Discussion:
mother church minster church
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Btms
2018-03-11 22:03:40 UTC
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Minster (church) - IPFS
https://ipfs.io › ipfs › wiki › Minster_(ch...
The word derives from the Old English "mynster", meaning "monastery",
"nunnery ", "mother church" or "cathedral", itself derived from the Latin
"monasterium", meaning a group of clergy living a communal life. Thus,
"minster" could apply to any ...

Sounds like semantics more than difference.
Kate B
2018-03-12 11:25:17 UTC
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Minster (church) - IPFS
https://ipfs.io › ipfs › wiki › Minster_(ch...
The word derives from the Old English "mynster", meaning "monastery",
"nunnery ", "mother church" or "cathedral", itself derived from the Latin
"monasterium", meaning a group of clergy living a communal life. Thus,
"minster" could apply to any ...
Sounds like semantics more than difference.
Tsk tsk. I thought we were talking about Piers Plowman. There may be
little difference *at present*, but the meaning has become very diluted
in the last century or so, with churches being designated minsters that
have never had anything to do with monastic foundations. A minster may
have daughter foundations but 'mother' is not what the word meant.
DINTAFPOU?
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-12 12:40:27 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Btms
Minster (church) - IPFS
https://ipfs.io › ipfs › wiki › Minster_(ch...
The word derives from the Old English "mynster", meaning "monastery",
"nunnery ", "mother church" or "cathedral", itself derived from the Latin
"monasterium", meaning a group of clergy living a communal life. Thus,
"minster" could apply to any ...
Sounds like semantics more than difference.
Tsk tsk. I thought we were talking about Piers Plowman. There may be
little difference *at present*, but the meaning has become very diluted
in the last century or so, with churches being designated minsters that
have never had anything to do with monastic foundations. A minster may
have daughter foundations but 'mother' is not what the word meant.
DINTAFPOU?
NAA!

As for "cathedral", I think it is, strictly, an adjective not a noun,
and refers to the church where the bishop's seat (throne?) was situated.
As in "ex cathedra" - an edict originally issued from that chair (OK,
the person sitting in it), in the "cathedral church". (And it _doesn't_
make the town a city. I think all the time _I_ lived near there,
Chelmsford had a cathedral (church), but _wasn't_ a city, though it has
managed to achieve that status since, I think. (I think I once had a
look inside the building: it was a perfectly nice Victorian-or-similar
church, but not particularly big or notable; I can think of at least one
non-cathedral church (in Jesmond, Newcastle) which is bigger and more
impressive (and I suspect better attended!).)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm a self-made man, thereby demonstrating once again the perils of unskilled
labor..." - Harlan Ellison
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