Discussion:
Totally O/T but very annoying.
(too old to reply)
Mike
2018-08-03 14:07:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some, perhaps
they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug our moral
responsibilities?
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2018-08-03 14:12:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
--
Steveski
Mike
2018-08-03 14:57:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
:-)))😊😊😊
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2018-08-04 05:21:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime. (Benefits include free next-day
delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your choice and
unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
LFS
2018-08-04 21:38:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free next-day
delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your choice and
unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Kate B
2018-08-04 21:51:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?

Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/

You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.

And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?

https://santamariadefe.org/

This has been a Public Service Announcement.
--
Kate B
London
Fenny
2018-08-04 22:34:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
--
Fenny
Steve Hague
2018-08-05 08:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-05 10:06:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Invest in ME here. For other sites, apart from Amazon, I try to do as
much of my shopping as possible through <www.giveasyoulive.com>, who
will pass on the commission they get[1] to your chosen charity.

[1] I'm not sure what proportion of the commission they keep but, for
Amazon, the amount which goes to charity is pretty much the same as the
proportion which Amazon Smile gives.
--
Best wishes, Serena
To be astonished is one of the surest ways of not growing old too
quickly. (Colette)
Sally Thompson
2018-08-05 10:17:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
Could I add that I use easyfundraising:
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
LFS
2018-08-05 10:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-05 11:29:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from. They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity. As you say, it can't be cost free.

I'm interested to see Sally say that her charity benefits from her
grocery shopping. I must look into that as, although all the
supermarkets are listed with giveasyoulive, they only pay commission for
new customers. If easyfundraising pays commission on weekly shopping,
that would be a good reason to switch to them.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. What has a neck but no head?
A. A bottle
Sally Thompson
2018-08-05 11:42:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from. They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity. As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm interested to see Sally say that her charity benefits from her
grocery shopping. I must look into that as, although all the
supermarkets are listed with giveasyoulive, they only pay commission for
new customers. If easyfundraising pays commission on weekly shopping,
that would be a good reason to switch to them.
Yes it does. For instance I've just had a delivery from Waitrose and had an
email yesterday confirming my donation of £1. I didn't spend that much but
I think there's an extra promotion at the moment. I buy cat food from
Zooplus and they support it too. Let me think. The other place I buy online
from occasionally is John Lewis and they are certainly in the scheme.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-05 12:17:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from. They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity. As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm interested to see Sally say that her charity benefits from her
grocery shopping. I must look into that as, although all the
supermarkets are listed with giveasyoulive, they only pay commission for
new customers. If easyfundraising pays commission on weekly shopping,
that would be a good reason to switch to them.
Yes it does. For instance I've just had a delivery from Waitrose and had an
email yesterday confirming my donation of £1. I didn't spend that much but
I think there's an extra promotion at the moment. I buy cat food from
Zooplus and they support it too. Let me think. The other place I buy online
from occasionally is John Lewis and they are certainly in the scheme.
That does sound as if it's worth me looking into and possibly switching.
--
Best wishes, Serena
As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what
they do. (Andrew Carnegie)
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-05 16:49:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 12:29:37 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
On 05/08/2018 11:51, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from. They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity. As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm interested to see Sally say that her charity benefits from her
grocery shopping. I must look into that as, although all the
supermarkets are listed with giveasyoulive, they only pay commission for
new customers. If easyfundraising pays commission on weekly shopping,
that would be a good reason to switch to them.
I checked as had easyfundraising apparently anyway and Tescos and
Morrisons can be used too.
Penny
2018-08-06 17:06:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 12:29:37 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm interested to see Sally say that her charity benefits from her
grocery shopping. I must look into that as, although all the
supermarkets are listed with giveasyoulive, they only pay commission for
new customers.
Well grocery shopping is one of the things they keep nagging me about - I
don't do grocery shopping online but buying gift-cards from the individual
supermarkets to pay for my shopping would apparently add to my donations.
As it would mean two or more extra cards to carry in my purse (and possibly
lose) as well as paying up front for food I have not bought yet, I don't
find it appealing.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
LFS
2018-08-07 15:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of
giving on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of
donating but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost
free. For example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their
operation? It's run through a private company and the financial
information available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from.  They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity.  As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm still interested to know about the money flows in the process. Like
easyfundraising, giveasyoulive is owned by a private company. When you
look at the history of these companies I'd guess that they are set up by
techie people who are looking for ways to use their expertise in
designing online processes and philanthropy is clearly good commercial
business, given that there appears to be a competitive market for their
services.

They are certainly passing over cash to charities but it's very
difficult to find out what proportion of their income is being handed
over. Someone is making a profit.

Other businesses which facilitate online giving tend to be more upfront.
They can also collect Gift Aid. This is an interesting Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_online_charity_donation_services_in_the_United_Kingdom

My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.

Just saying.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Kate B
2018-08-07 15:30:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria
Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of
giving on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of
donating but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be
cost free. For example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run
their operation? It's run through a private company and the financial
information available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you
how much they give for each company that you buy from.  They don't say
what their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've
always assumed that they receive more from each company than the
percentage they hand over to the charity.  As you say, it can't be
cost free.
I'm still interested to know about the money flows in the process. Like
easyfundraising, giveasyoulive is owned by a private company. When you
look at the history of these companies I'd guess that they are set up by
techie people who are looking for ways to use their expertise in
designing online processes and philanthropy is clearly good commercial
business, given that there appears to be a competitive market for their
services.
They are certainly passing over cash to charities but it's very
difficult to find out what proportion of their income is being handed
over. Someone is making a profit.
Other businesses which facilitate online giving tend to be more upfront.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_online_charity_donation_services_in_the_United_Kingdom
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
I agree with you absolutely. The Amazon thing is a bonus, but since we
are a very small charity we also have a page on BTMyDonate where people
can donate by credit/debit card and fundraisers can have a publicisable
slot.

I keep trying to persuade friends to use BTMyDonate rather than
JustGiving or any of the others (PayPal is the latest to home in on this
lucrative little scam), because they do not take any cut at all.
JustGiving and PayPal take a whacking 5%! The credit-card companies take
a small cut for the processing, but BT gives *everything* that's left to
us. They also collect GiftAid for you.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-07 15:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
Difficult, though, where it's done _at no cost to you_ - with Amazon
Smile for example (and I think a lot of the others people have
mentioned), you pay the same for your purchases as you would if you
_weren't_ buying through Smile (or whatever). So you aren't _making_ a
donation as such - unless you're deliberately paying more than you would
elsewhere (in which case your preference makes sense: you'd buy at the
"elsewhere", and give the difference - or some of it - direct).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If it jams - force it. If it breaks, it needed replacing anyway.
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-07 17:14:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are
disclosed and charities can be held accountable in ways that private
companies cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary
making a profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
Difficult, though, where it's done _at no cost to you_ - with Amazon
Smile for example (and I think a lot of the others people have
mentioned), you pay the same for your purchases as you would if you
_weren't_ buying through Smile (or whatever). So you aren't _making_ a
donation as such - unless you're deliberately paying more than you would
elsewhere (in which case your preference makes sense: you'd buy at the
"elsewhere", and give the difference - or some of it - direct).
Exactly. With these schemes, I'm not donating money to the charity,
just persuading Amazon (or whoever else I'm buying from) to donate money
on my behalf. Where it's possible to do that directly, as with Smile,
that's probably the best option but in most cases that isn't on offer,
so I'm happy to allow Giveasyoulive, or whoever, to take their
commission, so long as the charity gets the promised amount.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. What do you call a man with jelly in one ear and custard in the other?
A. A trifle deaf.
LFS
2018-08-07 18:06:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy
for it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are
disclosed and charities can be held accountable in ways that private
companies cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary
making a profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
Difficult, though, where it's done _at no cost to you_ - with Amazon
Smile for example (and I think a lot of the others people have
mentioned), you pay the same for your purchases as you would if you
_weren't_ buying through Smile (or whatever). So you aren't _making_ a
donation as such - unless you're deliberately paying more than you
would elsewhere (in which case your preference makes sense: you'd buy
at the "elsewhere", and give the difference - or some of it - direct).
Exactly.  With these schemes, I'm not donating money to the charity,
just persuading Amazon (or whoever else I'm buying from) to donate money
on my behalf.
Hm. And where is that money coming from that Amazon is so happy to
donate on your behalf? And why is Amazon doing it? And is Smile part of
Amazon's corporate structure? That's pretty opaque so not an easy
question to answer.

Waitrose give me little green counters which I can put in my choice of
boxes to support local charities and I can easily find out how much this
has contributed to their income. There is no intermediary.

Where it's possible to do that directly, as with Smile,
that's probably the best option but in most cases that isn't on offer,
so I'm happy to allow Giveasyoulive, or whoever, to take their
commission, so long as the charity gets the promised amount.
I don't think you can be at all sure of that unless you get a
personalised report that can be checked.

I find this business of intermediaries really odd. When you buy a poppy
or a charity flag from a seller on the street, would you expect that
person to get a fee out of your contribution?
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-07 19:19:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy
for it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are
disclosed and charities can be held accountable in ways that private
companies cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an
intermediary making a profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
Difficult, though, where it's done _at no cost to you_ - with Amazon
Smile for example (and I think a lot of the others people have
mentioned), you pay the same for your purchases as you would if you
_weren't_ buying through Smile (or whatever). So you aren't _making_
a donation as such - unless you're deliberately paying more than you
would elsewhere (in which case your preference makes sense: you'd buy
at the "elsewhere", and give the difference - or some of it - direct).
Exactly.  With these schemes, I'm not donating money to the charity,
just persuading Amazon (or whoever else I'm buying from) to donate
money on my behalf.
Hm. And where is that money coming from that Amazon is so happy to
donate on your behalf?  And why is Amazon doing it? And is Smile part of
Amazon's corporate structure? That's pretty opaque so not an easy
question to answer.
I think Amazon, along with a lot of other companies, routinely pay
commission to websites which pass them business through affiliate links.
These companies are simply a subset of those. The money Amazon pays
them is probably much the same as the money they would pay a newspaper,
for example, if it had a link to Amazon for a product they are reviewing.

My assumption is that a significant number of Amazon's customers were
shopping via intermediaries, such as Giveasyoulive, and they decided it
would be a good idea to cut out the middle man. This both gives them
the kudos of making the charity donations and saves them the portion of
the commission which would, otherwise, have gone to the middle man.

Personally, given that it isn't costing me anything extra, I'm quite
happy to keep using both Smile and Giveasyoulive[1]. I get frequent
emails from Giveasyoulive, telling me that I've just raised np, for my
chosen charity and I have no reason to think that this isn't being
passed on. With Smile, I have to take it on faith, as I can't see
anywhere that tells me what they're paying on my behalf but, again, I
have no reason to think that they're cheating me (or my preferred charity).

[1] Although I might switch to the company Sally uses (whose name
currently escapes me), given what she said about getting commission on
her supermarket shops.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. Why was the Egyptian boy confused?
A. Because his daddy was a mummy
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-07 21:18:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 20:19:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Personally, given that it isn't costing me anything extra, I'm quite
happy to keep using both Smile and Giveasyoulive[1]. I get frequent
emails from Giveasyoulive, telling me that I've just raised np, for my
chosen charity and I have no reason to think that this isn't being
passed on. With Smile, I have to take it on faith, as I can't see
anywhere that tells me what they're paying on my behalf but, again, I
have no reason to think that they're cheating me (or my preferred charity).
[1] Although I might switch to the company Sally uses (whose name
currently escapes me), given what she said about getting commission on
her supermarket shops.
https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/
is the one she said. I think I did my first Tescos shop via them
today, to arrive tomorrow. I chose Guide Dogs for my charity,
although I am supporting a pup in training with a monthly donation
too.
Fenny
2018-08-07 21:54:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I chose Guide Dogs for my charity,
although I am supporting a pup in training with a monthly donation
too.
I sponsor a couple of guide dog pups for me and Ma. I emailed them
recently about their website - the new pop up about cookies covers so
much of the screen I can't see anything else, including the bit where
I can decide which cookies I want to accept or not.

I was trying to read the item about parking on pavements being
dangerous for people with visual impairments, so I told them I thought
it was ironic that there's no way of reading the website around such a
large pop up. I never blanket accept all cookies, especially the ones
that allow FB to track my every move. So if I can't see the page that
lets me turn those off, I won't be reading their website any more.
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-08 00:49:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I chose Guide Dogs for my charity,
although I am supporting a pup in training with a monthly donation
too.
I sponsor a couple of guide dog pups for me and Ma. I emailed them
recently about their website - the new pop up about cookies covers so
much of the screen I can't see anything else, including the bit where
I can decide which cookies I want to accept or not.
I fear you'll be ignored.
Post by Fenny
I was trying to read the item about parking on pavements being
dangerous for people with visual impairments, so I told them I thought
it was ironic that there's no way of reading the website around such a
large pop up. I never blanket accept all cookies, especially the ones
that allow FB to track my every move. So if I can't see the page that
lets me turn those off, I won't be reading their website any more.
"Oh goody - no more complaints from her then. Don't change anything."

Cynical, moi?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

in the kingdom of the bland, the one idea is king. - Rory Bremner (on
politics), RT 2015/1/31-2/6
Chris McMillan
2018-08-08 08:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I chose Guide Dogs for my charity,
although I am supporting a pup in training with a monthly donation
too.
I sponsor a couple of guide dog pups for me and Ma. I emailed them
recently about their website - the new pop up about cookies covers so
much of the screen I can't see anything else, including the bit where
I can decide which cookies I want to accept or not.
I was trying to read the item about parking on pavements being
dangerous for people with visual impairments, so I told them I thought
it was ironic that there's no way of reading the website around such a
large pop up. I never blanket accept all cookies, especially the ones
that allow FB to track my every move. So if I can't see the page that
lets me turn those off, I won't be reading their website any more.
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.

Sincerely Chris
Fenny
2018-08-08 17:21:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
--
Fenny
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-08 17:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
Fenny
2018-08-08 22:47:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
--
Fenny
Sally Thompson
2018-08-09 06:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I think my current one is Farah. The last one was Ava.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-09 10:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 9 Aug 2018 06:50:59 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I think my current one is Farah. The last one was Ava.
Oh I'm sure I had Ava too. She was a lovely blonde ..bit of a poodle
in the mix? If Farah is current for you then she must be my one.
Another OAP moment.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-09 07:10:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never be led astray onto the path of virtue.
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-09 10:28:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 08:10:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
I think they graduate in threes and there would only be one of the
name at a time, but not sure if they re-use names.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-09 11:39:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 08:10:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Fenny
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
I think they graduate in threes and there would only be one of the
name at a time, but not sure if they re-use names.
Well, the person I think has a Goldie is in Hadleigh in Kent (near
T?nbridge), if you know. Bit I'd be most surprised if there aren't a lot
of Goldies.
--
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you. -Richard
Mike
2018-08-09 12:51:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 08:10:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Fenny
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
I think they graduate in threes and there would only be one of the
name at a time, but not sure if they re-use names.
Well, the person I think has a Goldie is in Hadleigh in Kent (near
T?nbridge), if you know. Bit I'd be most surprised if there aren't a lot
of Goldies.
I wonder if there is a Hawn anywhere?
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-08-09 15:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 08:10:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
I think they graduate in threes and there would only be one of the
name at a time, but not sure if they re-use names.
They do indeed have more than one dog of the same name at the same time
these days, but I suspect not within the sane region.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-08-09 17:37:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 08:10:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:53:01 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:21:37 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
MTAAW. I am a sucker for cute pup pix. I think my current one is
Farah, but that might be the previous one. I have her picture now.
My current one is Buddy. I think the last one may have been Goldie,
but I CBA to get off the sofa and check.
I may know the recipient - I _think_ hers is called Goldie - although I
suspect that's a common name for this breed of dog.
I think they graduate in threes and there would only be one of the
name at a time, but not sure if they re-use names.
They do indeed have more than one dog of the same name at the same time
these days, but I suspect not within the sane region.
Sincerely Chris
Subsequent ‘same names’ are trained in the insane regions. ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-08-09 15:50:07 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
The son and dil of our very long deceased neighbour puppy walked a guide
dog to be a couple of years ago, sadly she failed her end of first year
training. We wouldn’t have known about it but the couple saw us at the
shops one day and came to show us the dog.

Pups are bred within the region they will be worked in I have discovered
recently.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-08-09 17:36:32 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 08:33:49 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Interesting, Fenny. I stopped GDBA contacting me eons ago. Flooded me
with emails. Mostly I now see guide dog owning friends naturally promoting
their campaigns but not via email, and I can skip them.
I like the electronic pupdates, as they generally have cute videos
attached. The paper versions come with photos to stick on the fridge.
The son and dil of our very long deceased neighbour puppy walked a guide
dog to be a couple of years ago, sadly she failed her end of first year
training. We wouldn’t have known about it but the couple saw us at the
shops one day and came to show us the dog.
Pups are bred within the region they will be worked in I have discovered
recently.
Sincerely Chris
That way, they will wag tails and bark in the local dialect for greater
understanding.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2018-08-08 12:35:14 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I chose Guide Dogs for my charity,
although I am supporting a pup in training with a monthly donation
too.
I sponsor a couple of guide dog pups for me and Ma. I emailed them
recently about their website - the new pop up about cookies covers so
much of the screen I can't see anything else, including the bit where
I can decide which cookies I want to accept or not.
I was trying to read the item about parking on pavements being
dangerous for people with visual impairments, so I told them I thought
it was ironic that there's no way of reading the website around such a
large pop up. I never blanket accept all cookies, especially the ones
that allow FB to track my every move. So if I can't see the page that
lets me turn those off, I won't be reading their website any more.
I just blindly click the "I accept" button (Isn't there an app somewhere
that will do that automatically?) but since I now browse everything in a
private window, icognito tab, whatever, all my cookies are delted on
exit. And if I'm doing something serious I boot up a fresh Live Linux
session and shut it down afterwards.

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-08 07:57:31 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/
is the one she said.
Thanks. You saved me from having to wade my way back up the thread to
find it :)
--
Best wishes, Serena
If nothing goes right, go left.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-08 00:47:57 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
Hm. And where is that money coming from that Amazon is so happy to
donate on your behalf? And why is Amazon doing it? And is Smile part
of Amazon's corporate structure? That's pretty opaque so not an easy
question to answer.
Two answers to "where from": 1 - as anotherrat has said, it comes (to a
rough approximation) out of their advertising budget; 2 - since I'm not
paying any _more_, I'm not really bothered where it comes from.
Post by LFS
Waitrose give me little green counters which I can put in my choice of
boxes to support local charities and I can easily find out how much
this has contributed to their income. There is no intermediary.
(I think I've seen that in some branches of other supermarkets too. I
haven't been in a Waitrose for a long time.) As anotherrat has said,
their charitable spend is (roughly) predetermined - what your green
plastic tokens determine is how it is partitioned (between usually only
three or four choices).
[]
Post by LFS
I find this business of intermediaries really odd. When you buy a poppy
or a charity flag from a seller on the street, would you expect that
person to get a fee out of your contribution?
No (even though it might actually be a productive thing to do, in bald
economic terms - just not acceptable to the British public). But I _do_
expect - or, at least presume - that the entities that make the poppies
and flags to. (Yes, I know the poppies used to be - and maybe still are
- made by injured servicemen under the supervision of some organisation;
but I don't think it actually runs at a _loss_. Certainly, the flag
company will more than break even, ditto the collecting box
manufacturer, sticker printer, ...)
TANSTAAFL
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

G B Shaw said: "Few people think more than two or three times a year; I have
made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week."
(quoted by "Dont Bother" [sic], 2015-8-24.)
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-07 17:17:24 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of
giving on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of
donating but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost
free. For example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their
operation? It's run through a private company and the financial
information available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from.  They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity.  As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm still interested to know about the money flows in the process. Like
easyfundraising, giveasyoulive is owned by a private company. When you
look at the history of these companies I'd guess that they are set up by
techie people who are looking for ways to use their expertise in
designing online processes and philanthropy is clearly good commercial
business, given that there appears to be a competitive market for their
services.
They are certainly passing over cash to charities but it's very
difficult to find out what proportion of their income is being handed
over. Someone is making a profit.
Other businesses which facilitate online giving tend to be more upfront.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_online_charity_donation_services_in_the_United_Kingdom
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
I thought the bonus was that you are forcing Amazon or Tescos etc to
do some giving too? In return for being directed to their website they
give a donation?
LFS
2018-08-07 18:09:08 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of
giving on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of
donating but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost
free. For example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their
operation? It's run through a private company and the financial
information available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from.  They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity.  As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm still interested to know about the money flows in the process. Like
easyfundraising, giveasyoulive is owned by a private company. When you
look at the history of these companies I'd guess that they are set up by
techie people who are looking for ways to use their expertise in
designing online processes and philanthropy is clearly good commercial
business, given that there appears to be a competitive market for their
services.
They are certainly passing over cash to charities but it's very
difficult to find out what proportion of their income is being handed
over. Someone is making a profit.
Other businesses which facilitate online giving tend to be more upfront.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_online_charity_donation_services_in_the_United_Kingdom
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
I thought the bonus was that you are forcing Amazon or Tescos etc to
do some giving too? In return for being directed to their website they
give a donation?
Forcing? Serena said persuading. It's actually the consumer - who likes
the feeling of being charitable, especially at no personal cost - who is
being persuaded to participate and there has to be a cost somewhere.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-07 19:29:51 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by LFS
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of
giving on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of
donating but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost
free. For example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their
operation? It's run through a private company and the financial
information available is limited.
I use <https://www.giveasyoulive.com/dashboard> and they do tell you how
much they give for each company that you buy from.  They don't say what
their cut is (or, if they do, I've never found it) but I've always
assumed that they receive more from each company than the percentage
they hand over to the charity.  As you say, it can't be cost free.
I'm still interested to know about the money flows in the process. Like
easyfundraising, giveasyoulive is owned by a private company. When you
look at the history of these companies I'd guess that they are set up by
techie people who are looking for ways to use their expertise in
designing online processes and philanthropy is clearly good commercial
business, given that there appears to be a competitive market for their
services.
They are certainly passing over cash to charities but it's very
difficult to find out what proportion of their income is being handed
over. Someone is making a profit.
Other businesses which facilitate online giving tend to be more upfront.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_online_charity_donation_services_in_the_United_Kingdom
My personal view is that I prefer to give directly to a charity. The
charity trustees can then decide how to use my donation. I'm happy for
it to be used to cover the charity's admin costs as these are disclosed
and charities can be held accountable in ways that private companies
cannot. But I really don't like the idea of an intermediary making a
profit out of my donation.
Just saying.
I thought the bonus was that you are forcing Amazon or Tescos etc to
do some giving too? In return for being directed to their website they
give a donation?
Forcing? Serena said persuading. It's actually the consumer - who likes
the feeling of being charitable, especially at no personal cost - who is
being persuaded to participate and there has to be a cost somewhere.
Yes, of course there's a cost but it's being born by the companies, such
as Amazon or Tesco who clearly think that signing up with these
intermediaries is likely to bring them enough extra business that they
are happy to pay it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. Why did the tightrope walker visit his bank?
A. To check his balance.
Fenny
2018-08-07 21:05:16 UTC
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On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 20:29:51 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Yes, of course there's a cost but it's being born by the companies, such
as Amazon or Tesco who clearly think that signing up with these
intermediaries is likely to bring them enough extra business that they
are happy to pay it.
Places like Tesco and Waitrose, who give you little counters to drop
in the appropriate boxes to support the charity of your choice from
this month's selection, have a budget for charitable donations. The
amout they give is mostly pre-determined, it's just the proportion
that goes to each charity that we get to influence.

In a thread elsewhere about switching energy suppliers and the cost of
the incentives being borne by those who don't switch - these come out
of the marketing budget. If Vicky recommends me to join a company she
is a customer of, it saves them having to advertise somewhere I might
see it. Paying out £100 for a definite customer sign up is probably a
far better conversion rate than paying out hundreds of thousands of
pounds for a marketing campaign that may bring in a few hundred new
customers.

Amazon probably work on a similar principle with Smile. They aren't
working off a commission based intermediary, as most people already
shop with Amazon and if a new customer does sign up, it's rarely
through a third party. Amazon don't appear on cashback sites. So, if
they donate a small proportion of each sale to charity, they know that
their total donations will be a very tiny part [1] of their annual
turnover, probably in line with most other large companies' donations.
As I spend several hundred pounds a year with Amazon, I'm happy to
have a small proportion of that charitable budget directed to a
charity I support, which they would otherwise not have had.

[1] The proportion of Amazon customers who use Smile is very small and
not all sales are eligible for Smile donations.
--
Fenny
Peter Percival
2018-08-08 15:26:56 UTC
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Post by Fenny
working off a commission based intermediary, as most people already
shop with Amazon
Really?
Sally Thompson
2018-08-05 11:38:54 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
<https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/panel/>. You can choose a charity of
your choice and you aren't tied to Amazon. I do most of my grocery shopping
online, and my charity benefits when I use Waitrose or Sainsbury's too
(other supermarkets are available).
Do umrats who do this check to see the impact of this process of giving
on the income of the chosen charities? It seems an easy way of donating
but I'd like to know exactly how it works as it can't be cost free. For
example, how much does easyfundraising deduct to run their operation?
It's run through a private company and the financial information
available is limited.
As I understand it, easyfundraising charge the company (say Amazon), but
the charity gets the whole 50p or whatever. It's a small amount but adds
up. So far my donations have raised about £98 for the charity.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-05 12:27:01 UTC
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On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 09:25:13 +0100, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Fenny
Post by Kate B
Post by LFS
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
Perhaps they could launch Amazon Crime.  (Benefits include free
next-day delivery of your business address to a tax haven of your
choice and unlimited streaming of untaxed profits.)
Nice. Still, there is no doubt that life is more convenient with Amazon
than without it for many people. I partially assuage my guilt by always
buying a book in any indie bookshop I visit, even when I know it can be
found cheaper online, and using Hive as much as I can.
Indeed, sometimes there is no option but to bite the Amazonian bullet.
So may I bring to the general attention of umrats an odd but welcome new
development chez Bezos?
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual one,
and choose a charity.
And if you have no pet charity of your own that is listed, may I humbly
but hopefully suggest you might consider the Santa Maria Education Fund?
https://santamariadefe.org/
This has been a Public Service Announcement.
I use Amazon Smile and the money goes to The One Foundation :-)
Barnardo's for me.
Steve
Just set it up and PDSA.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-06 09:55:57 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Kate B
<***@nospam.demon.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
Post by Kate B
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
You can find out about it and join the scheme. Shopping is exactly the
same, you just start at the smile.amazon site rather than the usual
one, and choose a charity.
[]
Despite the above, I'm with smile. It does have the advantage that if
you find yourself on www.amazon.co.uk rather than smile.amazon.co.uk (as
a result of following a link, for example), you get a popup saying
something like "would you prefer to be on smile", and if you click yes,
it moves you to the same page you were on but under smile.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The wish of the lazy to allow unsupervised access [to the internet] to their
children should not reduce all adults browsing to the level of suitability for a
five-year-old." Yaman Akdeniz, quoted in Inter//face (The Times, 1999-2-10): p12
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-06 10:56:14 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
The list seems to be expanding rapidly. When I first started using it,
none of the ME charities were listed, so I signed up with the most
interesting of a very short list, to use as a backup, if I forgot to go
through Giveasyoulive. Within a fairly short time, the list of
available charities was far longer and included at least a couple of ME
charities.

Smile is still fairly new and it must take a certain amount of time
before charities sign up for it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Are you honest and truthful in all you say and do? Do you maintain
strict integrity in business transactions and in your dealings with
individuals and organisations? (Quaker Advices and Queries #37)
Kate B
2018-08-06 11:05:00 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
The list seems to be expanding rapidly.  When I first started using it,
none of the ME charities were listed, so I signed up with the most
interesting of a very short list, to use as a backup, if I forgot to go
through Giveasyoulive.  Within a fairly short time, the list of
available charities was far longer and included at least a couple of ME
charities.
Smile is still fairly new and it must take a certain amount of time
before charities sign up for it.
Indeed. It's very easy as a registered charity to sign up, providing you
have the authority and the right credentials. If there's one you want to
see, write to them and urge them to do it.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-06 11:55:48 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
The list seems to be expanding rapidly.  When I first started using
it, none of the ME charities were listed, so I signed up with the
most interesting of a very short list, to use as a backup, if I
forgot to go through Giveasyoulive.  Within a fairly short time, the
list of available charities was far longer and included at least a
couple of ME charities.
Ah; I must look again - it hadn't occurred to me that the list wasn't
fixed. (I'm guessing one can move one's choice without too much bother.)
Post by Kate B
Smile is still fairly new and it must take a certain amount of time
before charities sign up for it.
Ideally, they wouldn't have to, and you could nominate a charity when
you sign up (provided it was/is a registered one, or something like
that).
Post by Kate B
Indeed. It's very easy as a registered charity to sign up, providing
you have the authority and the right credentials. If there's one you
want to see, write to them and urge them to do it.
Thanks, I might do that. When you say "the right credentials", do you
mean the charity itself has to satisfy certain criteria, or just that
the person applying on its behalf has to be a nominated official of the
charity or something like that?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Mary Poppins is a junkie" - bumper sticker on Julie Andrews' car in the '60s
Kate B
2018-08-06 14:27:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
 The list seems to be expanding rapidly.  When I first started using
it,  none of the ME charities were listed, so I signed up with the
most  interesting of a very short list, to use as a backup, if I
forgot to go  through Giveasyoulive.  Within a fairly short time, the
list of  available charities was far longer and included at least a
couple of ME  charities.
Ah; I must look again - it hadn't occurred to me that the list wasn't
fixed. (I'm guessing one can move one's choice without too much bother.)
Post by Kate B
 Smile is still fairly new and it must take a certain amount of time
before charities sign up for it.
Ideally, they wouldn't have to, and you could nominate a charity when
you sign up (provided it was/is a registered one, or something like that).
Post by Kate B
Indeed. It's very easy as a registered charity to sign up, providing
you have the authority and the right credentials. If there's one you
want to see, write to them and urge them to do it.
Thanks, I might do that. When you say "the right credentials", do you
mean the charity itself has to satisfy certain criteria, or just that
the person applying on its behalf has to be a nominated official of the
charity or something like that?
I think the charity has to be UK-registered. You have to be an official
of the charity - I am a trustee of ours, confirmed on the Charity
Commission website, so that was enough. You also have to supply a copy
of the charity account's bank statement to verify the destination of the
donations.
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2018-08-06 17:57:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 15:27:17 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I think the charity has to be UK-registered. You have to be an official
of the charity - I am a trustee of ours, confirmed on the Charity
Commission website, so that was enough. You also have to supply a copy
of the charity account's bank statement to verify the destination of the
donations.
Ah, in that case someone had already prompted the secretary/treasurer to do
the necessary before I joined.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-08-06 15:35:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
 The list seems to be expanding rapidly.  When I first started using
it,  none of the ME charities were listed, so I signed up with the
most  interesting of a very short list, to use as a backup, if I
forgot to go  through Giveasyoulive.  Within a fairly short time, the
list of  available charities was far longer and included at least a
couple of ME  charities.
Ah; I must look again - it hadn't occurred to me that the list wasn't
fixed. (I'm guessing one can move one's choice without too much bother.)
It was extremely simple, when I did it.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
 Smile is still fairly new and it must take a certain amount of time
before charities sign up for it.
Ideally, they wouldn't have to, and you could nominate a charity when
you sign up (provided it was/is a registered one, or something like that).
Well, they do need to have details of the charities' bank accounts and,
I would have thought, a suitable email address, so they do really need
the charities to do the signing up.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If God made us in his image, we've certainly returned the compliment
(Voltaire)
Penny
2018-08-06 17:54:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 6 Aug 2018 10:55:57 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
"Of your choosing" - from a (rather short) list, IIRR.
Not in my experience, I think I added the (very small) charity I wanted
myself.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2018-08-06 17:00:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 4 Aug 2018 22:51:26 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
I've been using for a while. It pays as much (extremely little in my case,
I don't 'shop' much) to my chosen charity as GiveAsYouLive does but without
the constant nagging.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2018-08-14 07:29:55 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Amazon have started a scheme by which they will give 0.5% of the
purchase cost of an item to a charity of your choosing. If you go to
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/
That is interesting. Am I right that if everyone joined up they
would then be paying more to charities than they have done in
tax?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Btms
2018-08-04 07:07:30 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
😝
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
p***@never.here
2018-08-04 10:15:25 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
?
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/2683.For_Dummies_Series
--
Pete
Mike
2018-08-04 10:48:07 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by p***@never.here
Post by steveski
Post by Mike
Sounds like Amazon have found every single tax loophole and some,
perhaps they would like to publish a book so the rest of us can shrug
our moral responsibilities?
'Tax avoidance for Dummies'?
?
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/2683.For_Dummies_Series
Ah yes, there are two possible genres - Fiction and Fantasy....
--
Toodle Pip
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