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OT: Car Insurance
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Mike Ruddock
2017-04-19 14:31:21 UTC
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I have insured my car with Liverpool Victoria for many years. The
renewal notice has just arrived and shows an increase of about 60% over
last year's premium.

I rang up to query this and was told that as I had had a claim in the
last 12 months the premium had gone up.

I pointed out that I paid extra to have my no claims bonus protected and
was told that I still had 9 years recorded no claims but the premium
always went up after a claim.

This is double speak of a high order.

I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.

It almost makes the world of politics look rational.

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2017-04-19 17:04:29 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 15:31:21 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I have insured my car with Liverpool Victoria for many years. The
renewal notice has just arrived and shows an increase of about 60% over
last year's premium.
I rang up to query this and was told that as I had had a claim in the
last 12 months the premium had gone up.
I pointed out that I paid extra to have my no claims bonus protected and
was told that I still had 9 years recorded no claims but the premium
always went up after a claim.
This is double speak of a high order.
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.
It almost makes the world of politics look rational.
The moral of this story is - never renew, get a new quote first.
I've been with Hastings Direct for a few years but always do the best quote
thing before phoning and asking them to match the quote I get from them
there.

Also, whatever you do don't get any points on your licence. A speeding
ticket adds £s to your premium for several years.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-19 21:49:32 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 15:31:21 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I have insured my car with Liverpool Victoria for many years. The
renewal notice has just arrived and shows an increase of about 60% over
last year's premium.
I rang up to query this and was told that as I had had a claim in the
last 12 months the premium had gone up.
I pointed out that I paid extra to have my no claims bonus protected and
was told that I still had 9 years recorded no claims but the premium
always went up after a claim.
This is double speak of a high order.
Yes. The so-called no-claims bonus is a percentage *of the premium you
would be charged*. If you have any sort of claim, that premium goes up;
preserving the NCB only preserves the percentage off. (Actually, I think
it often doesn't even preserve the percentage, it just stops the
proportion of "full" going up so much.)

It's definitely a fiddle.
Post by Penny
Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.
I always go to MoneySavingExpert each year; they usually have a list of
what order to hit the comparison sites in, plus list a couple of
companies that don't use the comparison sites (Direct Line is one.
That's not an endorsement, or a recommendation). It's tedious, but since
the increases are so huge otherwise, worth doing - even if I could
afford not to bother, I feel they have to be taught a lesson, as it
were.

I usually go back to my existing employer, with a few of the quotes I've
got (I mainly only select ones from companies I've heard of). Usually,
they say something like "hang on while I ask my boss" or something
equally silly, then either match the quote, or come down to within a
fiver or so, which I've tended to accept. Though on a couple of
occasions lately, I have actually switched, being somewhat cross.

[FWIW, I do my breakdown insurance with the same company, whoever it is;
I know I could do slightly better by doing them separately, especially
if I went for one of the companies where you pay for the breakdown
service then claim it back (I CBA with that). IIRR, I pay 2xx for
comprehensive cover and full breakdown.)
Post by Penny
Post by Mike Ruddock
It almost makes the world of politics look rational.
Did you stay with L(H)V?
Post by Penny
The moral of this story is - never renew, get a new quote first.
I've been with Hastings Direct for a few years but always do the best quote
thing before phoning and asking them to match the quote I get from them
there.
It's irritating that we have to do this every year (or whatever) - not
only for insurance (all sorts), but also utilities, and I've more or
less accepted I have to for broadband/linerental too, that is to say
ring PlusNet every year to haggle, usually with some success.
[]
It has occurred to me recently that, surely, there must be an
opportunity for a company to say "we're not the cheapest, but we won't
stiff you with a 60-80% increase at renewal"; I think they'd get a lot
of custom from people who really would rather not be arsed with messing
about in this way at every renewal, but at present feel they have to.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

All that glitters has a high refractive index.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-19 22:03:41 UTC
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I'm getting senior ...

In message <***@soft255.demon.co.uk>, "J. P. Gilliver
(John)" <G6JPG-***@255soft.uk> writes:
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's not an endorsement, or a recommendation). It's tedious, but
The second word was meant to be the opposite of endorsement ...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
since the increases are so huge otherwise, worth doing - even if I
could afford not to bother, I feel they have to be taught a lesson, as
it were.
I usually go back to my existing employer, with a few of the quotes
[]
... and that should have been "insurer". [That one could have been
Freudian, or whatever, due to my recent change of employer. Now in my
fifth week; still haven't decided. On their part, I think they've
forgotten they said it would be a month's trial each way.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Science fiction is escape into reality - Arthur C Clarke
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-20 00:17:01 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I always go to MoneySavingExpert each year; they usually have a list of
what order to hit the comparison sites in, plus list a couple of
companies that don't use the comparison sites (Direct Line is one.
That's not an endorsement, or a recommendation). It's tedious, but since
the increases are so huge otherwise, worth doing - even if I could
afford not to bother, I feel they have to be taught a lesson, as it were.
I usually go back to my existing employer(insurer?), with a few of the quotes I've
got (I mainly only select ones from companies I've heard of). Usually,
they say something like "hang on while I ask my boss" or something
equally silly, then either match the quote, or come down to within a
fiver or so, which I've tended to accept. Though on a couple of
occasions lately, I have actually switched, being somewhat cross.
Going back to your existing insurer and suggesting they match a quote is
effectively rewarding them for driving up your premiums.

If you don't shop around they make lots of cash.
If you do shop around & they (more or less) match it, they still get
your money albeit with a slightly lower profit.
--
Sam Plusnet
krw
2017-04-19 22:15:46 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.
I could tell a similar story (but without a claim and a smaller
percentage increase) from More Than who told me to take the new online
offer.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Penny
2017-04-19 23:18:32 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 23:15:46 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.
I could tell a similar story (but without a claim and a smaller
percentage increase) from More Than who told me to take the new online
offer.
Hastings won't let me do that, I end up on a page which says I am already
insured with them and need to phone.

One thing I discovered when using price comparison sites is that some
insurers will give you a lower quote if you select a lower than 'standard'
excess - or the price doesn't change if you do. Which seems slightly weird.

When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2017-04-20 07:10:37 UTC
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Post by Penny
When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
I guess that may well be because, generally, those who opt for
3rd party f&t are a worse risk.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2017-04-20 09:43:02 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or Russian
rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a figure more
than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from Liverpool (Heart)
Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was . . . Liverpool
(Heart) Victoria.
I could tell a similar story (but without a claim and a smaller
percentage increase) from More Than who told me to take the new online
offer.
Hastings won't let me do that, I end up on a page which says I am already
insured with them and need to phone.
One thing I discovered when using price comparison sites is that some
insurers will give you a lower quote if you select a lower than 'standard'
excess - or the price doesn't change if you do. Which seems slightly weird.
When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
As a PS I should add that I could not be sure the online More Than quote
matched existing cover and I needed to change a named driver so had to
phone them and we ended up with a lower figure than the original quote
but more than online - but the difference was similar to the charge for
changing a named driver. Complicated.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
BrritSki
2017-04-20 12:19:17 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
On 19/04/2017 15:31, Mike Ruddock wrote;
<snip insurance quote stories>
Last year we were nagged a lot by our bank manager (yes, we still have
them in Italy) about buying car insurance from the bank. So we gave in
and asked for a quote and then we asked Zurigo (yes, them) to match that
and they did, so we stayed with them since they have been very helpful
with several claims on house and car.

Bank manager got very arsy about it claiming that we just used him to
lower our quote from Z, but we only asked for his quote because he kept
nagging.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-20 07:25:15 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
Yes, that's one of the things MSE tell you. Apparently it's because
you're considered higher risk if you're only going for third party - not
that the claims will be lower, but that you might be more careless
driving. Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person. The third is play with your job
description - I forget whether engineer instead of technician, or vice
versa, or marketing manager versus something else: not fraud, just
different.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... there were parts of Roman York that appear to be more ethnically mixed
than parts of modern York. - David Olusoga, RT 2016/11/5-11
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-23 19:50:42 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
Yes, that's one of the things MSE tell you. Apparently it's because
you're considered higher risk if you're only going for third party - not
that the claims will be lower, but that you might be more careless
driving. Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person. The third is play with your job
description - I forget whether engineer instead of technician, or vice
versa, or marketing manager versus something else: not fraud, just
different.
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.

(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
--
Sam Plusnet
Flop
2017-04-23 20:25:59 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
When trying out several what-ifs after I noticed that, I also found
selecting 3rd party f&t is often *more* expensive than fully comp.
Yes, that's one of the things MSE tell you. Apparently it's because
you're considered higher risk if you're only going for third party - not
that the claims will be lower, but that you might be more careless
driving. Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person. The third is play with your job
description - I forget whether engineer instead of technician, or vice
versa, or marketing manager versus something else: not fraud, just
different.
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
steveski
2017-04-24 01:05:39 UTC
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[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.

Which is better than 'chemist' :-)

Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2017-04-24 09:22:56 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
Which is better than 'chemist' :-)
Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
I used to put "Instrument Maker" which seemed to conjure up images of
steel and lathes and delicate measuring tools after discovering that
"Musical Instrument Maker" set off all the bells and klaxons.

Nick
Peter Percival
2017-04-24 12:48:42 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
Which is better than 'chemist' :-)
Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
I used to put "Instrument Maker" which seemed to conjure up images of
steel and lathes and delicate measuring tools after discovering that
"Musical Instrument Maker" set off all the bells
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
Post by Nick Odell
and klaxons.
Nick
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Mike
2017-04-24 15:16:46 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
Which is better than 'chemist' :-)
Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
I used to put "Instrument Maker" which seemed to conjure up images of
steel and lathes and delicate measuring tools after discovering that
"Musical Instrument Maker" set off all the bells
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
Post by Nick Odell
and klaxons.
Nick
Wunderkind would support that proposal!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2017-04-25 09:55:17 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
I quite liked it although it did seem a bit tedious.
Then I had a baby.

I realised the similarities between the music and baby raising quite soon.
At first everything is new though not necessarily going well but every time
you're beginning to feel you can't stand it any longer there is a subtle
change which grabs your interest and reinforces the thought 'it won't
always be like this, maybe I can cope'.

I'd rather have Tubular Bells as hold music than Vivaldi's Four Seasons..
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2017-04-24 16:28:58 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:48:42 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
Which is better than 'chemist' :-)
Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
I used to put "Instrument Maker" which seemed to conjure up images of
steel and lathes and delicate measuring tools after discovering that
"Musical Instrument Maker" set off all the bells
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
Post by Nick Odell
and klaxons.
What has Mike Oldfield's Tubular bells ever done for us?

Apart from giving us Virgin Records and Virgin Megastores

Virgin Cola, Virgin Mobile and Virgin Media

And Virgin Trains, Virgin Atlantic

Virgin Radio, Virgin Sport

And Virgin Money?




Nick
Mike
2017-04-24 17:28:19 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:48:42 +0100, Peter Percival
Post by Peter Percival
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Flop
Post by Sam Plusnet
With most insurance firms you are now required to select a job title
from their list.
Hard luck if your occupation doesn't quite fit into their world-view.
(This permits them to use the excuse "You stated that your job is 'X'
whilst it is actually 'Y' - hence we will deny your claim")
Insurance has undergone quite a change recently. The Ombudsman has
advised that insurance companies should not reject claims unless
statements are *wilfully* negligent.
The result is that T&Cs and questions have been re-written to be be more
precise.
Although, technically, available for work (as I am under retirement age -
but it's never going to happen as my disability is degenerative) I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
Which is better than 'chemist' :-)
Which is much better than 'musician' :-)))))
I used to put "Instrument Maker" which seemed to conjure up images of
steel and lathes and delicate measuring tools after discovering that
"Musical Instrument Maker" set off all the bells
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
Post by Nick Odell
and klaxons.
What has Mike Oldfield's Tubular bells ever done for us?
Apart from giving us Virgin Records and Virgin Megastores
Virgin Cola, Virgin Mobile and Virgin Media
And Virgin Trains, Virgin Atlantic
Virgin Radio, Virgin Sport
And Virgin Money?
Nick
Ah! This Virgin Money - is that anything like the gummint's New Money?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-04-24 22:18:03 UTC
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In message <odks7c$c91$***@news.albasani.net>, Peter Percival
<***@hotmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Peter Percival
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
[]
A form of minimalism - quite an early example, especially outside the
classical (for want of a better word) sphere. There is quite a lot of it
in that arena (Koyaanisqatsi is a good example; by Philip Glass, I
_think). Also, arguably, a lot of thump-and-wail pop music (arguably
including some of rap) is also minimalist (and to my mind, empty and
irritating - prolonged exposure to it makes me violent).

I quite liked Tubular Bells - its rate of change was just sufficient to
retain my interest. (Whether it would be if I came to it afresh now, I'm
not sure.) Partly, I like the sound of the actual instrument itself -
the most joyous example I can think of being one version of the Ballad
of Barry and Freda.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Who came first? Adam or Eve?" "Adam of course; men always do."
Victoria Wood (via Peter Hesketh)
Nick Odell
2017-04-25 00:09:45 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 23:18:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter Percival
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
[]
A form of minimalism - quite an early example, especially outside the
classical (for want of a better word) sphere. There is quite a lot of it
in that arena (Koyaanisqatsi is a good example; by Philip Glass, I
_think). Also, arguably, a lot of thump-and-wail pop music (arguably
including some of rap) is also minimalist (and to my mind, empty and
irritating - prolonged exposure to it makes me violent).
I quite liked Tubular Bells - its rate of change was just sufficient to
retain my interest. (Whether it would be if I came to it afresh now, I'm
not sure.) Partly, I like the sound of the actual instrument itself -
the most joyous example I can think of being one version of the Ballad
of Barry and Freda.
If this were Amazon, someone would have noticed your music choice and
commented that people who liked the above may also like Arvo Pärt.

Nick
Mike
2017-04-25 07:27:51 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 24 Apr 2017 23:18:03 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter Percival
Was Mike Oldfield's tubular bells the most tedious load of old pyjamas
ever inflicted on the human ear?
[]
A form of minimalism - quite an early example, especially outside the
classical (for want of a better word) sphere. There is quite a lot of it
in that arena (Koyaanisqatsi is a good example; by Philip Glass, I
_think). Also, arguably, a lot of thump-and-wail pop music (arguably
including some of rap) is also minimalist (and to my mind, empty and
irritating - prolonged exposure to it makes me violent).
I quite liked Tubular Bells - its rate of change was just sufficient to
retain my interest. (Whether it would be if I came to it afresh now, I'm
not sure.) Partly, I like the sound of the actual instrument itself -
the most joyous example I can think of being one version of the Ballad
of Barry and Freda.
If this were Amazon, someone would have noticed your music choice and
commented that people who liked the above may also like Arvo Pärt.
Nick
And that people who liked Arvo Part also liked Part 2 ....
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2017-04-24 09:37:41 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
As have I, although my reason is that I have no inclination, or luckily
need, to return to work. And of course as Usha points out I could not
get a job because employers have a ready choice of younger people.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2017-04-24 16:37:41 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
I have
put, in the last few years, 'retired'.
As have I, although my reason is that I have no inclination, or luckily
need, to return to work. And of course as Usha points out I could not
get a job because employers have a ready choice of younger people.
Should the inclination return, don't forget that many companies
actively recruit or retain older staff.

http://www.moneywise.co.uk/work-family/make-more-money/five-top-employers-older-people

Who could resist the appeal of working all day in an orange apron,
nodding sagely when younger, less well informed customers ask you
whether you need a .675 or a .875 cotter pin for the Mitsushitsu GQ101
lawnmower and responding by telling them to nugger off and Google it
like normal people?

Nick
DavidK
2017-04-24 08:12:33 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person.
Someone young that I know of was worried by this. He added his mother to
his insurance just lest she needed to drive it sometime, and his
insurance company dropped his insurance. He was very careful to tell his
insurance broker that his mother lived thirty miles away and would
rarely drive his car, if at all.
Nick Odell
2017-04-24 09:24:07 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person.
Someone young that I know of was worried by this. He added his mother to
his insurance just lest she needed to drive it sometime, and his
insurance company dropped his insurance. He was very careful to tell his
insurance broker that his mother lived thirty miles away and would
rarely drive his car, if at all.
"Dropped" as in reduced the cost or dropped as in refused to insure
him?

Nick
DavidK
2017-04-24 10:36:43 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another unexpected thing (mainly for younger drivers) is try
the effect of adding a second person.
Someone young that I know of was worried by this. He added his mother to
his insurance just lest she needed to drive it sometime, and his
insurance company dropped his insurance. He was very careful to tell his
insurance broker that his mother lived thirty miles away and would
rarely drive his car, if at all.
"Dropped" as in reduced the cost or dropped as in refused to insure
him?
Nick
reduced cost, careless of me to be unclear
Sam Plusnet
2017-04-20 00:11:59 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or
Russian rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a
figure more than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from
Liverpool (Heart) Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was .
. . Liverpool (Heart) Victoria.
I could tell a similar story (but without a claim and a smaller
percentage increase) from More Than who told me to take the new online
offer.
I hate those comparison sites.
They provide a huge long list of "quotes" but say nothing about the
details of what each one actually offers - indeed the same insurance
company will appear several times at different prices which presumable
means there are different levels of coverage involved. If you do follow
the link to each & every quote, trying to find out the details you
really is like pulling your own teeth out.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2017-04-20 09:21:18 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
I consulted one of the sites which use fat operatic tenors or
Russian rodents and was quoted as the cheapest of several dozen a
figure more than last year's, but less than the renewal quote from
Liverpool (Heart) Victoria, and the generous, foolhardy provider was .
. . Liverpool (Heart) Victoria.
I could tell a similar story (but without a claim and a smaller
percentage increase) from More Than who told me to take the new online
offer.
I hate those comparison sites.
They provide a huge long list of "quotes" but say nothing about the
details of what each one actually offers - indeed the same insurance
company will appear several times at different prices which presumable
means there are different levels of coverage involved. If you do follow
the link to each & every quote, trying to find out the details you
really is like pulling your own teeth out.
Not car insurance in my case but this is one of the reasons why I use
a broker for home insurance. The other being that, as a paying
customer of theirs, I'd expect them to fight my corner, should I have
to make a claim.

....So this week I get a letter from them telling me that they'll no
longer be offering what I previously purchased but will be selling
home insurance under their own brand. AISI that effectively knocks out
both my perceived advantages of going through that broker.

Nick
krw
2017-04-20 09:44:50 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
So this week I get a letter from them telling me that they'll no
longer be offering what I previously purchased but will be selling
home insurance under their own brand.
There must be something odd going on. I have used Philip Williams for a
couple of years for house insurance but they tell me they are
withdrawing from the market and I will get a quote when renewal is due
from Police.

Six months away.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Anne B
2017-04-21 11:16:57 UTC
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I have just had occasion to tell my insurance company on renewal that
the other named driver on my policy has died. I had heard that if you
have only one named driver your premium may be increased, which seems
incomprehensible to me, but not in this case. My premium will go down by
- ooooh, nearly £5 - and they are waiving the admin fee for changing
named drivers 'in the circumstances'.

Anne B
Rosemary Miskin
2017-04-21 16:54:44 UTC
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 I had heard that if you 
have only one named driver your premium may be increased, which seems 
incomprehensible to me, but not in this case. 
Might it be because if you have twondriveers they can share ling trips, and so redyuce
the chsnce of accidents caused by tiredness?

Rosemary
Nick Odell
2017-04-21 18:57:45 UTC
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On Fri, 21 Apr 2017 09:54:44 -0700 (PDT), Rosemary Miskin
Post by Rosemary Miskin
 I had heard that if you 
have only one named driver your premium may be increased, which seems 
incomprehensible to me, but not in this case. 
Might it be because if you have twondriveers they can share ling trips, and so redyuce
the chsnce of accidents caused by tiredness?
It might be that nobody knows why but since they get fewer or smaller
claims from two-named-driver policies they price them accordingly.

Nick
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