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Ask EU: strange keyboard behaviour.
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Steve Hague
2017-04-15 08:02:25 UTC
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I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Steve
Vicky
2017-04-15 08:39:27 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:02:25 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Steve
Maybe the new one sends a space or a comma or something? Is it set to
go automatically? Do the password manually and make sure no spaces
first?
--
Vicky
Sid Nuncius
2017-04-15 09:06:20 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which characters
come up.

Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has nothing
to do with it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Peter Percival
2017-04-15 09:56:06 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which characters
come up.
Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has nothing
to do with it.
I had some trouble once that also has nothing to do with it.

I'm remind of comedy sketches which begin with a solitary figure coming
onto the stage and saying "My name is Bertrand McWhirter McWhirter from
Tillicoultry in the county of Clackmannanshire and I have absolutely
nothing to do with these proceeding so I'll bit you all goodnight".
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
krw
2017-04-15 12:48:26 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which characters
come up.
Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has nothing
to do with it.
I had some trouble once that also has nothing to do with it.
I'm remind of comedy sketches which begin with a solitary figure coming
onto the stage and saying "My name is Bertrand McWhirter McWhirter from
Tillicoultry in the county of Clackmannanshire and I have absolutely
nothing to do with these proceeding so I'll bit you all goodnight".
My guess would be that the new keyboard needs a different driver
installing on the pc.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Steve Hague
2017-04-16 07:48:51 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which characters
come up.
Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has nothing
to do with it.
I had some trouble once that also has nothing to do with it.
I'm remind of comedy sketches which begin with a solitary figure
coming onto the stage and saying "My name is Bertrand McWhirter
McWhirter from Tillicoultry in the county of Clackmannanshire and I
have absolutely nothing to do with these proceeding so I'll bit you
all goodnight".
My guess would be that the new keyboard needs a different driver
installing on the pc.
The trouble with any explanation I can come up with is it types the
password and anything else faultlessly in a document. The problem occurs
only before I log on, which makes tracing it a bit awkward.
Steve
Vicky
2017-04-16 08:13:05 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 08:48:51 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
The trouble with any explanation I can come up with is it types the
password and anything else faultlessly in a document. The problem occurs
only before I log on, which makes tracing it a bit awkward.
Steve
have you tried changing the password once on with the new keyboard? It
might then feel some ownership and cooperate?
--
Vicky
Steve Hague
2017-04-16 08:26:06 UTC
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Post by Vicky
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 08:48:51 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
The trouble with any explanation I can come up with is it types the
password and anything else faultlessly in a document. The problem occurs
only before I log on, which makes tracing it a bit awkward.
Steve
have you tried changing the password once on with the new keyboard? It
might then feel some ownership and cooperate?
As a fellow believer in the innate hostility of inanimate objects I
consider that definitely worth a try Vicky. I'll give it a go when I'm
back at work on Tuesday.
Steve
Jenny M Benson
2017-04-16 10:26:36 UTC
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Post by Vicky
have you tried changing the password once on with the new keyboard? It
might then feel some ownership and cooperate?
That reminds me of my Bank app when it says "we don't recognize that
computer; where were you born?"
--
Jenny M Benson
Penny
2017-04-16 17:47:39 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 11:26:36 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
have you tried changing the password once on with the new keyboard? It
might then feel some ownership and cooperate?
That reminds me of my Bank app when it says "we don't recognize that
computer; where were you born?"
:)
I wish my credit card company used simple stuff like that. I paid for a
family meal out in Kent this week and my credit card didn't like it and
asked someone to phone them. The chap I was trying to pay then made a very
lengthy phone call which apparently involved going through lots of complex
menus and in-putting various numbers on an automated system. Once he
thought he'd solved the problem he then had to try three different
card-readers before the transaction went through.

I presume the problem/query related to the fact the card was being used 300
miles from 'home' and could have been sorted much more quickly if they'd
phoned me to check I was me.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2017-04-16 19:57:49 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky
have you tried changing the password once on with the new keyboard? It
might then feel some ownership and cooperate?
That reminds me of my Bank app when it says "we don't recognize that
computer; where were you born?"
:)
I wish my credit card company used simple stuff like that. I paid for a
family meal out in Kent this week and my credit card didn't like it and
asked someone to phone them. The chap I was trying to pay then made a very
lengthy phone call which apparently involved going through lots of complex
menus and in-putting various numbers on an automated system. Once he
thought he'd solved the problem he then had to try three different
card-readers before the transaction went through.
I presume the problem/query related to the fact the card was being used 300
miles from 'home' and could have been sorted much more quickly if they'd
phoned me to check I was me.
If it had been me I would have presumed the query had arisen from my
actually bringing the card out into the real world: practically all my
card purchases are on-line these days.

Nick
Penny
2017-04-17 10:02:31 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 20:57:49 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
If it had been me I would have presumed the query had arisen from my
actually bringing the card out into the real world: practically all my
card purchases are on-line these days.
Oh, I rarely use cash these days, even for spends of <£10.
D#2 always picks where we eat based largely upon how much she trusts their
allergy handling and what 'vouchers' (usually on her phone) she has got
hold of - the parsimonious gene is alive and well :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-04-17 11:49:16 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 20:57:49 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
If it had been me I would have presumed the query had arisen from my
actually bringing the card out into the real world: practically all my
card purchases are on-line these days.
Oh, I rarely use cash these days, even for spends of <£10.
D#2 always picks where we eat based largely upon how much she trusts their
allergy handling and what 'vouchers' (usually on her phone) she has got
hold of - the parsimonious gene is alive and well :)
I emailed PM the other week when they were talking about paying by
cash. I pay cash for coffee from the tea trolley at work, having my
hair cut and for gradings and sparring workshops. Pretty much
everything else goes on my CC for the points or is paid for by gift
cards & discount vouchers (NUS card and Cineworld card do a good
selection of discounts). It's really about time all buses accepted
contactless payments, especially the ones who insist on correct change
for cash payments.

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krw
2017-04-17 12:23:20 UTC
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Post by Fenny
It's really about time all buses accepted
contactless payments, especially the ones who insist on correct change
for cash payments.
Move to London. Boris insisted they stop taking money.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2017-04-17 22:13:22 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Fenny
It's really about time all buses accepted
contactless payments, especially the ones who insist on correct change
for cash payments.
Move to London. Boris insisted they stop taking money.
I know, it's much easier than fishing for cash in places like Cardiff
or Northampton. Having been in all 3 places over the course of a
week, I can definitely say London transport is the easiest to use.

Of course, London transport is far more frequent and wide ranging than
public transport in pretty much any other part of the country. Even
when the train line betwen Southend and Liverpool Street is closed for
engineering works on a weekend.

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J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-17 23:45:22 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Fenny
<***@removethis.onetel.net> writes:
[]
Post by Fenny
---
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Hopefully, someone'll be along in a moment who can tell you where to
turn that off.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... referendum coverage is available with subtitles for the deaf, audio
description for the blind, and ITV for the thick. - Dead Ringers, 2016-6-25
krw
2017-04-17 11:51:10 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 20:57:49 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
If it had been me I would have presumed the query had arisen from my
actually bringing the card out into the real world: practically all my
card purchases are on-line these days.
Oh, I rarely use cash these days, even for spends of <£10.
D#2 always picks where we eat based largely upon how much she trusts their
allergy handling and what 'vouchers' (usually on her phone) she has got
hold of - the parsimonious gene is alive and well :)
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Penny
2017-04-17 14:00:28 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 12:51:10 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
If I think I might need some cash I tend to use a debit card and get cash
back* or use the ATM at the supermarket.

*which always gives me a shock when I scan down my bank statement and I'll
spend a minute or two trying to recall what high priced item I bought.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2017-04-17 21:40:04 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
If I think I might need some cash I tend to use a debit card and get cash
back* or use the ATM at the supermarket.
*which always gives me a shock when I scan down my bank statement and I'll
spend a minute or two trying to recall what high priced item I bought.
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2017-04-17 22:16:27 UTC
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Post by krw
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
I had to give up my Tesco delivery pass when they put the minimum
spend back up from £25 to £40.

These days, I mostly buy at least one thing every work day in
Waitrose, since they introduced having to buy something to get the
free coffee. Doing it in small doses means I can manage without the
car even on a Saturday.

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Penny
2017-04-17 22:56:22 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 23:16:27 +0100, Fenny <***@removethis.onetel.net>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
It is sometimes the only exercise I get (and the only people I speak to)
and when Ray was still alive it really was the only exercise he got.
Besides, I like to see what there is and would be very unhappy with
substitutions. I spend far too much time sitting at a computer :(
Post by Fenny
I had to give up my Tesco delivery pass when they put the minimum
spend back up from £25 to £40.
And that's the other reason. I do a main shop about once a fortnight so
might manage to spend that much I suppose but it would be more like
catalogue shopping and I'd probably spend more than intended.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-04-18 00:09:02 UTC
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Post by Penny
And that's the other reason. I do a main shop about once a fortnight so
might manage to spend that much I suppose but it would be more like
catalogue shopping and I'd probably spend more than intended.
Make a list and stick to it!
--
Fenny

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Penny
2017-04-18 07:44:20 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 01:09:02 +0100, Fenny <***@removethis.onetel.net>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
And that's the other reason. I do a main shop about once a fortnight so
might manage to spend that much I suppose but it would be more like
catalogue shopping and I'd probably spend more than intended.
Make a list and stick to it!
Nah, I'll just continue to visit the shop, ta.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky
2017-04-18 07:56:36 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
It is sometimes the only exercise I get (and the only people I speak to)
and when Ray was still alive it really was the only exercise he got.
Besides, I like to see what there is and would be very unhappy with
substitutions. I spend far too much time sitting at a computer :(
Post by Fenny
I had to give up my Tesco delivery pass when they put the minimum
spend back up from £25 to £40.
And that's the other reason. I do a main shop about once a fortnight so
might manage to spend that much I suppose but it would be more like
catalogue shopping and I'd probably spend more than intended.
I do a main shop online to be delivered, now alternating between
Morrisons and Tescos, even though the Tesco monthly delivery pass was
a good deal, because some things are better or cheaper from each
supermarket. We also do small shops during the week for things that
we run out of or find we need, and the next door Sainsburys contains
Lloyd's chemist where my prescriptions are sent to from the surgery.

I've managed to get B to do online requests for prescriptions but he
likes to pick them up from the surgery as they sometimes argue about
what is required. They try to tell him he doesn't need the asthma
puffer, or they prescribe the number in the packet for the month, even
if that is not the same thing.
--
Vicky
Mike
2017-04-18 07:53:47 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
If I think I might need some cash I tend to use a debit card and get cash
back* or use the ATM at the supermarket.
*which always gives me a shock when I scan down my bank statement and I'll
spend a minute or two trying to recall what high priced item I bought.
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
The McToodles 'waste time' going to Lidl a few times a week, Lidl don't
deliver and are no more than 150 metres from our favoured coffee
emporium/cafe.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2017-04-18 08:17:23 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
If I think I might need some cash I tend to use a debit card and get cash
back* or use the ATM at the supermarket.
*which always gives me a shock when I scan down my bank statement and I'll
spend a minute or two trying to recall what high priced item I bought.
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
I do pick & collect sometimes. I prefer the flexibility of choosing fruit
and picking up some reduced priced items. Delivery is ok but leads to
buying the same items to often. Boring. I like a little spontaneity. I
often prefer the local market for fruit, the lady from Grimsby who calls
with fish and the Farmers' Choice Company for meat. Supermarket buys are
far from my main supplier and often only a once a month visit. We have a
local farm shop too. Some lovely stuff from small growers etc but not
entirely sure I trust their veg and fruit. Expensive and not exceptional.

I don't like too much routine. Just shows how different we are. One size
does not suit all.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-18 08:24:35 UTC
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Post by krw
But we don't go to supermarkets as they deliver. Does anyone bother to
waste time these days when it can appear at the front door at the
appointed time and more cheaply (wofe assures me) because she does not
pick anything random up.
My weekly main shop includes a visit to the street market for
most of my fresh vegetables, occasionally some bread or fish, and
sometimes sundry other shops (or a deposit at Oxfam). Then back
to Sainsbury's (clockwise) where I have parked, for the bulk of
the shop, following a list (1).

Whilst I can't claim that I actually find shopping enjoyable, I
do prefer to see what I am buying, compare deals, check dates and
so forth, and would feel somewhat restricted if I had to do it
all on line.

(1) For several years I shopped for me alone, never writing
anything down. Then when I was shopping for two I still carried
on as before. Eventually the folly of buying for what _I_ thought
_we_ wanted to eat was pointed out to me. We eventually
introduced a system of writing down what the main meals (2) were
planned to be (still flexible though) and the shopping list
prepared accordingly.

(2) I am rubbish with selecting from recipes to use - it is a bit
like not being able to look at a score and "hear" the tune. We
now have several binders full of potential dishes, either from
publications (which reminds me that I have a pile needing filing)
of one of our books. When we have eaten one, it is graded.

Anything less than VG is discarded, VG+ is highest praise. We can
also annotate with hints and tweaks. For instance, we have yet to
find any recipe that adds as much cinnamon as we like, whilst
some are a bit heavy with chilli. Some cooking times are a bit
astray, and we can remind ourselves to use our biggest pan when
bulk cooking, or what size of container works well.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2017-04-18 08:39:10 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 09:24:35 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
I am rubbish with selecting from recipes to use - it is a bit
like not being able to look at a score and "hear" the tune. We
now have several binders full of potential dishes, either from
publications (which reminds me that I have a pile needing filing)
of one of our books. When we have eaten one, it is graded.
Anything less than VG is discarded, VG+ is highest praise. We can
also annotate with hints and tweaks. For instance, we have yet to
find any recipe that adds as much cinnamon as we like, whilst
some are a bit heavy with chilli. Some cooking times are a bit
astray, and we can remind ourselves to use our biggest pan when
bulk cooking, or what size of container works well.
Gosh, that seems extremely organised! I buy the sort of ingredients I
expect to find when I open the fridge and know I can then make a variety of
dishes*. I used to plan far more but now I'm just cooking for one I rarely
plan at all and sometimes, at the end of the day, can't be bothered which
is when the stock of frozen ready meals (some home-made) comes into its
own.

*My first husbad was a chef and never understood how I could produce a
tasty meal in less than 30 minutes from what he viewed as 'nothing'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-04-18 09:45:53 UTC
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Post by Penny
*My first husbad was a chef and never understood how I could produce a
tasty meal in less than 30 minutes from what he viewed as 'nothing'.
Is that not just a normal thing?
--
Fenny
Btms
2017-04-18 09:52:05 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
*My first husbad was a chef and never understood how I could produce a
tasty meal in less than 30 minutes from what he viewed as 'nothing'.
Is that not just a normal thing?
Often the normal in this house. But I guess a chef has to produce the meal
the customer expects and what may have been eaten previously. A more exact
process is perhaps required.*


* The essence** of this was given me by one of Rick Stein's chefs.

**see what I did there.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
krw
2017-04-18 10:44:34 UTC
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Post by Btms
* The essence** of this was given me by one of Rick Stein's chefs.
Jus it up why don't you.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Penny
2017-04-18 10:10:24 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 10:45:53 +0100, Fenny <***@removethis.onetel.net>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
*My first husbad was a chef and never understood how I could produce a
tasty meal in less than 30 minutes from what he viewed as 'nothing'.
Is that not just a normal thing?
Well it is to me but plainly not to this chef, nor what his mother could
do.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2017-04-18 09:47:50 UTC
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Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk> wrote:

[]
.
Post by Chris J Dixon
Anything less than VG is discarded, VG+ is highest praise. We can
also annotate with hints and tweaks. For instance, we have yet to
find any recipe that adds as much cinnamon as we like, whilst
some are a bit heavy with chilli. Some cooking times are a bit
astray, and we can remind ourselves to use our biggest pan when
bulk cooking, or what size of container works well.
Fwiw a friend is an importer of spices. Says what we buy in supermarkets
is generally a year or more old. Delia Smith says she replaces all her
herbs and spices in Jan each year.

From the above, I suspect the recipe quantities are far exact and we all
know chilli varies enormously anyway.

I used to go to Hounslow for spices when husbad worked there. I felt the
turnover kept them fresher and they tended to be supplied from larger bulk
buys rather than supermarket jars.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-18 10:00:05 UTC
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Post by Btms
Fwiw a friend is an importer of spices. Says what we buy in supermarkets
is generally a year or more old. Delia Smith says she replaces all her
herbs and spices in Jan each year.
From the above, I suspect the recipe quantities are far exact and we all
know chilli varies enormously anyway.
I used to go to Hounslow for spices when husbad worked there. I felt the
turnover kept them fresher and they tended to be supplied from larger bulk
buys rather than supermarket jars.
I will own up that my herbs and spices don't all turn over very
fast. Most come from Sainsbury's, but the best value packs are to
be found in the "ethnic" section.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2017-04-18 11:11:37 UTC
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Post by Btms
[]
.
Post by Chris J Dixon
Anything less than VG is discarded, VG+ is highest praise. We can
also annotate with hints and tweaks. For instance, we have yet to
find any recipe that adds as much cinnamon as we like, whilst
some are a bit heavy with chilli. Some cooking times are a bit
astray, and we can remind ourselves to use our biggest pan when
bulk cooking, or what size of container works well.
Fwiw a friend is an importer of spices. Says what we buy in supermarkets
is generally a year or more old. Delia Smith says she replaces all her
herbs and spices in Jan each year.
From the above, I suspect the recipe quantities are far exact and we all
know chilli varies enormously anyway.
I used to go to Hounslow for spices when husbad worked there. I felt the
turnover kept them fresher and they tended to be supplied from larger bulk
buys rather than supermarket jars.
Personally, we have a courier to bring ours back by air from Delhi.


(Actually, just a few Indian spices a friend brought back after having
leave to visit family; we use very little cumin or tumeric/tumeric and defo
do not do curries or use chilis.)
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-18 20:16:51 UTC
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In message <JvmJA.708781$***@fx37.am4>, Mike
<***@ntlworld.com> writes:
[]
Post by Mike
leave to visit family; we use very little cumin or tumeric/tumeric and defo
[]
Did you intend one of those to have an r in? (OK, another r.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Everything will be all right in the end. And if everything isn't all right,
then it isn't the end. - The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011)
Mike
2017-04-19 07:53:21 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
leave to visit family; we use very little cumin or tumeric/tumeric and defo
[]
Did you intend one of those to have an r in? (OK, another r.)
Yes
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2017-04-19 14:53:03 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
leave to visit family; we use very little cumin or tumeric/tumeric and defo
[]
Did you intend one of those to have an r in? (OK, another r.)
Only when there's an oyster in the month.
--
Jenny M Benson
Nick Odell
2017-04-18 13:56:29 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
We went out to lunch with friends recently. As usual he passed his
share to me as cash and it saved me going to the bank for ages.
If I think I might need some cash I tend to use a debit card and get cash
back* or use the ATM at the supermarket.
*which always gives me a shock when I scan down my bank statement and I'll
spend a minute or two trying to recall what high priced item I bought.
I always need some cash because it's more or less the only way I pay
for things in shops etc. I use my debit card to withdraw the same,
non-standard amount of cash from the machine every time I need to and
then spend it over shop counters and at tills. I've started to find
the self checkouts a handy way of offloading unwanted change without
paying 8.9% to Coinstar - by the way I would /never/ pay 8.9% to
Coinstar: using the self checkouts[1] just means I don't have to
smuggle measured amounts of coin into my purchase payments to keep my
pockets in shape. I don't use cards for these sorts of payments
because, even though I know there isn't a little man writing these
things down, it's none of Mr Visa's business - and none of Mrs Tesco's
either - who bought that punnet of mushrooms or this jug of milk.

Nick
[1]Cue post about checking one's self out of the store
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-18 15:34:41 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
I've started to find
the self checkouts a handy way of offloading unwanted change without
paying 8.9% to Coinstar - by the way I would /never/ pay 8.9% to
Coinstar: using the self checkouts[1] just means I don't have to
smuggle measured amounts of coin into my purchase payments to keep my
pockets in shape.
Quite so. Our local Co-op (clockwise) has self-checkouts with
this facility. On some occasions I have offered it so many coins
that my change included a note, as it always pays out in the
largest denominations it can manage.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Odell
2017-04-18 17:17:23 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
I've started to find
the self checkouts a handy way of offloading unwanted change without
paying 8.9% to Coinstar - by the way I would /never/ pay 8.9% to
Coinstar: using the self checkouts[1] just means I don't have to
smuggle measured amounts of coin into my purchase payments to keep my
pockets in shape.
Quite so. Our local Co-op (clockwise) has self-checkouts with
this facility. On some occasions I have offered it so many coins
that my change included a note, as it always pays out in the
largest denominations it can manage.
That's a neat idea. I'll give that a try next time my coins are
becoming over-bulky. (All slimmed down this morning in the
self-checkout in Poundland (Chirality-neutral. In through the back
door, out through the front)

Nick
krw
2017-04-18 22:01:57 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
I'll give that a try next time my coins are
becoming over-bulky.
I bought a bovril with a lot of loose change at the football at the
weekend. Pocket a lot lighter after parting with £2.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-18 20:22:05 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Nick Odell
<***@themusicworkshop.plus.com> writes:
[]
Post by Nick Odell
the self checkouts a handy way of offloading unwanted change without
paying 8.9% to Coinstar - by the way I would /never/ pay 8.9% to
Coinstar: using the self checkouts[1] just means I don't have to
smuggle measured amounts of coin into my purchase payments to keep my
pockets in shape. I don't use cards for these sorts of payments
because, even though I know there isn't a little man writing these
things down, it's none of Mr Visa's business - and none of Mrs Tesco's
either - who bought that punnet of mushrooms or this jug of milk.
I think that, although Messrs. Tesco and Sainsbury probably _do_ log
what you buy (at least if you use a so-called "loyalty" card - I
_suspect_ they're not allowed to do it on just credit card numbers), I
don't think Mr. Visa logs _what_ you buy, only that you were there and
how much you spent in total.

I've been using CC in supermarkets for ages - and, since they accept
contactless (Sainsburys only surprisingly recently - last month or two),
it's _far_ quicker.
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
[1]Cue post about checking one's self out of the store
That one has never occurred to me. Though I still wonder what it was
that alarmed this barrier.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Everything will be all right in the end. And if everything isn't all right,
then it isn't the end. - The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011)
Chris McMillan
2017-04-19 08:22:11 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Nick Odell
the self checkouts a handy way of offloading unwanted change without
paying 8.9% to Coinstar - by the way I would /never/ pay 8.9% to
Coinstar: using the self checkouts[1] just means I don't have to
smuggle measured amounts of coin into my purchase payments to keep my
pockets in shape. I don't use cards for these sorts of payments
because, even though I know there isn't a little man writing these
things down, it's none of Mr Visa's business - and none of Mrs Tesco's
either - who bought that punnet of mushrooms or this jug of milk.
I think that, although Messrs. Tesco and Sainsbury probably _do_ log
what you buy (at least if you use a so-called "loyalty" card - I
_suspect_ they're not allowed to do it on just credit card numbers), I
don't think Mr. Visa logs _what_ you buy, only that you were there and
how much you spent in total.
I've been using CC in supermarkets for ages - and, since they accept
contactless (Sainsburys only surprisingly recently - last month or two),
it's _far_ quicker.
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
[1]Cue post about checking one's self out of the store
That one has never occurred to me. Though I still wonder what it was
that alarmed this barrier.
Not all Sainsbugs do so far.

Sincerely Chris
Fenny
2017-04-16 20:31:32 UTC
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Post by Penny
I presume the problem/query related to the fact the card was being used 300
miles from 'home' and could have been sorted much more quickly if they'd
phoned me to check I was me.
Other than my new Amex card being temperamental when used for
contactless payments, I have extremely little problem with using my
cards away from home. Most card co's say you're supposed to tell them
if you're travelling abroad, but I rarely do and have never had a card
refused abroad.

I tend to work on the principal that if I've paid for airline tickets
and hotel bookings, they might work out I will be spending in forrin.
Although I have a separate card for using abroad as it doesn't charge
for overseas transactions.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Serena Blanchflower
2017-04-16 18:36:52 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by krw
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which characters
come up.
Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has nothing
to do with it.
I had some trouble once that also has nothing to do with it.
I'm remind of comedy sketches which begin with a solitary figure
coming onto the stage and saying "My name is Bertrand McWhirter
McWhirter from Tillicoultry in the county of Clackmannanshire and I
have absolutely nothing to do with these proceeding so I'll bit you
all goodnight".
My guess would be that the new keyboard needs a different driver
installing on the pc.
The trouble with any explanation I can come up with is it types the
password and anything else faultlessly in a document. The problem occurs
only before I log on, which makes tracing it a bit awkward.
That suggests that the proper software for controlling the keyboard is
only started later in the start up process than the initial password
request. My best guess would be to check the driver and, if possible,
reinstall that.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be
patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.
(Winnie the Pooh)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-16 09:37:13 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've just bought a new keyboard for my work PC. When the computer boots
up, it asks for my password. When I type it in with the new keyboard,
I'm told my password is invalid. If I use my old keyboard, the password
is accepted. Both keyboards are wireless, and Caps Lock is not selected.
Any ideas?
Like I would know anything...but could it be a layout problem? Is the
new keyboard perhaps set to a non-UK layout, or behaving as though it
is? Easily checked by logging in with the old one, then using the new
one to type your password somewhere you can see exactly which
characters come up.
Just a thought, as I had that trouble once - but it probably has
nothing to do with it.
I was _going_ to say, sounds like a good guess, and the above might not
prove it one way or another because the nominal layout might be
perceived differently after full login to at password point; but then I
remembered that keyboard layout isn't a property of the keyboard, it's
the OS. Still _might_ be worth a try - change your password so that it
doesn't contain any characters that are in different places on the UK
and US layouts (the one most likely), which from memory are £@"#'~ . If
it then works, then that might have been the problem (though if it is, I
have no idea how to fix it, other than by limiting your choice of
passwords, which doesn't sound like a good idea).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

No, I haven't changed my mind - I'm perfectly happy with the one I have, thank
you.
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