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Very OT - Ping KRW
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Fenny
2017-09-15 17:40:36 UTC
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One of the things we found at Pa's last weekend was a railway map of
England & Wales dated 1917. It belonged to probably my g-gf first,
then Grandpa, both of whom were railway employees.

Bro took it home with him, but I will eventually bring it down here. I
was specifically interested in looking at the line Dav was on, as the
former line runs past my house about 100 yards east of here. I told
my boss about it and he wants a scan of the local bit.
--
Fenny
krw
2017-09-15 20:20:05 UTC
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Post by Fenny
One of the things we found at Pa's last weekend was a railway map of
England & Wales dated 1917. It belonged to probably my g-gf first,
then Grandpa, both of whom were railway employees.
Bro took it home with him, but I will eventually bring it down here. I
was specifically interested in looking at the line Dav was on, as the
former line runs past my house about 100 yards east of here. I told
my boss about it and he wants a scan of the local bit.
If complete it also shows the UK railways at just about their greatest
extent. There were a few openings after that date (Wall of Death for
example), so not quite the entirety.

Closures commenced during the late 20s and during the economically
difficult times.

I cannot remember his name but it was about this time that someone first
claimed to have covered all of the UK railways. If someone knows his
name please remind me as it is doing my head in.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Nick Leverton
2017-09-25 12:16:58 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Fenny
One of the things we found at Pa's last weekend was a railway map of
England & Wales dated 1917. It belonged to probably my g-gf first,
then Grandpa, both of whom were railway employees.
Bro took it home with him, but I will eventually bring it down here. I
was specifically interested in looking at the line Dav was on, as the
former line runs past my house about 100 yards east of here. I told
my boss about it and he wants a scan of the local bit.
If complete it also shows the UK railways at just about their greatest
extent. There were a few openings after that date (Wall of Death for
example), so not quite the entirety.
Closures commenced during the late 20s and during the economically
difficult times.
I cannot remember his name but it was about this time that someone first
claimed to have covered all of the UK railways. If someone knows his
name please remind me as it is doing my head in.
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
complete steamindex.com he finished his task around December 1932:
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
krw
2017-09-25 13:40:25 UTC
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Post by Nick Leverton
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp
That's the feller. For some reason I thought he was based in Thame. I
see that it had taken him some 40 years to do which given the larger
size of the then network and the slower speed (usually) of trains and
much more limited holidays is not a surprise. Henley-in-Arden is fairly
central for the entire country.

I am not sure how much time it would take these days - these people have
recently visited all the stations: http://allthestations.co.uk/
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2017-09-25 18:03:33 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp
That's the feller. For some reason I thought he was based in Thame. I
see that it had taken him some 40 years to do which given the larger
size of the then network and the slower speed (usually) of trains and
much more limited holidays is not a surprise. Henley-in-Arden is fairly
central for the entire country.
I am not sure how much time it would take these days - these people have
recently visited all the stations: http://allthestations.co.uk/
We’re off to gaze at five GWR engines and other things tomorrow.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2017-09-26 09:21:14 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp
That's the feller. For some reason I thought he was based in Thame. I
see that it had taken him some 40 years to do which given the larger
size of the then network and the slower speed (usually) of trains and
much more limited holidays is not a surprise. Henley-in-Arden is fairly
central for the entire country.
I am not sure how much time it would take these days - these people have
recently visited all the stations: http://allthestations.co.uk/
We’re off to gaze at five GWR engines and other things tomorrow.
Sincerely Chris
Not worth the effort, Great Waste of a Railway. Have a happy birthday Mike.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Btms
2017-09-26 19:22:02 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp
That's the feller. For some reason I thought he was based in Thame. I
see that it had taken him some 40 years to do which given the larger
size of the then network and the slower speed (usually) of trains and
much more limited holidays is not a surprise. Henley-in-Arden is fairly
central for the entire country.
I am not sure how much time it would take these days - these people have
recently visited all the stations: http://allthestations.co.uk/
We’re off to gaze at five GWR engines and other things tomorrow.
Sincerely Chris
Not worth the effort, Great Waste of a Railway. Have a happy birthday Mike.
That has no doubt encouragedthem. 😳
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris McMillan
2017-09-27 09:31:19 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
I could remember his surname but nothing else; however having found a
spare tuit lying on my desk I can now supply the rest. The gentleman
wa a Mr. T.R. Perkins of Henley-in-Arden and according to the very
http://www.steamindex.com/locomag/lcwr38.htm#450-trp
That's the feller. For some reason I thought he was based in Thame. I
see that it had taken him some 40 years to do which given the larger
size of the then network and the slower speed (usually) of trains and
much more limited holidays is not a surprise. Henley-in-Arden is fairly
central for the entire country.
I am not sure how much time it would take these days - these people have
recently visited all the stations: http://allthestations.co.uk/
We’re off to gaze at five GWR engines and other things tomorrow.
Sincerely Chris
Not worth the effort, Great Waste of a Railway. Have a happy birthday Mike.
Certainly was worth it. A different experience. A cross between Beamish and
York.

Hardly anyone about so could get up close and read anything we wanted to,
almost no one where I wanted to take photos, and the volunteers were more
than happy to talk. And the lunch menu was
Excellent. The wit who wrote the menu was of an umratic turn of mind. I
messed up the photo and didn’t notice so hoping McT may have something on
his phone.

The only things I didn’t do was climb into Caerphilly Castle, didn’t like
the steps, and I decided against the footplate simulation.

Sincerely Chris

Btms
2017-09-15 20:40:11 UTC
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Post by Fenny
One of the things we found at Pa's last weekend was a railway map of
England & Wales dated 1917. It belonged to probably my g-gf first,
then Grandpa, both of whom were railway employees.
Bro took it home with him, but I will eventually bring it down here. I
was specifically interested in looking at the line Dav was on, as the
former line runs past my house about 100 yards east of here. I told
my boss about it and he wants a scan of the local bit.
The rear of our house would once have seen the Lambourn to Newbury trains
trundling by. Just trees there now.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-09-15 22:04:22 UTC
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On Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:40:36 +0100, Fenny <***@removethis.onetel.net>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
One of the things we found at Pa's last weekend was a railway map of
England & Wales dated 1917. It belonged to probably my g-gf first,
then Grandpa, both of whom were railway employees.
Bro took it home with him, but I will eventually bring it down here. I
was specifically interested in looking at the line Dav was on, as the
former line runs past my house about 100 yards east of here. I told
my boss about it and he wants a scan of the local bit.
National Library of Scotland has the 1923 revision 25 inch maps which can
be viewed individually or joined seamlessly side by side with a variety of
current mapping which you can pan and zoom
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=52.2571&lon=-1.1618&layers=176&right=Opendata>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2017-09-16 11:01:16 UTC
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Suddenly noticed I hadn't typed a hewding

Fenny wrote:

All about Dav

Newstap didn't give me anything to quote.

I am not KRW but I have a pre-grouping atlas and Dav was on the London and
Northwestern.

May or may not help.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_and_North_Western_Railway

Sincerely Chris
Btms
2017-09-16 13:36:22 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Suddenly noticed I hadn't typed a hewding
All about Dav
Newstap didn't give me anything to quote.
I am not KRW but I have a pre-grouping atlas and Dav was on the London and
Northwestern.
May or may not help.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_and_North_Western_Railway
Sincerely Chris
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Chris McMillan
2017-09-16 14:17:33 UTC
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Someone wrote:

BTMS asked for

https://www.lambourn.info/our-history/lambourn-valley-railway/
l***@gmail.com
2017-09-16 16:59:26 UTC
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Thanks. Our local history group had a talk on this. Very interesting. The site describes the route; I was hoping to find a map of the route. I know where it went but interested in how it got there specifically.
Nick Leverton
2017-09-16 23:03:27 UTC
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Post by l***@gmail.com
Thanks. Our local history group had a talk on this. Very interesting.
The site describes the route; I was hoping to find a map of the route.
I know where it went but interested in how it got there specifically.
There are old maps of the location of each station, starting at
http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/l/lambourn/ and other stations linked
in the page.
There are also photos relating the route to the present day at
http://www.lambournvalleyrailway.info/lvrtoday/lvr-today.htm
which is a pretty comprehensive site all about the branch, it seems.

Beware, tracing courses of old local railways can become addictive ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Btms
2017-09-16 16:34:44 UTC
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Btms <***@thetames.me.uk> wrote:
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-09-16 17:47:43 UTC
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On Sat, 16 Sep 2017 16:34:44 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2017-09-16 19:07:28 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*


*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Btms
2017-09-16 21:48:56 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*
*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
Well that was interesting insofar as it seems that before our house was
built, there was nothing else there! But imbam..
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-09-17 00:03:29 UTC
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On Sat, 16 Sep 2017 19:07:28 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*
*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
You shouldn't need to 'enter' anything. Simply click on either map to drag
it around, use mouse wheel to zoom in and out. You can change the map on
the right using the drop-down menu above it, if you prefer a satellite
photo version or something.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2017-09-17 08:28:46 UTC
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Post by Penny
You shouldn't need to 'enter' anything. Simply click on either map to drag
it around, use mouse wheel to zoom in and out. You can change the map on
the right using the drop-down menu above it, if you prefer a satellite
photo version or something.
Thanks. I have managed to use it now. Apart from being interested in the
old rail route; privately funded and run because of the benefits of moving
race horses around the country by rail, I am interested in what the
original garden boundaries were in my house.

Originally, six Council houses built in the 30s. The way the gardens work
is very odd. We have a nice sized plot. But am told it was once bigger.
Turned left at the top end "which is where ###### kept his chickens". This
would have made it an L shaped plot. This now belongs to our neighbour and
without it they would seem to have been given a very small back garden.
Next to them the house has virtually no back garden at all! But has a bit
more at the front. Another house has a really big garden (current owners
grow lots of stuff which is nice for them. They are on the corner. I
thought old Council houses had plots which allowed for growing veg. But
this doesn't necessarily seem so for these six houses.

It seems the bit of line which was there before our house was built was
acquired by the property the other side of the line. It is a very large
plot/garden so in affect not a neighbour. On the deeds it is described
as "land associated with" but also says they are not allowed to grow
anything on it. Today there are large trees where the line once ran and a
narrow strip (say 15-20 foot wide) between our fence and the old railway
bank. This is left to nature but our fence obscures it, so not a problem.
It is just all a bit odd to me and has provoked my curiosity.

The houses were acquired by a housing assoc., and later sold into private
ownership. Most have been enlarged but apart from the one which has a tiny
back garden all have managed this without leaving leaving the gardens much
reduced in size. In front of the houses is a small green, planted with
lime trees. These are in need of pollarding but the Council manage to
ignore requests. I was told veg was once grown there by the person with
the very small garden. It was also a gathering pen for cattle going to
market on the train. But this is not especially close to the old station.


Between the green and our property is a private road, still owned by the
housing company that sold the houses off. It is covered by gravel type
stones. They are resistant to maintaining the road so it has lots of large
potholes.

All adds to my curiosity.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-09-17 09:26:21 UTC
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2017 08:28:46 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Originally, six Council houses built in the 30s.
So the map I offered was too early for your purposes. NLS has 1:25k maps
for 1937-61 but nothing at a larger scale. https://www.old-maps.co.uk have
6" maps for 1932-38. You don't need to subscribe to view the maps (although
if you zoom in too much it blanks them). 6" will probably show garden
boundaries.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
l***@gmail.com
2017-09-17 14:28:28 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Originally, six Council houses built in the 30s.
So the map I offered was too early for your purposes. NLS has 1:25k maps
for 1937-61 but nothing at a larger scale. https://www.old-maps.co.uk have
6" maps for 1932-38. You don't need to subscribe to view the maps (although
if you zoom in too much it blanks them). 6" will probably show garden
boundaries.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Thanks. I will have a look. I am interested both in the rail line and how it relates to the time our house was built.

On a slightly contentious note, I am also interested in the meaning of "land associated with...." in relation to the rear of our garden before the land rises on to what was a small embankment. The reason is that I sprayed this land with weed killer and the gardener (aka village postie) aggressively shouted out his intention to pour concrete behind our fence to prevent us having access. I responded with equal aggression (a new part of myself I have rarely expressed or explored) and was delighted when he backed down. He has been dumping all the grass cuttings and weeds there from the house behind and there is evidence of rats in our garden plus the weeds are regenerating blah de blah .... make up the rest.

The owner of the house in question is 95 and not entirely on the same page all the time. A lady in possession of an imperious nature to boot. I am happy to deal with the weed problem but not happy with being attacked and threatened (only verbally) by the bliddy part-time gardener! It was for this reason I downloaded the Land Registry docs of the house and came across this 'land associated with' phrase. I wonder if it is squatters rights because the other housesin line with ours have gardens with boundaries right up to the embankment. Only those which back on to the old girl's place are different - we were all Council houses back in the day.

Just to add, bliddy gardener/postie agreed to treat area with agricultural strength weed killer and to stop dumping garden rubbish there. However, the weeds are currently about 3ft high and growing. I don't really mind as it probably protects our house from rear access which is a good thing. But I do want the weeds kept a bit clear of our fence and from intruding into our garden.

Will now go and lay down in a darkened room. Thanks umra.
Mike
2017-09-17 08:41:00 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*
*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
'Vulgarity' in UMRA!? What are you thinking of Bottoms?
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2017-09-17 12:34:28 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*
*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
'Vulgarity' in UMRA!? What are you thinking of Bottoms?
I feel that last question needs a comma, but I can't decide between
"What are you thinking of, Bottoms?" and "What, are you thinking of
Bottoms?"

john (aren't we all?)
Mike
2017-09-17 12:48:57 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Here's the Newbury end of the Lambourn Valley Railway at Speen - you can
drag the map along its length or zoom out to jump around.
<http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=16&lat=51.4109&lon=-1.3470&layers=176&right=Opendata>
Marked as unread. looks like I have to enter stuff and we all know how
accurate I am and how good I am at seeing errors before I press enter.*
*Uneasy feeling I may have invited some vulgarity. Oh I do hope not.
'Vulgarity' in UMRA!? What are you thinking of Bottoms?
I feel that last question needs a comma, but I can't decide between
"What are you thinking of, Bottoms?" and "What, are you thinking of
Bottoms?"
john (aren't we all?)
:-)
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2017-09-17 13:08:11 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
john (aren't we all?
I'm Spartacus.
Post by John Ashby
)
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
Jenny M Benson
2017-09-17 16:46:42 UTC
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Post by Peter Percival
Post by John Ashby
john (aren't we all?
I'm Spartacus.
A little while ago I worked at a place where our immediate boss kept
being absent rather a lot. My colleague and I named her Spartacus: one
or other of us had to take over some of her duties in her absence, so we
frequently claimed "I'm Spartacus!"
--
Jenny M Benson
krw
2017-09-16 18:48:09 UTC
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Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Essentially looking at the maps I can find online it looks as though the
builders took the line of least resistance and followed the river.

This looks relevant:
https://christohlr.github.io/au/00-hailey-morissette-iv-22/9781909099746-the-lambourn-valley-railway.pdf
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Btms
2017-09-16 19:07:27 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Essentially looking at the maps I can find online it looks as though the
builders took the line of least resistance and followed the river.
https://christohlr.github.io/au/00-hailey-morissette-iv-22/9781909099746-the-lambourn-valley-railway.pdf
It would also have been the lowest and flattest route.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Penny
2017-09-17 00:05:57 UTC
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On Sat, 16 Sep 2017 19:07:27 -0000 (UTC), Btms <***@thetames.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Btms
Post by krw
Post by Btms
Snipped all above.
Post by Btms
Where can I see the route of the Labourn to Newbury line, please. It ran
behind our garden but is now trees and is in a n other's arden. Poppy
walks part of the old route most days.
Or maybe Lambourn?
Essentially looking at the maps I can find online it looks as though the
builders took the line of least resistance and followed the river.
https://christohlr.github.io/au/00-hailey-morissette-iv-22/9781909099746-the-lambourn-valley-railway.pdf
It would also have been the lowest and flattest route.
Quite important with railways I believe. A fact several local railway
builders around these parts failed to understand... "But I want it to come
up the hill to my house."
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2017-09-16 14:20:53 UTC
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On Sat, 16 Sep 2017 11:01:16 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Suddenly noticed I hadn't typed a hewding
All about Dav
Newstap didn't give me anything to quote.
I am not KRW but I have a pre-grouping atlas and Dav was on the London and
Northwestern.
I know where the line went, I was just interested to see it on my
g-gf's map.

The local museum has loads of info on the station and railway line.
--
Fenny
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