Discussion:
Umra Book Club
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Sid Nuncius
2017-02-17 09:57:16 UTC
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This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.

No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.

Review here if interested:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky
2017-02-17 11:25:03 UTC
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2017 09:57:16 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
One of the Pratchett children's books was about poo. I got it for
grandson some years ago and think he and his dad enjoyed it.
--
Vicky
Peter Percival
2017-02-17 13:35:30 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 15:14:39 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2017-02-17 15:17:13 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 15:48:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2017-02-17 16:03:45 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 17:18:23 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
I sphincter right there!
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2017-02-17 18:12:10 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but
I genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy
Richard Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety,
but I was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to
reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject
of faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
I sphincter right there!
Now you're just being anal.
--
Steveski
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 18:41:51 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but
I genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy
Richard Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety,
but I was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to
reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject
of faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
I sphincter right there!
Now you're just being anal.
Cheeky!
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2017-02-17 19:03:14 UTC
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Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steveski
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least),
but I genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly
enjoy Richard Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of
Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty
and highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable
dubiety, but I was completely captivated and couldn't wait to
get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating
subject of faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
I sphincter right there!
Now you're just being anal.
Cheeky!
YAGluteusMaximusDecimusAICM5Sesterses
--
Steveski
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 23:16:46 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steveski
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least),
but I genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly
enjoy Richard Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of
Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty
and highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable
dubiety, but I was completely captivated and couldn't wait to
get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating
subject of faecal transplants?
Might they poo-poo the idea?
I can't stomach it myself.
Might you have put a colon at the nd of that sentence?
Or at the bottom had I written it vertically?
I sphincter right there!
Now you're just being anal.
Cheeky!
YAGluteusMaximusDecimusAICM5Sesterses
Oh Bum!
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2017-02-17 15:23:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
The reason I arks is that some animals are born with no (or inadequate
or the wrong type or something) gut bacteria so the young eat the
parents' faeces. I think elephants might be such creatures.

Also, the use of the word "transplant" were one might expect
"inoculation" is interesting. Claudia Hammond (maybe) did a pogrom
explaining that transplants are less heavily regulated than medicinal
therapies in the States, so that's how the procedure got its name.
Though I may have misremembered....
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Peter Percival
2017-02-17 16:04:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
The reason I arks is that some animals are born with no (or inadequate
or the wrong type or something) gut bacteria so the young eat the
parents' faeces. I think elephants might be such creatures.
Also, the use of the word "transplant" were one might expect
where
Post by Peter Percival
"inoculation" is interesting. Claudia Hammond (maybe) did a pogrom
explaining that transplants are less heavily regulated than medicinal
therapies in the States, so that's how the procedure got its name.
Though I may have misremembered....
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Sid Nuncius
2017-02-18 07:10:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
He doesn't, which is slightly disappointing because it is indeed a
fascinating subject. To be fair, he's a world-renowned entomologist
with a special interest in dung beetles so it's a bit out of his area of
expertise, but he does discuss gut flora so a mention would at least
have been appropriate.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
LFS
2017-02-18 12:27:42 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
He doesn't, which is slightly disappointing because it is indeed a
fascinating subject. To be fair, he's a world-renowned entomologist
with a special interest in dung beetles so it's a bit out of his area of
expertise, but he does discuss gut flora so a mention would at least
have been appropriate.
I've been told that this is riveting stuff, too, it's on my list:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gut-inside-story-bodys-under-rated-ebook/dp/B00VGJMAHA
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2017-02-18 13:39:33 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a somewhat unusual recommendation (to say the least), but I
genuinely think that a lot of umrats would thoroughly enjoy Richard
Jones's book Call Of Nature: The Secret Life Of Dung.
No, really - it's extraordinarily interesting, genuinely witty and
highly entertaining. I approached it with considerable dubiety, but I
was completely captivated and couldn't wait to get back to reading more.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R9X11TV1BTZFK/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Does The Author have anything to say about the fascinating subject of
faecal transplants?
He doesn't, which is slightly disappointing because it is indeed a
fascinating subject. To be fair, he's a world-renowned entomologist
with a special interest in dung beetles so it's a bit out of his area of
expertise, but he does discuss gut flora so a mention would at least
have been appropriate.
Perhaps you'll find an article in Readers Digest ?

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