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josh archer
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Btms
2017-09-30 20:26:11 UTC
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I have just learned that Josh Archer is closely related to Celia Imrie’s
son. It amazes me that in such an over crowded and tough profession so
many off-sprung follow their parents into it. Any views?
John Ashby
2017-09-30 21:35:03 UTC
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Post by Btms
I have just learned that Josh Archer is closely related to Celia Imrie’s
son.
ITYM "extremely friendly with". But he doesn't sound a bit like Mr
Bennett (So, Farewell then, Russell, you'll never listen to the Ring
Cycle over Christmas again).
Post by Btms
It amazes me that in such an over crowded and tough profession so
many off-sprung follow their parents into it. Any views?
Possible reasons:

Genetic disposition. Children of actors may have innate talent for acting.

Cultural imprinting. Having grown up with the stage as a constant
background, with acting talked about in depth, it might be an easy
discipline for them to take up

Nepotism. The family will have a wide set of connections who can help in
progressing a career.

Statistical fluke. Is this a real or a perceived effect? Should we get
More or Less to investigate whether the phenomenon is more prevalent in
the acting profession than it is in medicine, music, science, the law,
etc (where all of the previous three reasons might apply)? Do we just
notice the sons and daughters more than those who enter the profession
do novo?

I'm aware of medical dynasties, scientific dynasties, musical dynasties,
mathematical dynasties, sporting dynasties, and as you say, acting
dynasties. I'd like to believe it's down to the cultural imprinting, but
I suspect it's a combination of at least those four reasons.

john
Jenny M Benson
2017-09-30 23:21:24 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Btms
Celia Imrie’s
son.
ITYM "extremely friendly with". But he doesn't sound a bit like Mr
Bennett (So, Farewell then, Russell, you'll never listen to the Ring
Cycle over Christmas again).
Now you've totally confused me (easily done) because a chap who played
Mr Bennett in some version of Ms Austen's work also played the
wonderful, gorgeous Russell in After Henry. But I'm sure he's far too
old to be a son of Ms Imrie.
--
Jenny M Benson
John Ashby
2017-10-01 04:59:55 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by John Ashby
Post by Btms
Celia Imrie’s
son.
ITYM "extremely friendly with". But he doesn't sound a bit like Mr
Bennett (So, Farewell then, Russell, you'll never listen to the Ring
Cycle over Christmas again).
Now you've totally confused me (easily done) because a chap who played
Mr Bennett in some version of Ms Austen's work also played the
wonderful, gorgeous Russell in After Henry.  But I'm sure he's far too
old to be a son of Ms Imrie.
Celia Imrie's son is also Benjamin Whitrow's.

Mr Whitrow's obit appeared yesterday.

john
Jenny M Benson
2017-10-01 08:57:32 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Celia Imrie's son is also Benjamin Whitrow's.
Mr Whitrow's obit appeared yesterday.
Ah! All is crystal now. Very sorry BW is no longer with us.
--
Jenny M Benson
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-01 00:23:26 UTC
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Post by Btms
I have just learned that Josh Archer is closely related to Celia Imrie’s
son.
ITYM "extremely friendly with". But he doesn't sound a bit like Mr
Bennett (So, Farewell then, Russell, you'll never listen to the Ring
Cycle over Christmas again).
Post by Btms
It amazes me that in such an over crowded and tough profession so
many off-sprung follow their parents into it. Any views?
Genetic disposition. Children of actors may have innate talent for acting.
Cultural imprinting. Having grown up with the stage as a constant
background, with acting talked about in depth, it might be an easy
discipline for them to take up
Nepotism. The family will have a wide set of connections who can help
in progressing a career.
Statistical fluke. Is this a real or a perceived effect? Should we get
More or Less to investigate whether the phenomenon is more prevalent in
the acting profession than it is in medicine, music, science, the law,
etc (where all of the previous three reasons might apply)? Do we just
notice the sons and daughters more than those who enter the profession
do novo?
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Post by John Ashby
I'm aware of medical dynasties, scientific dynasties, musical
dynasties, mathematical dynasties, sporting dynasties, and as you say,
acting dynasties. I'd like to believe it's down to the cultural
imprinting, but I suspect it's a combination of at least those four
reasons.
john
I suspect you're right, and a well-thought-through response as well.

In latter years, I've heard/read various well-known thesps, when asked
if they'd encourage their children to follow them, say something like "I
wouldn't encourage them into it, but if they show a strong inclination
to, I wouldn't dissuade them, though I'd certainly warn them of the
hardships involved", and in some but not all cases they've added "and to
acquire a backup trade/profession".

The question is I _think_ more often asked when their offspring _have_
entered the profession, though I've certainly heard it asked of ones
whose children are too young to have decided yet.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Quantity is no substitute for quality, but it's the only one we've got.
Btms
2017-10-01 06:45:50 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Yes this is what I mean by tough. I understand 90% of them are out of work
at any one time for a start. In this particular case both parents are/were
successful. I can understand this might encourage off-sprung to go for it,
if they have the talent. But I feel this is atypical? Perhaps if you have
connections it is easier?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Marjorie
2017-10-01 10:42:02 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Yes this is what I mean by tough. I understand 90% of them are out of work
at any one time for a start. In this particular case both parents are/were
successful. I can understand this might encourage off-sprung to go for it,
if they have the talent. But I feel this is atypical? Perhaps if you have
connections it is easier?
I'm sure that in the case of child actors, nepotism and contacts have a
lot to do with it.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
l***@gmail.com
2017-10-01 11:20:08 UTC
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Post by Marjorie
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Yes this is what I mean by tough. I understand 90% of them are out of work
at any one time for a start. In this particular case both parents are/were
successful. I can understand this might encourage off-sprung to go for it,
if they have the talent. But I feel this is atypical? Perhaps if you have
connections it is easier?
I'm sure that in the case of child actors, nepotism and contacts have a
lot to do with it.
--
Marjorie
I rather think this is so but I notice how keen they are to deny it helps. My initial post was a tad tongue in cheek.
Chris McMillan
2017-10-01 17:03:18 UTC
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Post by l***@gmail.com
Post by Marjorie
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Yes this is what I mean by tough. I understand 90% of them are out of work
at any one time for a start. In this particular case both parents are/were
successful. I can understand this might encourage off-sprung to go for it,
if they have the talent. But I feel this is atypical? Perhaps if you have
connections it is easier?
I'm sure that in the case of child actors, nepotism and contacts have a
lot to do with it.
--
Marjorie
I rather think this is so but I notice how keen they are to deny it
helps. My initial post was a tad tongue in cheek.
Last night I was at a concert where a new choir had been formed following
the death of a well known choral conductor. His wofe had been a long
standing member of previous choir, joining as a student or just after
graduation (I’m going back 40 years plus in choir history - but was not an
original choir member, that too had risen from another choir).

The new choir appointed a new conductor last year: one of his daughters,
and her mum is a member of same choir along with quite a few from the
previous choir. Feels slightly weird watching the daughter of someone
you’d been watching conduct for the best part of 40 yrs do the same thing
and produce an even better end result. I don’t know if this choir have
bern in direct competition with the ‘old’ choir in the usual annual choir
competitions but Lucy has won at least one trophy. Her dad won many dozen
over the years.

Not found out what her sister’s doing (she ought to be living up to her
musical name though: Melody).

Oh yes, our friend has the identical name to a TA actor, but I knew on
seeing it (one of our newer best friends) it was not our friend. Although
the programme has the name I expected, the MC introduced her with her
middle name. First time I’d heard it, maybe a new plan. I shall see next
tine they perform close to home.

In local music and am dram there’s a lot of inter-generational input. Lots
of musical school aged children where we know who their musical parents
are.

(Heard a mention of a Pasadena Roof Orchestra concert on R3 this morning,
it was for this evening, forget where. Must look them up and see where
Stownley is).

Sincerely Chris

Sincerly Chris

Sincerely Chris
Sally Thompson
2017-10-01 11:26:39 UTC
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Post by Marjorie
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though none of those other professions (well, maybe music) are
"overcrowded and tough", as Btms puts it. (Well, medicine at least
certainly is _difficult_, but I think Btms meant difficult in the sense
of high competition, rather than hard.)
Yes this is what I mean by tough. I understand 90% of them are out of work
at any one time for a start. In this particular case both parents are/were
successful. I can understand this might encourage off-sprung to go for it,
if they have the talent. But I feel this is atypical? Perhaps if you have
connections it is easier?
I'm sure that in the case of child actors, nepotism and contacts have a
lot to do with it.
And perhaps just familiarity with acting as a way of life.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
krw
2017-10-02 22:10:32 UTC
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Post by Btms
I have just learned that Josh Archer is closely related to Celia Imrie’s
son. It amazes me that in such an over crowded and tough profession so
many off-sprung follow their parents into it. Any views?
I thought this was well known as much fuss was made at the time of his
joining as the best friend.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
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