Discussion:
Topical inserts...
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p***@never.here
2017-04-20 09:42:46 UTC
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IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..

Anybody know?
--
Pete
Jenny M Benson
2017-04-20 10:48:02 UTC
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Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
--
Jenny M Benson
p***@never.here
2017-04-20 10:59:05 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
--
Pete
Penny
2017-04-20 12:08:51 UTC
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Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Whoever lives closest and is available?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2017-04-20 12:24:20 UTC
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Post by Penny
Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Whoever lives closest and is available?
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
krw
2017-04-20 12:42:25 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
DavidK
2017-04-20 13:14:53 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
The interviews on Radio 4 news in the morning, and I'm assuming they are
using skype or something similar, vary enormously in quality. I'd like
to know why.
Peter Percival
2017-04-20 16:23:22 UTC
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Post by DavidK
The interviews on Radio 4 news in the morning, and I'm assuming they
are using skype or something similar, vary enormously in quality. I'd
like to know why.
Fluctuations.

And, since I don't wish to appear discriminatory, fluctuEuropeans as well.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Chris McMillan
2017-04-21 18:15:44 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
The interviews on Radio 4 news in the morning, and I'm assuming they are
using skype or something similar, vary enormously in quality. I'd like
to know why.
Sometimes they admit to it being skype. I use both skype and Facetime. I
wouldn't say skype is any more reliable than my bog standard basic fobile.
But then maybe if you pay for skype its as good as some landlines?

Sincerely Chris - not really over impressed with either

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2017-04-20 16:13:14 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question.
If only we had a sound engineer who could tell us ;)
Mike
2017-04-20 17:54:10 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question.
If only we had a sound engineer who could tell us ;)
Given sufficient bandwidth, the signals via Skype could be fairly good
(off-hand, I am uncertain of their maximum spec but I have heard
conversations from the Uk, Canada, China and the USA which vary from pretty
awful to very clean and clear) some signals have surpassed the quality of
many phone lines Auntie has used, even twin line 'high quality' [can't
think of the name just now] lines. Some regular correspondents have these
lines (for which BT charge a considerable premium) wired into their homes
so that they can send their contributions down the line for recording by
Auntie.

There is an alternative and that is to record into an audio card and send
the resulting files as attachments, the quality of the 'line' or internet
link does not dictate the quality this way, a poor line or low bandwidth
just means the packets of data take longer to send; of course, this method
doesn't lend itself to events where immediacy matters.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2017-04-22 10:43:55 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question.
If only we had a sound engineer who could tell us ;)
Given sufficient bandwidth, the signals via Skype could be fairly good
(off-hand, I am uncertain of their maximum spec but I have heard
conversations from the Uk, Canada, China and the USA which vary from pretty
awful to very clean and clear) some signals have surpassed the quality of
many phone lines Auntie has used, even twin line 'high quality' [can't
think of the name just now] lines. Some regular correspondents have these
lines (for which BT charge a considerable premium) wired into their homes
so that they can send their contributions down the line for recording by
Auntie.
There is an alternative and that is to record into an audio card and send
the resulting files as attachments, the quality of the 'line' or internet
link does not dictate the quality this way, a poor line or low bandwidth
just means the packets of data take longer to send; of course, this method
doesn't lend itself to events where immediacy matters.
*could* being the operative word. I rarely ask Himself to join a call I
make, its too painful but talking to died in the wool 'Canada's so much
better than the motherland for comms' and Skype refuses to work is too
funny for words.

Sincerely Chris

Peter Percival
2017-04-20 16:20:39 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.

And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
krw
2017-04-20 16:29:55 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
I am not in immediate continuous pain. The internet suggests a range of
possibilities. It might get better of its own accord or it might be
serious. The chances are high that the doctor will not know what it is
either but will probably send me off for a scan. OTOH it may go away of
its own accord and then I will not need the appointment.

However I would prefer that the doctors made sure they could such cases
sooner than more than 7 days, without me declaring that it is an emergency.

And why does the receptionist want to know?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Vicky
2017-04-20 17:55:41 UTC
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Post by krw
I am not in immediate continuous pain. The internet suggests a range of
possibilities. It might get better of its own accord or it might be
serious. The chances are high that the doctor will not know what it is
either but will probably send me off for a scan. OTOH it may go away of
its own accord and then I will not need the appointment.
However I would prefer that the doctors made sure they could such cases
sooner than more than 7 days, without me declaring that it is an emergency.
And why does the receptionist want to know?
That last bit drives B mad! He thinks it is an invasion of privacy, it
is asked when there are others behind you queuing to see the
receptionist, and she is not medically qualified anyway so how can she
triage?

There are 3 ways to book in our surgery; by phone, person and online.
And times give different options. If you go first thing at 8.30 a.m
you get an earlier date, often same day. then there is the walk in
every morning where you go and just sit and wait. Emergencies only. B
can't do that easily as gets too much pain sitting, or standing, and
waiting.
--
Vicky
krw
2017-04-21 08:39:23 UTC
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Post by krw
However I would prefer that the doctors made sure they could such cases
sooner than more than 7 days, without me declaring that it is an emergency.
Having now seen a dentist the doctor's appointment has been cancelled.
However the probable pain to the pocket next month is eye-watering.
Anti-biotics in the meantime.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2017-04-21 18:15:45 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
I am not in immediate continuous pain. The internet suggests a range of
possibilities. It might get better of its own accord or it might be
serious. The chances are high that the doctor will not know what it is
either but will probably send me off for a scan. OTOH it may go away of
its own accord and then I will not need the appointment.
However I would prefer that the doctors made sure they could such cases
sooner than more than 7 days, without me declaring that it is an emergency.
And why does the receptionist want to know?
Triage purposes but you don't have to say so.

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2017-04-20 23:09:22 UTC
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On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:20:39 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...

Nick
LFS
2017-04-21 06:52:35 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:20:39 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...
I think you must be quite young! This is an effective philosophy until
you reach an age where your system is less able to fight back on its
own: at that point ignoring symptoms may not lead directly to terminal
decline but can impinge in a very negative way on the quality of your
remaining life...
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2017-04-21 07:19:22 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Nick Odell
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...
I think you must be quite young! This is an effective philosophy until
you reach an age where your system is less able to fight back on its
own: at that point ignoring symptoms may not lead directly to terminal
decline but can impinge in a very negative way on the quality of your
remaining life...
Inspired by a friend who at 70+ has just had a very successful hip
replacement, I decided to go and get my achey hips checked out as well
as my knee which has been bad for ages. GP recommended a private
consultation as under the local NHS it would take months, so off we went
to a doc. in San Remo complete with X-rays.

Very nice young man who had trained for a year in Epsom so had perfect
English which makes medical conversations much easier for me.

He looked at my hip x-ray first and said there was no sign of arthritis
- later checked with manipulation of legs to confirm full range of
pain-free articulation - just a bit of inflammation which he prescribed
a NSAID for.

Then knee which he also said that wasn't too bad considering I'd had a
clean out 11 years ago. No op. necessary, but he advised hyaluronic acid
injection which he did there and then. Needle a bit painful, first he
drew off a bit of fluid, then injected the acid. Even walking back to
the car I felt an improvement (probably the fluid removal) and then a
lot better the next day.

All good news and knowing that I'm not doing any damage to my hips by
keeping going and with my knee much less painful I've been much more
active in the garden with digging, strimming etc., all helping with
weight loss and I am feeling so much more positive about life.
Penny
2017-04-21 08:00:35 UTC
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On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 09:19:22 +0200, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
He looked at my hip x-ray first and said there was no sign of arthritis
- later checked with manipulation of legs to confirm full range of
pain-free articulation - just a bit of inflammation which he prescribed
a NSAID for.
Then knee which he also said that wasn't too bad considering I'd had a
clean out 11 years ago. No op. necessary, but he advised hyaluronic acid
injection which he did there and then. Needle a bit painful, first he
drew off a bit of fluid, then injected the acid. Even walking back to
the car I felt an improvement (probably the fluid removal) and then a
lot better the next day.
All good news and knowing that I'm not doing any damage to my hips by
keeping going and with my knee much less painful I've been much more
active in the garden with digging, strimming etc., all helping with
weight loss and I am feeling so much more positive about life.
That sounds like a great outcome!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2017-04-21 09:20:38 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
He looked at my hip x-ray first and said there was no sign of arthritis
- later checked with manipulation of legs to confirm full range of
pain-free articulation - just a bit of inflammation which he prescribed
a NSAID for.
Then knee which he also said that wasn't too bad considering I'd had a
clean out 11 years ago. No op. necessary, but he advised hyaluronic acid
injection which he did there and then. Needle a bit painful, first he
drew off a bit of fluid, then injected the acid. Even walking back to
the car I felt an improvement (probably the fluid removal) and then a
lot better the next day.
All good news and knowing that I'm not doing any damage to my hips by
keeping going and with my knee much less painful I've been much more
active in the garden with digging, strimming etc., all helping with
weight loss and I am feeling so much more positive about life.
That sounds like a great outcome!
I agree. Finding a doctor who thinks like that is a huge step towards
positive outcomes like those. Good for you, sir! (And it certainly
sounds as if it has been good for you.)

Nick
LFS
2017-04-21 08:28:54 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Post by Nick Odell
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...
I think you must be quite young! This is an effective philosophy until
you reach an age where your system is less able to fight back on its
own: at that point ignoring symptoms may not lead directly to terminal
decline but can impinge in a very negative way on the quality of your
remaining life...
Inspired by a friend who at 70+ has just had a very successful hip
replacement, I decided to go and get my achey hips checked out as well
as my knee which has been bad for ages. GP recommended a private
consultation as under the local NHS it would take months, so off we went
to a doc. in San Remo complete with X-rays.
Very nice young man who had trained for a year in Epsom so had perfect
English which makes medical conversations much easier for me.
He looked at my hip x-ray first and said there was no sign of arthritis
- later checked with manipulation of legs to confirm full range of
pain-free articulation - just a bit of inflammation which he prescribed
a NSAID for.
Then knee which he also said that wasn't too bad considering I'd had a
clean out 11 years ago. No op. necessary, but he advised hyaluronic acid
injection which he did there and then. Needle a bit painful, first he
drew off a bit of fluid, then injected the acid. Even walking back to
the car I felt an improvement (probably the fluid removal) and then a
lot better the next day.
All good news and knowing that I'm not doing any damage to my hips by
keeping going and with my knee much less painful I've been much more
active in the garden with digging, strimming etc., all helping with
weight loss and I am feeling so much more positive about life.
That sounds like a very good outcome. I think that there are many
relatively minor niggles that we tolerate, tending to assume that they
are just age-related wear and tear, which can be very effectively dealt
with these days.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-21 21:31:03 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
That sounds like a very good outcome. I think that there are many
relatively minor niggles that we tolerate, tending to assume that they
are just age-related wear and tear, which can be very effectively dealt
with these days.
Not unlike when the NHS was first set up, as covered by Call the Midwife
and other dramas I've seen that covered the period: lots of * ailments
that had been tolerated for years were cleared up in short order. Often,
apparently, things that had just been considered normal, much as you
describe.
* I was going to insert "minor" there, but some might have been major.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand
Btms
2017-04-21 09:18:48 UTC
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BrritSki <***@gmail.com> wrote:
[]
Post by BrritSki
Inspired by a friend who at 70+ has just had a very successful hip
replacement, I decided to go and get my achey hips checked out as well
as my knee which has been bad for ages. GP recommended a private
consultation as under the local NHS it would take months, so off we went
to a doc. in San Remo complete with X-rays.
[]
Post by BrritSki
All good news and knowing that I'm not doing any damage to my hips by
keeping going and with my knee much less painful I've been much more
active in the garden with digging, strimming etc., all helping with
weight loss and I am feeling so much more positive about life.
Yay 😊
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
krw
2017-04-21 08:40:03 UTC
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where your system is less able to fight back on its own
Which is one of the "complications" of diabetes.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2017-04-21 09:14:47 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:20:39 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...
I think you must be quite young! This is an effective philosophy until
you reach an age where your system is less able to fight back on its
own: at that point ignoring symptoms may not lead directly to terminal
decline but can impinge in a very negative way on the quality of your
remaining life...
I'm nearly sixty-eight, you know! In common with others here, there's
a two week wait for a routine appointment with my GP. Going through
the indignity of claiming to a receptionist that my malaise is more
important than somebody else's malaise is an indignity too far for me
and I would rather wait the two weeks. So, instead of making an
appointment and waiting two weeks, I just wait the two weeks and -
guess what? Whatever it was clears up and proves that my malaise was
not more important after all.

I've nothing against routine maintenance: I get my teeth checked
regularly, I should get my eyes checked again and I've been meaning to
get an appointment with an audiologist for some time. The rest is just
down to fair wear and tear.

Nick
LFS
2017-04-21 09:45:18 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by LFS
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:20:39 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
Interesting question. I used Skype recently for the first time and my
caller was somewhere in the US. I was surprised at the clarity of the
call - better than the normal call I made this morning to the surgery.
Appointment is Thursday next week at 7pm or the following week. I might
be ill!
And if you are, and if the illness is the sort of thing that clears up
of its own accord in a few days, then the expectation is that you will
cancel your appointment. Waits are not always a bad idea.
And what if, you may ask, it's a serious illness and you die before the
appointment? In that case not turning up and not cancelling will lead
to you being removed from the doctor's list.
My philosophy is that if you ignore something for long enough, it will
just go away. Okay: I realise that one day something will come along
and I'll ignore it and it will be me that goes away but - hey - I've
been lucky so far...
I think you must be quite young! This is an effective philosophy until
you reach an age where your system is less able to fight back on its
own: at that point ignoring symptoms may not lead directly to terminal
decline but can impinge in a very negative way on the quality of your
remaining life...
I'm nearly sixty-eight, you know! In common with others here, there's
a two week wait for a routine appointment with my GP. Going through
the indignity of claiming to a receptionist that my malaise is more
important than somebody else's malaise is an indignity too far for me
and I would rather wait the two weeks. So, instead of making an
appointment and waiting two weeks, I just wait the two weeks and -
guess what? Whatever it was clears up and proves that my malaise was
not more important after all.
I've nothing against routine maintenance: I get my teeth checked
regularly, I should get my eyes checked again and I've been meaning to
get an appointment with an audiologist for some time. The rest is just
down to fair wear and tear.
<grin>

When I was nearly sixty-eight people kept telling me I wasn't hearing
them properly so I tootled off to my GP who sent me to the ENT
department at the local hospital for a test. I was shepherded into a
soundproof booth, fitted with headphones and told to press a button when
I heard a sound. I heard nothing. The audiologist reappeared and rather
crossly showed me the button and explained the process again. I told her
that I understood perfectly but had heard nothing ... which was
obviously why I was there...

She then confirmed that I was quite deaf in my right ear and said that I
should ask my GP to refer me for further tests but in the meantime she
would make me a hearing aid. Which she did. This involved further
bizarre encounters with her. The hearing aid made no difference and I
put it in a drawer and carried on with my life.

The next time I saw my GP, some months later, about something different,
she said that it might be a good idea to follow up the audiologist's
suggestion of further tests. It turned out that my deafness had a rather
serious cause. I was belatedly grateful to the audiologist for spotting
that there was a problem and I told her this when I was sent to see her
for a further test. This did not seem to improve her bad temper. I was
again put in the soundproof booth and instructed as before. This time I
heard lots of noises so pressed the button frequently. Again she came in
and told me off for not doing it properly. I pointed out that I now had
quite severe tinnitus so was hearing noises all the time...

I later saw a private audiologist and ended up with more sophisticated
hearing aids. When I returned the NHS one the grumpy audiologist asked
to look at my new ones. She was quite puzzled as to how they worked and
I had to explain it to her.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky
2017-04-21 10:25:53 UTC
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Post by LFS
I later saw a private audiologist and ended up with more sophisticated
hearing aids. When I returned the NHS one the grumpy audiologist asked
to look at my new ones. She was quite puzzled as to how they worked and
I had to explain it to her.
Over the last 10 years I've been tested in a booth three times, in
Cambridge area, Palmers Green area and lately St Albans. Well. lately
was about 3 months ago and this time I was at the level to have a
hearing aid, and this week got an appointment for a date in May.

The people testing me were very kind and pleasant each time and the
last one took ages explaining what the aid would do, how the new ones
are an improvement and even where I'd later on be able to get free
batteries for it. I also was given a phone number to call her if I
had queries between the test and fitting clinic. I think the aid is
being made specifically for me and the appointment will apparently
take an hour. Or maybe that is the fitting to make the device...

I seem to recall she said it might take a while to get used to the new
aid. I have to say all care at St Albans, Watford Gernal and
Addenbrookes in Cambridge has been first class for this and other
unrelated visits and operations. All NHS and long may it remain so.
My MP is Tory and faithfully gives the party line when I contact him
about anything, but has been helping to get Watford Hospital a
rebuilding upgrade. As a local MP he is good. Shame I can't ever vote
for him.
--
Vicky
LFS
2017-04-21 10:46:36 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by LFS
I later saw a private audiologist and ended up with more sophisticated
hearing aids. When I returned the NHS one the grumpy audiologist asked
to look at my new ones. She was quite puzzled as to how they worked and
I had to explain it to her.
Over the last 10 years I've been tested in a booth three times, in
Cambridge area, Palmers Green area and lately St Albans. Well. lately
was about 3 months ago and this time I was at the level to have a
hearing aid, and this week got an appointment for a date in May.
The people testing me were very kind and pleasant each time and the
last one took ages explaining what the aid would do, how the new ones
are an improvement and even where I'd later on be able to get free
batteries for it. I also was given a phone number to call her if I
had queries between the test and fitting clinic. I think the aid is
being made specifically for me and the appointment will apparently
take an hour. Or maybe that is the fitting to make the device...
I seem to recall she said it might take a while to get used to the new
aid. I have to say all care at St Albans, Watford Gernal and
Addenbrookes in Cambridge has been first class for this and other
unrelated visits and operations. All NHS and long may it remain so.
My MP is Tory and faithfully gives the party line when I contact him
about anything, but has been helping to get Watford Hospital a
rebuilding upgrade. As a local MP he is good. Shame I can't ever vote
for him.
It takes a while for your brain to adjust to a hearing aid so you do
need to wear it all the time and be patient. The private audiologist
began by asking me what I wanted from a hearing aid and it does help
with the two most bothersome things (tinnitus and lack of
directionality). She let me try several different types over several
months without any charge and I ended up back with the first one she had
recommended. But despite its sophistication it doesn't always help,
especially with speech discrimination. The most frustrating thing is
missing quick witty comebacks in conversation!
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky
2017-04-21 11:49:46 UTC
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Post by LFS
It takes a while for your brain to adjust to a hearing aid so you do
need to wear it all the time and be patient. The private audiologist
began by asking me what I wanted from a hearing aid and it does help
with the two most bothersome things (tinnitus and lack of
directionality). She let me try several different types over several
months without any charge and I ended up back with the first one she had
recommended. But despite its sophistication it doesn't always help,
especially with speech discrimination. The most frustrating thing is
missing quick witty comebacks in conversation!
Two of the times I notice a problem are in the swimming pool and
listening to the radio at night, neither of which will be helped I
think. One doesn't wear it at night or in the pool, does one? But tv
and family get togethers will hopefully be improved, and times when
someone talks to me and I didn't know they are going to and so haven't
focussed.
--
Vicky
Btms
2017-04-20 20:59:04 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Whoever lives closest and is available?
Can't they do it by phone these days ?
I foubt it. The studio has all sorts if ambient sound environments.
McToodles can amplify*

*pun op as well. A bit of a bogoff.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
carolet
2017-04-21 11:05:51 UTC
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Post by Penny
Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Whoever lives closest and is available?
If they are recording they will choose from the people that are there to
record something extra. If not they will see who can be called in at
short notice. If that happens they will, no doubt, be reinmbursed for
their trouble. I think I've heard this said at one of the Archers events
that I've been to, but can't remember who said it.

I suspect that topical inserts are more likely during weeks when they
are recording, for the very reason that it is easier to arrange.
--
CaroleT
Marjorie
2017-04-21 15:59:40 UTC
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Post by Penny
Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Whoever lives closest and is available?
Probably. In this case, it turned out to be the two characters least
likely in the whole of Ambridge to be discussing politics.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Clive Arthur
2017-04-20 12:15:50 UTC
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Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
They have plenty of archive material, and plenty of technology, so
something like this...



Cheers
--
Clive
Jim Easterbrook
2017-04-20 13:23:13 UTC
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Post by p***@never.here
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:48:02 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
That works if there is a recording session happening at the time. What
happens if it is between sessions?
Don't be silly. The powers that be are sent copies of the recording schedule
so that they can arrange newsworthy events accordingly.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Btms
2017-04-20 20:59:04 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I don't KNOW, but I imagine they put the TI into the mouths of whoever
happens to be on the payroll/in the studio at the appropriate time,
wording the script accordingly.
Ot who lives nearest? Who they want to pay to get if they are available.
Lots of options.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
krw
2017-04-20 12:40:32 UTC
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Post by p***@never.here
IIRC from previous postings on umra actors are only paid by the
episode. If that is correct - how does it work with "topical inserts"?
Do they have a couple of actors on a retainer so that they are
available at a moments notice as with Ed and Emma and the
forthcoming election..
Anybody know?
I wonder if they are in the studio this week anyway. I believe that
when Jill did one (Diana?) she was called in specially. Once upon a
time when some of the cast were also part of BBC repertory then they
might well be around anyway.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
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