Discussion:
Right to repair rules come into force.
Add Reply
steve hague
2021-07-01 09:46:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
From today, but at least ten years too late. Manufacturers will do the
same as they have done for many years, offer the most demanded spares,
but at a price no one in their right mind would consider paying. This
means no-one finds out that the parts aren't actually stocked.
Typically, a replacement LCD TV screen would cost considerably more than
a new TV from the same manufacturer. Also, when I retired a couple of
years ago there was only one qualified/ accredited TV engineer left in
Cornwall, and he's a couple of years older than me. Who's going to do
the repairs? This horse has most definitely bolted.
Steve
Jim Easterbrook
2021-07-01 11:08:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
This horse has most definitely bolted.
Yeah, but at least you can fix the stable door now.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-07-01 11:56:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
From today, but at least ten years too late. Manufacturers will do the
same as they have done for many years, offer the most demanded spares,
but at a price no one in their right mind would consider paying. This
means no-one finds out that the parts aren't actually stocked.
Typically, a replacement LCD TV screen would cost considerably more
than a new TV from the same manufacturer. Also, when I retired a couple
of years ago there was only one qualified/ accredited TV engineer left
in Cornwall, and he's a couple of years older than me. Who's going to
do the repairs? This horse has most definitely bolted.
Steve
Couldn't agree more. The current media coverage seems to be
concentrating on people doing the repairs themselves; this is not what
the legislation is about - it's about continued parts availability. One
would _hope_ it covered pricing, but I wouldn't be surprised if it
didn't - and of course even if it does, the manufacturers will get round
it.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The average age at which a woman has her first child has passed 30.
Jason Cowley, RT 2016/6/11-17
Chris J Dixon
2021-07-01 12:28:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Couldn't agree more. The current media coverage seems to be
concentrating on people doing the repairs themselves; this is not what
the legislation is about - it's about continued parts availability. One
would _hope_ it covered pricing, but I wouldn't be surprised if it
didn't - and of course even if it does, the manufacturers will get round
it.
So we shouldn't hope for accessible repair instructions any time
soon then?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
steve hague
2021-07-01 15:05:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steve hague
From today, but at least ten years too late. Manufacturers will do the
same as they have done for many years, offer the most demanded spares,
but at a price no one in their right mind would consider paying. This
means no-one finds out that the parts aren't actually stocked.
Typically, a replacement LCD TV screen would cost considerably more
than a new TV from the same manufacturer. Also, when I retired a
couple of years ago there was only one qualified/ accredited TV
engineer left in Cornwall, and he's a couple of years older than me.
Who's going to do the repairs? This horse has most definitely bolted.
Steve
Couldn't agree more. The current media coverage seems to be
concentrating on people doing the repairs themselves; this is not what
the legislation is about - it's about continued parts availability. One
would _hope_ it covered pricing, but I wouldn't be surprised if it
didn't - and of course even if it does, the manufacturers will get round
it.
I wonder how the new legislation would affect this situation. I bought a
new electric lawnmower last year from a British supplier selling via
Amazon for just under £90. It worked perfectly well, and did the job I'd
bought it to do. A month or so ago it stopped working with a smell of
electrical burning. The motor had burned out. I contacted the supplier,
who told me they could supply me with a new motor. It would cost about
£60 and would take up to five months to arrive from China. It was two
months out of warranty. Not great customer relations.
Steve
Sam Plusnet
2021-07-01 20:33:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steve hague
From today, but at least ten years too late. Manufacturers will do the
same as they have done for many years, offer the most demanded spares,
but at a price no one in their right mind would consider paying. This
means no-one finds out that the parts aren't actually stocked.
Typically, a replacement LCD TV screen would cost considerably more
than a new TV from the same manufacturer. Also, when I retired a
couple of years ago there was only one qualified/ accredited TV
engineer left in Cornwall, and he's a couple of years older than me.
Who's going to do the repairs? This horse has most definitely bolted.
Steve
Couldn't agree more. The current media coverage seems to be
concentrating on people doing the repairs themselves; this is not what
the legislation is about - it's about continued parts availability. One
would _hope_ it covered pricing, but I wouldn't be surprised if it
didn't - and of course even if it does, the manufacturers will get round
it.
<An old codger speaks>
I remember when Belkin[1] guaranteed that any component in their
catalogue would remain available for at least (IIRC) 10 years.

[1] Once a venerable and respected supplier of electrical & electronic
components M'Lud.

We 'ad proper switches in my day, that didn't stop working after a
year's mild use.
--
Sam Plusnet
Loading...