Discussion:
OT: pasta makers
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Sally Thompson
2018-06-20 14:33:43 UTC
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I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
the Omrud
2018-06-20 15:01:40 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
We have a very basic pasta maker (not sure it's even got a brand) and
it's very easy indeed, if a little slow. Flour and eggs and a lot of
mangling is all that's required.
--
David
Btms
2018-06-20 15:59:56 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
I bought mine from ebay iirc. Make is Imperia.

Others may disagree but I think the cheaper models are too lightweight to
do a good job. Ypu also need somewhere robust as a surface to mount it on
imho.

The recipe books tell you to use 00 grade flour for pasta. Supermarkets
have it generally.

Very pleased with the pasta. Put me off the shop stuff for a while.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Vicky Ayech
2018-06-20 16:13:31 UTC
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On 20 Jun 2018 14:33:43 GMT, Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
#1 daughter's son's dad has Italian parents and he makes his own
pasta. He always did but then daughter got him a pasta maker for his
birthday and now he makes it lots more,. I wattched and it seemed very
easy. I will try and ask which make.
Sally Thompson
2018-06-20 17:39:17 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On 20 Jun 2018 14:33:43 GMT, Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
#1 daughter's son's dad has Italian parents and he makes his own
pasta. He always did but then daughter got him a pasta maker for his
birthday and now he makes it lots more,. I wattched and it seemed very
easy. I will try and ask which make.
That would be useful, thanks. I have 00 flour which I use for pizza bases
(suggestion up there), so that’s no problem.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
LFS
2018-06-20 18:28:13 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
My Lithuanian grandma made her own with a rolling pin (which she always
called a pinroller). She used to hang it over the kitchen chairs to dry.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Sally Thompson
2018-06-20 18:41:29 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
My Lithuanian grandma made her own with a rolling pin (which she always
called a pinroller). She used to hang it over the kitchen chairs to dry.
Er, thank you, but I think I might move a little more into the modern
age:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Btms
2018-06-20 19:05:25 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
My Lithuanian grandma made her own with a rolling pin (which she always
called a pinroller). She used to hang it over the kitchen chairs to dry.
My guess is that grandma had better muscles than me.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
steveski
2018-06-20 23:33:26 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been
watching Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta
maker on occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was,
and (b) if any of you make your own and had any comments about how
easy/difficult it is and what you use.
My Lithuanian grandma made her own with a rolling pin (which she always
called a pinroller). She used to hang it over the kitchen chairs to dry.
That's a strange way to dry a rolling pin . . . IGMC
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-20 23:49:20 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been
watching Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta
maker on occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was,
and (b) if any of you make your own and had any comments about how
easy/difficult it is and what you use.
My Lithuanian grandma made her own with a rolling pin (which she always
called a pinroller). She used to hang it over the kitchen chairs to dry.
Or in early April in Switzerland, from the bushes ...
Post by steveski
That's a strange way to dry a rolling pin . . . IGMC
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Subtlety is the art of saying what you think and getting out of the way
before it is understood." - Fortunes
Nick Odell
2018-06-21 21:10:27 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
I've no idea what you've seen on television because its on television
but, if it is any help, I've bought two of 'em and, apart from the
different names of celebrity chefs engraved on each of them, they appear
to be exactly the same. Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.

My favourite recipe for spaghetti/tagliatelli is

One hundred grammes of flour
One egg
One tablespoon of olive oil mixed together and left for
One hour before rolling out etc.

It's delicious, with two reservations.

Firstly, cook straight from rolling out of the machine - it's useless
when dried out.
Second, it's useless for making ravioli - DAMHIKT

Nick
Sally Thompson
2018-06-21 23:15:50 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
I've no idea what you've seen on television because its on television
but, if it is any help, I've bought two of 'em and, apart from the
different names of celebrity chefs engraved on each of them, they appear
to be exactly the same. Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
My favourite recipe for spaghetti/tagliatelli is
One hundred grammes of flour
One egg
One tablespoon of olive oil mixed together and left for
One hour before rolling out etc.
It's delicious, with two reservations.
Firstly, cook straight from rolling out of the machine - it's useless
when dried out.
Second, it's useless for making ravioli - DAMHIKT
That’s very useful. I’ve kept the recipe. I’ve never actually made ravioli
because I suppose it isn’t my favourite pasta. However if I get a machine
there might be no end to my experiments!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Nick Odell
2018-06-22 23:44:30 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
I don’t usually watch cookery programmes but have recently been watching
Britain’s Best Home Cook. They all used a particular pasta maker on
occasion and I wondered (a) if anyone knew what make it was, and (b) if any
of you make your own and had any comments about how easy/difficult it is
and what you use.
I've no idea what you've seen on television because its on television
but, if it is any help, I've bought two of 'em and, apart from the
different names of celebrity chefs engraved on each of them, they appear
to be exactly the same. Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
My favourite recipe for spaghetti/tagliatelli is
One hundred grammes of flour
One egg
One tablespoon of olive oil mixed together and left for
One hour before rolling out etc.
It's delicious, with two reservations.
Firstly, cook straight from rolling out of the machine - it's useless
when dried out.
Second, it's useless for making ravioli - DAMHIKT
That’s very useful. I’ve kept the recipe. I’ve never actually made ravioli
because I suppose it isn’t my favourite pasta. However if I get a machine
there might be no end to my experiments!
I ought to have mentioned that buying a second pasta machine doesn't
mean that the first one was rubbish and broke. I bought the second one
for Liliana because I liked the first one so much

Nick
Btms
2018-06-23 08:03:47 UTC
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Nick Odell <***@themusicworkshop.plus.com> wrote:


[]

Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
Post by Nick Odell
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
[]

The only problem is mine uses a g-clamp and the surface needs a lip under
it to grip.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-06-23 10:49:53 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
[]
Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
Post by Nick Odell
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
[]
The only problem is mine uses a g-clamp and the surface needs a lip under
it to grip.
Are you familiar with the ‘sticky gel’ used to affix cards from your bank
(other sources are available) to a letter they send? If you roll a little
of this off the card or paper and apply it to the clamping surface of your
mandraulically propelled machine, this may stop it slipping on the
underside of the work surface. Tip #3211.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-06-23 10:56:00 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
[]
Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
Post by Nick Odell
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
[]
The only problem is mine uses a g-clamp and the surface needs a lip under
it to grip.
Are you familiar with the ‘sticky gel’ used to affix cards from your bank
(other sources are available) to a letter they send? If you roll a little
of this off the card or paper and apply it to the clamping surface of your
mandraulically propelled machine, this may stop it slipping on the
underside of the work surface. Tip #3211.
🙂
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2018-06-23 12:34:48 UTC
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On Sat, 23 Jun 2018 10:49:53 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Nick Odell
[]
Think I'm surprised btms has problems clamping
Post by Nick Odell
it: on mine, provided the feet are clean and free from grease they hold
with just a gentle pressure from the clamp and a smooth and controlled
winding of the handle doesn't disturb the set at all.
[]
The only problem is mine uses a g-clamp and the surface needs a lip under
it to grip.
Is there a drawer or cupboard under the counter which you could open to
accommodate the clamp?
Are you familiar with the ‘sticky gel’ used to affix cards from your bank
(other sources are available) to a letter they send? If you roll a little
of this off the card or paper and apply it to the clamping surface of your
mandraulically propelled machine, this may stop it slipping on the
underside of the work surface. Tip #3211.
I think that's Cow Gum - useful stuff but probably no better than a damp
cloth (wot we was taught at school to use under mixing bowls to stop
slipping) and inadequate to hold the pasta machine.

When I designed my kitchen here I included a counter with no cupboards
under it, intended for, but longer than the washing machine, as well as a
foot long overhang to the island counter. My builder tended to call these
both 'breakfast bars'. I think the odd visitor has eaten breakfast there.

The space beside the washing machine houses recycling bins. The overhang on
the island has proved extremely useful for clamping wood for sawing and
drilling when molishing other stuff for the house as well as a place to
clamp the marmalade cutter. My mincer has a suction cup instead of a clamp
but a clamp is better.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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