Discussion:
post continuity spoiler, 3rd Oct
(too old to reply)
Chris McMillan
2017-10-03 18:16:54 UTC
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Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?

Sincerely Chris
Vicky
2017-10-03 21:58:06 UTC
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On Tue, 03 Oct 2017 18:16:54 GMT, Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
Sincerely Chris
She had a bit of a wobble before starting honest labour to get the
money for her trip but Roy put her straight, although jenny did do her
best to undermind the lesson with the handout later, but basically
Phoebs is Haley's work come good. A contrast to her mother and aunt.
I'm wondering now about Lucas's ability as a parent too. Or is TA
making the argument for nature v nurture?
--
Vicky
Robin Stevens
2017-10-04 18:06:05 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.

Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.

I don't think it's been revealed which college she's at, has it? Lonsdale,
or perhaps Shrewsbury? Jordan seems unlikely - it's very hard to get in
unless you know the right knife to use.
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-04 18:20:29 UTC
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Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
that the term doesn't begin till next Sunday:

<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
Post by Robin Stevens
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
Do freshers start a week early?
--
Best wishes, Serena
You are making progress if each mistake is a new one.
Robin Stevens
2017-10-04 23:36:44 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example: https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Robin Stevens
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
Do freshers start a week early?
Not generally - it's more that the weekend before Thursday of 0th week is
often a more convenient time for parents to deliver the little dears and
their assorted clobber than doing so mid-week.
Serena Blanchflower
2017-10-05 07:49:01 UTC
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Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford
today.
--
Best wishes, Serena
This is life, this is my life, and no matter what I do I can't go back
to the way it used to be. It is about accepting the changes and rising
to the challenges.' (Doreen Lawrence)
LFS
2017-10-05 08:55:21 UTC
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Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
krw
2017-10-05 10:17:00 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Mike
2017-10-05 10:42:48 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
Being devout tight skinflints, we have used our concessionary passes to go
from Reading to Oxford but it is not my favourite place, for one thing, the
strewn and also active cycles don’t enamour me with the idea of walking
around some areas of Oxford city as we are visually handicapped.


( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2017-10-05 12:21:46 UTC
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Mike <***@ntlworld.com> wrote:

I
Post by Mike
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
I dont see how this works?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris J Dixon
2017-10-05 12:57:18 UTC
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Post by Btms
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
I dont see how this works?
Perhaps it evokes something visibly impaired.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2017-10-05 13:15:05 UTC
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Post by Btms
I
Post by Mike
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
I dont see how this works?
Best not to eat it.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2017-10-05 14:59:49 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Btms
I
Post by Mike
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
I dont see how this works?
Best not to eat it.
🤓
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
LFS
2017-10-05 15:28:20 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
Being devout tight skinflints, we have used our concessionary passes to go
from Reading to Oxford but it is not my favourite place, for one thing, the
strewn and also active cycles don’t enamour me with the idea of walking
around some areas of Oxford city as we are visually handicapped.
Even if there are no bikes in the way, the broken paving is treacherous
everywhere.
Post by Mike
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 17:08:14 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
Being devout tight skinflints, we have used our concessionary passes to go
from Reading to Oxford but it is not my favourite place, for one thing, the
strewn and also active cycles don’t enamour me with the idea of walking
around some areas of Oxford city as we are visually handicapped.
Even if there are no bikes in the way, the broken paving is treacherous
everywhere.
Post by Mike
( I don’t like the term ‘visually impaired’ for, as I have said on In
Touch on R4, it suggests a vision of a lump of stale mouldy cheese.)
Too true. I have been rellie hospital visiting this year, definitely pays
to choose ones visiting times!

Sincerely Chris
Btms
2017-10-05 12:21:45 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
We use the park and ride.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
krw
2017-10-05 12:32:45 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
We use the park and ride.
Northampton by the way is a revelation. They do not charge for parking
at weekends in the town centre which keeps the shopping centre busy and
the shops are open. Something Reading could usefully learn.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Btms
2017-10-05 12:58:35 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
We use the park and ride.
Northampton by the way is a revelation. They do not charge for parking
at weekends in the town centre which keeps the shopping centre busy and
the shops are open. Something Reading could usefully learn.
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it. Parking is a
nightmare.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
krw
2017-10-05 13:50:16 UTC
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Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Btms
2017-10-05 15:18:13 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
Until you have been lost in Ikea, you haven’t lived.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2017-10-05 15:22:28 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
Until you have been lost in Ikea, you haven’t lived.
You mean there is life after Ikea???!!!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-05 15:52:56 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
Until you have been lost in Ikea, you haven’t lived.
You mean there is life after Ikea???!!!
<echoey voice> Lo - ost ... in ... I ke a !!!</echoey>. Look out for Dr.
Smith.

(I find it an interesting experience once every few years. [And the
meatballs _are_ nice. Though I've found "Swedish meatballs" in both
Sainsburgs and Tesco.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

/Downton Abbey/ presented a version of the past that appealed to anyone who
had ever bought a National Trust tea towel. - Alison Graham, RT 2015/11/7-13
LFS
2017-10-05 15:20:21 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mike
2017-10-05 15:24:25 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
Balls are veggie???
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2017-10-05 19:36:08 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by LFS
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
Balls are veggie???
Think how the poor matzoes suffer each Passover.

john
LFS
2017-10-06 09:31:08 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by LFS
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
Balls are veggie???
Think how the poor matzoes suffer each Passover.
I set 'em up.. but there's no e in matzos.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
John Ashby
2017-10-06 10:27:16 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by LFS
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
Balls are veggie???
Think how the poor matzoes suffer each Passover.
I set 'em up.. but there's no e in matzos.
I quayle before your wrath.

john
Sid Nuncius
2017-10-08 07:24:22 UTC
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Post by LFS
I set 'em up.. but there's no e in matzos.
There's a bloke round here with a bike and a hoodie who could help you
with that. Were you planning to make this night different from all
other nights in a somewhat non-traditional way, then?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
LFS
2017-10-08 09:45:50 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by LFS
I set 'em up.. but there's no e in matzos.
There's a bloke round here with a bike and a hoodie who could help you
with that.  Were you planning to make this night different from all
other nights in a somewhat non-traditional way, then?
<giggle>
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Flop
2017-10-05 17:05:33 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by krw
Post by Btms
In Reading we go no further than ikea if we can help it.
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
The Reading one is lovely. We had an excellent lunch there (and bought a
supply of frozen veggie balls to take home) and I was very impressed by
the layout of the cafeteria and the facilities for those with small
children. It was a great improvement on previous trips to IKEA years ago.
You were lucky.

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/reading-berkshire-news/ikea-customers-stuck-car-park-13567245

https://tinyurl.com/yadckzeo
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-05 17:18:18 UTC
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In message <2q2dnU3915rC-***@brightview.co.uk>, Flop
<***@flop.knot.me.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Flop
You were lucky.
http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/reading-berkshire-news/ikea-customers-s
tuck-car-park-13567245
When I clicked through to that, I got:

403 Forbidden
nginx
Post by Flop
https://tinyurl.com/yadckzeo
(And that.)
3
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you help someone when they're in trouble, they will remember you when
they're in trouble again.
Chris J Dixon
2017-10-05 19:05:04 UTC
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Post by krw
I have never yet been to an Ikea and hopefully will continue in that
vein forever.
I started shopping at IKEA when there were only a couple of
stores. Because of stock problems, and aided by an assistant who
was willing to cross a few software barriers, I bought the basic
parts of my living room units in Neasden, and all the doors
drawers and shelves in Warrington the following day.

I visited Wednesbury on its opening day, to return a spare roll
of wallpaper - also meant I could get in through customer
services and avoid the queues at the main entrance :-)

I once had a bizarre visit to Nottingham, which is now really
handy for me, on a day when breakfast was free to those turning
up before 9 am in nightwear.

I like their continental bed sizes and don't have a problem with
getting the matching bed linen from them. ES lampholders work for
me. The old Sten shelving is a real workhorse, there is more
choice of storage solutions than most folk could want. Most of my
house is furnished by IKEA.

Overall I find their stuff to be well designed and good value,
and look forward to my shopping visits, usually taking advantage
of their very affordable restaurant.

Knowing the shortcuts is certainly useful. Once upon a time
Neasden also had a quick way back to the entrance from the
checkouts, and it may have been there that the quickest way to
the marketplace was to walk straight through the lift.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2017-10-05 19:23:40 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Overall I find their stuff to be well designed and good value,
and look forward to my shopping visits
YANAOU
Post by Chris J Dixon
Knowing the shortcuts is certainly useful. Once upon a time
Neasden also had a quick way back to the entrance from the
checkouts, and it may have been there that the quickest way to
the marketplace was to walk straight through the lift.
LOL. Knowing the store and its shortcuts is vital.
Btms
2017-10-05 21:23:51 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris J Dixon
Overall I find their stuff to be well designed and good value,
and look forward to my shopping visits
YANAOU
Post by Chris J Dixon
Knowing the shortcuts is certainly useful. Once upon a time
Neasden also had a quick way back to the entrance from the
checkouts, and it may have been there that the quickest way to
the marketplace was to walk straight through the lift.
LOL. Knowing the store and its shortcuts is vital.
Fwiw they sign them in Reading. And maybe other stores too now.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Flop
2017-10-05 17:01:24 UTC
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Northampton by the way is a revelation.  They do not charge for parking
at weekends in the town centre which keeps the shopping centre busy and
the shops are open.  Something Reading could usefully learn.
Such as a Christmas market?

https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowUserReviews-g186363-d948667-r247805955-Forbury_Gardens-Reading_Berkshire_England.html

https://tinyurl.com/y9tywsnl
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 17:10:44 UTC
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Post by Flop
Northampton by the way is a revelation.  They do not charge for parking
at weekends in the town centre which keeps the shopping centre busy and
the shops are open.  Something Reading could usefully learn.
Such as a Christmas market?
https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowUserReviews-g186363-d948667-r247805955-Forbury_Gardens-Reading_Berkshire_England.html
https://tinyurl.com/y9tywsnl
And just about every other market you can think of.

Sincerely Chris
Fenny
2017-10-05 21:36:18 UTC
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Post by krw
Northampton by the way is a revelation. They do not charge for parking
at weekends in the town centre which keeps the shopping centre busy and
the shops are open. Something Reading could usefully learn.
Daventry doesn't charge for parking at all in the town centre car
parks. When we finally manage to develop the shops that have been in
planning for severals of years, we hope to keep them filled with all
the people who would normally go to Northampton or Rugby.
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 14:06:30 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
Park and ride buses behave like normal buses in my experience from Laura’s
area/Churchill hospital and rail station

Sincerely Chris
LFS
2017-10-05 15:26:56 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb.  This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and
tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example:https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
That would suggest that Phoebe will be fine if she returns to Oxford today.
Many students are already here but quite a lot will be returning on
Sunday. One of the arguments against closing off the city for a half
marathon on that day is the difficulty it will cause for parents
bringing their offspring back. #firstworldproblems
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway.  I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
Of course you can but it depends where you're coming from, what time and
whether you have the wherewithal to pay the exorbitant parking charges.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Robin Stevens
2017-10-05 22:54:10 UTC
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Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.

I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-06 01:06:34 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
Isn't Milton Keynes the usual answer?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I've got this shocking pain right behind the eyes."
"Have you considered amputation?" - Vila & Avon
Robin Stevens
2017-10-06 12:30:10 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Robin Stevens
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
Isn't Milton Keynes the usual answer?
A proper US design wouldn't have all those roundabouts. And they'd
probably keep *some* of the old buildings, even if they ended up
immediately adjacent to elevated freeways.
LFS
2017-10-06 09:29:47 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
Cornmarket.

I sometimes wonder what difference the much disputed inner ring road
might have made.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
krw
2017-10-06 09:34:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked. Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way). In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Vicky
2017-10-06 10:23:18 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked. Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way). In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
--
Vicky
John Ashby
2017-10-06 10:30:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky
Post by krw
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked. Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way). In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
No, the purpose of the traffic controls is to isolate the People's
Republics of East Oxford and Headington.

john
krw
2017-10-06 12:12:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Ashby
Post by Vicky
Post by Robin Stevens
  From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway.  I
will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room.  Dunces'
caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked.  Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way).  In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
No, the purpose of the traffic controls is to isolate the People's
Republics of East Oxford and Headington.
Which means they do not get visits from Theresa and Boris.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
John Ashby
2017-10-06 13:29:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by John Ashby
Post by Vicky
Post by Robin Stevens
  From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway.  I
will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room.  Dunces'
caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked.  Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way).  In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
No, the purpose of the traffic controls is to isolate the People's
Republics of East Oxford and Headington.
Which means they do not get visits from Theresa and Boris.
So that's all good, then.

john
LFS
2017-10-06 15:56:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John Ashby
Post by Vicky
Post by Robin Stevens
  From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway.  I
will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room.  Dunces'
caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked.  Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way).  In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
No, the purpose of the traffic controls is to isolate the People's
Republics of East Oxford and Headington.
<grin>

Among the current spate of roadworks amusingly entitled "Access to
Headington" is some mysterious activity around the junction of Old Road
and Roosevelt Drive which leads to the Churchill Hospital. The various
bits of machinery and other stuff completely obscure the large sign at
the beginning of the road leading to the hospital. Some small notices on
sheets of paper have been stuck to the metal roadworks signs, presumably
intended to assist pedestrians in negotiating these works.

One notice instructed pedestrians to follow an arrow to further signs.
The next sign instructed pedestrians to use a zebra crossing further
along the road, with another helpful arrow. Except that the arrow was
pointing in the wrong direction, back towards the first sign. In that
direction, there is no zebra crossing. (In both signs the word Churchill
is misspelled.)

I have walked along the road several times this week and each time I
have encountered several distressed pedestrians trying to work out where
the zebra crossing is and how to get to the hospital. Yesterday I drew
the problem to the attention of local councillors via Twitter and the
local online forum. This had an immediate effect. Today the signs have
disappeared completely.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Chris McMillan
2017-10-06 17:55:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by John Ashby
Post by Vicky
Post by Robin Stevens
  From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway.  I
will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room.  Dunces'
caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked.  Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way).  In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are anti-car.
So if Teresa and Boris want to visit a venue in Oxford do they go on
the park and ride?
No, the purpose of the traffic controls is to isolate the People's
Republics of East Oxford and Headington.
<grin>
Among the current spate of roadworks amusingly entitled "Access to
Headington" is some mysterious activity around the junction of Old Road
and Roosevelt Drive which leads to the Churchill Hospital. The various
bits of machinery and other stuff completely obscure the large sign at
the beginning of the road leading to the hospital. Some small notices on
sheets of paper have been stuck to the metal roadworks signs, presumably
intended to assist pedestrians in negotiating these works.
One notice instructed pedestrians to follow an arrow to further signs.
The next sign instructed pedestrians to use a zebra crossing further
along the road, with another helpful arrow. Except that the arrow was
pointing in the wrong direction, back towards the first sign. In that
direction, there is no zebra crossing. (In both signs the word Churchill
is misspelled.)
I have walked along the road several times this week and each time I
have encountered several distressed pedestrians trying to work out where
the zebra crossing is and how to get to the hospital. Yesterday I drew
the problem to the attention of local councillors via Twitter and the
local online forum. This had an immediate effect. Today the signs have
disappeared completely.
Coming up from the road from the cross roads having come from the station,
one doesn’t see a single sign until one stops at the wide drive intending
to carry on walking. I have been assuming it must be well signed from the
opposing direction for drivers.

Sincerely Chris
Robin Stevens
2017-10-06 12:45:20 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by krw
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by krw
From my experience Oxford is closed to the car user anyway. I will not
go there because you cannot get there by car.
I must apologise for our great medieval minds who failed to predict that,
many centuries hence, the horseless carriage would become king, and so they
should place all the colleges further apart to leave room. Dunces' caps
all round I fear.
I sometimes wonder what the city centre would be like if typical mid-20th
century US urban planners had been let loose upon it.
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked.
So have I, but I try not to.
Post by krw
Suddenly the council said no cars and banished them all (London is fast
going the same way).
If they ever said that, few people were listening, given the long queues of
slow-moving cars everywhere in rush hour, if not all day long.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-10-06 13:06:34 UTC
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Raw Message
In message <or7ind$nsg$***@gioia.aioe.org>, krw <***@whitnet.uk> writes:
[]
Post by krw
I have driven a car in Oxford and it worked. Suddenly the council said
no cars and banished them all (London is fast going the same way). In
reality it worked and would still work - merely politicians are
anti-car.
I don't think too many of them actually are: it's just that they don't
dare _say_ they are pro-car. It's a bit like atheism - few politicians
will _say_ they're not very religious, even if that is the case.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If a cluttered desk is characteristic of a cluttered mind, what does an empty
desk mean ?
DavidK
2017-10-05 08:41:50 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example: https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Robin Stevens
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
Do freshers start a week early?
Not generally - it's more that the weekend before Thursday of 0th week is
often a more convenient time for parents to deliver the little dears and
their assorted clobber than doing so mid-week.
I disagree. At all universities I know about, freshers start a week
early for freshers week.
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 14:06:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
That's Full Term, which is when lectures and practicals and tutorials and
things happen, but distinct from when undergraduates are expected to be in
residence - for example: https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/term-dates
Arrival dates may differ at other colleges, and in some cases there may be
events even earlier for particular subjects and so forth.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Robin Stevens
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
Do freshers start a week early?
Not generally - it's more that the weekend before Thursday of 0th week is
often a more convenient time for parents to deliver the little dears and
their assorted clobber than doing so mid-week.
Ah, I was thinking internationals who arrive ten days before, or the Thurs
or Fri, and end with the day before official term with a coach trip. Or
used to before the interwebby thing educated everyone befor they arrived.
Ruined many a birthday weekend without McT’s work engagements.

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 14:06:29 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
I had been wondering that and had a look on the interweb. This suggests
<https://www.ox.ac.uk/about/facts-and-figures/dates-of-term?wssl=1>
Post by Robin Stevens
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
Do freshers start a week early?
Yes, but she’s now second year! Eeeek!!

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2017-10-04 20:39:38 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
I don't think it's been revealed which college she's at, has it? Lonsdale,
or perhaps Shrewsbury? Jordan seems unlikely - it's very hard to get in
unless you know the right knife to use.
What a subtle comment..

Nick
Chris McMillan
2017-10-05 14:06:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
I don't think it's been revealed which college she's at, has it? Lonsdale,
or perhaps Shrewsbury? Jordan seems unlikely - it's very hard to get in
unless you know the right knife to use.
Good point Robin. Maybe she’s Oxford Brookes? I forget. Carolet?

Sincerely Chris
LFS
2017-10-05 15:22:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow. Most will have returned a few days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
I don't think it's been revealed which college she's at, has it? Lonsdale,
or perhaps Shrewsbury? Jordan seems unlikely - it's very hard to get in
unless you know the right knife to use.
Good point Robin. Maybe she’s Oxford Brookes? I forget. Carolet?
She isn't. Brookes' teaching starts well before the other university,
students are already back.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Marjorie
2017-10-10 09:47:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Chris McMillan
Poor Phoebe, I think she needs a session in he yoga tent, don’t you?
I want to know why she's not going back to Oxford until Sunday.
Undergraduates are normally expected to be in residence by Thursday of 0th
week of each term, which is tomorrow.  Most will have returned a few
days
earlier, and indeed town was full of people unloading outside college
buildings at the weekend.
I don't think it's been revealed which college she's at, has it?
Lonsdale,
or perhaps Shrewsbury?  Jordan seems unlikely - it's very hard to get in
unless you know the right knife to use.
Good point Robin.  Maybe she’s Oxford Brookes?  I forget.  Carolet?
She isn't. Brookes' teaching starts well before the other university,
students are already back.
I have a feeling she's at Oriel, which is where my step-granddaughter
goes (she went back on Thurs 4th). Freshers do start a bit earlier, and
older students can earn a bit of cash - or possibly just free
accommodation - by going up early to show them around.

I can also tell you that car access is not only possible but essential
to some of the student accommodation. At Oriel, the students are
required to remove every personal possession (books, clothes, bedding
etc) at the end of every term - no storage space whatever is available
in the college, except for students who come from far overseas (beyond
the EU, I think). There is a nominated morning when this evacuation has
to take place, which favours Home-Counties students whose Daddies or
Mummies have a big car and can get there in an hour of two (and time off
work, of course). Less favoured parents have to stay overnight in order
to make transport available for their offspring and their belongings.
Heaven knows how students from Northern Ireland (as I was, although not
at Oxford)are supposed to manage.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
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