Discussion:
Jack Woolley made me cry, twice
(too old to reply)
Penny
2020-05-28 10:47:22 UTC
Permalink
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.

That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".

Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.

I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.

My eyes are leaking again...

There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-05-28 12:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
Big hugs Penny

Chris
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-28 12:37:00 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 May 2020 12:00:16 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
Big hugs Penny
Chris
And from me too xxx
Sid Nuncius
2020-05-28 17:30:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
Big hugs Penny
And from me.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Min
2020-05-29 00:24:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
Big hugs Penny
And from me.
Big Hugs here as well.
--
Min
Serena Blanchflower
2020-05-29 08:48:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Big hugs Penny
and from me.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
War does not determine who is right - only who is left.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-28 12:04:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
We can say this on here: <BIG HUG>. (Now you've got _me_ vaguely teary,
and I've never known anyone so afflicted!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Play dirty. If a fellow contestant asks the audience if they've got any
requests for what he or she should play, reply, "Yeah... Monopoly."
Nick Odell
2020-05-28 18:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
YANAOU. Not that line but time after time I find myself in the middle
of an anecdote about something or other when something very intense
creeps up unexpectedly. There, mid sentence, my eyes well up and my
voice breaks. Fortunately I am in the company of a very patient and
understanding anecdotee.

Nick
krw
2020-05-29 08:37:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
The whole episode had me going I am afraid - not because of the
affliction but where I knew it would lead.

<<<HUGS>>>
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2020-05-29 11:17:23 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 May 2020 09:37:42 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
The whole episode had me going I am afraid - not because of the
affliction but where I knew it would lead.
<<<HUGS>>>
Thanks for all the hugs, much appreciated.
But I feel I should clarify - Ray's use of the phrase was a joky reference
to the scene, not an indication he was so afflicted.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jane Vernon
2020-05-29 17:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
Our local fireworks were on the following Saturday (5/11/08 was a
Wednesday) and when we were watching from an upstairs window, Ray said, "Is
this what we do?" in his own W. Midlands accent. He did it again for the
next four years or so, whenever we were watching fireworks from that
window.
I caught it again on the lunch-time repeat - similar result, not quite so
strong. I consciously avoided it on Sunday.
My eyes are leaking again...
There you go - something to read on a quiet Thursday.
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they? Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do. Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM. Hugs.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-29 20:20:48 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they? Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do. Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM. Hugs.
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"When _I_ saw him, he was dead." "uh, he looked exactly the same when he was
alive, except he was vertical." (The Trouble with Harry)
Penny
2020-05-29 21:55:50 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 May 2020 21:20:48 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they? Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do. Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM. Hugs.
Yes, somehow good.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
Hm, no, not like that at all, although there are pieces of music which stir
me in strange ways and Ray always wept at Dido's Lament.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-05-30 10:36:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 29 May 2020 21:20:48 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Post by Jane Vernon
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they? Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do. Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM. Hugs.
Yes, somehow good.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
Hm, no, not like that at all, although there are pieces of music which stir
me in strange ways and Ray always wept at Dido's Lament.
No accounting to how people find pieces of music. :)

Sincerely Chris
steve hague
2020-05-30 07:32:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
 That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and
Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Penny
 My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they?  Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do.  Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM.  Hugs.
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
I get that with June Tabor's version of Ewan McColl's "The first Time
Ever I Saw Your Face". It leaves me a blubbering wreck, but in a good way.
Steve
Nick Odell
2020-05-30 22:56:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 May 2020 08:32:11 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
 That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and
Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Penny
 My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they?  Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do.  Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM.  Hugs.
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
I get that with June Tabor's version of Ewan McColl's "The first Time
Ever I Saw Your Face". It leaves me a blubbering wreck, but in a good way.
Have you heard the version by Peggy Seeger unto whom perforce it was
written? The Soul Music programme on this song is well worth a listen
too, IMO https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07zz5y8

Nick
Penny
2020-05-30 20:20:10 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 May 2020 19:56:05 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Sat, 30 May 2020 08:32:11 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
I get that with June Tabor's version of Ewan McColl's "The first Time
Ever I Saw Your Face". It leaves me a blubbering wreck, but in a good way.
Have you heard the version by Peggy Seeger unto whom perforce it was
written? The Soul Music programme on this song is well worth a listen
too, IMO https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07zz5y8
Peggy Seeger's was the first version I ever heard. All the others at
college only knew the Roberta Flack version and didn't like the one I kept
playing in the print studio.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
steve hague
2020-05-31 07:46:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sat, 30 May 2020 08:32:11 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 29 May 2020 at 18:30:37, Jane Vernon
Post by Penny
It was daft really, I knew the line was coming, in a way I was looking
forward to it, I just didn't expect the power of the emotion when it
arrived.
 That scene from Bonfire Night. (5th November 2008) when Jack and
Peggy were
watching the fireworks from an upstairs window and Jack said, "Is this what
we do?".
[]
Post by Penny
 My eyes are leaking again...
[]
Ah, these things jump out at you sometimes, don't they?  Usually when
unexpected, IME.
For what it's worth, I always think it's good when they do.  Yes,
they're upsetting, but somehow so real, IYKWIM.  Hugs.
IKW_Y_M; it's happy weeping. I get it with certain bits of music* (and a
few film clips); odd, as many of the ones that affect me have no
particular connection to me. Can be a bit inconvenient/embarrassing,
though.
* Mostly tracks, rather than classical pieces. (Three or four Edith Piaf
tracks in particular, though I am getting better on those.)
I get that with June Tabor's version of Ewan McColl's "The first Time
Ever I Saw Your Face". It leaves me a blubbering wreck, but in a good way.
Have you heard the version by Peggy Seeger unto whom perforce it was
written? The Soul Music programme on this song is well worth a listen
too, IMO https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07zz5y8
Nick
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
Steve
krw
2020-05-31 21:29:36 UTC
Permalink
Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her down the phone.
I have even heard Peggy Seeger tell the story herself on stage at the
Barbican so am tempted to believe it is true.

Indeed You Tube has part of the evening.

--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-31 22:04:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-06-01 22:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.

Nick
krw
2020-06-02 12:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
Nick
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2020-06-02 18:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
Peggy Seeger is not my Mastermind specialist subject so some or all of
this could be wrong...

I believe he wrote the song in or around 1957. Thanks to Senator Joe
McCarthy and between at least 56-58, if Peggy Seeger had returned to
the USA she would have had her passport revoked: this was behind her
marriage of convenience to Alex Campbell - which incidentally took
place in Paris, did it not? Could she have been in Europe at the time
of the phone call?

Nick
steve hague
2020-06-02 15:43:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
Peggy Seeger is not my Mastermind specialist subject so some or all of
this could be wrong...
I believe he wrote the song in or around 1957. Thanks to Senator Joe
McCarthy and between at least 56-58, if Peggy Seeger had returned to
the USA she would have had her passport revoked: this was behind her
marriage of convenience to Alex Campbell - which incidentally took
place in Paris, did it not? Could she have been in Europe at the time
of the phone call?
Nick
My understanding is that she was in Scandinavia at the time. I could be
wrong, it happens occasionally, not as often as my wife says though.
Steve
John Ashby
2020-06-02 18:53:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
Peggy Seeger is not my Mastermind specialist subject so some or all of
this could be wrong...
I believe he wrote the song in or around 1957. Thanks to Senator Joe
McCarthy and between at least 56-58, if Peggy Seeger had returned to
the USA she would have had her passport revoked: this was behind her
marriage of convenience to Alex Campbell - which incidentally took
place in Paris, did it not? Could she have been in Europe at the time
of the phone call?
Nick
My understanding is that she was in Scandinavia at the time. I could be
wrong, it happens occasionally, not as often as my wife says though.
Steve
Wikipaedia is no use on this (as on so many things). On Ewan McColl's
page Peggy is touring the States when he teaches her the song and it is
McColl who was unable to go there because of his communist past. Peggy's
page has the story of the threatened revocation of her passport and
gives no location for her in 1957 beyond saying that her visa was due to
expire in 1958.

john
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-02 23:08:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
My understanding is that she was in Scandinavia at the time. I could be
wrong, it happens occasionally, not as often as my wife says though.
Wofes do tend to introduce a lot of false positives.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris J Dixon
2020-06-03 10:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
Peggy Seeger is not my Mastermind specialist subject so some or all of
this could be wrong...
I believe he wrote the song in or around 1957. Thanks to Senator Joe
McCarthy and between at least 56-58, if Peggy Seeger had returned to
the USA she would have had her passport revoked: this was behind her
marriage of convenience to Alex Campbell - which incidentally took
place in Paris, did it not? Could she have been in Europe at the time
of the phone call?
According to Peggy's memoir "First Time Ever" Page 110, she was
in the US.

"Ewan wrote, made a phone call whenever he could afford it. One
day I told him a Los Angeles radio show had asked me for a very
short, modern love song. 'How about this one?' and he sang 'The
First Time Ever I Saw Your Face'. Yes, that'll do nicely."

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Odell
2020-06-03 20:28:44 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steve hague
I'll give it a listen. Legend has it that McColl first sang it to her
down the phone. I think the first version I heard was Cleo Laine and
John Williams.
I wonder what that transatlantic call cost back then?
I am pretty sure she was living in England at that time.
I am pretty sure he was in the UK but she was visiting the States at the
time of the said conversation.
Peggy Seeger is not my Mastermind specialist subject so some or all of
this could be wrong...
I believe he wrote the song in or around 1957. Thanks to Senator Joe
McCarthy and between at least 56-58, if Peggy Seeger had returned to
the USA she would have had her passport revoked: this was behind her
marriage of convenience to Alex Campbell - which incidentally took
place in Paris, did it not? Could she have been in Europe at the time
of the phone call?
According to Peggy's memoir "First Time Ever" Page 110, she was
in the US.
"Ewan wrote, made a phone call whenever he could afford it. One
day I told him a Los Angeles radio show had asked me for a very
short, modern love song. 'How about this one?' and he sang 'The
First Time Ever I Saw Your Face'. Yes, that'll do nicely."
That is more or less what she said in the interview which was used in
the Soul Music programme so I guess that must be the Authorised
Version.

Not that I have had nothing better to do with my time but searching
for different takes on the story has been fascinating: different
language versions of Wikipedia seem not to be machine translations but
actually have different stories with different attributions which all
confuse rather than inform.

My favourite document that I have turned up has been:

Communist Passport Frauds: A Staff Study Prepared for the Subcommittee
to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and
Other Internal Security Laws July 11, 1958

..from which I offer this extract:

Another member of the "executive committee" was Peggy Seeger of Santa
Barbara, Calif. Margaret (Peggy) Seeger was issued passport 729373 on
July 11, 1955. She declared that she was visiting the Netherlands for
study at the University of Lieden. She is the sister of Pete Seeger, a
singer of radical songs at Communist functions who was indicted in
Federal court on March 26, 1957 for contempt of Congress in refusing
to answer questions before the House Committee on Un-American
Activities pertaining to his alleged affiliation with the Communist
Party. She and Guy Carawan engaged in banjo strumming and song as the
delegation started from Moscow for its China tour On April 19, 1958,
her passport was confiscated by order of the American Embassy in
London, because she had made the unauthorized trip to Communist China.




..engaged in banjo strumming and song... indeed!

Nick

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