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Hot Cross Flatbreads
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Nick Odell
2017-04-14 10:37:15 UTC
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Title says it all really.

That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2017-04-14 12:19:11 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
--
Best wishes, Serena
Don't wait for your ship to come in, swim out to it. (Anon)
Mike
2017-04-14 12:31:01 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.πŸ˜’πŸ˜’πŸ˜’
--
Toodle Pip
Jane Vernon
2017-04-14 12:45:16 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.πŸ˜’πŸ˜’πŸ˜’
I, by contrast, this morning baked the biggest, lightest hot cross buns
I've ever made. They had plenty of spice. I also used quick yeast and
vitamin C and covered them with oiled clingfilm for the second rise,
which I've never done before, and prevented a crust forming before had a
chance to rise.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Nick Odell
2017-04-14 14:53:49 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 13:45:16 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.???
I, by contrast, this morning baked the biggest, lightest hot cross buns
I've ever made. They had plenty of spice. I also used quick yeast and
vitamin C and covered them with oiled clingfilm for the second rise,
which I've never done before, and prevented a crust forming before had a
chance to rise.
Congratulations! My sister's Hot Cross Buns and mince pies (she'd
found some left-over mincemeat in the back of the cupboard) came out
brilliantly too.

Nick
John Ashby
2017-04-14 16:36:08 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.πŸ˜’πŸ˜’πŸ˜’
I, by contrast, this morning baked the biggest, lightest hot cross buns
I've ever made. They had plenty of spice. I also used quick yeast and
vitamin C and covered them with oiled clingfilm for the second rise,
which I've never done before, and prevented a crust forming before had a
chance to rise.
Mine were pretty good, possibly slightly under spiced and could have
been a shade sweeter (I used the last of the mixed spice and guessed the
dark brown sugar (as I did the sultanas and mixed peel)). I did the
first rise overnight, then 40 mins in a 40C oven for the second rise.
Frozen fresh yeast which is coming to the end of its life (we get a
chunk from Tenko's (anti-), break it into mix-sized pieces and freeze)
so the first rise was not impressive but the second one went well.

No quartering, so they were Hot Not-Even-Mildly-Irritated Buns.

john

Nick Odell
2017-04-14 14:51:04 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
:)
Post by Mike
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.???
I think if I'd done it the 1920s way and kneaded it on the worktop it
would have incorporated much more flour and I'd have ended up with a
stiffer mix that was capable of rising upwards. What I got was a paste
that spread ever wider as the ferment took hold.

Oh well...

Nick
Peter Percival
2017-04-14 15:14:45 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Title says it all really.
That'll larn me to take a recipe from a 1920s cookbook and put it in
the breadmaker, won't it?
Does this mean you're now a Hot Cross Nick?
:)
Post by Mike
The added spices fight the yeast and as such kill the rise to a lesser or
greater extent.???
I think if I'd done it the 1920s way and kneaded it on the worktop it
would have incorporated much more flour and I'd have ended up with a
stiffer mix that was capable of rising upwards. What I got was a paste
that spread ever wider as the ferment took hold.
Oh well...
Nick
May I ask what you made your crosses with?
--
Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
to me what you really mean.
I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan
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