Discussion:
OT: New laptop
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Fenny
2017-04-14 11:09:32 UTC
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New machine ordered online from John Lewis, (via the Virgin Atlantic
shopping portal to collect more points) to be picked up tomorrow from
Waitrose nearest where I'll be for the weekend. It's a very useful
option, as it means I don't have to find somewhere to park in the
centre of town.

Slightly more expensive than I would have preferred, but having read
the reviews of the models I was looking at yesterday, this has better
specs for what I want.

Now I'll have to sort out a new version of Office via work and decide
what other software I need to put on it.
--
Fenny
krw
2017-04-14 11:35:32 UTC
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Post by Fenny
New machine ordered online from John Lewis, (via the Virgin Atlantic
shopping portal to collect more points) to be picked up tomorrow from
Waitrose nearest where I'll be for the weekend. It's a very useful
option, as it means I don't have to find somewhere to park in the
centre of town.
Slightly more expensive than I would have preferred, but having read
the reviews of the models I was looking at yesterday, this has better
specs for what I want.
Now I'll have to sort out a new version of Office via work and decide
what other software I need to put on it.
Another umrat recommended https://ninite.com/ and they certainly looked
after the basic stuff when I bought this - over 4 years ago.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2017-04-14 11:57:28 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Fenny
New machine ordered online from John Lewis, (via the Virgin Atlantic
shopping portal to collect more points) to be picked up tomorrow from
Waitrose nearest where I'll be for the weekend. It's a very useful
option, as it means I don't have to find somewhere to park in the
centre of town.
Slightly more expensive than I would have preferred, but having read
the reviews of the models I was looking at yesterday, this has better
specs for what I want.
Now I'll have to sort out a new version of Office via work and decide
what other software I need to put on it.
Another umrat recommended https://ninite.com/ and they certainly looked
after the basic stuff when I bought this - over 4 years ago.
Looks handy, ta.
--
Fenny
DavidK
2017-04-14 14:11:01 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
New machine ordered online from John Lewis, (via the Virgin Atlantic
shopping portal to collect more points) to be picked up tomorrow from
Waitrose nearest where I'll be for the weekend. It's a very useful
option, as it means I don't have to find somewhere to park in the
centre of town.
Slightly more expensive than I would have preferred, but having read
the reviews of the models I was looking at yesterday, this has better
specs for what I want.
Now I'll have to sort out a new version of Office via work and decide
what other software I need to put on it.
Another umrat recommended https://ninite.com/ and they certainly looked
after the basic stuff when I bought this - over 4 years ago.
Looks handy, ta.
My advice when people buy a new laptop is to

1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
2) do a complete backup of the small drive, swap in the large drive, and
reinstall on the hard-drive.
3) put the small drive somewhere safe, but not so safe that it's lost
and forgotten

That way, if something breaks in the laptop, you can swap in the small
drive and the repair shop doesn't get access to your data and they can't
install something you don't want.
Peter Percival
2017-04-14 14:27:34 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
New machine ordered online from John Lewis, (via the Virgin Atlantic
shopping portal to collect more points) to be picked up tomorrow from
Waitrose nearest where I'll be for the weekend. It's a very useful
option, as it means I don't have to find somewhere to park in the
centre of town.
Slightly more expensive than I would have preferred, but having read
the reviews of the models I was looking at yesterday, this has better
specs for what I want.
Now I'll have to sort out a new version of Office via work and decide
what other software I need to put on it.
Another umrat recommended https://ninite.com/ and they certainly looked
after the basic stuff when I bought this - over 4 years ago.
Looks handy, ta.
My advice when people buy a new laptop is to
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
Post by DavidK
2) do a complete backup of the small drive, swap in the large drive, and
reinstall on the hard-drive.
3) put the small drive somewhere safe, but not so safe that it's lost
and forgotten
That way, if something breaks in the laptop, you can swap in the small
drive and the repair shop doesn't get access to your data and they can't
install something you don't want.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
DavidK
2017-04-15 08:09:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.

That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
Nick Odell
2017-04-15 10:23:39 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.
That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
I replaced a failing "spinning rust" drive with a solid state disc in
an old netbook of mine. So that's at least one laptop that's not
hybrid. Unfortunately the promised performance increases never
materialised - I suppose because of the elderly architecture involved.
At least I replaced it before it finally finished failing!

Nick
Penny
2017-04-15 12:24:32 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 11:23:39 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I replaced it before it finally finished failing
I like that!
Definitely the best time ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2017-04-15 12:36:35 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 11:23:39 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I replaced it before it finally finished failing
I like that!
Definitely the best time ;)
The final verse of the swan's song?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2017-04-15 18:21:45 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 11:23:39 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I replaced it before it finally finished failing
I like that!
Definitely the best time ;)
The final verse of the swan's song?
Wouldn't that have been finally finished flailing?

Nick
Peter Percival
2017-04-15 18:29:38 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 11:23:39 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I replaced it before it finally finished failing
I like that!
Definitely the best time ;)
The final verse of the swan's song?
Wouldn't that have been finally finished flailing?
Nick
Like Stomp shaking their Vestas?
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-16 09:57:08 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 11:23:39 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I replaced it before it finally finished failing
I like that!
Definitely the best time ;)
That's what's put me off SSDs: from experience with USB sticks, which is
probably a bad comparison as I know they are not entirely the same
technology, I fear that they might fail suddenly with no warning. My
experience with spinning drives has been that they usually* give
indications of failure over long enough for you to do something,

*Not always - my one that suddenly stopped going round was obviously
sudden and no warning. But I still feel happier with long-established
technology (-:.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Gravity is a myth; the Earth sucks.
krw
2017-04-15 12:45:52 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Unfortunately the promised performance increases never
materialised
I have an ssd boot disk on this desktop - also bigger than the original.
But the speedy boot up promised still seems very slow.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Penny
2017-04-15 12:15:49 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:09:27 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.
That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
Rather like scratched vinyl (or shellac)?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2017-04-15 12:22:24 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.
That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
Rather like scratched vinyl (or shellac)?
One used to be able to carry out disk repair functions that mapped out bad
sectors so they weren't used.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-15 21:56:40 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.
That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
Rather like scratched vinyl (or shellac)?
One used to be able to carry out disk repair functions that mapped out bad
sectors so they weren't used.
I thought HDDs now do all that sort of thing by themselves without
needing any human intervention? (I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-16 10:29:51 UTC
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[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
One used to be able to carry out disk repair functions that mapped out bad
sectors so they weren't used.
I thought HDDs now do all that sort of thing by themselves without
needing any human intervention? (I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
(Something "measuring and reporting technology", IIRR; I'm sure
Wikipedia will tell you.) Yes, modern ones (as of quite a lot of years),
the computer does not have direct access to sectors, though the drive
electronics make it think it has. Modern drives are so high-density that
there are inevitably some bad sectors, but these are automatically
logged and swapped out for good ones by the drive electronics; they're
made with a few extra sectors beyond the nominal capacity. One of the
SMART parameters - I think it's "reallocated sector count" - tells you
how that's getting on, but only beyond a threshold; the manufacturers
don't let it tell you until there are fewer than X free sectors left,
apparently to stop people checking and returning drives until they get a
very good one.

A lot of the SMART reading utilities (I use DiskCheckup, from
http://www.passmark.com/ [make sure you get the free one], but there are
plenty of others) will, once you've run them twice or more, give you a
predicted failure date for the drive; mine's currently 18 Jun 2231,
based on Spin Up Time, with all the other parameters showing as N.A.,
presumably because they're not changing (including the sector count
ones). Obviously, I wouldn't rely on these - they're based on an
assumption of gradual deterioration, not sudden occurrence - but give
_some_ estimate, at least of something that _is_ deteriorating.

There _is_ a way to get some idea if your drive has some dud sectors
before their number exceeds the SMART threshold (or the number of spares
left falls below it more like): another of the free utilities will give
a graph of access speed across the disc. (I think it's called HDTune -
the access time graph isn't its main function; I'm not online at the
moment, but look for old posts by "Paul" in the XP or 7 'groups and
you'll find it for sure.) For a spinning drive, this should be a smooth
curve, starting high and coming down a bit (drives are fastest near
their start - I think that's the outer edge), with a few narrow dip
spikes where the operating system interrupted it. (Windows is nearly
always doing something that it thinks takes priority over anything _you_
tell it to do.) If any of these dips are in the same place on two
subsequent runs, then that's where the drive had to move the head to
access the replacement sector, which of course takes momentarily longer
than just moving on to the next sector. If any of the dips are
noticeably wide, then you have a bad _patch_, and arguably it's time to
think about getting a replacement, though maybe not (read Paul on the
matter).

Sorry for lecture (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Gravity is a myth; the Earth sucks.
Penny
2017-04-17 09:56:04 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 22:56:40 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
(I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?

*involving M42, M40, M25, M26, M20, M2 - can't recall where the signs were.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2017-04-17 11:02:57 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
(I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?
*involving M42, M40, M25, M26, M20, M2 - can't recall where the signs were.
Isn't where the speed signs change to accommodate traffic volume? I've
experienced them on the M20, the M25 and the M1 - usually they'll say
50mph, to stop bunching. When that goes down to 30 you know you're in
trouble, but by then you're generally stationary anyway. They're
supposed to respond automatically to changing traffic. They are a
complete pain when they don't, and you can see miles of empty motorway
ahead and you're limited to 50. There are usually speed cameras (or
worse, average speed cameras) on the gantries, so no cheating :(
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2017-04-17 11:10:08 UTC
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 12:02:57 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?
Isn't where the speed signs change to accommodate traffic volume? I've
experienced them on the M20, the M25 and the M1 - usually they'll say
50mph, to stop bunching. When that goes down to 30 you know you're in
trouble, but by then you're generally stationary anyway. They're
supposed to respond automatically to changing traffic. They are a
complete pain when they don't, and you can see miles of empty motorway
ahead and you're limited to 50. There are usually speed cameras (or
worse, average speed cameras) on the gantries, so no cheating :(
Could be - they never seem to work very well* on the M25 where I had
finally got up to 25mph - after being stationary for some time - when the
40 sign in front of me changed to 50.

*largely because so many drivers ignore them when the road ahead looks
clear...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-04-17 11:45:49 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Isn't where the speed signs change to accommodate traffic volume? I've
experienced them on the M20, the M25 and the M1 - usually they'll say
50mph, to stop bunching. When that goes down to 30 you know you're in
trouble, but by then you're generally stationary anyway. They're
supposed to respond automatically to changing traffic. They are a
complete pain when they don't, and you can see miles of empty motorway
ahead and you're limited to 50. There are usually speed cameras (or
worse, average speed cameras) on the gantries, so no cheating :(
Yes, the M1 from Alfreton most of the way to Tinsley was showing 50mph
on Friday afternoon. There was no more traffic than there had been
all the way up from Lutterworth, but because of the pointless speed
restrictions, it was all bunched together.

There is talk of reducing the limit on the M1 to 50 permanently up the
stretch past Sheffield. There is really no reason to do this and it
will just end up producing more concentrated pollution. If they do,
more people going to Sheffield will come off at the Chesterfield
junction and clog up the A61/A617 junction.

---
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krw
2017-04-17 12:24:52 UTC
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Post by Fenny
There is really no reason to do this and it
will just end up producing more concentrated pollution.
The argument is that as the vehicles will be going slower there will be
less pollution generated and we will meet the requirements on air
quality. Same on the rebuilt M3 which is also being smarted up. (But
dumbed down in reality).
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Fenny
2017-04-17 22:09:00 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Fenny
There is really no reason to do this and it
will just end up producing more concentrated pollution.
The argument is that as the vehicles will be going slower there will be
less pollution generated and we will meet the requirements on air
quality. Same on the rebuilt M3 which is also being smarted up. (But
dumbed down in reality).
I don't actually believe that argument at all. But someone high
enough up does, so it gets enacted. And so people cut through the
towns to avoid the build ups of traffic on the slow moving motorways.

---
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http://www.avg.com
krw
2017-04-17 22:27:46 UTC
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Post by Fenny
I don't actually believe that argument at all. But someone high
enough up does, so it gets enacted.
Apparently someone sufficiently important was told that diesels produce
less carbon dioxide than petrol engines hence all sorts of encouragement
to buy diesels. No-one thought it important to point out the other
(serious) pollutants diesels kick out. Now suddenly diesels are nasty -
but they were all along. All cars are.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Anne B
2017-04-18 17:14:42 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
There is really no reason to do this and it
will just end up producing more concentrated pollution.
The argument is that as the vehicles will be going slower there will be
less pollution generated and we will meet the requirements on air
quality. Same on the rebuilt M3 which is also being smarted up. (But
dumbed down in reality).
I don't actually believe that argument at all. But someone high
enough up does, so it gets enacted. And so people cut through the
towns to avoid the build ups of traffic on the slow moving motorways.
Shirley if you go slower you change down a gear or two. So for a given
amount of engine activity you go less distance. So you use more fuel,
and generate more pollution, than if you were travelling in a higher
gear? OAIAM?

Anne B
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-18 17:37:23 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Shirley if you go slower you change down a gear or two. So for a given
amount of engine activity you go less distance. So you use more fuel,
and generate more pollution, than if you were travelling in a higher
gear? OAIAM?
A little reflection should allow you to realise that this in
incorrect. The heavier you stamp on the accelerator, the more
fuel you use. At lower speeds you will be using less fuel - it is
not a fixed amount per engine revolution.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-18 20:01:43 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
There is really no reason to do this and it
will just end up producing more concentrated pollution.
The argument is that as the vehicles will be going slower there will be
less pollution generated and we will meet the requirements on air
quality. Same on the rebuilt M3 which is also being smarted up. (But
dumbed down in reality).
I don't actually believe that argument at all. But someone high
enough up does, so it gets enacted. And so people cut through the
towns to avoid the build ups of traffic on the slow moving motorways.
Shirley if you go slower you change down a gear or two. So for a given
amount of engine activity you go less distance. So you use more fuel,
and generate more pollution, than if you were travelling in a higher
gear? OAIAM?
Anne B
It's not as simple as that. I used to think the same, but that assumes
your engine uses the same amount of fuel per revolution; it doesn't, it
uses more if it's pushing hard, even at the same (engine) speed.

One of the things the engine is pushing against is air resistance, which
I think goes as the square (or at least one and a half power) of the
speed.

It used to be the case that 55 or so was the most economical speed -
_much_ less than that, the effect you mention comes in (towards the
obvious extreme of crawling - or even stationary! - traffic being very
polluting), and above that air and other resistances (e. g. rolling) do
start to have an adverse effect. Improvements in aerodynamics (i. e.
streamlining) have helped _somewhat_, countered by the general growth in
the bulk of vehicles (mainly due to "safety").

I find that, unless I concentrate on going faster, I tend to settle at
about 55 anyway. (I have to try to go faster on single carriageways,
where the limit is 60, otherwise I find I'm pulling a train.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Everything will be all right in the end. And if everything isn't all right,
then it isn't the end. - The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011)
krw
2017-04-18 22:04:25 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I find that, unless I concentrate on going faster, I tend to settle at
about 55 anyway.
On motorways I tend to set the cruise control at 60 and drift along with
pretty good fuel consumption figures.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-19 06:57:43 UTC
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Post by krw
On motorways I tend to set the cruise control at 60 and drift along with
pretty good fuel consumption figures.
Indeed. Set the cruise control and just point it. I like those
long journeys where I get home with more range showing on the
computer than when I set off.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Fenny
2017-04-19 07:29:47 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by krw
On motorways I tend to set the cruise control at 60 and drift along with
pretty good fuel consumption figures.
Indeed. Set the cruise control and just point it. I like those
long journeys where I get home with more range showing on the
computer than when I set off.
So the modern lack of correct lane choice is an umratic thing?
--
Fenny
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-19 07:36:25 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Chris J Dixon
Indeed. Set the cruise control and just point it. I like those
long journeys where I get home with more range showing on the
computer than when I set off.
So the modern lack of correct lane choice is an umratic thing?
I'm not quite sure of your reasoning there. I didn't say that
"pointing" precluded occasional lane changes.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2017-04-19 08:25:10 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by krw
On motorways I tend to set the cruise control at 60 and drift along with
pretty good fuel consumption figures.
Indeed. Set the cruise control and just point it. I like those
long journeys where I get home with more range showing on the
computer than when I set off.
So the modern lack of correct lane choice is an umratic thing?
At those speeds one rarely leaves the left hand lane.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
krw
2017-04-19 08:24:46 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Set the cruise control and just point it. I like those
long journeys where I get home with more range showing on the
computer than when I set off.
Rarely achieved. But it is an interesting target.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-17 17:51:38 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
(I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?
*involving M42, M40, M25, M26, M20, M2 - can't recall where the signs were.
Isn't where the speed signs change to accommodate traffic volume? I've
experienced them on the M20, the M25 and the M1 - usually they'll say
50mph, to stop bunching. When that goes down to 30 you know you're in
trouble, but by then you're generally stationary anyway. They're
supposed to respond automatically to changing traffic. They are a
complete pain when they don't, and you can see miles of empty motorway
ahead and you're limited to 50. There are usually speed cameras (or
worse, average speed cameras) on the gantries, so no cheating :(
The M4 around Newport has had variable speed limits for a few years now.
However they only started issuing speeding tickets based on those limits
6 months ago. 13,000 tickets have been issued, apparently.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-39515289
--
Sam Plusnet
krw
2017-04-17 11:47:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
(I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?
*involving M42, M40, M25, M26, M20, M2 - can't recall where the signs were.
It is where they turn the hard shoulder rendomnly into an extra lane and
have signs limiting you to about 40mph in all traffic conditions because
it is safer.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Flop
2017-04-17 16:51:01 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
(I have no idea what S.M.A.R.T.
actually stands for)
On my travels this last week* I met several signs announcing the road I was
travelling on was to become a SMART motorway - what on earth does that
mean?
*involving M42, M40, M25, M26, M20, M2 - can't recall where the signs were.
It is where they turn the hard shoulder rendomnly into an extra lane and
have signs limiting you to about 40mph in all traffic conditions because
it is safer.
I suspect that a 'SMART' motorway is one designed to keep speed slow
with deliberately confusing messages.

Imagine driving along the M4 in the evening when a message suddenly
appears - "M4 closed between J13 and J12".

This is scary because a) you are on the M4 between J13 and J12

and b) there are no other vehicles on the motorway.
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
Btms
2017-04-17 17:05:14 UTC
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On 17/04/2017 12:47, krw wrote:
On 17/04/2017 10:56, Penny wrote; my response is lower down:

[]

I suspect that a 'SMART' motorway is one designed to keep speed slow with
deliberately confusing messages.
Imagine driving along the M4 in the evening when a message suddenly appears
- "M4 closed between J13 and J12".

This is scary because a) you are on the M4 between J13 and J12

and b) there are no other vehicles on the motorway.

Nah...it'll be fine. My exit is J14 😂
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
krw
2017-04-17 21:38:32 UTC
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Post by Flop
Imagine driving along the M4
For several weeks one sign spoke of problems along the A329 towards
Reading - they just forgot to turn it off. So it is not surprising that
M4 drivers ignore signs on motorways.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-16 09:51:56 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Peter Percival
Post by DavidK
1) buy one with a small disk-drive and also buy a spare large hard-drive.
The disk-drives in a laptop, are they disk-drives or are they
semiconductor simulacra of disk-drives?
I'd forgotten that, but I think almost all laptop disk-drives still
whirl around* although hybrids are now available.
If it had a reasonably large capacity SSD (solid state drive), it'd have
been noticeably more expensive, and I'm pretty sure the sales card would
have drawn your attention to the fact.

The other possibility: there are some _very_ cheap machines about - and
yes, available through PC World too - that have 32G "eMMC". I say cheap
meaning inexpensive, not inferior; I've seen them online for less than
110, possibly even less than 100. However, as always, they quote the
capacity of the "disc", not the free space; when I actually played with
a couple of these in PCW, and looked at the disc usage piechart, on one
the free space segment was very small, and on the other it wasn't
visible. (Windows itself takes a certain amount of space - which in the
case of these, is most of the disc.) They're probably OK for certain
limited types of use, and/or if the user intends to use them with
external storage ("cloud" or otherwise).

As DavidK says, most _mid-range_ (pricewise) laptops still have what the
pejorators (!) call spinning-rust drives.
Post by DavidK
That clicking noise I heard in mine was the head finding a bad patch on
the drive and returning repeatedly to its resting position. :-(
)-:
[When mine stopped, and after all else had failed I opened it up (head
had stuck to platter I think; it freed when I touched it and I was able
to recover the majority of the data {to a new disc - I wasn't going to
rely on one I'd opened}), the platters were not brown rust colour, like
recording tape or a floppy, but mirror finish.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

No, I haven't changed my mind - I'm perfectly happy with the one I have, thank
you.
krw
2017-04-17 11:48:59 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[When mine stopped, and after all else had failed I opened it up (head
had stuck to platter I think; it freed when I touched it and I was able
to recover the majority of the data {to a new disc - I wasn't going to
rely on one I'd opened}), the platters were not brown rust colour, like
recording tape or a floppy, but mirror finish.]
I had one which I took to work and they gently dropped it on the floor
and recovered the data.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-17 12:42:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[When mine stopped, and after all else had failed I opened it up
(head had stuck to platter I think; it freed when I touched it and I
was able to recover the majority of the data {to a new disc - I
wasn't going to rely on one I'd opened}), the platters were not brown
rust colour, like recording tape or a floppy, but mirror finish.]
I had one which I took to work and they gently dropped it on the floor
and recovered the data.
Oh, I'd tried all the ways I could find - there are documents on the
'net, things like "100 ways to recover ...", which include all sorts of
hitting from various angles and levels, putting in the freezer
overnight, ... I think it had just spot-welded itself (the fan in this
notebook had been failing (initially unknown to me), and it was the
hottest part of the year). _Possibly_ a sufficient impact in the right
direction and level _would_ have freed it (I freed it by turning the
central shaft - didn't take much), but I'd obtained a new (larger in
capacity) drive by then anyway, and since we had a clean air cabinet at
work, I decided to open it.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Very funny, Scotty. Now beam down my clothes
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