Discussion:
ot Red Arrows
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Btms
2018-06-09 19:05:41 UTC
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Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-09 23:18:09 UTC
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Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
I didn't realise we still had fly-pasts.

I thought Health & Safety concerns meant that all such displays had to
take place at, or above, 15,000 feet.
--
Sam Plusnet
Btms
2018-06-10 07:04:15 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
I didn't realise we still had fly-pasts.
I thought Health & Safety concerns meant that all such displays had to
take place at, or above, 15,000 feet.
Obviously there are exceptions for Royalty and important others.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
LFS
2018-06-10 14:35:31 UTC
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Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mike
2018-06-10 15:07:36 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Yes, Concorde flew directly over us and drowned out The Archers :-(((
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-06-10 19:44:39 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Yes, Concorde flew directly over us and drowned out The Archers :-(((
Not often seen over us until its finale. It was on the telly and overhead.
I went into the garden and felt emotional at watching the end of an era
moment. Then two more flew in but the bbc presented it all as a single
event. Rather spoiled my sense of numinosity in the moment.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-10 19:27:07 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be
flying over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Interesting. Maybe it's their bird-catching instincts!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

When I went to see Biddy Baxter [Blue Peter's editor] and told her I was
pregnant, her first reaction was 'Oh good, another viewer'. - Janet Ellis, RT
2016/2/27-3/4
Sid Nuncius
2018-06-11 06:37:31 UTC
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Post by LFS
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home.
We did that. There's something rather wonderful about seeing the planes
*really* thundering over my head a few seconds after they've cruised
down The Mall, including our own Red Arrows fly-past - just. The RAs
seem to think that other parts of Shepherds Bush are more important, but
can be glimpsed between buildings. Others go pretty well right overhead.

Sadly, the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight seems to follow a different
route home and we rarely see them, although the Lancaster's engines are
clearly audible. I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and still find a
very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was born a decade or
so after the BoB.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2018-06-11 15:52:14 UTC
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Post by LFS
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home.
We did that.  There's something rather wonderful about seeing the planes
*really* thundering over my head a few seconds after they've cruised
down The Mall, including our own Red Arrows fly-past - just.  The RAs
seem to think that other parts of Shepherds Bush are more important, but
can be glimpsed between buildings.  Others go pretty well right overhead.
Sadly, the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight seems to follow a different
route home and we rarely see them, although the Lancaster's engines are
clearly audible.  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and still find a
very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was born a decade or
so after the BoB.
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...






...after first inserting gun turrets.



Nick
Btms
2018-06-11 16:41:58 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by LFS
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home.
We did that.  There's something rather wonderful about seeing the planes
*really* thundering over my head a few seconds after they've cruised
down The Mall, including our own Red Arrows fly-past - just.  The RAs
seem to think that other parts of Shepherds Bush are more important, but
can be glimpsed between buildings.  Others go pretty well right overhead.
Sadly, the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight seems to follow a different
route home and we rarely see them, although the Lancaster's engines are
clearly audible.  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and still find a
very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was born a decade or
so after the BoB.
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...
...after first inserting gun turrets.
Nick
I enjoyed airfix too. Many were affordable on my pocket money. Happy days.
Its all lego now.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2018-06-11 19:34:33 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
...  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and still find a
very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was born a decade or
so after the BoB.
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...
...after first inserting gun turrets.
I enjoyed airfix too.
So did La Snell <sniffffffffff>
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-12 00:22:59 UTC
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Post by Btms
Post by Nick Odell
Post by LFS
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home.
We did that.  There's something rather wonderful about seeing the planes
*really* thundering over my head a few seconds after they've cruised
down The Mall, including our own Red Arrows fly-past - just.  The RAs
seem to think that other parts of Shepherds Bush are more important, but
can be glimpsed between buildings.  Others go pretty well right overhead.
Sadly, the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight seems to follow a different
route home and we rarely see them, although the Lancaster's engines are
clearly audible.  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and still find a
very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was born a decade or
so after the BoB.
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...
...after first inserting gun turrets.
Nick
I enjoyed airfix too. Many were affordable on my pocket money. Happy days.
Its all lego now.
And where are the balsa-wood gliders of yesteryear?
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2018-06-11 18:17:38 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Sadly, the Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight seems to follow a
different route home and we rarely see them, although the Lancaster's
engines are clearly audible.  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and
still find a very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was
born a decade or so after the BoB.
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...
...after first inserting gun turrets.
Oh, yes. With me it was a Spitfire and the prop.[1] As you say, a
valuable life-lesson. You never forget your first time, do you?


[1]I didn't make the Lancaster until considerably later. I can still
remember a bit of slightly clumsy glueing which meant that three props
turned perfectly and one was stuck solid. It really used to rankle.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2018-06-11 23:08:27 UTC
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On Mon, 11 Jun 2018 19:17:38 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber. Glue sides
of fuselage together...
...after first inserting gun turrets.
Oh, yes. With me it was a Spitfire and the prop.[1] As you say, a
valuable life-lesson. You never forget your first time, do you?
[1]I didn't make the Lancaster until considerably later. I can still
remember a bit of slightly clumsy glueing which meant that three props
turned perfectly and one was stuck solid. It really used to rankle.
When my brothers got bored with the dusty planes hanging around in their
bedroom they staged, and photographed, air crashes on the bonfire.

I made historical figures, Henry VIII and a Royal guardsman of some sort -
lovely long black boots and a shiny helmet which never looked as good as
the real thing. I don't think they were burnt though I don't know what did
happen to them.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2018-06-12 11:28:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
I made historical figures, Henry VIII and a Royal guardsman of some sort -
lovely long black boots and a shiny helmet which never looked as good as
the real thing.
I say Penny, this is a family newsgroup you know !

And anyway, Mrs McToodles is the designated F'r'Us rep.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-12 01:46:26 UTC
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[Battle of Britain flight]
Post by Nick Odell
engines are clearly audible.  I was an Airfix-obsessed little boy and
still find a very resonant echo in those planes, even though I was
born a decade or so after the BoB.
A little more so in my case, but I still find them very - resonant is a
good word.
Post by Nick Odell
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even
learned a very important lesson that he carries through to this day.
Read The Instructions First. I still remember that Lancaster Bomber.
Glue sides of fuselage together...
And another lesson: if you're ever involved with writing instructions,
write them in an order that avoids (or at least reduces) the incidence
of examples like the above.
Post by Nick Odell
...after first inserting gun turrets.
(Insert gun turrets, _then_ glue sides of fuselage together.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than
to those attending too small a degree of it. -Thomas Jefferson, 3rd US
president, architect and author (1743-1826)
Fred
2018-06-12 07:57:25 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First.
I too used to build Airfix but after the job was done I'd then disassemble the kit and rebuild into my own design. I remember a particularly satisfying design with two fuselages joined by a short section of wing. Seemed a great design for carrying more cargo, I thought.

On the topic of Red Arrows, my friend is as member of the Red Barrows - a team of chaps who do formation "flying" to music* with red wheelbarrows at fairs and fetes.

Fred
*Dambusters March, obviously, among others.
F
Nick Odell
2018-06-12 11:02:51 UTC
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Post by Fred
Post by Nick Odell
Ah yes. Thanks to the kits, this Airfix-obsessed little boy even learned
a very important lesson that he carries through to this day. Read The
Instructions First.
I too used to build Airfix but after the job was done I'd then disassemble the kit and rebuild into my own design. I remember a particularly satisfying design with two fuselages joined by a short section of wing. Seemed a great design for carrying more cargo, I thought.
Cor....I reckon you might have just invented the Lockheed P38. Or, on a
bigger scale, do you reckon you might claim royalties from Scaled
Composites for their Stratolaunch?
Post by Fred
On the topic of Red Arrows, my friend is as member of the Red Barrows - a team of chaps who do formation "flying" to music* with red wheelbarrows at fairs and fetes.
Fred
*Dambusters March, obviously, among others.
F
Brilliant!


Nick
Chris McMillan
2018-06-11 09:06:52 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Clever cat, he must have been an exception! :)

Sincerely Chris
LFS
2018-06-11 10:19:01 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Clever cat, he must have been an exception! :)
All our family cats have been very eccentric. Smokey, who was my
companion growing up, was the funniest. He would open the pantry door
and roll out a tin of cat food to let us know he was hungry. He would
follow Mum to the shops and wait for her outside the greengrocer and he
once tried to get on a bus with her. He loved Elvis and would sing along
to the radio or records - his favourite was "Are You Lonesome Tonight?"

There have been many feline companions since but I still miss him and
retain a deep loathing of the mean people who were responsible for his
eventual sad decline.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Btms
2018-06-11 11:04:30 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Clever cat, he must have been an exception! :)
All our family cats have been very eccentric. Smokey, who was my
companion growing up, was the funniest. He would open the pantry door
and roll out a tin of cat food to let us know he was hungry. He would
follow Mum to the shops and wait for her outside the greengrocer and he
once tried to get on a bus with her. He loved Elvis and would sing along
to the radio or records - his favourite was "Are You Lonesome Tonight?"
There have been many feline companions since but I still miss him and
retain a deep loathing of the mean people who were responsible for his
eventual sad decline.
How lovely. We have many stories of life with our siamese Misty. He was so
funny and clear with his house rules. Would wait up for both boys after
they reached the age of going out in the evening alone. Then take a flying
leap on to our bed.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
BrritSki
2018-06-11 11:35:23 UTC
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Post by LFS
All our family cats have been very eccentric.
I wonder what the common denominator could be ? ;)
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-12 00:27:44 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society.  Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today.  Their
navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
Clever cat, he must have been an exception!  :)
All our family cats have been very eccentric. Smokey, who was my
companion growing up, was the funniest. He would open the pantry door
and roll out a tin of cat food to let us know he was hungry. He would
follow Mum to the shops and wait for her outside the greengrocer and he
once tried to get on a bus with her. He loved Elvis and would sing along
to the radio or records - his favourite was "Are You Lonesome Tonight?"
There have been many feline companions since but I still miss him and
retain a deep loathing of the mean people who were responsible for his
eventual sad decline.
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.

Whenever we had new shoes, the shoebox would be placed on the floor &
she would immediately get in - usually bursting the sides open since she
was traditionally built.

Even a matchbox would attract her attention & she would sit with one paw
in the box, purring happily.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-12 01:48:22 UTC
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[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
There have been many feline companions since but I still miss him
and retain a deep loathing of the mean people who were responsible
for his eventual sad decline.
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
I think _all_ cats share that obsession. (And small children - often
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
Post by Sam Plusnet
Whenever we had new shoes, the shoebox would be placed on the floor &
she would immediately get in - usually bursting the sides open since
she was traditionally built.
Even a matchbox would attract her attention & she would sit with one
paw in the box, purring happily.
Ah, perhaps that's a bit more of an obsession than most ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

[What's your guilty pleasure?] Why should you feel guilty about pleasure? -
Michel Roux Jr in Radio Times 2-8 February 2013
Jenny M Benson
2018-06-12 08:57:44 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sam Plusnet
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
I think _all_ cats share that obsession.
It's EXTREMELY difficult to do a jigsaw puzzle with a cat in the room!

(And small children - often
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
I remember well my daughter's first Christmas - she was 10 months. I
don't recall what toys we had bought her, but I do remember her playing
all day with the box of excelsior which had contained the turkey!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-12 16:58:45 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sam Plusnet
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
I think _all_ cats share that obsession.
It's EXTREMELY difficult to do a jigsaw puzzle with a cat in the room!
(And small children - often
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
I remember well my daughter's first Christmas - she was 10 months. I
don't recall what toys we had bought her, but I do remember her playing
all day with the box of excelsior which had contained the turkey!
What is excelsior in this context? To me the word always conjures up
thoughts of the Longfellow (or OOTC) doggerel of that title, and the
Stanley Holloway sendup thereof.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

1974: not one member of the British jury gave the Swedish band a single point.
Nick Odell
2018-06-12 21:11:31 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
 I think _all_ cats share that obsession.
It's EXTREMELY difficult to do a jigsaw puzzle with a cat in the room!
(And small children - often
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
I remember well my daughter's first Christmas - she was 10 months.  I
don't recall what toys we had bought her, but I do remember her
playing all day with the box of excelsior which had contained the turkey!
What is excelsior in this context? To me the word always conjures up
thoughts of the Longfellow (or OOTC) doggerel of that title, and the
Stanley Holloway sendup thereof.
And to me it always means my first motorbike.

Nick
Mike Ruddock
2018-06-13 07:20:54 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
 I think _all_ cats share that obsession.
It's EXTREMELY difficult to do a jigsaw puzzle with a cat in the room!
(And small children - often
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
I remember well my daughter's first Christmas - she was 10 months.  I
don't recall what toys we had bought her, but I do remember her
playing all day with the box of excelsior which had contained the turkey!
What is excelsior in this context? To me the word always conjures up
thoughts of the Longfellow (or OOTC) doggerel of that title, and the
Stanley Holloway sendup thereof.
And to me it always means my first motorbike.
Nick
My American mother-in-law always referred to fine shavings of wood,
often used as packing for crockery etc, as excelsior.

Mike Ruddock
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-06-13 10:13:27 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
 I think _all_ cats share that obsession.
It's EXTREMELY difficult to do a jigsaw puzzle with a cat in the room!
(And small children - often
portrayed as them being more interested in the box the toy came in ...)
I remember well my daughter's first Christmas - she was 10 months.
I don't recall what toys we had bought her, but I do remember her
playing all day with the box of excelsior which had contained the turkey!
What is excelsior in this context? To me the word always conjures up
thoughts of the Longfellow (or OOTC) doggerel of that title, and the
Stanley Holloway sendup thereof.
And to me it always means my first motorbike.
Nick
My American mother-in-law always referred to fine shavings of wood,
often used as packing for crockery etc, as excelsior.
And indeed it turns up in that context in Cannery Row, which I first
read when I was 15 and it puzzled me then.
LFS
2018-06-12 06:15:39 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
All our family cats have been very eccentric. Smokey, who was my
companion growing up, was the funniest. He would open the pantry door
and roll out a tin of cat food to let us know he was hungry. He would
follow Mum to the shops and wait for her outside the greengrocer and
he once tried to get on a bus with her. He loved Elvis and would sing
along to the radio or records - his favourite was "Are You Lonesome
Tonight?"
There have been many feline companions since but I still miss him and
retain a deep loathing of the mean people who were responsible for his
eventual sad decline.
One of ours had an obsession with boxes.
Whenever we had new shoes, the shoebox would be placed on the floor &
she would immediately get in - usually bursting the sides open since she
was traditionally built.
Even a matchbox would attract her attention & she would sit with one paw
in the box, purring happily.
Son's cat does that too, causing great problems when moving house. He
also insists on only drinking from a glass placed on the coffee table.
Visitors cannot put glasses down. This is a cat who has led an exciting
life, having as a youngster been taken everywhere with a harness and
lead. It was quite a surprise to see him sitting in the front passenger
seat of Son's car and he spent a lot of time on the shop counter talking
to customers. I fear that the arrival of Grandbaby will put his nose out
of joint considerably.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-06-12 08:09:31 UTC
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Post by LFS
Son's cat does that too, causing great problems when moving house. He
also insists on only drinking from a glass placed on the coffee table.
Visitors cannot put glasses down. This is a cat who has led an exciting
life, having as a youngster been taken everywhere with a harness and
lead. It was quite a surprise to see him sitting in the front passenger
seat of Son's car and he spent a lot of time on the shop counter talking
to customers. I fear that the arrival of Grandbaby will put his nose out
of joint considerably.
#2 daughter's cat was a rescue cat with attitude and delicate
sensibilities. When her partner moved in he pulled a lot of his fur
out in places (cat pulled own fur, not partner pulling own or cat's)
and it took him months to reccover. WHen grandson, now 20 months old,
came along the cat was very upset. Lap of daughter was often occupied
by new thing. Time had to be made for cat lap access.

Then it got so much worse. Grandson on the move turned out to be a cat
lover, just like his mum. Cat did not reciprocate and took measures.
Grandson is a tough little boy and is not deterred. For a long while
cat was one of only 3 words he could use. All animals were cat and he
followed the poor cat anywhere he could get to. Grandson was often
covered in scratches and little injuries where the cat said he didn't
want to play.

Luckily they are no longer in a flat and a 4 story house allows lots
of hiding places :). I haven't seen the cat on the last 3 visits.
Penny
2018-06-12 09:35:01 UTC
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2018 09:09:31 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
#2 daughter's cat was a rescue cat with attitude and delicate
sensibilities. When her partner moved in he pulled a lot of his fur
out in places (cat pulled own fur, not partner pulling own or cat's)
and it took him months to reccover. WHen grandson, now 20 months old,
came along the cat was very upset. Lap of daughter was often occupied
by new thing. Time had to be made for cat lap access.
Then it got so much worse. Grandson on the move turned out to be a cat
lover, just like his mum. Cat did not reciprocate and took measures.
Grandson is a tough little boy and is not deterred. For a long while
cat was one of only 3 words he could use. All animals were cat and he
followed the poor cat anywhere he could get to. Grandson was often
covered in scratches and little injuries where the cat said he didn't
want to play.
Luckily they are no longer in a flat and a 4 story house allows lots
of hiding places :). I haven't seen the cat on the last 3 visits.
I, rather reluctantly, agreed to rehouse SiL's two cats. The older female,
Sadie (although Sadist might have been more appropriate) was a very grumpy
elderly female who dribbled constantly, didn't seem to like people and
really disliked children. Our youngest was a toddler when she arrived and
would try to get Sadie to play with her. Fortunately Sadie kept herself
well out of reach most of the time.

The other cat, Charlie, was very friendly and kind and became even more so
after Sadie died. He was a great companion to me and would lie across the
back of my shoulders like a scarf.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-12 18:56:32 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
#2 daughter's cat was a rescue cat with attitude and delicate
sensibilities. When her partner moved in he pulled a lot of his fur
out in places (cat pulled own fur, not partner pulling own or cat's)
and it took him months to reccover. WHen grandson, now 20 months old,
came along the cat was very upset. Lap of daughter was often occupied
by new thing. Time had to be made for cat lap access.
Then it got so much worse. Grandson on the move turned out to be a cat
lover, just like his mum. Cat did not reciprocate and took measures.
Grandson is a tough little boy and is not deterred. For a long while
cat was one of only 3 words he could use. All animals were cat and he
followed the poor cat anywhere he could get to. Grandson was often
covered in scratches and little injuries where the cat said he didn't
want to play.
Luckily they are no longer in a flat and a 4 story house allows lots
of hiding places :). I haven't seen the cat on the last 3 visits.
I, rather reluctantly, agreed to rehouse SiL's two cats. The older female,
Sadie (although Sadist might have been more appropriate) was a very grumpy
elderly female who dribbled constantly, didn't seem to like people and
really disliked children. Our youngest was a toddler when she arrived and
would try to get Sadie to play with her. Fortunately Sadie kept herself
well out of reach most of the time.
The other cat, Charlie, was very friendly and kind and became even more so
after Sadie died. He was a great companion to me and would lie across the
back of my shoulders like a scarf.
There must be something special about cats called Charlie.
Ours was a large (but not fat) very friendly cat who would climb up onto
my shoulders, rub his face against my chin (& mouth if I didn't take
evasive action) whilst thwacking my other ear with his tail.

I still have a few very old tee-shirts with pinholes across the shoulders.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2018-06-12 21:46:45 UTC
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2018 19:56:32 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
The other cat, Charlie, was very friendly and kind and became even more so
after Sadie died. He was a great companion to me and would lie across the
back of my shoulders like a scarf.
There must be something special about cats called Charlie.
Ours was a large (but not fat) very friendly cat who would climb up onto
my shoulders, rub his face against my chin (& mouth if I didn't take
evasive action) whilst thwacking my other ear with his tail.
My first cat was called Captain Flint because he sat on my shoulder. This
was fine but when he took a flying leap off the kitchen chair in order to
grab my shirt and heave himself up there* it was less amusing or
comfortable.

*hoping to steal the food I was cooking.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2018-06-12 14:24:27 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I haven't seen the cat on the last 3 visits.
One of d#2's cats lives under the bed. Last time we stayed we found
this was true until sometime in the middle of the night (we were using
the master bedroom as d#2 and husband were away and we were sitting on
the children). Then she came out and walked across the top of pillows
stopping to stick her nose onto each of our heads as she walked past in
both directions.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-06-12 11:16:46 UTC
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Post by LFS
Son's cat does that too, causing great problems when moving house. He
also insists on only drinking from a glass placed on the coffee table.
Visitors cannot put glasses down. This is a cat who has led an exciting
life, having as a youngster been taken everywhere with a harness and
lead.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Last autumn I was waiting to board the ferry at Fishguard and a woman from a car with french plates was walking around with a cat on a lead.
LFS
2018-06-12 13:01:07 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by LFS
Son's cat does that too, causing great problems when moving house. He
also insists on only drinking from a glass placed on the coffee table.
Visitors cannot put glasses down. This is a cat who has led an exciting
life, having as a youngster been taken everywhere with a harness and
lead.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Last autumn I was waiting to board the ferry at Fishguard and a woman from a car with french plates was walking around with a cat on a lead.
I remember having lunch in a restaurant in Bordeaux where a cat was
sitting on a chair with a group of people at the next table. No harness
or lead.

And in Helsinki I saw a street performer with trained cats, which I
found quite upsetting.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-06-12 20:55:53 UTC
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Post by LFS
And in Helsinki I saw a street performer with trained cats, which I
found quite upsetting.
B goes back downstairs at midnight to have his final meds. The cats
get a treat then; probably dreamies, and Molly used to go down then
too. She's sit nicely for the treat and he got both cats to sit too,
one either side of her. They will still sit for food.

He just got Fang to sit in an attempt to make her supper more
desirable :). SOrt of if you work for it it must be worth more. No,
she didn't eat the Gourmet Gold senior fish pate out of the new
12-pack I just bought. She sniffed at it and stalked off. But will
probably go back and clean the plate later on. Or Harry will. clean
hers for her.

We were thinking of videoing them sitting for treats but will it upset
you if we do and I put it on fb? :)
LFS
2018-06-13 06:58:39 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
And in Helsinki I saw a street performer with trained cats, which I
found quite upsetting.
B goes back downstairs at midnight to have his final meds. The cats
get a treat then; probably dreamies, and Molly used to go down then
too. She's sit nicely for the treat and he got both cats to sit too,
one either side of her. They will still sit for food.
He just got Fang to sit in an attempt to make her supper more
desirable :). SOrt of if you work for it it must be worth more. No,
she didn't eat the Gourmet Gold senior fish pate out of the new
12-pack I just bought. She sniffed at it and stalked off. But will
probably go back and clean the plate later on. Or Harry will. clean
hers for her.
We were thinking of videoing them sitting for treats but will it upset
you if we do and I put it on fb? :)
Sitting is not a problem. The cats in Helsinki were performing quite
complicated acrobatic tricks.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Jenny M Benson
2018-06-13 19:48:42 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
B goes back downstairs at midnight to have his final meds. The cats
get a treat then; probably dreamies, and Molly used to go down then
too. She's sit nicely for the treat and he got both cats to sit too,
one either side of her. They will still sit for food.
He-who-cannot-be-named, the cat of my childhood and teenage, learned to
sit on command and to "say please" (waving a front paw) without any
direct input from us - he just saw the dogs responding to the commands
and getting food. One day, not expecting any response, I asked him if
he wanted to come "Walkies!" and much to my surprise he did, obviously
recognizing that word, too.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2018-06-13 20:09:47 UTC
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On Wed, 13 Jun 2018 20:48:42 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
B goes back downstairs at midnight to have his final meds. The cats
get a treat then; probably dreamies, and Molly used to go down then
too. She's sit nicely for the treat and he got both cats to sit too,
one either side of her. They will still sit for food.
He-who-cannot-be-named, the cat of my childhood and teenage, learned to
sit on command and to "say please" (waving a front paw) without any
direct input from us - he just saw the dogs responding to the commands
and getting food. One day, not expecting any response, I asked him if
he wanted to come "Walkies!" and much to my surprise he did, obviously
recognizing that word, too.
Harry occasionally goes round with Bobby for the walk.
Penny
2018-06-13 22:03:52 UTC
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On Wed, 13 Jun 2018 20:48:42 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
He-who-cannot-be-named, the cat of my childhood and teenage, learned to
sit on command and to "say please" (waving a front paw) without any
direct input from us - he just saw the dogs responding to the commands
and getting food. One day, not expecting any response, I asked him if
he wanted to come "Walkies!" and much to my surprise he did, obviously
recognizing that word, too.
My good friend's beautiful tabby tom cat Bacardi used to escort me home
when I'd been to visit. One of ours learnt to ask verbally for milk - or
maybe she taught me to understand what she wanted...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike Headon
2018-06-12 07:03:53 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society.  Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today.  Their
navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
This is the first year for a very long time that I haven't watched the
Trooping of the Colour and rushed out into the garden to watch the
planes heading home. I was always accompanied by a cat - all our cats
have liked looking at planes. Figgy who lived with Mum and Dad in
Caversham used to like Concorde: he knew exactly when it would be flying
over and would head for the garden to watch it.
About three years ago XH558 flew over us after displaying at Goodwood. I
thought the end of the world had come.
--
Mike Headon
R69S R850R
IIIc IIIg FT FTn FT2 EOS450D
e-mail: mike dot headon at enn tee ell world dot com

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Chris J Dixon
2018-06-12 07:42:08 UTC
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Post by Mike Headon
About three years ago XH558 flew over us after displaying at Goodwood. I
thought the end of the world had come.
I recall a flying display at Finningley featuring a scramble of 3
Vulcans, and that sound really shook your body.

The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.

I have been inside the Vulcan at Newark, and certainly wouldn't
fancy 16 hours travelling backwards in those cramped conditions.

I've just read

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vulcan-607-Rowland-White/dp/0552152293

which is a great story, even if you know the ending.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Btms
2018-06-12 07:57:03 UTC
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Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk> wrote:

[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.
Oh yes the Lightning. Often flew over us. Impressive and scary. Often
recall the affect on me when news reports show war zones where there are
civilians.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Nick Odell
2018-06-12 11:06:17 UTC
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Post by Btms
[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.
Oh yes the Lightning. Often flew over us. Impressive and scary. Often
recall the affect on me when news reports show war zones where there are
civilians.
I believe I took several photos with my Box Brownie of the air where the
Lightning had been during various visits to Farnborough.

Nick
BrritSki
2018-06-12 11:25:37 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.
Oh yes the Lightning.  Often flew over us. Impressive and scary.  Often
recall the affect on me when news reports show war zones where there are
civilians.
I believe I took several photos with my Box Brownie of the air where the
Lightning had been during various visits to Farnborough.
In approx. 1962 our ATC Squadron (84th Coventry M'Lud) went on summer
camp to RAF Leuchars where a Lightning squadron was based. Watching a
flight taking off on full reheat so that before the end of the runway
they were facing straight up and accelerated vertically until out of
sight. Rather memorable.
steveski
2018-06-12 16:40:05 UTC
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:25:37 +0200, BrritSki wrote:

[]
Post by BrritSki
In approx. 1962 our ATC Squadron (84th Coventry M'Lud) went on summer
camp to RAF Leuchars where a Lightning squadron was based.
120 squadron Hendon for me.

Then I went and joined the RN . . .
--
Steveski
Fenny
2018-06-12 18:26:07 UTC
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Post by steveski
[]
Post by BrritSki
In approx. 1962 our ATC Squadron (84th Coventry M'Lud) went on summer
camp to RAF Leuchars where a Lightning squadron was based.
120 squadron Hendon for me.
Then I went and joined the RN . . .
Lucky blighter. Although I got Pa to agree I could, I wasn't allowed
:-(
--
Fenny
Sid Nuncius
2018-06-12 18:23:05 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
I believe I took several photos with my Box Brownie of the air where the
Lightning had been during various visits to Farnborough.
:o))
I took a number of very similar photos when I were a nipper.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-12 19:04:37 UTC
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Post by Btms
[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.
Oh yes the Lightning. Often flew over us. Impressive and scary. Often
recall the affect on me when news reports show war zones where there are
civilians.
We now have some new Lightnings.
I'm not sure why they can't call them F35s.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-06-12 21:33:59 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Btms
[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
The Lightning doing a low pass and rapid climb was another
highlight.
Oh yes the Lightning. Often flew over us. Impressive and scary.
Often
recall the affect on me when news reports show war zones where there are
civilians.
We now have some new Lightnings.
I'm not sure why they can't call them F35s.
I think we like to give them names - helps us forget we've bought them
from America.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Look out for #1. Don't step in #2 either.
Clive Arthur
2018-06-11 09:55:19 UTC
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Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
I was honoured to be kept circling round for an extra ten minutes while
Heathrow was temporarily closed. Along with thousands of others.

Time we lost this Ruritanian nonsense.

Cheers
--
Clive
Btms
2018-06-11 11:04:29 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Btms
Ai was honoured to experience a red arrow flypast earlier today.
Presumably this is in recognition of my position as founder of the Lynda
Snell Society. Assume the palace was concerned ai should not feel
sidelined with regard to the honours announced today. Their navigation was
a tad off but I guess the Mall is a tad easier to find.
I was honoured to be kept circling round for an extra ten minutes while
Heathrow was temporarily closed. Along with thousands of others.
Time we lost this Ruritanian nonsense.
Cheers
I disagree.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Fenny
2018-06-11 17:55:33 UTC
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On Mon, 11 Jun 2018 10:55:19 +0100, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
I was honoured to be kept circling round for an extra ten minutes while
Heathrow was temporarily closed. Along with thousands of others.
Time we lost this Ruritanian nonsense.
Yes, how many thousands more would be delayed if they keep up this
nonsense of a third runway at LHR instead of moving it north to
Birmingham or Manchester?

Stop the nonsense now.
--
Fenny
krw
2018-06-12 14:25:56 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Mon, 11 Jun 2018 10:55:19 +0100, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
I was honoured to be kept circling round for an extra ten minutes while
Heathrow was temporarily closed. Along with thousands of others.
Time we lost this Ruritanian nonsense.
Yes, how many thousands more would be delayed if they keep up this
nonsense of a third runway at LHR instead of moving it north to
Birmingham or Manchester?
Stop the nonsense now.
Gatwick would work as well.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Fenny
2018-06-12 18:26:54 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Fenny
On Mon, 11 Jun 2018 10:55:19 +0100, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
I was honoured to be kept circling round for an extra ten minutes while
Heathrow was temporarily closed. Along with thousands of others.
Time we lost this Ruritanian nonsense.
Yes, how many thousands more would be delayed if they keep up this
nonsense of a third runway at LHR instead of moving it north to
Birmingham or Manchester?
Stop the nonsense now.
Gatwick would work as well.
FVO north!
--
Fenny
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