Discussion:
Spoiler Sunday 26/2
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BrritSki
2017-02-26 19:24:55 UTC
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"chuckin' out the kitchen scraps" ?

I thought it was illegal to feed kitchen scraps to pigs...
Sally Thompson
2017-02-26 19:36:28 UTC
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"chuckin' out the kitchen scraps" ?
I thought it was illegal to feed kitchen scraps to pigs...
It is. Either they haven't bothered the ag adviser or it's meant to show
that Eddie is feckless and stupid.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2017-02-28 15:49:35 UTC
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On 26 Feb 2017 19:36:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by BrritSki
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"chuckin' out the kitchen scraps" ?
I thought it was illegal to feed kitchen scraps to pigs...
It is. Either they haven't bothered the ag adviser or it's meant to show
that Eddie is feckless and stupid.
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2017-02-28 16:14:28 UTC
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Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs

Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.

And it is a form of recycling:
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/

So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
tiny.cc/KRWpics
Penny
2017-02-28 17:30:29 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:14:28 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.

Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally (I was
never that keen on the result as a growing medium but feel that's not the
point). Now it is transported 100 miles or so to an anaerobic digester in
Oxfordshire - madness!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2017-02-28 18:09:59 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Penny
2017-02-28 18:23:36 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:09:59 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Oh I do that with the raw stuff too (and generate few inedible left-overs).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Btms
2017-02-28 20:37:27 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Doesn't this attract rats? I only put uncooked food waste in my compost
bin. And before I got it supported off the earth, something used to throw
eggshells out of it. Sems ok on concrete slabs.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Sam Plusnet
2017-03-01 03:03:44 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Doesn't this attract rats? I only put uncooked food waste in my compost
bin. And before I got it supported off the earth, something used to throw
eggshells out of it. Sems ok on concrete slabs.
I've heard that suggested before, but shirley rats are quite used to a
raw diet?
--
Sam Plusnet
Btms
2017-03-01 08:34:38 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
I was surprised to hear the Grundys have pigs. Is it still illegal if they
are only for home consumption?
They got the pigs sometime ago. Not sure they are solely for home
consumption, although we have never heard them selling the meat.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
I hope so, pigs and chickens used to be well used for recycling.
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Doesn't this attract rats? I only put uncooked food waste in my compost
bin. And before I got it supported off the earth, something used to throw
eggshells out of it. Sems ok on concrete slabs.
I've heard that suggested before, but shirley rats are quite used to a
raw diet?
My point is that it was when I included cooked cooked scraps something was
getting in. The evidence was the eggshells. Though uncooked they were the
evidence of visitors. But since then I have located the bin on a firm
base. This seems to have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Hearing that Britski seems to chuck everything out, I wonder if I am
being too pedantic; even for umra.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Flop
2017-03-01 09:02:56 UTC
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But since then I have located the bin on a firm base. This seems to have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Putting a compost bin on a solid base to make it rat proof is not ideal.

Decomposition is speeded significantly by the introduction of worms.

Your best bet is to put the bin on soil with a sheet of chicken wire
under the bin.

The worms will feed and enrich the soil - so relocate the bin every few
months. Or whenever.
--
Flop

General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
BrritSki
2017-03-01 13:32:37 UTC
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Post by Flop
But since then I have located the bin on a firm base. This seems to
have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Putting a compost bin on a solid base to make it rat proof is not ideal.
I agree
Post by Flop
Decomposition is speeded significantly by the introduction of worms.
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.

I've only just done it this week (*) and as always I keep transferring
until I get down as far as the good ready-to-use stuff. Inevitably this
means that I transfer a layer of almost-ready compost that is still full
of worms and which starts the new heap off nicely. I always compress any
large additions to the heap by standing on it, pee on it and add water
when it's very dry, but don't cover it.

The heaps are all purpose built some 12 years ago and are starting to
show their age, so will be dismantled and reconstructed this spring with
any luck.

Most of our compost is from weeding rather than trimmings/peelings or
food waste (although there are plenty of tea-bags and coffee grounds).
Waife is an inveterate weeder and likes pulling them out (*) whereas
when I weed I just hoe (checks spelling carefully to avoid *) them in.

The new compost is used as a soil enricher in flower and veg beds, for
growing potatoes in bins (badgers dig them up if we grow in the ground)
and for top-dressing lawn which has just had it's second cut this year
after springing into life yesterday when we had about 7cms of rain in 8
hours after a long dry spell.

[1] and 2 smaller ones for leaf mould

(*) F'r'Us
Jim Easterbrook
2017-03-01 14:53:57 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
BrritSki
2017-03-01 15:18:36 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
Nice.

I'll just ask the local timber man to drop off some rough-cut sweet
chestnut boards. Not as cheap as leftovers, but should see me out :)
Btms
2017-03-01 20:43:02 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
Very impressive. I don't think our garden is big enough.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Sam Plusnet
2017-03-02 01:02:57 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
Seriously impressive.
Ours consist of a number of posts driven into the ground at about 4 foot
intervals with stock fencing (large square holes) stretched between them.
Eight bays (4 face north & 4 south) each more than wide enough to take a
wheelbarrow.
I've had to replace the posts once in the last three decades.
--
Sam Plusnet
Flop
2017-03-02 09:25:42 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
Seriously impressive.
Ours consist of a number of posts driven into the ground at about 4 foot
intervals with stock fencing (large square holes) stretched between them.
Eight bays (4 face north & 4 south) each more than wide enough to take a
wheelbarrow.
I've had to replace the posts once in the last three decades.
Compost bins have two functions - disposal of waste and producing
nutrient for the soil.

It is unfortunate that fixed location bins waste so much plant food. It
is rich in trace metals and organic feed.

They also have the problem of producing and encouraging weeds such as
nettles.

But any compost bin is fun :-)
--
Flop
General Norman Schwarzkopf was asked if he thought there was room for
forgiveness toward terrorists.
The General said, "I believe that forgiving them is God's function...
OUR job is to arrange the meeting."
Penny
2017-03-02 12:05:30 UTC
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On Thu, 2 Mar 2017 01:02:57 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by BrritSki
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
Building such bins is a good way to dispose of unwanted decking. See
https://flic.kr/p/eMJ1js for one I made earlier.
Seriously impressive.
Ours consist of a number of posts driven into the ground at about 4 foot
intervals with stock fencing (large square holes) stretched between them.
Eight bays (4 face north & 4 south) each more than wide enough to take a
wheelbarrow.
I've had to replace the posts once in the last three decades.
I built a two bin system using angle iron from a redundant single bed
(which was in the house when husgod bought it) for the uprights at the
front and fairly heavy grade pine tongue and groove boards removed from the
walls when we redid the kitchen. Space was limited but the system worked
well, boards could be added or removed by sliding them down/up the angle
iron and when one side was full I'd turn it over onto the nearly empty side
until I got to the well-composted level.

Over the years the whole structure got wider so eventually failed because
the boards were too short to hold and not, as I'd expected, because they'd
rotted.

One memorable year I discovered some seeds survive composting well. I'd
forked in compost on most of the flower beds and got the most amazing crop
of parsley (which I usually have trouble growing) *everywhere* :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2017-03-01 20:56:54 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Flop
But since then I have located the bin on a firm base. This seems to
have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Putting a compost bin on a solid base to make it rat proof is not ideal.
I agree
Post by Flop
Decomposition is speeded significantly by the introduction of worms.
MTAAW. We actually have two 1m square bins next to each other[1] and
when one is full we empty the remaining ready-to-use compost out of the
other bin and then transfer the top of the full bin into the now-empty one.
At my old house, I had three such bins, so that while one was filling
up, the next was rotting down and the third was ready to use on the garden.

My new garden is too small for a proper compost bin but I do have a
wormery[1] which munches up my kitchen waste.


[1] Originally bought, at my old house, when my mobility was becoming a
problem and I couldn't reliably take the kitchen scraps down to the
compost heap at the far end of the garden. The wormery could live close
to the back door, where I could reach it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Beware of the half-truth. You may have gotten hold of the wrong half.
Btms
2017-03-01 20:43:02 UTC
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Post by Flop
But since then I have located the bin on a firm base. This seems to
have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Putting a compost bin on a solid base to make it rat proof is not ideal.
Decomposition is speeded significantly by the introduction of worms.
Your best bet is to put the bin on soil with a sheet of chicken wire
under the bin.
The worms will feed and enrich the soil - so relocate the bin every few
months. Or whenever.
Thank you. Makes sense.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Sally Thompson
2017-03-01 20:52:54 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Flop
But since then I have located the bin on a firm base. This seems to
have sorted it. Also I now only put raw scraps in it.
Putting a compost bin on a solid base to make it rat proof is not ideal.
Decomposition is speeded significantly by the introduction of worms.
Your best bet is to put the bin on soil with a sheet of chicken wire
under the bin.
The worms will feed and enrich the soil - so relocate the bin every few
months. Or whenever.
Thank you. Makes sense.
When we bought this land, there wasn't a worm, ant or bird to be seen. It
had been a spoil tip and was clay and coal shale.

We have many compost bins (!), all on earth. I did wonder if we should buy
a worm "starter kit" but I needn't have worried since very quickly the
worms found their way in. Plenty of worms, ants and birds everywhere now!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
BrritSki
2017-03-01 07:29:46 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Doesn't this attract rats? I only put uncooked food waste in my compost
bin. And before I got it supported off the earth, something used to throw
eggshells out of it. Sems ok on concrete slabs.
No, the rats seem to prefer the fat balls hung out for the birds :/

We don't put meat or cheese leftovers in the compost. We hardly ever
seem to throw away cheese, even the heels get put into soups and
anything soft is thrown into a blue cheese pasta sauce.

Bones from meat are invariably simmered for stock, so very little left
on them when they are thrown away in the normal bin.
Btms
2017-03-01 08:34:39 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
Our local food waste was, until a few years back, composted locally
Ours is too - 50m down the garden onto the compost heap :)
Doesn't this attract rats? I only put uncooked food waste in my compost
bin. And before I got it supported off the earth, something used to throw
eggshells out of it. Sems ok on concrete slabs.
No, the rats seem to prefer the fat balls hung out for the birds :/
We don't put meat or cheese leftovers in the compost. We hardly ever
seem to throw away cheese, even the heels get put into soups and
anything soft is thrown into a blue cheese pasta sauce.
Bones from meat are invariably simmered for stock, so very little left
on them when they are thrown away in the normal bin.
Thank you. I admit to sometimes leaving leftovers in the fridge beyond the
point when I want to eat them. Reluctant to compost meat in sauces. Fat At
the end of ham. Stale bread when I have a surfeit of breadcrumbs in the
freezer.
--
BTMS - Usurped as Editor in waiting
Chris J Dixon
2017-03-01 07:42:22 UTC
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Post by krw
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jul/14/food-waste-fed-to-pigs
Banned as part of the action against BSE. And a possible cause of foot
and mouth - although the pigswill accused was untreated.
https://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2011/01/07/pigswill-and-public-health-a-load-of-old-bull-from-the-eu/
So perhaps the subject is to be examined?
All the plate scrapings from school dinners went into buckets
that were later collected for pig swill. Whenever we had prunes
we had to dump the stones separately.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
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