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Nic’s funeral
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Btms
2018-03-23 09:16:03 UTC
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Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.

Otoh she might just feel as I do about the unremitting number of negative
events being foregrounded atm and doesn’t want to participate.
Serena Blanchflower
2018-03-23 09:54:34 UTC
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Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
Probably not. She missed the service itself, apparently due to work
problems, but arrived at the pub for the wake and immediately[1] got
extremely drunk and offensive to both Will and Beverley.



[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk before
she started.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I don't feel old. I don't feel anything until noon. Then it's time for
my nap. (Bob Hope)
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-23 10:15:30 UTC
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Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.

Rotaa
Serena Blanchflower
2018-03-23 11:05:06 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well. The rest of Ambridge seem to be
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival. I
suspect this is over optimistic though.
--
Best wishes, Serena
What can you draw with an Escher-Sketch?
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-23 11:17:25 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well. The rest of Ambridge seem to be
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.

Rotaa
Serena Blanchflower
2018-03-23 11:29:17 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well. The rest of Ambridge seem to be
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably. I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit. This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver. He was rather over three times the limit, having had
one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out. The
friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly normal;
trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
Remember, Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, but she did it
backwards and in high heels (Faith Whittlesey)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-24 02:26:32 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to
Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well. The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably. I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit. This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver. He was rather over three times the limit, having
had one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out.
The friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly normal;
trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
Interesting. It could even be argued that his body had become accustomed
to that level, and that in fact he _was_ sober - or at least his
behaviour, reactions, etc. were the same as a sober person's, at that
point. Fortunately on balance for society, I think, such an argument is
not accepted - not least because of the practical difficulties of
establishing a baseline for each individual, but I'd say fortunately
anyway as it would not be a good precedent to set, and would encourage
drinking.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you can't construct a coherent argument for the other side, you
probably
don't understand your own opinion. - Scott Adams, 2015
Serena Blanchflower
2018-03-24 08:12:44 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1]  Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well.  The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
 As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably.  I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit.  This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver.  He was rather over three times the limit, having
had one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out.
The friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly
normal; trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
Interesting. It could even be argued that his body had become accustomed
to that level, and that in fact he _was_ sober - or at least his
behaviour, reactions, etc. were the same as a sober person's, at that
point. Fortunately on balance for society, I think, such an argument is
not accepted - not least because of the practical difficulties of
establishing a baseline for each individual, but I'd say fortunately
anyway as it would not be a good precedent to set, and would encourage
drinking.
Given that this happened almost 25 years ago, I can't really judge how
his normal reaction speeds compared to a sober person's but his drinking
certainly affected his behaviour and how he reacted to stuff, in
general. It's also worth noting that the reason he was pulled over was
that he clipped the curb, when turning into the road where he lived.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Cats are intended to teach us that not everything in nature has a
purpose. (Garrison Keillor)
Btms
2018-03-24 08:29:20 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
[1]  Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well.  The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
 As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably.  I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit.  This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver.  He was rather over three times the limit, having
had one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out.
The friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly
normal; trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
Interesting. It could even be argued that his body had become accustomed
to that level, and that in fact he _was_ sober - or at least his
behaviour, reactions, etc. were the same as a sober person's, at that
point. Fortunately on balance for society, I think, such an argument is
not accepted - not least because of the practical difficulties of
establishing a baseline for each individual, but I'd say fortunately
anyway as it would not be a good precedent to set, and would encourage
drinking.
Given that this happened almost 25 years ago, I can't really judge how
his normal reaction speeds compared to a sober person's but his drinking
certainly affected his behaviour and how he reacted to stuff, in
general. It's also worth noting that the reason he was pulled over was
that he clipped the curb, when turning into the road where he lived.
But I believe you worked for IBM? So did I back in the day. Say n’more?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Serena Blanchflower
2018-03-24 08:36:56 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s
decision.
[1]  Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well.  The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
 As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably.  I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit.  This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver.  He was rather over three times the limit, having
had one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out.
The friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly
normal; trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
Interesting. It could even be argued that his body had become accustomed
to that level, and that in fact he _was_ sober - or at least his
behaviour, reactions, etc. were the same as a sober person's, at that
point. Fortunately on balance for society, I think, such an argument is
not accepted - not least because of the practical difficulties of
establishing a baseline for each individual, but I'd say fortunately
anyway as it would not be a good precedent to set, and would encourage
drinking.
Given that this happened almost 25 years ago, I can't really judge how
his normal reaction speeds compared to a sober person's but his drinking
certainly affected his behaviour and how he reacted to stuff, in
general. It's also worth noting that the reason he was pulled over was
that he clipped the curb, when turning into the road where he lived.
But I believe you worked for IBM? So did I back in the day. Say n’more?
Yes, I did (technically, still do) but the alcofrolic in question didn't.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A day without laughter is a day wasted. (Charlie Chaplin)
Btms
2018-03-24 08:56:04 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s
decision.
[1]  Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well.  The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
 As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
Very probably.  I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit.  This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver.  He was rather over three times the limit, having
had one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out.
The friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly
normal; trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
Interesting. It could even be argued that his body had become accustomed
to that level, and that in fact he _was_ sober - or at least his
behaviour, reactions, etc. were the same as a sober person's, at that
point. Fortunately on balance for society, I think, such an argument is
not accepted - not least because of the practical difficulties of
establishing a baseline for each individual, but I'd say fortunately
anyway as it would not be a good precedent to set, and would encourage
drinking.
Given that this happened almost 25 years ago, I can't really judge how
his normal reaction speeds compared to a sober person's but his drinking
certainly affected his behaviour and how he reacted to stuff, in
general. It's also worth noting that the reason he was pulled over was
that he clipped the curb, when turning into the road where he lived.
But I believe you worked for IBM? So did I back in the day. Say n’more?
Yes, I did (technically, still do) but the alcofrolic in question didn't.
I guess the tendency is not exclusive. Tbf I worked in the City where the
habit was not exclusive but out of kilter with a, then, Quaker Company.
Could never show alcohol on entertainment for customers. Tricky.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-24 14:35:46 UTC
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Post by Btms
I guess the tendency is not exclusive. Tbf I worked in the City where the
habit was not exclusive but out of kilter with a, then, Quaker Company.
Could never show alcohol on entertainment for customers. Tricky.
I don't think it's to do with Quaker companies. I worked for Chase
Manhattan, admittedly considered rather prim by the standards of
American banks and certainly no Citibank, and you could be instantly
dismissed for having so much as an unopened bottle open to view
(nobody was keeping an eye on the night operators though, and they
were always good for a slurp of Bulgarian Cabernet if you were working
late). There was only one occasion when this ruling was lifted that I
recall, and that was for the Bradford City fire when glasses of wine
could be bought in the canteen for a contribition to the relief fund.

That didn't stop a lot of drinking going on off the premises
though. We non-dealer staff favoured the Pavilion End in Watling
Street, which was probably as good a pub as any in the City and
less overrun than many. I expect it's long gone now and become another
champagne bar or whatever the latest fad is. One fairly senior dealer
manager was frogmarched off the premises for being drunk in the
dealing room when the representatives of Phillips & Drew were in there
when Chase was negotiating to buy them pre-Big Bang. In the end Chase
didn't get any of the big stockbrokers and that helped it on its way
to its demise.

Rotaa
Btms
2018-03-24 15:00:55 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Btms
I guess the tendency is not exclusive. Tbf I worked in the City where the
habit was not exclusive but out of kilter with a, then, Quaker Company.
Could never show alcohol on entertainment for customers. Tricky.
I don't think it's to do with Quaker companies. I worked for Chase
Manhattan, admittedly considered rather prim by the standards of
American banks and certainly no Citibank, and you could be instantly
dismissed for having so much as an unopened bottle open to view
(nobody was keeping an eye on the night operators though, and they
were always good for a slurp of Bulgarian Cabernet if you were working
late). There was only one occasion when this ruling was lifted that I
recall, and that was for the Bradford City fire when glasses of wine
could be bought in the canteen for a contribition to the relief fund.
That didn't stop a lot of drinking going on off the premises
though. We non-dealer staff favoured the Pavilion End in Watling
Street, which was probably as good a pub as any in the City and
less overrun than many. I expect it's long gone now and become another
champagne bar or whatever the latest fad is. One fairly senior dealer
manager was frogmarched off the premises for being drunk in the
dealing room when the representatives of Phillips & Drew were in there
when Chase was negotiating to buy them pre-Big Bang. In the end Chase
didn't get any of the big stockbrokers and that helped it on its way
to its demise.
Rotaa
In IBM we were told it was because it was a Quaker coy. Then umbrella a
member of the Board/founding family was done for some form of sexual
harassment to a cabin crew person whilst inebriated. Attitudes loosened
after this. All a very long tine ago. Iirc it was more of a prohibition
when entertaining customers than in the wider sense. In the City of London
this was problematic if the detailed cost were going to be seen in the
States.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Vicky
2018-03-24 09:24:11 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 02:26:32 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to
Alice’s decision.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk
before she started.
Didn't she consume quite a lot, on an empty stomach? (Being only a very
moderate drinker [I go months between, usually], I know little of the
timescales involved.) Plus, the wake was presumably telescoped for us -
i. e. the timescale was presumably _more_ than the - what, five minutes?
- we heard it in.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I had the impression that Alice was pretty scunnered when she arrived.
That was my impression, as well. The rest of Ambridge seem to be
She was a bit loud, I agree, so you might be right.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
accepting the more comfortable view that she got drunk after arrival.
I suspect this is over optimistic though.
As a, er, seasoned drinker I expect she's become quite adept at seeming
to be fine after the drinks she'd had beforehand. The ones she had at
the funeral tipped her over the edge.
I didn't think she was necessarily already drunk on arrival but was
upset at being so late. I wonder if something at work delayed her and
she was annoyed about that too. Drinking quickly and then getting
drunk as not eating does sound likely.

Now that everyone is so angry with her and that she has definitely
behaved badly I feel sorry for her. I think there was an important
point during the evening when she entertained Fallon and Harrison when
Chris urged her more than once to have a drink. She knew she needed to
have some time not drinking and he sabotaged that. I am not certain
but I think that was not the first time he encouraged her to have a
drink or drink more, for whatever reason. For him to then turn round
and scold her for it seems unfair to me.

Brian obviously knows his allowing pollution is partly to blame for
how unhappy Alice is, in that her project was scuppered because of the
publicity about it. His kindness to her and support and suggestion of
a job were partly to sooth his princess and partly guilt. His
treatment of Ruth was totally out of order and I hope she does find
something to his disadvantage. He is trying to bully her into not
doing the job she took on on Rorry's behalf.

Clarrie is a tigress, defending her young, Will and the children.
Otherwise I think politeness and natural deference would have let her
accept Alice's apology. Probably not doing so just now is good for
Alice. I never liked Will but he is currently not my least favourite
person because he took my advice and took Poppy to the funeral. I knew
it was the right thing. He also seems to be making a good effort at
coping.

Susan was nice to Clarrie because she feels maybe a bit responsible
for Alice as she's her daughter-in-law. No reason to but she feels it
reflacts on the family. On the other hand ..Horrobins :). I would
like Clarrie's lesson during Helen's project to lead to more pay and a
title better than Susan's :)

Shula is unreasonable because she should have let Snappy know ages ago
thaqt things were not right. Jill is right about that. They should
have been able to work on it together. She was never really that in
love as she had the side trip to Dr Locke. She wanted a nice safe
professional dad for Daniel.
--
Vicky
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-24 14:40:14 UTC
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Post by Vicky
I didn't think she was necessarily already drunk on arrival but was
upset at being so late. I wonder if something at work delayed her and
she was annoyed about that too. Drinking quickly and then getting
drunk as not eating does sound likely.
<snipples>

There is some truth in there, but it is clear that Alice has an
alcohol problem that is eventually going to bring her right down, and
that is the story that is unravelling IMHO. From a narrative point of
view, just arriving late and drinking on an empty stomach on a one-off
occasion is just excess fluff. There should be a proper narrative or
character-establishing reason for every action.

Rotaa
Chris J Dixon
2018-03-24 08:45:49 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Very probably. I remember, many years ago, it was established that an
alcoholic of my acquaintance had a background blood alcohol level
approximately double the drink drive limit. This was discovered after
he was breathalysed at the end of an evening out when he had been the
designated driver. He was rather over three times the limit, having had
one pint of cider (fairly normal strength stuff) while he was out. The
friends he was with were astounded as he'd seemed perfectly normal;
trouble was, normal for him was pretty drunk :(
On the tram the other afternoon (we use it as Park & Ride when we
go to Nottingham), a family group sat near us and were
exceedingly loud, and appeared to be the worse for drink. We
eventually moved seats to be out of earshot.

They travelled to the end of the line and got into their car for
the rest of their journey.

We did consider if we should contact the police, but realised
that we had absolutely no evidence that they had actually been
drinking, they could just have been naturally obnoxious.

What would UMRA do?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Vicky
2018-03-24 09:04:39 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
On the tram the other afternoon (we use it as Park & Ride when we
go to Nottingham), a family group sat near us and were
exceedingly loud, and appeared to be the worse for drink. We
eventually moved seats to be out of earshot.
They travelled to the end of the line and got into their car for
the rest of their journey.
We did consider if we should contact the police, but realised
that we had absolutely no evidence that they had actually been
drinking, they could just have been naturally obnoxious.
What would UMRA do?
Chris
It is possible most of them were drunk and that there was a sober
designated driver.
--
Vicky
Chris J Dixon
2018-03-24 10:04:41 UTC
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Post by Vicky
Post by Chris J Dixon
On the tram the other afternoon (we use it as Park & Ride when we
go to Nottingham), a family group sat near us and were
exceedingly loud, and appeared to be the worse for drink. We
eventually moved seats to be out of earshot.
They travelled to the end of the line and got into their car for
the rest of their journey.
We did consider if we should contact the police, but realised
that we had absolutely no evidence that they had actually been
drinking, they could just have been naturally obnoxious.
What would UMRA do?
It is possible most of them were drunk and that there was a sober
designated driver.
We saw who got in the driving seat. I would not have travelled in
a car with him at the wheel.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-24 17:27:27 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky
Post by Chris J Dixon
On the tram the other afternoon (we use it as Park & Ride when we
go to Nottingham), a family group sat near us and were
exceedingly loud, and appeared to be the worse for drink. We
eventually moved seats to be out of earshot.
They travelled to the end of the line and got into their car for
the rest of their journey.
We did consider if we should contact the police, but realised
that we had absolutely no evidence that they had actually been
drinking, they could just have been naturally obnoxious.
What would UMRA do?
It is possible most of them were drunk and that there was a sober
designated driver.
We saw who got in the driving seat. I would not have travelled in
a car with him at the wheel.
Chris
I would _want_ to call the police, but not want to get involved - and I
don't think there now _is_ a good way to make an anonymous call of that
nature, unfortunately; I'm pretty sure any fobile moan call will be
traceable, unless you really have gone to the trouble of getting what US
dramas call a "burn 'phone", and what few public callboxes remain are
probably in view of one or more SCUNTs.

I think this is a sad situation: sure, law enforcement often has genuine
reasons for wanting to know who is making a call. But the above proves
the point that there _is_ a place for anonymous: the argument against -
in this case, would be I suppose that such calls could be maliciously
made - could simply be sorted by an (ideally unmarked) police car
following the described car for a bit and seeing how they were driving,
and if actually safely, doing nothing.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

… too popular actually to be any good. - Alison Graham in Radio Times 2-8
February 2013
the Omrud
2018-03-24 17:29:54 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
It is possible most of them were drunk  and that there was a sober
designated driver.
We saw who got in the driving seat. I would not have travelled in
a car with him at the wheel.
I would _want_ to call the police, but not want to get involved - and I
don't think there now _is_ a good way to make an anonymous call of that
nature, unfortunately; I'm pretty sure any fobile moan call will be
traceable, unless you really have gone to the trouble of getting what US
dramas call a "burn 'phone", and what few public callboxes remain are
probably in view of one or more SCUNTs.
I think this is a sad situation: sure, law enforcement often has genuine
reasons for wanting to know who is making a call. But the above proves
the point that there _is_ a place for anonymous: the argument against -
in this case, would be I suppose that such calls could be maliciously
made - could simply be sorted by an (ideally unmarked) police car
following the described car for a bit and seeing how they were driving,
and if actually safely, doing nothing.
Crimestoppers state that you can report anonymously via them. I'm
inclined to believe them unless otherwise proved.
--
David
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-24 17:44:50 UTC
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[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think this is a sad situation: sure, law enforcement often has
genuine reasons for wanting to know who is making a call. But the
above proves the point that there _is_ a place for anonymous: the
argument against - in this case, would be I suppose that such calls
could be maliciously made - could simply be sorted by an (ideally
unmarked) police car following the described car for a bit and seeing
how they were driving, and if actually safely, doing nothing.
Crimestoppers state that you can report anonymously via them. I'm
inclined to believe them unless otherwise proved.
Interesting - good question. I'd be suspicious, but then I am. [Some
people looking at me would say I'm very suspicious ... (-:] But you
would need to keep a note of their number - I don't think it is as
memorable as 999/911/11x.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Penny
2018-03-24 21:21:24 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 17:44:50 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think this is a sad situation: sure, law enforcement often has
genuine reasons for wanting to know who is making a call. But the
above proves the point that there _is_ a place for anonymous: the
argument against - in this case, would be I suppose that such calls
could be maliciously made - could simply be sorted by an (ideally
unmarked) police car following the described car for a bit and seeing
how they were driving, and if actually safely, doing nothing.
Crimestoppers state that you can report anonymously via them. I'm
inclined to believe them unless otherwise proved.
Interesting - good question. I'd be suspicious, but then I am. [Some
people looking at me would say I'm very suspicious ... (-:] But you
would need to keep a note of their number - I don't think it is as
memorable as 999/911/11x.
0800 555 111
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2018-03-24 21:44:37 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 17:44:50 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think this is a sad situation: sure, law enforcement often has
genuine reasons for wanting to know who is making a call. But the
above proves the point that there _is_ a place for anonymous: the
argument against - in this case, would be I suppose that such calls
could be maliciously made - could simply be sorted by an (ideally
unmarked) police car following the described car for a bit and seeing
how they were driving, and if actually safely, doing nothing.
Crimestoppers state that you can report anonymously via them. I'm
inclined to believe them unless otherwise proved.
Interesting - good question. I'd be suspicious, but then I am. [Some
people looking at me would say I'm very suspicious ... (-:] But you
would need to keep a note of their number - I don't think it is as
memorable as 999/911/11x.
0800 555 111
I thought/believe crimestoppers is a charity and if so, not sure how it
would help if some instant response was expected?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-24 14:43:53 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
On the tram the other afternoon (we use it as Park & Ride when we
go to Nottingham), a family group sat near us and were
exceedingly loud, and appeared to be the worse for drink. We
eventually moved seats to be out of earshot.
They travelled to the end of the line and got into their car for
the rest of their journey.
We did consider if we should contact the police, but realised
that we had absolutely no evidence that they had actually been
drinking, they could just have been naturally obnoxious.
What would UMRA do?
I can't speak for all of umra but for thisrat it depends on the nature
of the family group. Might there have been an autistic child there?
Parents of difficult autistic children come in for a lot of abuse and
I'm generally willing to cut them some slack.

Rotaa (who has come to acknowledge that she is almost certainly
somewhere on the spectrum)
steveski
2018-03-24 16:55:12 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 14:43:53 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell wrote:

[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Rotaa (who has come to acknowledge that she is almost certainly
somewhere on the spectrum)
Aren't most of us, though?
--
Steveski
Clive Arthur
2018-03-24 17:44:33 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Rotaa (who has come to acknowledge that she is almost certainly
somewhere on the spectrum)
Aren't most of us, though?
Richard of York certainly was.

Cheers
--
Clive
Btms
2018-03-24 18:30:24 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Rotaa (who has come to acknowledge that she is almost certainly
somewhere on the spectrum)
Aren't most of us, though?
Richard of York certainly was.
Cheers
Husbad and I work with folk on the spectrum and would concur most of us can
be seen on the spectrum tse.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Btms
2018-03-23 11:36:26 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
Probably not. She missed the service itself, apparently due to work
problems, but arrived at the pub for the wake and immediately[1] got
extremely drunk and offensive to both Will and Beverley.
[1] Improbably quickly, unless she had already been pretty drunk before
she started.
So not at the funeral but up for a drink at the wake. Dear oh dear!
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-03-23 10:16:44 UTC
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Post by Btms
Not listening but gather Alice didn’t go to funeral for flimsy reasons.
Just wondering if the Matt hit n run affair is linked to Alice’s decision.
Otoh she might just feel as I do about the unremitting number of negative
events being foregrounded atm and doesn’t want to participate.
She is viewing all events through a large wineglass.
--
Toodle Pip
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