Discussion:
Miranda and Justin
(too old to reply)
Btms
2017-02-16 08:19:33 UTC
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I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
Chris McMillan
2017-02-16 09:12:01 UTC
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Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
Well they might buy out Gay Grables as a start.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2017-02-16 10:31:17 UTC
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Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Serena Blanchflower
2017-02-16 11:23:27 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
I think that what she expects is, pretty much, what she's found. That's
why she doesn't want to spend much time in Ambridge and wants to have
Justin back where she can keep an eye on him.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I haven't lost my mind; it's backed up on tape somewhere.
Chris McMillan
2017-02-16 19:14:42 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
I think that what she expects is, pretty much, what she's found. That's
why she doesn't want to spend much time in Ambridge and wants to have
Justin back where she can keep an eye on him.
He'd better get Lizzie to organise another pop festival then! Miranda may
well appreciate LL more than Ambridge

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2017-02-16 11:32:14 UTC
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Post by krw
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Went to see this

http://theatre.farnhammaltings.com/portfolio/yorgjin-oxo/

last Sunday, at the village hall in the village where my sis and broil live.
--
Jenny M Benson
krw
2017-02-16 11:43:20 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by krw
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Went to see this
http://theatre.farnhammaltings.com/portfolio/yorgjin-oxo/
last Sunday, at the village hall in the village where my sis and broil live.
Which reminds me where is Kathy and film in the stix for Miranda?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Btms
2017-02-16 18:47:56 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by krw
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Went to see this
http://theatre.farnhammaltings.com/portfolio/yorgjin-oxo/
last Sunday, at the village hall in the village where my sis and broil live.
Which reminds me where is Kathy and film in the stix for Miranda?
Wherever she is, I hope she is offering something more appealing than the
worthy offerings that attract little support in our village hall cinema.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Chris J Dixon
2017-02-17 08:22:56 UTC
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Post by Btms
Wherever she is, I hope she is offering something more appealing than the
worthy offerings that attract little support in our village hall cinema.
There are film show in our village church. Apparently the terms
under which they can screen them prohibit public advertising, so
the poster simply tells us to look at the notice in the porch,
which I have yet to do.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Btms
2017-02-16 18:47:56 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by krw
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Went to see this
http://theatre.farnhammaltings.com/portfolio/yorgjin-oxo/
last Sunday, at the village hall in the village where my sis and broil live.
Yebutt that's only a five iron from Sunningdale........probably an early
influence on our Lynda.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Mike Ruddock
2017-02-16 12:55:16 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations. When I lived in N Devon I had
to attend a training session in Exeter. One of those present at the
Exeter meeting complained at one point that she had just moved from
London to Exeter and found the lack of cultural life appalling. Exeter
folk could attend concerts regularly held in the Cathedral and plays at
the Northcott Theatre (I think that was the name) among much else.

I told the young woman to be glad she didn't live in Bideford where all
we got was an occasional visit from some wandering players in a cafe at
Instow. (Mind you we saw Henry Williamson there and Henry Livings, Alex
Glasgow and Ken Campbell as well as an occasional opera in Barnstaple,
so we weren't quite in the outer darkness.)


<Mike Ruddock


---
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Jenny M Benson
2017-02-16 14:34:29 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
--
Jenny M Benson
Anne B
2017-02-16 15:45:59 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
Long ago I lived in a very small, very remote village in the Highlands.
There was plenty of social life going on if you fitted in with the way
of life, though admittedly we were not on the circuit for culture in the
form of symphony orchestras, grand opera, cutting edge theatre, vast
rock concerts etc.

We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).

Come winter, and some of them quickly got bored, complaining that there
was no culture - no xxx club or yyy society or zzz association in the
village. Some went even further and (with the help of other 'white
settlers') set up an xxx club or yyy society or zzz association. Then
they complained that they were working their socks off to provide an xxx
club or yyy society or zzz association and the locals weren't doing
their duty by supporting the xxx club or yyy society or zzz association.

I could never quite get my head round the idea that these folk came to
live somewhere, then immediately or soon after set about changing
things, and got upset when those already living there didn't welcome the
changes.

Fortunately quite a lot of the 'white settlers' had had enough by the
end of one good-going bad winter and upped sticks to go back thither
whence they had come.

Anne B
Mike McMillan
2017-02-16 15:58:03 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Long ago I lived in a very small, very remote village in the Highlands.
There was plenty of social life going on if you fitted in with the way
of life, though admittedly we were not on the circuit for culture in the
form of symphony orchestras, grand opera, cutting edge theatre, vast
rock concerts etc.
Anne B
Not unlike a certain Snell woman then?
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2017-02-16 18:16:15 UTC
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Post by Anne B
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
One often hears of this sort of thing, particularly in rural areas. I
don't think I've yet heard anyone else point out what I always think,
which is that most of these houses must be being sold by the
parents/relatives/friends of the "young local families" -
parent/relatives/friends who are obviously willing to accept a higher
price for their property rather then sell it to their younger
children/relatives/friends.

(When my mother was selling her house in rural Wales some years ago she
had offers from 2 couples and accepted the lower offer because it was
from first-time buyers expecting their first baby and she thought they
"deserved" it.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Btms
2017-02-16 19:36:16 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Anne B
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
One often hears of this sort of thing, particularly in rural areas. I
don't think I've yet heard anyone else point out what I always think,
which is that most of these houses must be being sold by the
parents/relatives/friends of the "young local families" -
parent/relatives/friends who are obviously willing to accept a higher
price for their property rather then sell it to their younger
children/relatives/friends.
(When my mother was selling her house in rural Wales some years ago she
had offers from 2 couples and accepted the lower offer because it was
from first-time buyers expecting their first baby and she thought they
"deserved" it.)
Quite
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Anne B
2017-02-16 20:04:24 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Anne B
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
One often hears of this sort of thing, particularly in rural areas. I
don't think I've yet heard anyone else point out what I always think,
which is that most of these houses must be being sold by the
parents/relatives/friends of the "young local families" -
parent/relatives/friends who are obviously willing to accept a higher
price for their property rather then sell it to their younger
children/relatives/friends.
Or disaffected ex-'white settlers'. Or executors of estates needing to
get the maximum amount for the property. Or people living hundreds or
thousands of miles away who are the residual legatees of distant
relatives they barely know. Or businesses shedding surplus housing
previously used for their estate staff.

As one of those wishing to buy, I went through it all!

Anne B
John Ashby
2017-02-16 20:14:33 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
(When my mother was selling her house in rural Wales some years ago she
had offers from 2 couples and accepted the lower offer because it was
from first-time buyers expecting their first baby and she thought they
"deserved" it.)
Communist!

john
Btms
2017-02-16 18:48:52 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
Long ago I lived in a very small, very remote village in the Highlands.
There was plenty of social life going on if you fitted in with the way
of life, though admittedly we were not on the circuit for culture in the
form of symphony orchestras, grand opera, cutting edge theatre, vast
rock concerts etc.
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
Come winter, and some of them quickly got bored, complaining that there
was no culture - no xxx club or yyy society or zzz association in the
village. Some went even further and (with the help of other 'white
settlers') set up an xxx club or yyy society or zzz association. Then
they complained that they were working their socks off to provide an xxx
club or yyy society or zzz association and the locals weren't doing
their duty by supporting the xxx club or yyy society or zzz association.
I could never quite get my head round the idea that these folk came to
live somewhere, then immediately or soon after set about changing
things, and got upset when those already living there didn't welcome the
changes.
Fortunately quite a lot of the 'white settlers' had had enough by the
end of one good-going bad winter and upped sticks to go back thither
whence they had come.
Anne B
Rather like Cornwall then? I find the Highlands of Scotland stuffed full
of a wide range of culture. As for Rock Concerts, well one needs a large
venue for this but Runrig at Stirling Castle was unforgettable. Pretty
amazing at Shepherd's Bush Empire last year too. So grateful to be
included in their final tour.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Anne B
2017-02-16 20:06:44 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Btms
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
Long ago I lived in a very small, very remote village in the Highlands.
There was plenty of social life going on if you fitted in with the way
of life, though admittedly we were not on the circuit for culture in the
form of symphony orchestras, grand opera, cutting edge theatre, vast
rock concerts etc.
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
Anne B
Rather like Cornwall then? I find the Highlands of Scotland stuffed full
of a wide range of culture. As for Rock Concerts, well one needs a large
venue for this but Runrig at Stirling Castle was unforgettable. Pretty
amazing at Shepherd's Bush Empire last year too. So grateful to be
included in their final tour.
Aye, well, it was a good five hours' drive to Stirling - and that's if
you were lucky with the traffic. Stirling's not in the Highlands.

Anne B
Btms
2017-02-16 20:21:29 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Btms
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
Long ago I lived in a very small, very remote village in the Highlands.
There was plenty of social life going on if you fitted in with the way
of life, though admittedly we were not on the circuit for culture in the
form of symphony orchestras, grand opera, cutting edge theatre, vast
rock concerts etc.
We also had a fair sprinkling of 'white settlers'. These were people who
had come up on a summer holiday, thought it was idyllic, and bought a
house intending to settle there (outbidding young local families in the
scarce local housing market while they were about it).
Anne B
Rather like Cornwall then? I find the Highlands of Scotland stuffed full
of a wide range of culture. As for Rock Concerts, well one needs a large
venue for this but Runrig at Stirling Castle was unforgettable. Pretty
amazing at Shepherd's Bush Empire last year too. So grateful to be
included in their final tour.
Aye, well, it was a good five hours' drive to Stirling - and that's if
you were lucky with the traffic. Stirling's not in the Highlands.
Anne B
I didn't say it was. It is a "vast" venue of the sort suitable for the
noise and crowds the boys attracted.
My boys once travelled by coach for around 15 hours plus to see them at
Stirling Castle. Once the crowd learned how far they come they were body
surfed to the front. There's hospitality for you 😍
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
BrritSki
2017-02-16 20:53:14 UTC
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Post by Anne B
I could never quite get my head round the idea that these folk came to
live somewhere, then immediately or soon after set about changing
things, and got upset when those already living there didn't welcome the
changes.
We have a bit of that here in Ceriana. Someone even suggested buying the
gelateria that is up for sale and turning it into an English tearoom !

WHat ? Nucking futs...
Btms
2017-02-16 21:21:14 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
I could never quite get my head round the idea that these folk came to
live somewhere, then immediately or soon after set about changing
things, and got upset when those already living there didn't welcome the
changes.
We have a bit of that here in Ceriana. Someone even suggested buying the
gelateria that is up for sale and turning it into an English tearoom !
WHat ? Nucking futs...
perhaps British Colonnial tendencies are genetic? 😥
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Sam Plusnet
2017-02-18 02:29:25 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
I could never quite get my head round the idea that these folk came to
live somewhere, then immediately or soon after set about changing
things, and got upset when those already living there didn't welcome the
changes.
We have a bit of that here in Ceriana. Someone even suggested buying the
gelateria that is up for sale and turning it into an English tearoom !
WHat ? Nucking futs...
"I'm moving here to enjoy my idyllic retirement - and things
_WILL_BE_IDYLLIC_ or else!
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2017-02-16 17:26:14 UTC
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:34:29 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
I used to live in rural Norfolk. Or it might have been rural
Cambridgeshire: it all depended on where they were drawing the
boundary that particular week. In those days, bus services were
something you read about in history books and I was amazed when I
moved to West Yorkshire and found that I could get almost anywhere I
wanted almost any time I wanted - as long as it wasn't an evening or a
Sunday.

Nick
the Omrud
2017-02-16 19:28:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:34:29 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
I used to live in rural Norfolk. Or it might have been rural
Cambridgeshire: it all depended on where they were drawing the
boundary that particular week. In those days, bus services were
something you read about in history books and I was amazed when I
moved to West Yorkshire and found that I could get almost anywhere I
wanted almost any time I wanted - as long as it wasn't an evening or a
Sunday.
We live in built-up Warrington (admittedly at the very edge), a town of
200,000. We have four buses a day, between about 09:30 and 15:00, and
none at weekends.
--
David
LFS
2017-02-17 12:31:24 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:34:29 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
I used to live in rural Norfolk. Or it might have been rural
Cambridgeshire: it all depended on where they were drawing the
boundary that particular week. In those days, bus services were
something you read about in history books and I was amazed when I
moved to West Yorkshire and found that I could get almost anywhere I
wanted almost any time I wanted - as long as it wasn't an evening or a
Sunday.
We live in built-up Warrington (admittedly at the very edge), a town of
200,000. We have four buses a day, between about 09:30 and 15:00, and
none at weekends.
Our nearest bus route which used to be five minutes away has been
reorganised so we now have a ten minute walk to catch a bus into town
but they run every few minutes.

And the same distance takes us to the stop for the buses to London -
there's rarely more than a ten minute wait for one of those. Best thing
about living here is the bus to London.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Chris McMillan
2017-02-17 18:10:55 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by the Omrud
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:34:29 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
I used to live in rural Norfolk. Or it might have been rural
Cambridgeshire: it all depended on where they were drawing the
boundary that particular week. In those days, bus services were
something you read about in history books and I was amazed when I
moved to West Yorkshire and found that I could get almost anywhere I
wanted almost any time I wanted - as long as it wasn't an evening or a
Sunday.
We live in built-up Warrington (admittedly at the very edge), a town of
200,000. We have four buses a day, between about 09:30 and 15:00, and
none at weekends.
Our nearest bus route which used to be five minutes away has been
reorganised so we now have a ten minute walk to catch a bus into town
but they run every few minutes.
And the same distance takes us to the stop for the buses to London -
there's rarely more than a ten minute wait for one of those. Best thing
about living here is the bus to London.
And I'm told the new rail line is streets ahead of via Reading, Oxford
friends refuse to travel with me now!
For a start there's more direct services - can't blame anyone not
travelling Virgin plus changing train here.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2017-02-17 12:07:58 UTC
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:34:29 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike Ruddock
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations.
I am reminded of an occurrence when I lived in rural Norfolk. A lady
lately moved to the vicinity from the London area made some disparaging
remark about the availability of public transport and someone from my
village told her we had a very good bus service - once a day to the
local town and twice a week to Norwich!
Wow!
When I lived in rural Essex I think there were two or three buses daily to
Bishop's Stortford but if you wanted to visit Saffron Walden the bus went
there on a Thursday but didn't return until Saturday.

I went to and from school by taxi which also collected three other
far-flung pupils.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2017-02-16 19:14:43 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations. When I lived in N Devon I had
to attend a training session in Exeter. One of those present at the
Exeter meeting complained at one point that she had just moved from
London to Exeter and found the lack of cultural life appalling. Exeter
folk could attend concerts regularly held in the Cathedral and plays at
the Northcott Theatre (I think that was the name) among much else.
Yup it is

Sincerely Chris
Marjorie
2017-02-22 17:42:54 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
Folks from Lunnon have high expectations. When I lived in N Devon I had
to attend a training session in Exeter. One of those present at the
Exeter meeting complained at one point that she had just moved from
London to Exeter and found the lack of cultural life appalling. Exeter
folk could attend concerts regularly held in the Cathedral and plays at
the Northcott Theatre (I think that was the name) among much else.
I think there are certain people who like to know that there are
cultural activities going on around them, even though they don't
actually take part very often. People make a big fuss, for example, when
a library or a theatre is closed, even ifhalf of them haven't actually
used these facilities in the last year or more. Sometimes it's a
vicarious set of values that have more to do with perception and
self-image than actual lifestyle.
--
Marjorie

To reply, replace dontusethisaddress with marje
Btms
2017-02-16 18:47:55 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
You were ok with the culture till you got to the Pet Shop Boys. Oh dear
me.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
vk
2017-02-16 19:02:41 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
You were ok with the culture till you got to the Pet Shop Boys. Oh dear
me.
Said the Runrig fan ;)
Btms
2017-02-16 19:36:16 UTC
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Post by vk
Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
You were ok with the culture till you got to the Pet Shop Boys. Oh dear
me.
Said the Runrig fan ;)
Exactly so.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Chris J Dixon
2017-02-17 08:31:42 UTC
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Post by vk
Said the Runrig fan ;)
Many years ago, I was driving back from a week at Sidmouth Folk
Festival, with the caravan, on my way to Warwick FF, and the
effects of too little sleep had become cumulative. The car
exhaust blew as I passed through Cirencester. A quick look showed
it wasn't a roadside repair (1), so I put in a Runrig tape,
turned it up loud, and continued my journey.

(1) A rather slower look later confirmed that the engine mounts
had failed, which was what had sheared the exhaust. :-(

I later discovered that the gear lever alignment changing
somewhat was a symptom that I might have noticed rather earlier.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
John Ashby
2017-02-17 17:45:10 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by vk
Said the Runrig fan ;)
Many years ago, I was driving back from a week at Sidmouth Folk
Festival, with the caravan, on my way to Warwick FF, and the
effects of too little sleep had become cumulative. The car
exhaust blew as I passed through Cirencester. A quick look showed
it wasn't a roadside repair (1), so I put in a Runrig tape,
turned it up loud, and continued my journey.
(1) A rather slower look later confirmed that the engine mounts
had failed, which was what had sheared the exhaust. :-(
I later discovered that the gear lever alignment changing
somewhat was a symptom that I might have noticed rather earlier.
Chris
There are few car problems that can't be cured by a louder car radio.

john
Mike McMillan
2017-02-17 18:33:08 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by vk
Said the Runrig fan ;)
Many years ago, I was driving back from a week at Sidmouth Folk
Festival, with the caravan, on my way to Warwick FF, and the
effects of too little sleep had become cumulative. The car
exhaust blew as I passed through Cirencester. A quick look showed
it wasn't a roadside repair (1), so I put in a Runrig tape,
turned it up loud, and continued my journey.
(1) A rather slower look later confirmed that the engine mounts
had failed, which was what had sheared the exhaust. :-(
I later discovered that the gear lever alignment changing
somewhat was a symptom that I might have noticed rather earlier.
Chris
There are few car problems that can't be cured by a louder car radio.
john
M.W. to disguise a minor whirr,
L.W. to disguise a loud whirr,
F.M. To disguise a frantic machine and....
D.A.B. to disguise a damned atrocious banging.
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2017-02-16 20:16:18 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
You were ok with the culture till you got to the Pet Shop Boys. Oh dear
me.
Well, we know that Borsetshire boasts at least two Pet Shop Boys fans.

john
krw
2017-02-17 11:40:35 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
I worry over this lack of culture - Miranda attended the panto and this
is a village. What more does she expect? A chamber orchestra at the
bottom of her garden? The RSC setting up camp under a bush? ENO
visiting Lower Loxley weekly? The Royal Ballet doing a pad de deux
outside the Dower House? Pet Shop Boys warbling in the village hall?
You were ok with the culture till you got to the Pet Shop Boys. Oh dear
me.
It was intended as a slightly humourous adjunct and more seriously that
is culture compared with some of the (c)rap which appears on the wireless.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-02-17 20:46:10 UTC
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In message <o86nfj$1nbj$***@gioia.aioe.org>, krw <***@whitnet.uk> writes:
[]
Post by krw
It was intended as a slightly humourous adjunct and more seriously that
is culture compared with some of the (c)rap which appears on the wireless.
Bah, rap, shmap. I've yet to hear a rap (_not_ that I listen to it!) to
beat the 1936 W. H. Auden one.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Advertising is legalized lying. - H.G. Wells
Sam Plusnet
2017-02-16 21:28:27 UTC
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Post by Btms
I wonder if they will move to Ambridge and she will be a new Lynda with an
agenda to bring more culture to Ambridge. If so, I wonder what form this
might take? Introducing an outsider to create dramatic tension?
Miranda and Lynda.

Mapp and Lucia?

If they are both swept away to sea in (another) dramatic flood, I think
we can guess the new Editor's influences.
--
Sam Plusnet
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