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Royal Mail
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krw
2018-04-30 15:46:31 UTC
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I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.

I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.

However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient. So why is the right question not
posed?

Why is my response that there is nothing contained therein on the
restricted list not acceptable?

I am not a terrorist. If I was I would probably lie anyway. Does
anyone know why they ask a question which simply annoys? And indeed
under GDPR may perhaps be illegal as it is stored on their system?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-04-30 17:13:46 UTC
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 16:46:31 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient. So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Post by krw
Why is my response that there is nothing contained therein on the
restricted list not acceptable?
I've never tried that, it should have been.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-30 18:34:51 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
Why is my response that there is nothing contained therein on the
restricted list not acceptable?
I've never tried that, it should have been.
A _possible_ reason (or at least argument: it may or may not be valid as
a reason) could be related to the matter of compensation. They do offer
compensation - I think it's about thirtysomething pounds - for stuff
lost (or damaged) in even the ordinary post (I think you have to wait
something like thirty days before you can claim it was not delivered).
In order to avoid (or at least reduce) fraudulent claims, they could
argue they need to know what's in it.

If you feel strongly, you could always just buy the requisite stamps,
and post it in a post box - but (a) only if it'll fit, (b) you have no
proof of posting (from the Post Office; you could always get some
friends to witness you posting).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Wisdom is the ability to cope. - the late (AB of C) Michael Ramsey,
quoted by Stephen Fry (RT 24-30 August 2013)
Nick Odell
2018-04-30 21:09:47 UTC
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On 30/04/18 19:34, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
<snip>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
They do offer
compensation - I think it's about thirtysomething pounds - for stuff
lost (or damaged) in even the ordinary post
I believe that it used to be set at one hundred times the price of a
first class stamp.

Nick
Nick Odell
2018-04-30 21:12:28 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
They do offer compensation - I think it's about thirtysomething pounds
- for stuff lost (or damaged) in even the ordinary post
I believe that it used to be set at one hundred times the price of a
first class stamp.
Doh! I mean "value." Since the cost of the stamp when purchased might
not be the price of a first class service when used.

Nick
Kate B
2018-05-01 10:21:19 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
They do offer compensation - I think it's about thirtysomething pounds
- for stuff lost (or damaged) in even the ordinary post
I believe that it used to be set at one hundred times the price of a
first class stamp.
Nick
It's currently £50, if you have the Post Office receipt with the proof
of posting.
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2018-04-30 21:53:37 UTC
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.

I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-05-01 07:55:48 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
Ooh yes, one could have fun with this couldn’t one? Items of a ‘bedroom’
nature perhaps or ‘blackmail messages’, maybe vivid descriptions of items
of apparel with gussets....
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2018-05-01 08:12:53 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
Ooh yes, one could have fun with this couldn’t one? Items of a ‘bedroom’
nature perhaps or ‘blackmail messages’, maybe vivid descriptions of items
of apparel with gussets....
....Or without.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Btms
2018-05-01 10:31:37 UTC
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Snipped
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Ooh yes, one could have fun with this couldn’t one? Items of a ‘bedroom’
nature perhaps or ‘blackmail messages’, maybe vivid descriptions of items
of apparel with gussets....
....Or without.
Rofl. Brilliant.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-05-01 12:46:40 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
Ooh yes, one could have fun with this couldn’t one? Items of a ‘bedroom’
nature perhaps or ‘blackmail messages’, maybe vivid descriptions of items
of apparel with gussets....
....Or without.
Or... a miniature infinite probability drive, a pink elephant brush (yes, I
do have one of these), maybe a spiflicating baffle board.....
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-05-01 12:56:41 UTC
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Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2018-05-01 13:15:31 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-05-01 13:18:13 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Leverton
2018-05-01 13:40:03 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
krw
2018-05-01 14:18:33 UTC
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Post by Nick Leverton
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...
Do they allow posting of a cup of tea - I cannot see it on the
prohibited list.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2018-05-01 14:44:33 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...
Do they allow posting of a cup of tea - I cannot see it on the
prohibited list.
Do they prohibit boiling liquids? Not that it would be boiling by the time
it was handed over the counter - unless the infinite probability drive is
used to power a heating element...
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-05-01 15:27:04 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...
Do they allow posting of a cup of tea - I cannot see it on the
prohibited list.
Do they prohibit boiling liquids? Not that it would be boiling by the time
it was handed over the counter - unless the infinite probability drive is
used to power a heating element...
Reading this conversation, I hear in my head the voices of Clegg et al in
Summer Wine. So much talent, sadly no longer with us.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Nick Odell
2018-05-06 18:40:38 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...
Do they allow posting of a cup of tea - I cannot see it on the
prohibited list.
Do they prohibit boiling liquids? Not that it would be boiling by the time
it was handed over the counter - unless the infinite probability drive is
used to power a heating element...
It might still be boiling, given the right conditions.

When I've bottled the last remnants of boiling jam in a piping hot jar,
it's sometimes continued boiling until lukewarm. I imagine that, given
the right conditions, a boiling cup of tea could continue boiling right
down to the triple point where ice, vapour and liquid can co-exist.

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-06 20:50:24 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by krw
Post by Mike
Post by krw
Post by Mike
a miniature infinite probability drive
Not allowed as it probably contains a battery.
No, solar powered.
Improbable.
Conventionally powered only by a cup of tea ...
Do they allow posting of a cup of tea - I cannot see it on the
prohibited list.
Do they prohibit boiling liquids? Not that it would be boiling by the time
it was handed over the counter - unless the infinite probability drive is
used to power a heating element...
It might still be boiling, given the right conditions.
When I've bottled the last remnants of boiling jam in a piping hot jar,
it's sometimes continued boiling until lukewarm. I imagine that, given
the right conditions, a boiling cup of tea could continue boiling right
down to the triple point where ice, vapour and liquid can co-exist.
You could consider the difference between "boiling" and "evaporating" as
quantitative rather than qualitative, so... Yes.
--
Sam Plusnet
Serena Blanchflower
2018-05-01 08:27:04 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
Ooh yes, one could have fun with this couldn’t one? Items of a ‘bedroom’
nature perhaps or ‘blackmail messages’, maybe vivid descriptions of items
of apparel with gussets....
I'm not sure what's been going on with the PO. They brought in this
rule, a few years ago and then dropped if for a year or so but have
recently re-introduced it.

When it came in, the first time, my carer and I had great fun thinking
of things of this nature, that she could declare on my behalf. In the
end we opted not to opt for embarrassing items but with a more frivolous
option.

Whenever she was posting something for me, we'd come up with a daft
description for whatever was inside[1]. For example, a brooch shaped
like a dachshund was declared simply as "a dachshund"[3]. One of the
women who worked in the PO used to really enjoy some of our descriptions
and her face would light up when she saw J in the queue.

On one occasion, I believe the entire queue ended up giggling[2]. A
friend of mine had a cat who was addicted to cardboard boxes and I'd
happened to receive one which looked just his size (and was shallow
enough to be cheap to post). By chance, the same day, I was sending
another friend a toy cat. Having "an empty box for a cat" and "a cat"
declared, provoked considerable amusement :)


[1] She would always know what was really in the parcel, so that she
could give a sensible version, if required.
[2] Although, on this occasion, the person behind the counter was
particularly po faced and didn't react at all. Her colleagues, at
neighbouring desks very much enjoyed it though.
[3] The PO clerk did offer to put a note on it, to ensure that it was
let out for regular runs.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. Who hides in the bakery at Christmas?
A. A mince spy!
Chris McMillan
2018-05-01 12:05:29 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
I may be naive but I’ve always put the actual item description on customs
labels - it may or may not enable the packet to get through customs, it
certainly doesn’t guarantee the item reaching its destination!

Sincerely Chris
krw
2018-05-01 12:57:48 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
I may be naive but I’ve always put the actual item description on customs
labels
Customs labels I accept because of the need for possible duty to be paid
by the recipient. Domestically however that does not apply (nor
technically at present within Europe).
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-05-01 17:55:41 UTC
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On Tue, 01 May 2018 12:05:29 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
I may be naive but I’ve always put the actual item description on customs
labels - it may or may not enable the packet to get through customs, it
certainly doesn’t guarantee the item reaching its destination!
My package was going to Sheffield - they're not a republic (yet).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2018-05-06 18:56:04 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 19:34:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?". That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
It's the sort of thing you see on a customs declaration label when buying
goods from abroad, along with a value. I think PO people have asked not
what is in the parcel but what is the value of the contents in the past -
or maybe that's the supplemental question if they think the answer to the
first sounds valuable. In the past I think I've said "gift" and then been
asked the value.
I too think krw may have a point but what I actually did when posting a
package to d#1 the other day was go into some detail about what the
contents were, to the possible embarrassment of the person serving me. One
has to take ones entertainment where one can ;)
I may be naive but I’ve always put the actual item description on customs
labels - it may or may not enable the packet to get through customs, it
certainly doesn’t guarantee the item reaching its destination!
If I'm sending gifts - which are almost always well below the value
threshold at which they might be taxed by the receiving country - I want
to be honest but I don't want to tell the recipient too much about what
they are going to open on the day. So I usually use an accurate
description for customs purposes which is misleading enough to not tell
the recipient anything. "Digital media" when I mean CD or DVD. That sort
of thing.

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2018-05-01 06:18:26 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?".  That is
private between me and the recipient.
That is a point that had never occurred to me.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
 So why is the right question not
posed?
They should probably pass you the list and ask if the package contains
anything on it but I think the answer to that question can be very vague
and general like "second hand goods", "clothing" or "documents".
Sounds good, though I still think krw has a point.
Post by Penny
Post by krw
Why is my response that there is nothing contained therein on the
restricted list not acceptable?
I've never tried that, it should have been.
A _possible_ reason (or at least argument: it may or may not be valid as
a reason) could be related to the matter of compensation.
<snip>

I suspect it's more a matter of ease; most people won't know the
regulations in detail and rather than expect them to read an entire
sheet of forbidden items and items which require special packaging while
people wait in the queue behind them, it's easier just to ask what's in
the package and enquire[1] further if necessary.

I haven't found it especially intrusive, although I can imagine that
some might.

[1] My spellchecker doesn't like "enquire". Cheek!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Fenny
2018-04-30 21:34:37 UTC
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Post by krw
I am not a terrorist. If I was I would probably lie anyway. Does
anyone know why they ask a question which simply annoys? And indeed
under GDPR may perhaps be illegal as it is stored on their system?
The content of the package isn't personal data.
--
Fenny
Serena Blanchflower
2018-05-01 08:12:57 UTC
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Post by krw
I understand that the above has to have limits of what may be sent to
comply with International regulations.
I also accept that the person undertaking the delivery of such items to
the Office of the Post should declare that the contents of any package
are not in contravention of the published limits.
However the question posed is "What is in the package?".  That is
private between me and the recipient.  So why is the right question not
posed?
Especially when the person handing the parcel over for posting isn't the
original sender. My helper had to phone me, from the post office,
recently when she was trying to post a parcel for me and was asked
(fairly rudely, in this instance) what was in it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A man who trusts nobody is apt to be the kind of man nobody trusts
(Harold MacMillan)
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