
Maybe someone will give her a job locally.
Gay Grables needs a restaurant manager I believe.
I think they're looking for someone who would be less hassle than Joey,
not more!
Bring back Jean-Paul!
--
Steveski
Fenny
2017-10-10 17:48:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Maybe someone will give her a job locally. Snappy needs another pair
of hands and so does Tom. Johnny combined work with training but he
had a place at college. Is there a way of just calling it on the job
training; if in Bridge Farm she could do the food hygiene course, and
would have to if working with food in any way. That's sometimes run
independently as a one-off.
Johnny was doing an apprenticeship. She cannot sign up to an
apprenticeship if she's not going to be around for the full time
period.

And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
--
Fenny
Jenny M Benson
2017-10-11 08:24:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
Many moons ago my daughter took on a paper round. She funded the
purchase of the Illustrated Oxford Dictionary as a part-work and part of
a bike before someone complained to the fuzz that she was under-age.
Our local bobby came round to say "Stop it!". He was very embarrassed
and apologetic about having to do so: not only on was he a friend of
ours but she delivered his paper every morning.
--
Jenny M Benson
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-12 07:42:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
--
Best wishes, Serena
If you smile at life, life will smile back at you...
Fenny
2017-10-12 21:19:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.

There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.

When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find a
funded course for her.
--
Fenny
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-13 07:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.
There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.
When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find a
funded course for her.
Thanks.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Believe those who are seeking the truth. Doubt those who find it. (Andre
Gide)
Btms
2017-10-13 07:36:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.
There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.
When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find
funded course for her.
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2017-10-13 08:43:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Fenny
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.
There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.
When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find
funded course for her.
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I won’t ‘soapbox’ or ‘hobby horse’ on this one but, I left school a few
months early to start work, had a total of six jobs during my working
years, used holiday leave in lieu of giving notice to leave jobs to start
the next job all the sooner and was fortunate in never having a day of
unemployment and retired on my 65th. birthday plus a few days ‘to see the
week out’; to me,dossing about sounds like voluntarily being unemployed.
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2017-10-13 09:05:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
I won’t ‘soapbox’ or ‘hobby horse’ on this one but, I left school a few
months early to start work, had a total of six jobs during my working
years, used holiday leave in lieu of giving notice to leave jobs to start
the next job all the sooner and was fortunate in never having a day of
unemployment and retired on my 65th.
My story is similar. I left uni after a year because I didn't like it
and wanted to start my flying career with the RAF which I did the weeks
after uni finished. Unfortunately my piloting did not last long (umra
passim) and I managed to leave the RAF 3 months later when they finally
accepted that I wasn't going to stay on as a navigator.
The day after I got home I went to the Labour Exchange (Professional and
Executive as an ex occifer (except I wasn't as I was only "acting" and
had never been commissioned)), the lady asked what I wanted to do, so I
told her computer programming, she made a phone call, I went for an
interview that afternoon and started the next monday at RR Engines 5
minutes walk from home. After that job I worked 25 years or so at TI, a
few months in the middle of that time at Massey Ferguson in Coventry and
then ended with 10 years as a contractor at Frod, retiring early at 57
and then being self-funded until OAP kicked in at 65. So like you Mike
never on benefits, unless you count uni, but even there I had an RAF
scholarship instead of a grant.
Chris J Dixon
2017-10-13 10:44:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
So like you Mike
never on benefits, unless you count uni, but even there I had an RAF
scholarship instead of a grant.
+1

About 20 years ago, following redundancy, I presented myself to
sign on, in line with the information package we had been given.

On learning that I had 3 months' pay in lieu, they explained that
I wasn't eligible for payments until that period had expired.

There was then internal consultation about some recent rule
change, which seemed to strike them as unhelpful.

Well, you can still sign on.

But I will then be required to come along and demonstrate that I
am doing all the job-seeking stuff that the process demands?

Yes.

And in return I get no payments?

Correct.

And there is no requirement to sign on now?

No.

See you in three months.

By which time, fortunately, I was employed again.

That job lasted until VR at 59, and my state pension at 65

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Vicky
2017-10-13 17:14:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris J Dixon
About 20 years ago, following redundancy, I presented myself to
sign on, in line with the information package we had been given.
On learning that I had 3 months' pay in lieu, they explained that
I wasn't eligible for payments until that period had expired.
There was then internal consultation about some recent rule
change, which seemed to strike them as unhelpful.
Well, you can still sign on.
But I will then be required to come along and demonstrate that I
am doing all the job-seeking stuff that the process demands?
Yes.
And in return I get no payments?
Correct.
And there is no requirement to sign on now?
No.
See you in three months.
By which time, fortunately, I was employed again.
That job lasted until VR at 59, and my state pension at 65
I signed on in 1996 as my contract with one FE college ended at the
end of July but the new contract with another college began in
September. I signed on for August and they made me show evidence of
job searching. No college employs people for one month in August, or
didn't then. I went away for 2 weeks holiday and so only got 2 weeks.
--
Vicky
LFS
2017-10-13 11:18:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Fenny
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.
There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.
When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find
funded course for her.
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Btms
2017-10-13 11:41:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Post by Fenny
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:42:16 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Fenny
And no, you can't just employ under 16s and pretend they are doing
training. It has to be properly arranged and funded.
What are the rules for 16 year olds, like Noluthando?
Sorry, I meant under 18s. The school participation age is now 18. So
if they are not in school, they cannot work (other than casual part
time type jobs) unless they are in an approved training scheme. To be
an apprentice, they must be signed up to a proper apprenticeship. The
employer has to agree to the training and any college attendance.
There are 16+ children who fail to continue to years 11 & 12 and
don't do apprenticeships, but they will have problems getting a full
time job and won't get any benefits.
When Phoebe went to SA, the visit was planned and they enrolled her in
school. No college will take a student for a few weeks unless they
can get funding for them. Unless things have changed significantly
this academic year, Borchester College will not be able to find
funded course for her.
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-10-13 14:45:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 13 Oct 2017 11:41:49 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2017-10-13 19:06:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sid Nuncius
2017-10-14 06:44:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
I spotted the irony, if it's any consolation, Bottoms.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2017-10-14 07:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
I spotted the irony, if it's any consolation, Bottoms.
Hugely consoling 😘
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2017-10-14 10:39:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
I spotted the irony, if it's any consolation, Bottoms.
Hugely consoling 😘
Is that a hugely consoled bottom.... or a consoled huge bottom???
--
Toodle Pip
LFS
2017-10-14 08:41:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year.  This was
before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about,  is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that’s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
I spotted the irony, if it's any consolation, Bottoms.
+1. I even heard it in my head in Ian Fletcher's voice. (I have a big
crush on him.)
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Penny
2017-10-14 16:35:52 UTC
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On Sat, 14 Oct 2017 07:44:10 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@tesco.net>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to ?doss about? because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
So that?s all good then.
If you want to cull the sick, disabled and (benefit-cock-up-caused)
homeless along with those workers not being paid enough to live, then I
suppose you could say that.
Well they do on W1A; that is claim any ridiculous idea or policy is “all
good”.
I spotted the irony, if it's any consolation, Bottoms.
So did I, sorry, just being unusually grumpy as still mostly in pain :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-10-13 16:54:18 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Btms
On a slight swerve, I was shocked when No1 son left College after A levels,
he said the rest of his class
(Not vast numbers) planned to go on benefits for a year. This was before
gap years were common but I remain shocked that we pay benefits to those
who choose to “doss about” because the Government will give them money.
Doss about, is the phrase I recall being used.
I also heard of youngsters doing this about twenty years ago but I very
much doubt whether it is still possible, especially in view of the
recent reports of problems with the early rollout of universal credit
which suggest that the system has been tightened up to a degree that
makes it unworkable and causes great hardship.
In the days before gap years were common, benefits were a very
different beast from now. I don't know a huge amout about benefits
these days, but anyone under 25 who doesn't have dependent children
will struggle to get an amount that would cover their mobile phone
habit.
--
Fenny
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