Discussion:
Supposing it were drama rather than a FOTWD.
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Mike
2018-04-04 13:31:07 UTC
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Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their imaginations run
riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very unlikely story lines;

Things such as:

The local squire suddenly realising that he had sold his family fortune
down a poisonous river for a ‘happorth’ of tar today.

A veterinary practice that handled cats, dogs, gerbils, cows, horses and
any other furry creature that scurries, yet not need nursing assistance,
accountancy advice and services, reception staff - in fact no staff to
assist in any way.

A landlord who walked into the job by default of marriage without any
knowledge beyond knowing how to pour intoxicants down his own throat.

A business tycoon who fails to observe the most rudimentary guidelines in
running a business.

A jumped up dairy assistant who could overnight become an expert in the
manufacture and marketing of kefir whilst knowing all the finer points of
illness and allergies and how to treat them with kefir.

A lazy good for nothing daughter of the squire who’s only expertise is in
wheedling enormous sums of money and parcels of land out of the family
whilst erecting yurts and running a wellbeing and beauty parlour without
having staff or the need to put any time or effort into running the
enterprise - including paying no heed to HMRC requirements or keeping any
records yet miraculously being able to whistle up a comprehensive set of
pie charts, profit and loss predictions in full colour and all this with no
more than the odd five minutes of application to the work. Oh! And having
the ability to proffer advice to others on being a good mother and
childcare guidance despite having wrecked her own marriage and with
children by various fathers.

Having a family organic and health foods enterprise that can capture all
the local business - so well planned that the purchase of some goats
producing milk is not discussed with the cheese maker in the team. The pig
man can just toss aside the hard earned merit of being organic and fly off
around the world leaving his duties to .... no-one!


A retired academic widower who welcomes into his small home a loud-mouthed
untidy pig-man’s assistant with his ‘ripe’ workwear that is dumped in the
doorways and who has never realised that housework is a ‘shared’ activity
when lodging.

In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
--
Toodle Pip
Steve Hague
2018-04-04 15:58:17 UTC
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Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their imaginations run
riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very unlikely story lines;
The local squire suddenly realising that he had sold his family fortune
down a poisonous river for a ‘happorth’ of tar today.
A veterinary practice that handled cats, dogs, gerbils, cows, horses and
any other furry creature that scurries, yet not need nursing assistance,
accountancy advice and services, reception staff - in fact no staff to
assist in any way.
A landlord who walked into the job by default of marriage without any
knowledge beyond knowing how to pour intoxicants down his own throat.
A business tycoon who fails to observe the most rudimentary guidelines in
running a business.
A jumped up dairy assistant who could overnight become an expert in the
manufacture and marketing of kefir whilst knowing all the finer points of
illness and allergies and how to treat them with kefir.
A lazy good for nothing daughter of the squire who’s only expertise is in
wheedling enormous sums of money and parcels of land out of the family
whilst erecting yurts and running a wellbeing and beauty parlour without
having staff or the need to put any time or effort into running the
enterprise - including paying no heed to HMRC requirements or keeping any
records yet miraculously being able to whistle up a comprehensive set of
pie charts, profit and loss predictions in full colour and all this with no
more than the odd five minutes of application to the work. Oh! And having
the ability to proffer advice to others on being a good mother and
childcare guidance despite having wrecked her own marriage and with
children by various fathers.
Having a family organic and health foods enterprise that can capture all
the local business - so well planned that the purchase of some goats
producing milk is not discussed with the cheese maker in the team. The pig
man can just toss aside the hard earned merit of being organic and fly off
around the world leaving his duties to .... no-one!
A retired academic widower who welcomes into his small home a loud-mouthed
untidy pig-man’s assistant with his ‘ripe’ workwear that is dumped in the
doorways and who has never realised that housework is a ‘shared’ activity
when lodging.
In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve

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Chris McMillan
2018-04-07 13:07:23 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their imaginations run
riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very unlikely story lines;
The local squire suddenly realising that he had sold his family fortune
down a poisonous river for a ‘happorth’ of tar today.
A veterinary practice that handled cats, dogs, gerbils, cows, horses and
any other furry creature that scurries, yet not need nursing assistance,
accountancy advice and services, reception staff - in fact no staff to
assist in any way.
A landlord who walked into the job by default of marriage without any
knowledge beyond knowing how to pour intoxicants down his own throat.
A business tycoon who fails to observe the most rudimentary guidelines in
running a business.
A jumped up dairy assistant who could overnight become an expert in the
manufacture and marketing of kefir whilst knowing all the finer points of
illness and allergies and how to treat them with kefir.
A lazy good for nothing daughter of the squire who’s only expertise is in
wheedling enormous sums of money and parcels of land out of the family
whilst erecting yurts and running a wellbeing and beauty parlour without
having staff or the need to put any time or effort into running the
enterprise - including paying no heed to HMRC requirements or keeping any
records yet miraculously being able to whistle up a comprehensive set of
pie charts, profit and loss predictions in full colour and all this with no
more than the odd five minutes of application to the work. Oh! And having
the ability to proffer advice to others on being a good mother and
childcare guidance despite having wrecked her own marriage and with
children by various fathers.
Having a family organic and health foods enterprise that can capture all
the local business - so well planned that the purchase of some goats
producing milk is not discussed with the cheese maker in the team. The pig
man can just toss aside the hard earned merit of being organic and fly off
around the world leaving his duties to .... no-one!
A retired academic widower who welcomes into his small home a loud-mouthed
untidy pig-man’s assistant with his ‘ripe’ workwear that is dumped in the
doorways and who has never realised that housework is a ‘shared’ activity
when lodging.
In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
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Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung and is
still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired (?) elderly
farmer’s wife who still works 7 days a week baking, bee and chook keeping
and will be a full tine nanny before we know it.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-07 17:15:28 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their
imaginations run
riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
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Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung and is
still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired (?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Post by Chris McMillan
farmer’s wife who still works 7 days a week baking, bee and chook keeping
and will be a full tine nanny before we know it.
Sincerely Chris
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A waist is a terrible thing to mind.
Btms
2018-04-07 19:17:23 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their imaginations run
riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
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Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung and is
still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired (?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Did Jo start his carriage driving to follow HRH?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
steveski
2018-04-07 21:45:19 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their
imaginations run riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very
unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
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Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung
and is still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired
(?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Did Jo start his carriage driving to follow HRH?
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-07 22:11:42 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their
imaginations run riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very
unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
---
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(This POST hasn't.)
Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung
and is still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired
(?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Did Jo start his carriage driving to follow HRH?
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The fifth bestselling detail of all time: the Ford Transit. (RT/C4 2015-5-24.)
steveski
2018-04-08 00:43:38 UTC
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[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
When I started motorcycling in about '73 you needed a provisional licence
which allowed up to 250cc (never mind all the moped regs for 16 year olds)
and passed my test on a BSA (Bloody Sore Arse) C15 and have been riding
ever since on a full licence (no cc restiction).

I *do* remember something about a car licence thingy but have forgotten.

Nowadays it's all quite complex with power output for new riders but I
just bimble along on the Beemer or Kwacker with the cheapest insurance
I've ever had :-)
--
Steveski
steveski
2018-04-08 00:46:47 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
When I started motorcycling in about '73 you needed a provisional
licence which allowed up to 250cc (never mind all the moped regs for 16
year olds)
and passed my test on a BSA (Bloody Sore Arse) C15 and have been riding
ever since on a full licence (no cc restiction).
I *do* remember something about a car licence thingy but have forgotten.
Nowadays it's all quite complex with power output for new riders but I
just bimble along on the Beemer or Kwacker with the cheapest insurance
I've ever had :-)
Bad form again but I've just remembered the licence thing. If you had a
full car licence you could use that in place of the provisional
motorcycle one.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2018-04-08 08:25:44 UTC
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Post by steveski
Bad form again but I've just remembered the licence thing. If you had a
full car licence you could use that in place of the provisional
motorcycle one.
Yes, you could ride a motorcycle up to 250cc with L plates if you had a
full car licence. They lowered the limit to 125cc around 1983. I
remember this because I'd been happily using L-plates while riding an MZ
125 (heaven help me, but it was all I could afford) and then my Honda
Superdream 250 on my full car licence for several years and it finally
made me enroll on a BMF course and then take (and pass, thanks to the
course) my test in 1983.

I'm not sure what the regs are these days. Sadly, it was only a few
years later (1986, possibly) when, on my way to work as usual, someone
pulled out of a side road without looking, knocking me off the bike. I
ended up lying some way down the road, straddling the white line with
the rush-hour traffic in the other lane whizzing by a few inches away.
I still don't like to think of the consequences if I'd ended up just a
couple of feet further over.

I was quite knocked about and a bit damaged, but good luck and a very
good Bell helmet (the marks on it were scary!) meant I wasn't seriously
hurt. The bike was a write-off. I did subsequently borrow a little
bike and I used it for a while, but wofe reckoned I'd had my warning and
I was inclined to agree, so after I returned it I never bought another
bike of my own.

I loved riding and I sometimes think fondly of my biking days, although
perhaps less fondly of the sopping wet feet and freezing hands which
sometimes resulted.

Er...no-one really wanted to know all that, did they? Sorry.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2018-04-08 08:45:05 UTC
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[snip] > I
still don't like to think of the consequences if I'd ended up just a
couple of feet further over.
Nor do we, Sid, nor do we.

john
Chris J Dixon
2018-04-08 10:07:01 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I'm not sure what the regs are these days. Sadly, it was only a few
years later (1986, possibly) when, on my way to work as usual, someone
pulled out of a side road without looking, knocking me off the bike. I
ended up lying some way down the road, straddling the white line with
the rush-hour traffic in the other lane whizzing by a few inches away.
I still don't like to think of the consequences if I'd ended up just a
couple of feet further over.
I was quite knocked about and a bit damaged, but good luck and a very
good Bell helmet (the marks on it were scary!) meant I wasn't seriously
hurt. The bike was a write-off. I did subsequently borrow a little
bike and I used it for a while, but wofe reckoned I'd had my warning and
I was inclined to agree, so after I returned it I never bought another
bike of my own.
I loved riding and I sometimes think fondly of my biking days, although
perhaps less fondly of the sopping wet feet and freezing hands which
sometimes resulted.
The Honda 50 kept me mobile through my student years and
eventually I upgraded to a Honda 175, but was no longer doing
long runs. Sadly, I managed to collide with a car when I was
turning right. Luckily it was the bike that went down, whilst I
ended up on the car bonnet. I mended, after a spell with arm and
leg in plaster, the bike didn't, so it was back to a Honda 70,
which lasted me until my first car.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2018-04-08 10:37:01 UTC
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Er...no-one really wanted to know all that, did they?  Sorry.
Don't be silly Sid, of course we did !

I've never quite seen the attraction myself, although I was very glad of
my friend giving me a lift to the ATC on his single pot 500cc BSA Gold
Star until the day that he remarked as he collected me that his oil leak
had gone away without realising that this was because there was no oil
left and the engine seized at 70. Luckily on a nice wide curving country
road and we stayed on it as it slid sideways and slowed down and were
saved any serious road rash when we rolled off by the thick uniforms we
were wearing. No helmets of course in 1965.
Jenny M Benson
2018-04-08 11:02:46 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
I've never quite seen the attraction myself, although I was very glad of
my friend giving me a lift to the ATC on his single pot 500cc BSA Gold
Star until the day that he remarked as he collected me that his oil leak
had gone away without realising that this was because there was no oil
left and the engine seized at 70. Luckily on a nice wide curving country
road and we stayed on it as it slid sideways and slowed down and were
saved any serious road rash when we rolled off by the thick uniforms we
were wearing. No helmets of course in 1965.
With all this recollection of motor-cycle accidents I am all the more
reminded how foolish (1) we were when my then-boyfriend took off his
L-plates to give me a ride from Birkenhead to the Lake District (via the
M6.) We were wearing helmets, but no sort of protective clothing: in
fact, the hot exhaust burnt a hole in my (2)tights.

A few years earlier the then subject of a great crush who some years
later became a boyfriend had promised me a lift on his AJS and I was
very miffed when my parents rang to say they were coming to pick me up.
"I was going to get a lift on ___'s motorbike" I complained. "That's
what we thought - that's why we came" said my parents. It was probably
the right thing to do on 2 counts!

(1) Probably much too "light" a word.
(2) American Tan, of course!
--
Jenny M Benson
Penny
2018-04-08 14:33:18 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 12:02:46 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
With all this recollection of motor-cycle accidents I am all the more
reminded how foolish (1) we were when my then-boyfriend took off his
L-plates to give me a ride from Birkenhead to the Lake District (via the
M6.) We were wearing helmets, but no sort of protective clothing: in
fact, the hot exhaust burnt a hole in my (2)tights.
Ah, that reminds me of an accident I had on my Honda 50, probably in 1969.
I was working on a dig near Winchester (a very long way to go on such a
small bike) and gave a lift into town to a fellow volunteer. She had no
helmet and the intention was for me to drop her off on the edge of town.
The Honda 50 had an automatic clutch but it was necessary to throttle down
when changing gear. Struggling up a steep hill I forgot to do so when I
kicked it into 1st and we did a backwards somersault. Fortunately neither
of us was hurt and the bike survived too (though it probably unsettled a
wing mirror - they always suffered, along with the indicators when the bike
got dropped).

Foolish times.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2018-04-08 22:27:07 UTC
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Post by Penny
Ah, that reminds me of an accident I had on my Honda 50, probably in 1969.
I was working on a dig near Winchester (a very long way to go on such a
small bike) and gave a lift into town to a fellow volunteer. She had no
helmet and the intention was for me to drop her off on the edge of town.
The Honda 50 had an automatic clutch but it was necessary to throttle down
when changing gear. Struggling up a steep hill I forgot to do so when I
kicked it into 1st and we did a backwards somersault. Fortunately neither
of us was hurt and the bike survived too (though it probably unsettled a
wing mirror - they always suffered, along with the indicators when the bike
got dropped).
Foolish times.
My only motorised two wheel experience was a Honda 50, bought (new) in
1969 for the princely sum of £95. I can't recall how much the insurance
set me back, but it was pretty negligible.

I had one or two hairy moments but emerged unscathed, thanks to luck
standing in for good judgement.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2018-04-09 07:47:44 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Ah, that reminds me of an accident I had on my Honda 50, probably in 1969.
I was working on a dig near Winchester (a very long way to go on such a
small bike) and gave a lift into town to a fellow volunteer. She had no
helmet and the intention was for me to drop her off on the edge of town.
The Honda 50 had an automatic clutch but it was necessary to throttle down
when changing gear. Struggling up a steep hill I forgot to do so when I
kicked it into 1st and we did a backwards somersault. Fortunately neither
of us was hurt and the bike survived too (though it probably unsettled a
wing mirror - they always suffered, along with the indicators when the bike
got dropped).
Foolish times.
My only motorised two wheel experience was a Honda 50, bought (new) in
1969 for the princely sum of £95. I can't recall how much the insurance
set me back, but it was pretty negligible.
I had one or two hairy moments but emerged unscathed, thanks to luck
standing in for good judgement.
A work colleague of that time (about 1969/70) had a new Honda 50 ever year,
he reckoned that the trade in value was still good at 12 months and thus a
new one cost him little and helped to ensure low maintenance costs, good
reliability and economy of running.
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2018-04-08 11:45:29 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Bad form again but I've just remembered the licence thing. If you had a
full car licence you could use that in place of the provisional
motorcycle one.
Yes, you could ride a motorcycle up to 250cc with L plates if you had a
full car licence. They lowered the limit to 125cc around 1983.  I
remember this because I'd been happily using L-plates while riding an MZ
125 (heaven help me, but it was all I could afford) and then my Honda
Superdream 250 on my full car licence for several years and it finally
made me enroll on a BMF course and then take (and pass, thanks to the
course) my test in 1983.
I'm not sure what the regs are these days.  Sadly, it was only a few
years later (1986, possibly) when, on my way to work as usual, someone
pulled out of a side road without looking, knocking me off the bike.  I
ended up lying some way down the road, straddling the white line with
the rush-hour traffic in the other lane whizzing by a few inches away. I
still don't like to think of the consequences if I'd ended up just a
couple of feet further over.
I was quite knocked about and a bit damaged, but good luck and a very
good Bell helmet (the marks on it were scary!) meant I wasn't seriously
hurt.  The bike was a write-off.  I did subsequently borrow a little
bike and I used it for a while, but wofe reckoned I'd had my warning and
I was inclined to agree, so after I returned it I never bought another
bike of my own.
I loved riding and I sometimes think fondly of my biking days, although
perhaps less fondly of the sopping wet feet and freezing hands which
sometimes resulted.
Er...no-one really wanted to know all that, did they?  Sorry.
You are never alone..... I had a tiny little Honda (was it even 125cc?)
which I rode everywhere, up hill, down dale, as far as Fife and
Caernarfon, and all over Suffolk when I was teaching in Ipswich. I was
young in those days and didn't really mind getting wet. I had a huge
waterproof onesie out of which I would emerge like a short, fat, but
very colourful butterfly. Going downhill on it was almost like flying. I
only came off once or twice, and never had such a terrifying experience
as Sid, but after I finally got my driving licence it was so much more
convenient to load everything into a nice dry car that the poor little
thing fusted unused, and eventually got sold for spare parts. I did love
riding it, though, in its time.
--
Kate B
London
Sid Nuncius
2018-04-08 18:05:06 UTC
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I had a huge waterproof onesie out of which I would emerge
Ooh yes - I had one of those (FSVO waterproof). Padded, lined and
everything. I called it Biggles. In time-honoured fashion it began to
leak at the crotch after a couple of years and I sometimes used to turn
up to work and social events looking as though I'd wet myself. Oh, how
I laughed! I took to wearing an extra pair of "waterproof" trousers
over it in the wet which, in time-honoured fashion...

Biggles did, however, save my flesh (and clothes) from a serious mauling
when I was knocked off.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steveski
2018-04-08 21:17:12 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Apr 2018 09:25:44 +0100, Sid Nuncius wrote:

[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'd been happily using L-plates while riding an MZ
125 (heaven help me)
The MZs were lovely little bean-tins - simple to maintain and sturdy (not
to be confused with the execrable CZs).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Honda Superdream 250
Quite the reverse, horrible, horrible over-complicated gutless things.

Just my tuppence :-)
--
Steveski
p.s. BMW R100/7 and Kawasaki GT550 (but I'd swap them for a Triumph
Triple of some kidney :-) )
Sid Nuncius
2018-04-09 07:15:58 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'd been happily using L-plates while riding an MZ
125 (heaven help me)
The MZs were lovely little bean-tins - simple to maintain and sturdy (not
to be confused with the execrable CZs).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Honda Superdream 250
Quite the reverse, horrible, horrible over-complicated gutless things.
Just my tuppence :-)
Interesting. My experience was the opposite; the MZ was a nightmare to
maintain (Parts? Yeah, right. Even a headlight bulb took months to
find.[1]), incredibly unreliable in the wet especially and began missing
if I attempted to exceed 45mph - which made riding it from London to
Bristol an interesting experience. I found these pics which didn't
exactly inspire a wave of warm nostalgia:
http://databikes.com/infophoto/mz/es_1251-1977.html

I liked the Honda; reliable, perfectly powerful enough for my needs and
a pleasure to handle after the MZ. Wofe and I went on holiday to
Cornwall on it and it was great. I was very sorry when it got written
off. All right, it's not a 1952 Vincent Black Lightning, but I was very
fond of it.
http://www.wemoto.com/news/article/525/honda_cb250n_superdream
<wistful sigh>

[1] When I moved to Bristol I did find an MZ garage who were able to
maintain it for me. They were rude, hostile, not very good mechanics
and extremely expensive. They were part of the reason I bought a new bike.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris J Dixon
2018-04-08 06:55:38 UTC
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Post by steveski
When I started motorcycling in about '73 you needed a provisional licence
which allowed up to 250cc (never mind all the moped regs for 16 year olds)
and passed my test on a BSA (Bloody Sore Arse) C15 and have been riding
ever since on a full licence (no cc restiction).
Nowadays it's all quite complex with power output for new riders but I
just bimble along on the Beemer or Kwacker with the cheapest insurance
I've ever had :-)
I remember having to take the test again, in the 60s, having
upgraded from my dad's old NSU Quickly (there's an oxymoron)
which was a moped, to a Honda 50. Pretty daft really, since it
then meant that I could (and still can) legally drive any bike;
not that I would dare. Two wheels were for me simply an economic
necessity at the time, not a lifestyle choice.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2018-04-08 10:36:56 UTC
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On 8 Apr 2018 00:43:38 GMT, steveski <***@invalid.com> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
When I started motorcycling in about '73 you needed a provisional licence
which allowed up to 250cc (never mind all the moped regs for 16 year olds)
and passed my test on a BSA (Bloody Sore Arse) C15 and have been riding
ever since on a full licence (no cc restiction).
In theory I too am licensed to ride a motorcycle of any size but have not
done so since 1979 and doubt I will again. Still considering an electric
bicycle though (no licence required). I think the cycling might be good for
my arthritic hips (now much more settled) and the motor will get me up the
hill - I haven't been able to walk into town for months now.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2018-04-08 22:11:39 UTC
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Post by steveski
Nowadays it's all quite complex with power output for new riders but I
just bimble along on the Beemer or Kwacker with the cheapest insurance
I've ever had :-)
Bimbling is extra Luv.

(Well, someone had to say it)
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2018-04-09 07:43:52 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Nowadays it's all quite complex with power output for new riders but I
just bimble along on the Beemer or Kwacker with the cheapest insurance
I've ever had :-)
Bimbling is extra Luv.
(Well, someone had to say it)
.... and their second album was....
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2018-04-08 08:25:04 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their
imaginations run riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very
unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
---
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(This POST hasn't.)
Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung
and is still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired
(?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Did Jo start his carriage driving to follow HRH?
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2018-04-08 08:31:39 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2018-04-08 08:46:58 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
Is this the one about the lawnmower rider who travels a long way to see a
sick friend?
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2018-04-08 09:18:52 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
Is this the one about the lawnmower rider who travels a long way to see a
sick friend?
Yes. (Brother, actually, but you've got the right film.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2018-04-08 09:27:28 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
Is this the one about the lawnmower rider who travels a long way to see a
sick friend?
Yes. (Brother, actually, but you've got the right film.)
Yup, I have been to sleep a few times since I saw it ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2018-04-08 09:31:04 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
Is this the one about the lawnmower rider who travels a long way to see a
sick friend?
Yes. (Brother, actually, but you've got the right film.)
Yup, I have, but have been to sleep a number of times since then!;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2018-04-08 09:28:36 UTC
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May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story?  It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me.  A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
Oh yes, seen that and entirely agree with you...Mmm! I see I can rent
it from Amazon for 99p, Might well do that later.
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky
2018-04-08 11:12:01 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 09:31:39 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And if you got your licence before some date, as I did, you can drive a
motorbike (I think up to 250cc) on your car licence; people who passed
more recently can't. I've never actually done so, and I _suspect_ I'd
get stung for the insurance if I tried, but in theory.
Probably safer with a lawnmower.
<this isn't actually a swerve>
May I commend to the assembled umrats the film The Straight Story? It's
by David Lynch, but seemed very un-DL to me. A brilliant film, I
thought, and an unexpected delight.
We watched half of About Time last night but I didn't want to see the
rest. I'm not quite sure I hadn't already seen it. I didn't care
what happened in the end, anyway. I thought it lame.
--
Vicky
Mike
2018-04-08 08:24:03 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Btms
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Under such circumstances, the s/w’s could really let their
imaginations run riot and we could enjoy some preposterous and very
unlikely story lines;
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Steve Hague
You couldn't make it up, could you.
Steve
---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
(This POST hasn't.)
Post by Chris McMillan
Not forgetting the very elderly farmer who developed a farmer’s lung
and is still fit enough at 96 at drive a pony and cart, or the retired
(?) elderly
Do you need insurance to drive a pony and cart?
Did Jo start his carriage driving to follow HRH?
If, like my father - born in 1912, you don't need to pass a test. You
have a licence to drive anything.
Including people round the bend.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-04-05 13:46:09 UTC
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On 04/04/2018 14:31, Mike wrote; my response is lower down:

Much snippage - but all worth reading.
Post by Mike
In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
I think that saves me listening to this week's rubbish. I gather Olwen
has been brought into moan about 1995 pensions legislation. Get rid of
her quickly please. It was debated then and does not need discussing now.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Btms
2018-04-05 13:52:15 UTC
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Post by krw
Much snippage - but all worth reading.
Post by Mike
In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
I think that saves me listening to this week's rubbish. I gather Olwen
has been brought into moan about 1995 pensions legislation. Get rid of
her quickly please. It was debated then and does not need discussing now.
This was probably part of the deal to get her to do it. These lefty right
on theatricals you know. 🤭
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Kate B
2018-04-05 14:03:14 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Much snippage - but all worth reading.
Post by Mike
In fact, it is just as well The Archers is a FOTWD and no such preposterous
story lines are featured..... err.... isn’t it???
I think that saves me listening to this week's rubbish. I gather Olwen
has been brought into moan about 1995 pensions legislation. Get rid of
her quickly please. It was debated then and does not need discussing now.
This was probably part of the deal to get her to do it. These lefty right
on theatricals you know. 🤭
Besides which, Eleanor Bron is Otherwise Engaged.
--
Kate B
London
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