Discussion:
OT: Brian of Britain
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Jenny M Benson
2018-05-19 12:20:14 UTC
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Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.

Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what
I was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS
(or BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or
Indices), Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was taught
Brackets, Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about indices
before we were taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Mike
2018-05-19 12:55:28 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what
I was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS
(or BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or
Indices), Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was taught
Brackets, Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about indices
before we were taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I find that most of round britian, brian of britian and all the others go
way over my head with their frequent references to modern or ‘pop’ music
that I know not what of - leaves me cold...
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-19 12:56:47 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot
cleverer? I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer
(correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what
I was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS
(or BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or
Indices), Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was
taught Brackets, Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about
indices before we were taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find
most expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and
multiplication, and addition and subtraction, being given equal
priority, rather than strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
Marmaduke Jinks
2018-05-19 13:06:31 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was taught Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about indices before we were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of". Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.

Re Order. I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.

MJ
John Finlay
2018-05-19 13:31:20 UTC
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Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was taught Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about indices before we were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of". Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order. I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know. JDF
Kate B
2018-05-19 14:12:51 UTC
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Post by John Finlay
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though.  He "translated" the mathematical acronymn
BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction.  I was taught
Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc.  I don't think we'd learned about indices before we
were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of".  Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order.  I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
--
Kate B
London
LFS
2018-05-19 14:29:33 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by John Finlay
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though.  He "translated" the mathematical acronymn
BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction.  I was taught
Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc.  I don't think we'd learned about indices before
we were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to
do so
with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of".  Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order.  I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
SODAM
2018-05-19 15:01:45 UTC
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LFS <***@gmail.com> wrote:
<snop> (TWATBILI)
Post by LFS
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
I slogged through O level Maths in 1960
and we used BODMAS , in which the O stood for ‘of’.

Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury
2018-05-19 15:36:41 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
"palam, cum and ex and e"
Mike
2018-05-19 15:42:26 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury
Post by SODAM
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
"palam, cum and ex and e"
Oooh Matron, they are talking rude on UMRA!
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2018-05-19 15:48:14 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury
Post by SODAM
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
"palam, cum and ex and e"
“Palam, clam, cum, ex and e,” Shirley?
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury
2018-05-19 16:13:20 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury
Post by SODAM
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
"palam, cum and ex and e"
“Palam, clam, cum, ex and e,” Shirley?
Not according to my Kennedy. But L&S has a few (early) usages with the Ablative by Plautus.
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-19 17:10:02 UTC
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Post by SODAM
<snop> (TWATBILI)
Post by LFS
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
I slogged through O level Maths in 1960
and we used BODMAS , in which the O stood for ‘of’.
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid :).
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-19 20:44:20 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid:).
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants. Nearly drove myself potty this morning trying to remember the
name of a shrub in my garden which I only bought a couple of years ago
and it's the second time I've had one. Scouting the internet for "pink
flowered shrub" got me nowhere so I sat down with my Trees & Shrubs book
and went through the index until I got to Lavatera. I knew I'd
recognize it the moment I saw it!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Chris J Dixon
2018-05-20 08:29:12 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants.
I'm getting the same feeling. I have no idea if it is really
getting worse, or simply that I'm noticing (or imagining) it.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Btms
2018-05-20 09:43:21 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants.
I'm getting the same feeling. I have no idea if it is really
getting worse, or simply that I'm noticing (or imagining) it.
Chris
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Guess I should exclude current crop from my perceptions as I haven’t heard
it at all for a while.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2018-05-20 12:07:32 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 09:43:21 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants.
I'm getting the same feeling. I have no idea if it is really
getting worse, or simply that I'm noticing (or imagining) it.
Chris
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Post by Btms
Guess I should exclude current crop from my perceptions as I haven’t heard
it at all for a while.
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2018-05-20 14:44:10 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants.
I'm getting the same feeling. I have no idea if it is really
getting worse, or simply that I'm noticing (or imagining) it.
Chris
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Post by Btms
Guess I should exclude current crop from my perceptions as I haven’t heard
it at all for a while.
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
The previous comments refer very clearly to BofB. As for losing it m’dear
I was courteously acknowledging that my comments refer to previous and
older broadcasts and may risk being out of context.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-20 17:31:59 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
The previous comments refer very clearly to BofB. As for losing it m’dear
I was courteously acknowledging that my comments refer to previous and
older broadcasts and may risk being out of context.
Are you sure you mean BoB and not Round Britain Quiz? The contestants
don't have much opportunity to be pretentious on BoB. I don't make the
effort to listen to RBQ much, but it can be toe-curlingly
self-congratulatory sometimes - to the extent that I'm sometimes
shamefully pleased when I hear a team failing to get to grips with a
question at all.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2018-05-20 18:14:03 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
The previous comments refer very clearly to BofB. As for losing it m’dear
I was courteously acknowledging that my comments refer to previous and
older broadcasts and may risk being out of context.
Are you sure you mean BoB and not Round Britain Quiz? The contestants
don't have much opportunity to be pretentious on BoB. I don't make the
effort to listen to RBQ much, but it can be toe-curlingly
self-congratulatory sometimes - to the extent that I'm sometimes
shamefully pleased when I hear a team failing to get to grips with a
question at all.
Yes. Or should that be No? I suspect I am thinking of RBQ......toe-curling
is a good description of the affect on me. When they can’t get the answer,
they are helped out and then adopt a sort of self justified attitude.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-21 05:51:52 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
The previous comments refer very clearly to BofB. As for losing it m’dear
I was courteously acknowledging that my comments refer to previous and
older broadcasts and may risk being out of context.
Are you sure you mean BoB and not Round Britain Quiz? The contestants
don't have much opportunity to be pretentious on BoB. I don't make the
effort to listen to RBQ much, but it can be toe-curlingly
self-congratulatory sometimes - to the extent that I'm sometimes
shamefully pleased when I hear a team failing to get to grips with a
question at all.
Yes. Or should that be No? I suspect I am thinking of RBQ......toe-curling
is a good description of the affect on me. When they can’t get the answer,
they are helped out and then adopt a sort of self justified attitude.
That's the feller. Even the questions sound smug.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2018-05-20 19:46:24 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 14:44:10 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants.
I'm getting the same feeling. I have no idea if it is really
getting worse, or simply that I'm noticing (or imagining) it.
Chris
I find all the participants so very pretentious I have rarely heard it.
Participants to what - this thread?
Post by Btms
Guess I should exclude current crop from my perceptions as I haven?t heard
it at all for a while.
Ah, no, you're losing it too but not just for names of people and plants..
The previous comments refer very clearly to BofB. As for losing it m’dear
I was courteously acknowledging that my comments refer to previous and
older broadcasts and may risk being out of context.
It wasn't clear to me. Apart from the thread title (which often has nothing
to do with the post) there was nothing related to BoB in the bits you
quoted which are about age-related memory loss.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-05-20 08:41:50 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid:).
I think you and I are pretty much the same age, Vicky, give or take a
few months. I think I'm still quite lucid most of the time but the real
bugbear for me is not being able to recall the names of people and
plants. Nearly drove myself potty this morning trying to remember the
name of a shrub in my garden which I only bought a couple of years ago
and it's the second time I've had one. Scouting the internet for "pink
flowered shrub" got me nowhere so I sat down with my Trees & Shrubs book
and went through the index until I got to Lavatera. I knew I'd
recognize it the moment I saw it!
The ‘bog’ plant?
--
Toodle Pip
Mike Ruddock
2018-05-20 07:37:32 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
<snop> (TWATBILI)
Post by LFS
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
I slogged through O level Maths in 1960
and we used BODMAS , in which the O stood for ‘of’.
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid :).
Why, ma'am, that mighty civil of you.
(There weren't any O levels when I were a lad. School Certificate is
what we did.)
I should add that lucidity comes and goes.

Mike Ruddock
LFS
2018-05-20 08:44:25 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
<snop> (TWATBILI)
Post by LFS
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
I slogged through O level Maths in 1960
and we used BODMAS , in which the O stood for ‘of’.
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid :).
Thank you, Vicky, I think I am mostly lucid but my brain doesn't make
connections as quickly as I used to. Yesterday I asked my cousin's
daughter if she had ever met my son. She looked at me oddly and said,
yes, several times. It was several hours later that it dawned on me that
I had been present on at least two of those occasions.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-20 10:16:17 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
<snop> (TWATBILI)
Post by LFS
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no idea
what this thread is about...
I slogged through O level Maths in 1960
and we used BODMAS , in which the O stood for ‘of’.
Anyone for ‘A, ab, absque, coram, de’ ?
I thought I was one of the oldest on umra but I did o level in 1962,
63 and 64 (when I finally passed it ) so you and Mike Ruddock must be
at least as old as me. That's nice to know.You both seem to still be
lucid :).
Thank you, Vicky, I think I am mostly lucid but my brain doesn't make
connections as quickly as I used to. Yesterday I asked my cousin's
daughter if she had ever met my son. She looked at me oddly and said,
yes, several times. It was several hours later that it dawned on me that
I had been present on at least two of those occasions.
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
Penny
2018-05-20 12:12:32 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 11:16:17 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
Real people should wear name tags.

I'm quite good at recognising/identifying voices but real names of actors
or where I've seen them before is another matter (I hate 'celebrity'
picture quizzes).

I'm sure facial recognition has now got to a stage where a
'who-is-that-and-what-have-I-seen-them-in-before' button on the remote has
become a possibility.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-05-20 15:08:16 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
Real people should wear name tags.
I'm quite good at recognising/identifying voices but real names of actors
or where I've seen them before is another matter (I hate 'celebrity'
picture quizzes).
I'm sure facial recognition has now got to a stage where a
'who-is-that-and-what-have-I-seen-them-in-before' button on the remote has
become a possibility.
Not as far as the pollis are concerned it ain’t.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-20 17:24:09 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
Real people should wear name tags.
I'm quite good at recognising/identifying voices but real names of actors
or where I've seen them before is another matter (I hate 'celebrity'
picture quizzes).
I'm sure facial recognition has now got to a stage where a
'who-is-that-and-what-have-I-seen-them-in-before' button on the remote has
become a possibility.
B calls it granny prompts and thinks it should be in text balloons by
characters' heads in programmes. She is the one who has the daughter
who was killed. or This is the detective, and she has a pony tail
too.
Fenny
2018-05-20 12:22:50 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 11:16:17 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
I'm pretty good at telling people apart, whether or not I know there
names. But we have several young women (under 25) at work who all
look very similar - long dark hair, roundish faces, dark rimmed
glasses. I know I know some of their names, but not all of them, and
I really struggle to tell which is which. I mentioned it in the
office not long ago and my cow-orkers all agreed they had the same
problem.
--
Fenny
Btms
2018-05-20 14:44:11 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sun, 20 May 2018 11:16:17 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
One of my problems is that I have always had poor ability to recognise
faces, and that has got worse. This was a disadvantage when teaching
and is when watching tv or films. If they have similar hair and
clothes I can find it hard to distinguish. This can apply in real life
too :).
I'm pretty good at telling people apart, whether or not I know there
names. But we have several young women (under 25) at work who all
look very similar - long dark hair, roundish faces, dark rimmed
glasses. I know I know some of their names, but not all of them, and
I really struggle to tell which is which. I mentioned it in the
office not long ago and my cow-orkers all agreed they had the same
problem.
I used to think names were important but after attending an experiential
course on alternative therapies, I realised they weren’t tha5 important. It
was 3/4 days before we got around to exchanging names. Very refreshing
ime.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2018-05-20 20:00:03 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 14:44:11 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I used to think names were important but after attending an experiential
course on alternative therapies, I realised they weren’t tha5 important. It
was 3/4 days before we got around to exchanging names. Very refreshing
ime.
The husgod was hopeless at names and took to calling everybody Brian (we
knew no Brians) regardless of gender. This lead to some amusing moments
like the customer who came in looking for his print job which Brian had
promised would be ready today.

I found it frustrating when we first started going out together because he
was so embarrassed by not remembering people's names he would avoid talking
to people he knew and certainly never introduced me to them. I got pretty
good at introducing myself which solved both problems because they would
then do the same.

I link my memory for names may be full now, after 3 years at WI I've given
it up this year. Of the 30 odd people I am now on at least nodding
acquaintance with, most know my name but I only know about 10 - doesn't
stop me talking to them though.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2018-05-20 22:13:03 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I used to think names were important but after attending an experiential
course on alternative therapies, I realised they weren’t tha5 important. It
was 3/4 days before we got around to exchanging names. Very refreshing
ime.
The husgod was hopeless at names and took to calling everybody Brian (we
knew no Brians) regardless of gender. This lead to some amusing moments
like the customer who came in looking for his print job which Brian had
promised would be ready today.
I found it frustrating when we first started going out together because he
was so embarrassed by not remembering people's names he would avoid talking
to people he knew and certainly never introduced me to them. I got pretty
good at introducing myself which solved both problems because they would
then do the same.
I link my memory for names may be full now, after 3 years at WI I've given
it up this year. Of the 30 odd people I am now on at least nodding
acquaintance with, most know my name but I only know about 10 - doesn't
stop me talking to them though.
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could be
extremely embarrassing.

These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2018-05-20 23:45:44 UTC
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On Sun, 20 May 2018 23:13:03 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly.
This reminds me, there are some people hereabouts who always address me as
Vicar ( a part I played in panto a few years back). I can't recall their
names, or even their character names for the most part now.
Post by Kate B
This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
I knew the name of every child in the school where I worked - couldn't
always reliably match them to all the faces though.
Post by Kate B
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
I'm thingumy, how do you do?

Actually, facebook addresses me by name every morning so I'll be OK for a
while as long as I don't try to use my instagram name instead...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-21 06:10:22 UTC
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Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could be
extremely embarrassing.
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
Yes, it was vital to learn the names of the people in my classes very
quickly which meant several dozen each new school year. I tried to learn
them by the end of the first full week. I used to know the names of the
great majority of the 900 or so students in the schools I worked in. Of
course, I had five years to get to know most of them, but they often
stuck; ex-pupils I met years later were often surprised (and flattered)
that I'd remembered their names and was often able to ask after their
siblings, too.

It came in very handy once or twice - I once managed to disarm a
potentially nasty situation with a threatening group of young men by
smiling widely at one of them, saying "Richard! How nice to see you
again," shaking his hand, introducing him properly (surname and all) to
wofe and asking how he was. We ended up having quite a nice chat.
Phew. :o)

Nowadays, like you, names don't stick well and recalling even famous
names I know well can be a problem. It took me a couple of minutes
before I eventually dredged up Michael Gambon's name the other day when
I posted about The Singing Detective, for example. <sigh>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-21 08:49:32 UTC
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 07:10:22 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
I used to know the names of the
great majority of the 900 or so students in the schools I worked in. Of
course, I had five years to get to know most of them, but they often
stuck; ex-pupils I met years later were often surprised (and flattered)
that I'd remembered their names and was often able to ask after their
siblings, too.
My secondary school closed and was to be knocked down and changed to
flats. There was a reunion about 10 years ago, just beforehand, and
there were some teachers. Our senior teacher gave a speech and then
said dismiss, as he'd done after assembly daily. It was very touching
to see him and all the ex pupils, and there was one teacher there from
my primary school. He recognised me and said hello by name. which
really surprised me :). I forget why he would have been there. Maybe
he went to that school or taught there at some point.
LFS
2018-05-21 11:41:35 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to
take advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could
be extremely embarrassing.
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
Yes, it was vital to learn the names of the people in my classes very
quickly which meant several dozen each new school year. I tried to learn
them by the end of the first full week.  I used to know the names of the
great majority of the 900 or so students in the schools I worked in.  Of
course, I had five years to get to know most of them, but they often
stuck; ex-pupils I met years later were often surprised (and flattered)
that I'd remembered their names and was often able to ask after their
siblings, too.
For years, I had no difficulty remembering all my students' names, even
though teaching on a modular degree programme meant that I was faced
with several new groups of up to thirty every term. But my memory
suddenly collapsed (so suddenly that I feared the onset of dementia).
This coincided with increasing numbers of international students with
unpronounceable names. I then had to spend time at the start of teaching
each group explaining that they would need to help me by (a) adopting a
name I could pronounce properly and (b) sitting in the same place in
every class so that I could make a map with their names on.

I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-21 14:27:57 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
unpronounceable names. I then had to spend time at the start of
teaching each group explaining that they would need to help me by (a)
adopting a name I could pronounce properly and (b) sitting in the same
place in every class so that I could make a map with their names on.
[]
Oh good, someone else who remembers by position. I tended to remember
people by where they sat, in whatever office/workshop/whatever. This is
of course no use when yo meet them in a corridor, or meeting )-:. [And
they always seemed to remember me. Though that's probably because I tend
to speak up in meetings (probably not always to my advantage), and maybe
am of memorable appearance.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm not against women. Not often enough, anyway." - Groucho Marx
LFS
2018-05-21 15:35:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
unpronounceable names. I then had to spend time at the start of
teaching each group explaining that they would need to help me by (a)
adopting a name I could pronounce properly and (b) sitting in the same
place in every class so that I could make a map with their names on.
[]
Oh good, someone else who remembers by position. I tended to remember
people by where they sat, in whatever office/workshop/whatever. This is
of course no use when yo meet them in a corridor, or meeting )-:. [And
they always seemed to remember me. Though that's probably because I tend
to speak up in meetings (probably not always to my advantage), and maybe
am of memorable appearance.]
As I explained to a woman who accosted me on the platform at Crewe and
nearly made me miss my connection by *insisting* that I should remember
her from ten years previously, there was only one of me and hundreds of
them and I needed my limited brainpower to help them to learn things,
not to remember their names for evermore.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Sally Thompson
2018-05-22 07:29:40 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by LFS
unpronounceable names. I then had to spend time at the start of
teaching each group explaining that they would need to help me by (a)
adopting a name I could pronounce properly and (b) sitting in the same
place in every class so that I could make a map with their names on.
[]
Oh good, someone else who remembers by position. I tended to remember
people by where they sat, in whatever office/workshop/whatever. This is
of course no use when yo meet them in a corridor, or meeting )-:. [And
they always seemed to remember me. Though that's probably because I tend
to speak up in meetings (probably not always to my advantage), and maybe
am of memorable appearance.]
I’ve always had problems with names and faces but I try to use mnemonics.
For instance when there were two people in an office Warren sat by the
Window. Once I got to know them better I realised they were nothing alike!
Similarly with two staff in a pub, EiLEEN was not lean! It’s embarrassing
when someone comes to the door and I haven’t a clue who they are though. OH
is brilliant and always calls them by name for my benefit.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-21 20:20:51 UTC
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Post by LFS
I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
Now that simply follows tradition.

As the youngest of three, in later decades I got used to my Mother
running through all her offspring's names before getting to mine.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2018-05-21 23:40:21 UTC
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 21:20:51 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
Now that simply follows tradition.
As the youngest of three, in later decades I got used to my Mother
running through all her offspring's names before getting to mine.
Indeed, my mother, an only child, was often looked after by aunts. She said
one of them would run right through the list of all the many cousins
(mostly male) before reaching her name.

My elder daughter went through a phase of being greatly offended and hurt
every time I addressed her using her sister's name - I think she's over it
now.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-22 08:01:01 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
Now that simply follows tradition.
As the youngest of three, in later decades I got used to my Mother
running through all her offspring's names before getting to mine.
Indeed, my mother, an only child, was often looked after by aunts. She said
one of them would run right through the list of all the many cousins
(mostly male) before reaching her name.
My elder daughter went through a phase of being greatly offended and hurt
every time I addressed her using her sister's name - I think she's over it
now.
Grandchildren haven't actually heard me refer to them by the dogs'
names, luckily, but B is amused.
Nick Odell
2018-05-22 20:53:07 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
Now that simply follows tradition.
As the youngest of three, in later decades I got used to my Mother
running through all her offspring's names before getting to mine.
Indeed, my mother, an only child, was often looked after by aunts. She said
one of them would run right through the list of all the many cousins
(mostly male) before reaching her name.
My elder daughter went through a phase of being greatly offended and hurt
every time I addressed her using her sister's name - I think she's over it
now.
Grandchildren haven't actually heard me refer to them by the dogs'
names, luckily, but B is amused.
Oh, You do that too?

Actually, it's my son I do that to: well, it is his dog.

Nick
Nick Odell
2018-05-22 20:49:30 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out
of theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting
to take advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them
pinned). However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting
people years later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly
forgotten could be extremely embarrassing.
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
Yes, it was vital to learn the names of the people in my classes very
quickly which meant several dozen each new school year. I tried to
learn them by the end of the first full week.  I used to know the
names of the great majority of the 900 or so students in the schools I
worked in.  Of course, I had five years to get to know most of them,
but they often stuck; ex-pupils I met years later were often surprised
(and flattered) that I'd remembered their names and was often able to
ask after their siblings, too.
For years, I had no difficulty remembering all my students' names, even
though teaching on a modular degree programme meant that I was faced
with several new groups of up to thirty every term. But my memory
suddenly collapsed (so suddenly that I feared the onset of dementia).
This coincided with increasing numbers of international students with
unpronounceable names. I then had to spend time at the start of teaching
each group explaining that they would need to help me by (a) adopting a
name I could pronounce properly and (b) sitting in the same place in
every class so that I could make a map with their names on.
I do get confused with our children's names. They both shortened their
given names to three letters differing only in the middle vowel and our
new daughter-in-law's name has the same consonants. You can probably
work them out now.
Have I just stumbled into the "Teday" quiz thread?

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2018-05-21 08:45:01 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I used to think names were important but after attending an experiential
course on alternative therapies, I realised they weren’t tha5 important. It
was 3/4 days before we got around to exchanging names. Very refreshing
ime.
The husgod was hopeless at names and took to calling everybody Brian (we
knew no Brians) regardless of gender. This lead to some amusing moments
like the customer who came in looking for his print job which Brian had
promised would be ready today.
I found it frustrating when we first started going out together because he
was so embarrassed by not remembering people's names he would avoid talking
to people he knew and certainly never introduced me to them. I got pretty
good at introducing myself which solved both problems because they would
then do the same.
I link my memory for names may be full now, after 3 years at WI I've given
it up this year. Of the 30 odd people I am now on at least nodding
acquaintance with, most know my name but I only know about 10 - doesn't
stop me talking to them though.
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could be
extremely embarrassing.
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
As I taught adults I simply said I have a rubbish memory so can we all
put our names on these cards and have them next to us? I gave out
cards, and I had one too. I did learn them after a few lessons, but
it helped and everyone knew everyone.
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-21 09:43:13 UTC
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Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could be
extremely embarrassing.
It takes me ages to learn names. When I was teaching night school there
would always be a few people whose names just wouldn't stick. I recall
in particular 2 men who always sat together and I could never remember
which was which.

Further ago than that I sometimes used to serve in the shop at my
parents' riding centre. Because many of the customers were regulars
over the years and I was one of very few people who ever served them,
most of them would know who I was and would greet me cordially and chat.
But because I saw scores of people in a day and the days were fairly
rare occasions I never remembered who any of them were.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Kate B
2018-05-21 11:24:52 UTC
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Post by Kate B
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to
take advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could
be extremely embarrassing.
It takes me ages to learn names.  When I was teaching night school there
would always be a few people whose names just wouldn't stick.  I recall
in particular 2 men who always sat together and I could never remember
which was which.
I have an extra problem sometimes, which stems from my synaesthesia -
first names (not so much surnames) have definite physical attributes and
if a person doesn't fit their name I am sunk if I don't make a
superhuman effort. When I was about 15 I upset dreadfully two chaps
called Alan and Terry at the local youth club. This was a pity because I
quite fancied the blond one, but Alan is a tall blond name and Terry is
a skinny dark name, and it was Terry who was actually the blond. I had
to find another youth club eventually.
--
Kate B
London
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-21 20:26:54 UTC
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Post by Kate B
I have an extra problem sometimes, which stems from my synaesthesia -
first names (not so much surnames) have definite physical attributes and
if a person doesn't fit their name I am sunk if I don't make a
superhuman effort. When I was about 15 I upset dreadfully two chaps
called Alan and Terry at the local youth club. This was a pity because I
quite fancied the blond one, but Alan is a tall blond name and Terry is
a skinny dark name, and it was Terry who was actually the blond. I had
to find another youth club eventually.
Is that synaesthesia?
I always disliked the name "Derek" (A Derek should be shortish, stocky,
dark unkempt hair) because the first Derek I ever met was nasty, brutish
& a bully.
--
Sam Plusnet
Kate B
2018-05-21 22:00:00 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kate B
I have an extra problem sometimes, which stems from my synaesthesia -
first names (not so much surnames) have definite physical attributes
and if a person doesn't fit their name I am sunk if I don't make a
superhuman effort. When I was about 15 I upset dreadfully two chaps
called Alan and Terry at the local youth club. This was a pity because
I quite fancied the blond one, but Alan is a tall blond name and Terry
is a skinny dark name, and it was Terry who was actually the blond. I
had to find another youth club eventually.
Is that synaesthesia?
I always disliked the name "Derek" (A Derek should be shortish, stocky,
dark unkempt hair) because the first Derek I ever met was nasty, brutish
& a bully.
It's a bit more complicated than it seems from what I said. It's more
than just a physical impression. The actual sound is a shape: 'Alan' is
bright, radiant, a flat broad high plane of light; 'Terry' is curled,
level, thin, dark. The sound of 'Derek' is hard, stocky, dark, so we're
in agreement there, but it's not because of anyone I knew called Derek,
it's the shape of the sound. The shape of 'Sam' is thin, slippery, blue.
Sorry :)
--
Kate B
London
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-22 21:00:08 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kate B
I have an extra problem sometimes, which stems from my synaesthesia -
first names (not so much surnames) have definite physical attributes
and if a person doesn't fit their name I am sunk if I don't make a
superhuman effort. When I was about 15 I upset dreadfully two chaps
called Alan and Terry at the local youth club. This was a pity
because I quite fancied the blond one, but Alan is a tall blond name
and Terry is a skinny dark name, and it was Terry who was actually
the blond. I had to find another youth club eventually.
Is that synaesthesia?
I always disliked the name "Derek" (A Derek should be shortish,
stocky, dark unkempt hair) because the first Derek I ever met was
nasty, brutish & a bully.
It's a bit more complicated than it seems from what I said. It's more
than just a physical impression. The actual sound is a shape: 'Alan' is
bright, radiant, a flat broad high plane of light; 'Terry' is curled,
level, thin, dark. The sound of 'Derek' is hard, stocky, dark, so we're
in agreement there, but it's not because of anyone I knew called Derek,
it's the shape of the sound. The shape of 'Sam' is thin, slippery, blue.
Sorry :)
Don't be.
I think that's the only way I will ever be described as "slim", & one
out of three ain't bad.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2018-05-22 06:44:11 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kate B
I have an extra problem sometimes, which stems from my synaesthesia -
first names (not so much surnames) have definite physical attributes
and if a person doesn't fit their name I am sunk if I don't make a
superhuman effort. When I was about 15 I upset dreadfully two chaps
called Alan and Terry at the local youth club. This was a pity because
I quite fancied the blond one, but Alan is a tall blond name and Terry
is a skinny dark name, and it was Terry who was actually the blond. I
had to find another youth club eventually.
Is that synaesthesia?
I always disliked the name "Derek" (A Derek should be shortish, stocky,
dark unkempt hair) because the first Derek I ever met was nasty, brutish
& a bully.
Appropriately for this thread, the first bully I encountered was called
Brian Redhead (no, not that one) at junior school in Barrow [1]. The
teacher said in front of the whole class that he should be kept in a
cage :/. When he tried it on with me I punched him on the nose and that
nipped any trouble in the bud !

[1] Have I ever told umra that I played football with Emlyn Hughes while
we were there ?

Really ? That any times !
Nick Odell
2018-05-22 20:43:46 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
I used to think names were important but after attending an experiential
course on alternative therapies, I realised they weren’t tha5 important. It
was 3/4 days before we got around to exchanging names.  Very refreshing
ime.
The husgod was hopeless at names and took to calling everybody Brian (we
knew no Brians) regardless of gender. This lead to some amusing moments
like the customer who came in looking for his print job which Brian had
promised would be ready today.
I found it frustrating when we first started going out together because he
was so embarrassed by not remembering people's names he would avoid talking
to people he knew and certainly never introduced me to them. I got pretty
good at introducing myself which solved both problems because they would
then do the same.
I link my memory for names may be full now, after 3 years at WI I've given
it up this year. Of the 30 odd people I am now on at least nodding
acquaintance with, most know my name but I only know about 10 - doesn't
stop me talking to them though.
I used to have a very good short term memory for names - needing to
learn every name in a chorus of perhaps 50 (and sometimes a lot more)
for every different opera production I did, gave me a facility for
picking up names very quickly. This stood me in good stead when out of
theatre work and doing odd stints as a supply teacher (expecting to take
advantage, revolting pupils soon learnt that I had them pinned).
However, it was a *very* short-term memory and meeting people years
later who remembered me but whose names I had utterly forgotten could be
extremely embarrassing.
These days I'm lucky if I remember my own name....
Hello Miss!

Hello er... er... I'm sorry I've forgotten your name.

(Disappointed) It's Julia, Miss.

Yes, yes Julia. Of course I know your first name. It's your last name
I've forgotten. What was it again?


Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-19 23:52:25 UTC
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[]
Post by LFS
Post by Kate B
Post by John Finlay
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the
late sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I am even older! I did A level Maths in the mid sixties and have no
idea what this thread is about...
Precedence of operators - how you know that in an expression like

(a + bc - d)/e

, you know that you _don't_ add a to b before multiplying it by c.

(I was taught BODMAS, but I like BIMA - it avoids the precedence of D
over M or A over S that BODMAS implies.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here: this is the war room!" (Dr. Strangelove)
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-19 14:57:31 UTC
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Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I did O level maths in the mid 70s and A levels (maths and further maths)
2 years later and had also never heard of it until recently. (I did the
SMP syllabus though, which is a bit different.) I was taught the order to
do things in without use of mnemonics. I've rarely found mnemonics any
easier to remember than the thing they're supposed to help with.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris McMillan
2018-05-21 14:00:32 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I did O level maths in the mid 70s and A levels (maths and further maths)
2 years later and had also never heard of it until recently. (I did the
SMP syllabus though, which is a bit different.) I was taught the order to
Likewise Jim. My maths knowing friends say that SMP was useless.

Sincerely Chris
Post by Jim Easterbrook
do things in without use of mnemonics. I've rarely found mnemonics any
easier to remember than the thing they're supposed to help with.
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-21 14:26:43 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I did O level maths in the mid 70s and A levels (maths and further maths)
2 years later and had also never heard of it until recently. (I did the
SMP syllabus though, which is a bit different.) I was taught the order to
Likewise Jim. My maths knowing friends say that SMP was useless.
I don't agree that it was useless. As an engineer it was far more useful
than trad maths would have been. The only disadvantage was the mismatch
between knowledge assumed by my university and knowledge I actually had.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris McMillan
2018-05-21 15:13:31 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I did O level maths in the mid 70s and A levels (maths and further maths)
2 years later and had also never heard of it until recently. (I did the
SMP syllabus though, which is a bit different.) I was taught the order to
Likewise Jim. My maths knowing friends say that SMP was useless.
I don't agree that it was useless. As an engineer it was far more useful
than trad maths would have been. The only disadvantage was the mismatch
between knowledge assumed by my university and knowledge I actually had.
As people with a visual impairment, universities weren’t exactly falling
over themselves to take us. These friends knew their stuff traditionally
but felt SMP let them down in our final years. How well it suited us with
sight loss might have been another factor. We had no changes to syllabi
(with the exception of map reading in Geography) so it really was a level
playing field but without the modern adaptations.

Sincerely Chris
Mike Ruddock
2018-05-19 14:58:27 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by John Finlay
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though.  He "translated" the mathematical acronymn
BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction.  I was taught
Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc.  I don't think we'd learned about indices before
we were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to
do so
with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of".  Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order.  I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
I met BODMAS when I was 11 at grammar school in 1943

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2018-05-19 15:14:09 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 19 May 2018 15:12:51 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by John Finlay
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though.  He "translated" the mathematical acronymn
BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction.  I was taught
Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc.  I don't think we'd learned about indices before we
were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of".  Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order.  I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
MTAAW.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2018-05-21 09:45:14 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Kate B
Post by John Finlay
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
I suspect you're just getting cleverer/more experienced.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what I
was taught, though.  He "translated" the mathematical acronymn
BODMAS (or
BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or Indices),
Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction.  I was taught
Brackets,
Of, Divide, etc.  I don't think we'd learned about indices before
we were
taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
I was I think taught Order too (197x); thinking about it, I can't
specifically remember what it means now, though I think I'd not find most
expressions ambiguous. (I vaguely remember division and multiplication,
and addition and subtraction, being given equal priority, rather than
strictly in the BODMAS order.)
--
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to
do so
with
some passion, some compassion, some humour, and some style. - Maya Angelou,
quoted by Annabel Nnochiri, in RT 2017/5/13-19
I was taught "of".  Welsh Grammar school 1960/70's.
Re Order.  I think it may just mean "in this order" - of DMAS.
MJ
I was taught BIMA - Brackets, Indices, Multiplication/Division,
Addition/Subtraction but I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be
ubiquitous among nearly everybody I know.  JDF
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
Steve
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-21 09:56:14 UTC
Reply
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.

Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Steve Hague
2018-05-21 10:04:50 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the
late sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
I passed my maths O level (just) in 1968, but haven't used it much.
Steve
Kate B
2018-05-21 11:17:15 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the
late sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
I passed my maths O level (just) in 1968, but haven't used it much.
Steve
Ditto. But if you had given me 3 + 2 x 6 I would certainly have said 30.
Or possibly 15 if I'd started at the other end. I don't understand how
you could ever get 36 from that. Or did you mean 3 x 2 x 6?
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-05-21 10:52:42 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-05-21 11:04:20 UTC
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 10:52:42 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
You're either reading the wrong book or your book has the sum as
(3+2)x6=30.
I think I'd prefer it as 3+(2x6)=36 as it is much clearer.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-05-21 11:12:09 UTC
Reply
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
You're either reading the wrong book or your book has the sum as
(3+2)x6=30.
I think I'd prefer it as 3+(2x6)=36 as it is much clearer.
Err...... 15?
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-05-21 13:20:44 UTC
Reply
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 11:12:09 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
You're either reading the wrong book or your book has the sum as
(3+2)x6=30.
I think I'd prefer it as 3+(2x6)=36 as it is much clearer.
Err...... 15?
Yes, I think I was reading the mind, rather than the book :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kosmo
2018-05-21 16:57:16 UTC
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Post by Penny
I think I'd prefer it as 3+(2x6)=36 as it is much clearer.
3(2x6) gives the right question.
--
Kosmo
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-21 11:06:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops! I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!

Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-05-21 13:22:34 UTC
Reply
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 12:06:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops! I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-05-21 13:47:30 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops! I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
‘Let’s call the whole thing off!’
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-21 17:29:12 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops! I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
My maths isn't all that brilliant, but I did study it beyond A Level and
it seems to me that using BODMAS, because there are no brackets in the
equation the multiplication should be done before the addition, so the
answer is 15, as Penny says.

For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me. The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.

So there. :o)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Kate B
2018-05-21 17:44:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 May 2018 12:06:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops!  I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
My maths isn't all that brilliant, but I did study it beyond A Level and
it seems to me that using BODMAS, because there are no brackets in the
equation the multiplication should be done before the addition, so the
answer is 15, as Penny says.
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me.  The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
So there.  :o)
I am still bemused by this insistence that you do the multiplication
first even if it comes later in the sum. I can't get the thing to make
36 however hard I look.
--
Kate B
London
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-21 17:51:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kate B
I am still bemused by this insistence that you do the multiplication
first even if it comes later in the sum. I can't get the thing to make
36 however hard I look.
Quite. That's why you need brackets, IMO. And it doesn't make 36
however you do it. The technical mathematical term for 2+3x6 = 36 is
"wrong". :o)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Kate B
2018-05-21 17:55:21 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kate B
I am still bemused by this insistence that you do the multiplication
first even if it comes later in the sum. I can't get the thing to make
36 however hard I look.
Quite.  That's why you need brackets, IMO.  And it doesn't make 36
however you do it.  The technical mathematical term for 2+3x6 = 36 is
"wrong".  :o)
That's a relief. Thank you, Sid.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-22 00:54:30 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Kate B
I am still bemused by this insistence that you do the multiplication
I never was really at home with the BODMAS concept, either, at least
with things written out with + and × (or the approximation of the letter
x which seems to have replaced it) signs. [I hope that's come through OK
- it isn't proper ASCII.]

I could reasonably easily grasp (and accept) the idea in something like

a + bc - d

, where the multiplication of b by c is sort of "tighter" than the + and
-.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Kate B
first even if it comes later in the sum. I can't get the thing to make
36 however hard I look.
(Agreed; either 20 [by BODMAS] or 30 [calculator order]; no way 36!)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Quite. That's why you need brackets, IMO. And it doesn't make 36
however you do it. The technical mathematical term for 2+3x6 = 36 is
"wrong". :o)
Indeed (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Abandon hope, all ye who <ENTER> here.
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-22 09:24:52 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I never was really at home with the BODMAS concept, either, at least
with things written out with + and × (or the approximation of the letter
x which seems to have replaced it) signs. [I hope that's come through OK
- it isn't proper ASCII.]
I never knew it was ever anything but an x.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Quite. That's why you need brackets, IMO. And it doesn't make 36
however you do it. The technical mathematical term for 2+3x6 = 36 is
"wrong". :o)
As I said, way back up there, I did a mistook. I corrected myself.
(NO!, Brritters).
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-21 18:00:53 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me. The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
I agree Sid, especially as I've used programming languages with very
different ideas of operator order. As it says in the Tao of Python,
explicit is better than implicit.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2018-05-21 18:24:35 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me. The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
I agree Sid, especially as I've used programming languages with very
different ideas of operator order. As it says in the Tao of Python,
explicit is better than implicit.
Weren’t there some differences in the way some pocket calculators had to
have the instructions entered to achieve the desired results?
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2018-05-21 19:11:12 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me. The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
I agree Sid, especially as I've used programming languages with very
different ideas of operator order. As it says in the Tao of Python,
explicit is better than implicit.
Weren’t there some differences in the way some pocket calculators had to
have the instructions entered to achieve the desired results?
Early Hewlett Packard calculators used Reverse Polish notation so that
instead of 2 + 2 =, you would enter 2 <enter> 2 +.

john
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-22 01:02:49 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me. The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
I agree Sid, especially as I've used programming languages with very
different ideas of operator order. As it says in the Tao of Python,
explicit is better than implicit.
Weren’t there some differences in the way some pocket calculators had to
have the instructions entered to achieve the desired results?
Early Hewlett Packard calculators used Reverse Polish notation so that
instead of 2 + 2 =, you would enter 2 <enter> 2 +.
john
Yes; hsiloP was a useful introduction to how a lot of microprocessor
stacks worked. Yes, Mike, when simple calculators (but _after_ the
hsiloP ones) started to appear, they took things in the order you
entered them; the second and subsequent operators triggered the
calculation of the result so far. So in "2 + 3 × 4 =", the pressing of
the × key caused the result (5) to be calculated. It was relatively
late, and probably only about the time of scientific calculators, that
they started to implement BODMAS or similar. (And I had a Casio, which
also implemented proper fractions; I think they were the only ones that
did.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Abandon hope, all ye who <ENTER> here.
steveski
2018-05-21 19:14:00 UTC
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On Mon, 21 May 2018 18:24:35 +0000, Mike wrote:

[]
Post by Mike
Weren’t there some differences in the way some pocket calculators had to
have the instructions entered to achieve the desired results?
"We are Pentium - you will be approximated".
--
Steveski
John Ashby
2018-05-21 19:07:38 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 May 2018 12:06:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops!  I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
My maths isn't all that brilliant, but I did study it beyond A Level and
it seems to me that using BODMAS, because there are no brackets in the
equation the multiplication should be done before the addition, so the
answer is 15, as Penny says.
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me.  The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
So there.  :o)
In my part of Suffolk in the late sixties, BODMAS (or BIDMAS as my
children have been taught) was unknown, we were just encouraged to make
expressions unambiguous by use of brackets. My Canadian mathematician
friend, who is visiting at the moment, was taught PEDMAS (parenthesis,
exponent...) but a) in French and b) internalised it quickly so never
needed the mnemonic.

john
Mike
2018-05-22 07:39:05 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 May 2018 12:06:07 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Kate B
I must be extremely old, then, because I did O level maths in the late
sixties and had never heard of BODMAS or anything like it until
comparatively recently.
YANAOU.This thread is the first time I've come across it.
But presumably you were taught and had to remember somehow that (for
example) 3 + 2 x 6 = 36 and not 30.
Or is the reason for all those mathematical errors which have plagued
you for years just dawning?!!!
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops!  I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
My maths isn't all that brilliant, but I did study it beyond A Level and
it seems to me that using BODMAS, because there are no brackets in the
equation the multiplication should be done before the addition, so the
answer is 15, as Penny says.
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me.  The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
So there.  :o)
In my part of Suffolk in the late sixties, BODMAS (or BIDMAS as my
children have been taught) was unknown, we were just encouraged to make
expressions unambiguous by use of brackets. My Canadian mathematician
friend, who is visiting at the moment, was taught PEDMAS (parenthesis,
exponent...) but a) in French and b) internalised it quickly so never
needed the mnemonic.
john
Personally, I haven’t heard of either, I recognize BODMIN Moor.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2018-05-21 21:00:33 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
But... but.... but 3 plus 2 equals 5 in my book, and 5 times 6 equals 30 in
my book too!
Whoops!  I had written it down and then didn't copy what I'd written!
Should have said ... 3 + 2 x 6 = 30 and not 15.
Um, no.
My maths isn't all that brilliant, but I did study it beyond A Level and
it seems to me that using BODMAS, because there are no brackets in the
equation the multiplication should be done before the addition, so the
answer is 15, as Penny says.
For me, the expression 3+2x6 is rather ambiguous and is the sort of
thing I'd want to put brackets in for clarity, even if it makes strict
mathematical sense without them: (3+2)x6 or 3+(2x6) are both unambiguous
and much better form, if you ask me.  The confusion in this thread would
seem to support my contention.
It was intended to be ambiguous. My point was that if one didn't know
that multiply had to be dealt with before plus, one might get the wrong
answer.

And the "Um, no" is not right! I was saying that without Bodmas one
would arrive at ..., not that 30 was the right answer.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
krw
2018-05-20 13:35:42 UTC
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I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Btms
2018-05-20 14:44:11 UTC
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Post by krw
I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
Does it grow nowhere else?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-05-20 15:12:08 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
Does it grow nowhere else?
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-20 16:35:53 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by krw
I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
Does it grow nowhere else?
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The death of democracy is not likely to be an assassination from ambush.
It will be a slow extinction from apathy, indifference, and undernourishment.
-Robert Maynard Hutchins, educator (1899-1977)
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-20 17:34:26 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
It was before my time, but I was told that it stood for Be Upstairs
Ready My Angel.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Btms
2018-05-20 18:14:04 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
It was before my time, but I was told that it stood for Be Upstairs
Ready My Angel.
Oooh I say! What will Matron say!
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2018-05-20 18:38:19 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
It was before my time, but I was told that it stood for Be Upstairs
Ready My Angel.
Oooh I say! What will Matron say!
That she thought it was UNDRESSED I expect....
John Ashby
2018-05-21 07:59:38 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH
stood for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what
BURMA.
It was before my time, but I was told that it stood for Be Upstairs
Ready My Angel.
But of course, if she were Upstairs Ready, she'd be in the flat of the
window dresser from Bourne and Hollingsworth, and we wouldn't want that,
would we? And he certainly wouldn't.

john
Mike Ruddock
2018-05-21 14:34:14 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH
stood for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what
BURMA.
It was before my time, but I was told that it stood for Be Upstairs
Ready My Angel.
But of course, if she were Upstairs Ready, she'd be in the flat of the
window dresser from Bourne and Hollingsworth, and we wouldn't want that,
would we? And he certainly wouldn't.
john
I seem to recall that it was the flat of the Polish lodger.

Mike Ruddock
Mike
2018-05-20 17:36:59 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by krw
I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
Does it grow nowhere else?
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
Be upstairs ready my angel.
HTH
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-20 17:52:55 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by krw
I acknowledge that BODMAS seems to be ubiquitous among nearly everybody
I know.
BODMAS appears on the walls of Sri Lankan schools.
Does it grow nowhere else?
BURMA used to appear on some envelopes too.
I can remember (anecdotally - I'm not _that_ old!) What (k)NORWICH stood
for, but although it tickles the memory, I can't remember what BURMA.
Be upstairs ready my angel.
HTH
Thanks (and Sid). I'd just about remembered the RMA part.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"If just one child is saved, then we'll have created a police state for the
benefit of just one child."
Chris McMillan
2018-05-19 14:04:04 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these days.
Russell Davies just gave an answer which was a little different to what
I was taught, though. He "translated" the mathematical acronymn BODMAS
(or BIDMAS, which I hadn't heard before) as Brackets, Order (or
Indices), Division, Multiplication, Addition, Subtraction. I was taught
Brackets, Of, Divide, etc. I don't think we'd learned about indices
before we were taught BODMAS, but what does "Order" mean?
B = Work out brackets first

O = other to indicate what to do next

D = Divide
M = Multiply
+
A = add
S = subtract

From my maths text book Maths the Basic Skills, pub 2004 but I did part of
a so called three yr course in 2010/12, scuppered partly by the govt
changing the rules, some eye sight problems and my course being moved when
the further ed building in our road was sold and courses to move to
*Bracknell*.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-19 17:07:40 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Is BoB being dumbed down these days or am I just getting a lot cleverer?
 I'm amazed how many of the questions I can answer (correctly!) these
days.
In general, I think the difficulty is still pretty much as it was, but I
thought that episode featured a lot of much easier questions - or
perhaps they just happened to ask more things I knew.

I do like Russell Davies as chair, btw; I think he gets the tone just right.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2018-05-20 07:59:52 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I do like Russell Davies as chair, btw; I think he gets the tone just right.
MTAAW, and I said much the same to other half at the end of last night's
programme.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
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