Discussion:
This week's spoiler from the DF.
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2021-07-31 21:15:56 UTC
Permalink
Was it Professor Plum in the library with a candlestick? Or Colonel
Mustard in the study with a revolver? Or Mrs Aldridge in the kitchen
with one of her hefty Le Creuset frying pans - and a list of motives
as long as your arm? Ruairi, who’s set himself the daunting challenge
of lifting spirits at Willow Cottage, gets a game of Cluedo going. He
hopes for a cosy, domestic scene, but as the game heats up, one member
of the troubled and troublesome clan makes a confession. Meanwhile,
the doggedly decent Neil, who’s been struggling with recent events,
tries to do the right thing, but seems to be making matters worse.
(Is anyone happy in Ambridge?)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-07-31 23:11:32 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 31 Jul 2021 at 22:15:56, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
wrote (my responses usually follow points raised):
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
(Is anyone happy in Ambridge?)
We haven't heard from Jim for _ages_. (He usually - childhood traumas
excepted - seems a fairly happy person to me. Can't think of anyone else
though!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Train sets are like breasts: they are intended for children but it's dads who
have the most fun playing with them. - Nick Odell in UMRA, 2021-2-10
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 08:07:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
(Is anyone happy in Ambridge?)
We haven't heard from Jim for _ages_. (He usually - childhood traumas
excepted - seems a fairly happy person to me. Can't think of anyone else
though!)
Haven’t heard Christine or Cathy say an unhappy word in ages.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Nick Odell
2021-08-01 10:34:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 00:11:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Train sets are like breasts: they are intended for children but it's dads who
have the most fun playing with them. - Nick Odell in UMRA, 2021-2-10
No, no, no. Definitely no.

I was quoting somebody else when I said that.

Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 10:52:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 00:11:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Train sets are like breasts: they are intended for children but it's dads who
have the most fun playing with them. - Nick Odell in UMRA, 2021-2-10
No, no, no. Definitely no.
I was quoting somebody else when I said that.
Nick
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 13:15:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
--
We've still got one of those in the attic. Our boys enjoyed building meccano
models for it to drive.
Rosemary
I once built a clock to be driven by the engine, the hours literally ‘flew
by’;-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Tony Smith
2021-08-01 14:46:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
One of my brothers had one. He used to run it along a long corridor where dad worked.
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 16:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
One of my brothers had one. He used to run it along a long corridor where dad worked.
Mine was the simple static model (and had a slightly dented steam chimney)
that my parents bought me for Christmas one year; I think they bought it as
‘shop soiled’ because of the dented chimney. Mine dew, I say ‘static’ but
when it really revved up, the vibration meant the whole caboodle used to
move across the table so had to to be stood on some layers of felt to keep
it still.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sid Nuncius
2021-08-01 18:15:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith
2021-08-01 18:22:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Jetex?
steve hague
2021-08-01 19:10:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Jetex?
Flipping Jetex. I remember building various models which I thought would
be powered by this amazing little jet engine, only to find that
the supportng structure had burst into flames or melted before it had
gone twenty feet. We had no access to titanium when I were a lad.
Steve
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 19:57:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Jetex?
Flipping Jetex. I remember building various models which I thought would
be powered by this amazing little jet engine, only to find that
the supportng structure had burst into flames or melted before it had
gone twenty feet. We had no access to titanium when I were a lad.
Steve
I flew Jetex powered aircraft and used a small pad of asbestos wrapped
around the balsa wood where the Jetex motor was mounted; when it landed, we
had to handle the motor with a leather pad (an old wallet) so we could
release it from its’ sprung mount cradle assembly. Used to have good and
bad flights with those motors, if the fuse cleared the orifice cleanly, all
would be well, but, if any trace of fuse material blocked the jet, then
flight power was so reduced as to be very disappointing.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Tony Smith
2021-08-01 20:32:15 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, 1 August 2021 at 20:57:35 UTC+1, Mike McMillan wrote:
. Used to have good and
Post by Mike McMillan
bad flights with those motors, if the fuse cleared the orifice cleanly, all
would be well, but, if any trace of fuse material blocked the jet, then
flight power was so reduced as to be very disappointing.
Maybe that was it. My attempts were so disappointing I gave up on Jetex.
Nick Odell
2021-08-01 23:04:33 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 19:57:34 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Sid Nuncius
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Jetex?
Flipping Jetex. I remember building various models which I thought would
be powered by this amazing little jet engine, only to find that
the supportng structure had burst into flames or melted before it had
gone twenty feet. We had no access to titanium when I were a lad.
Steve
I flew Jetex powered aircraft and used a small pad of asbestos wrapped
around the balsa wood where the Jetex motor was mounted; when it landed, we
had to handle the motor with a leather pad (an old wallet) so we could
release it from its’ sprung mount cradle assembly. Used to have good and
bad flights with those motors, if the fuse cleared the orifice cleanly, all
would be well, but, if any trace of fuse material blocked the jet, then
flight power was so reduced as to be very disappointing.
My first and only Jetex-powered balsa model should have survived its
test flight but sadly that was not to be. The balsa was fine: it was
protected by the asbestos patch. I trimmed the glide path before
trying it out under power and after I lit the fuse, it soared away
over Sunbury Rec and glided back to earth with sparks still streaming
from the jet exhaust.

And the boy who was with me in the park thought the sparks meant that
it was on fire and he stamped on the model to put the blaze out.

Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-08-02 07:15:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 19:57:34 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Sid Nuncius
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Jetex?
Flipping Jetex. I remember building various models which I thought would
be powered by this amazing little jet engine, only to find that
the supportng structure had burst into flames or melted before it had
gone twenty feet. We had no access to titanium when I were a lad.
Steve
I flew Jetex powered aircraft and used a small pad of asbestos wrapped
around the balsa wood where the Jetex motor was mounted; when it landed, we
had to handle the motor with a leather pad (an old wallet) so we could
release it from its’ sprung mount cradle assembly. Used to have good and
bad flights with those motors, if the fuse cleared the orifice cleanly, all
would be well, but, if any trace of fuse material blocked the jet, then
flight power was so reduced as to be very disappointing.
My first and only Jetex-powered balsa model should have survived its
test flight but sadly that was not to be. The balsa was fine: it was
protected by the asbestos patch. I trimmed the glide path before
trying it out under power and after I lit the fuse, it soared away
over Sunbury Rec and glided back to earth with sparks still streaming
from the jet exhaust.
And the boy who was with me in the park thought the sparks meant that
it was on fire and he stamped on the model to put the blaze out.
Nick
Maybe because of my limited sight, I could not see any sparks, just the
smoke / exhaust gases that escaped and became a plume trail behind the
soaring aircraft.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-08-01 19:51:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan as I understand it.
Sid Nuncius
2021-08-02 05:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82). I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it. Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller! Thanks, Mike. Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.

The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though. It may come to me at some point.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Finlay
2021-08-02 12:32:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate. The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.

The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
Mike McMillan
2021-08-02 12:54:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Finlay
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate. The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.
The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
If you have asbestos gloves, a longish stick to shake and have no need of
emptying your bladder, you may wish to visit:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexamethylenetetramine
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
DavidK
2021-08-02 14:12:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by John Finlay
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate. The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.
The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
If you have asbestos gloves, a longish stick to shake and have no need of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexamethylenetetramine
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.

I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
Mike Ruddock
2021-08-02 14:23:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate.  The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.
The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
If you have asbestos gloves, a longish stick to shake and have no need of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexamethylenetetramine
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
When I were a lad, evacuated to Somerset in the war, we used to put a
small piece of calcium carbide in the inkwell of a desk. In those days,
before fountain pens (biros hadn't been invented) each desk has its own
pot of ink, which sat in a small hole and could be covered by a little
metal slide when not in use. A bit of carbide would make the ink foam up
round the edges of the metal slide and also produce a dank smell. Oh
what fun (?)

Mike Ruddock
Vicky Ayech
2021-08-02 16:20:55 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 2 Aug 2021 15:23:36 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
When I were a lad, evacuated to Somerset in the war, we used to put a
small piece of calcium carbide in the inkwell of a desk. In those days,
before fountain pens (biros hadn't been invented) each desk has its own
pot of ink, which sat in a small hole and could be covered by a little
metal slide when not in use. A bit of carbide would make the ink foam up
Don't be silly! You can't be old enough to have been evacuated in the
war.
Chris J Dixon
2021-08-03 07:47:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
In those days,
before fountain pens (biros hadn't been invented) each desk has its own
pot of ink, which sat in a small hole and could be covered by a little
metal slide when not in use. A bit of carbide would make the ink foam up
round the edges of the metal slide and also produce a dank smell. Oh
what fun (?)
We certainly had the inkwells at primary school, but I had no
access to carbide, as cycle lights had evolved to dynamos, though
I was always a little concerned on my childhood cycle trips that
making a right turn would place me in the middle of the road with
no lights.

Grammar school desks did have inkwell provision, but this was
because it made them exempt from purchase tax.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike McMillan
2021-08-02 15:51:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by John Finlay
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate. The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.
The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
If you have asbestos gloves, a longish stick to shake and have no need of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexamethylenetetramine
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
Sounds like a ‘Just Willyerm’ type story to me…
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-08-02 15:53:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by John Finlay
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike McMillan
As a lad, I had a Mammary steam engine powered by methylated spirit … or
was it a Mamod?
I remember them also powered by a solid fuel tablet with a specific
name. (We used them when I was teaching science c.1979-82).  I'm blowed
if I can think of the name; I've found Mamod, Hexi and a couple of
others by googling, but I don't think that was it.  Anyone remember?
Possibly Meta Tablets; solid methylated spirit
That's the feller!  Thanks, Mike.  Those are definitely the ones which
went with Meccano or whatever when I were a nipper.
The ones we used later in the science lab were called something else,
though.  It may come to me at some point.
The chemical used in Jetex tablets was ammonium dichromate. The green
residue of chromium oxide that had to be cleared out at the end of the
process was/is quite toxic.
The chemical in the (white) tablets used in later Mamod steam engines
and in camping stoves is called Hexamine. I don't know its trade names
though.
If you have asbestos gloves, a longish stick to shake and have no need of
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexamethylenetetramine
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
A friend had a lamp on his bicycle which was powered from a screw topped
tube in which he put powder - sounds like the sort of thing of which you
speak.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-08-02 16:24:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
When we lived in Chicago for a year in 1963/64, my friend Jay had a
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/big-bang-60mm-carbide-cannon-vintage-1854274683
My memory is that we loaded it with calcium carbide, closed the breech
and added some water down the barrel, then left it for a short while
(probably 15 seconds or so). Then you hit the gubbins sticking out of
the breech (the "striker" apparently) causing a spark and a very
satisfactory bang and flash as the acetylene[1] combusted. I have no
idea whether they were ever available/legal here. I doubt it; neither
of us blew any of our fingers off, but it's potentially pretty
dangerous, I'd think. For a couple of 9/10-year-old boys it was
terrific fun, though.
[1] Or ethyne, for the more modern organic chemist.
Is this where the ‘Big Bang Theory’ came from?;-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-02 18:00:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
When we lived in Chicago for a year in 1963/64, my friend Jay had a
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/big-bang-60mm-carbide-cannon-vintage-1854274683
My memory is that we loaded it with calcium carbide, closed the breech
and added some water down the barrel, then left it for a short while
(probably 15 seconds or so).  Then you hit the gubbins sticking out of
the breech (the "striker" apparently) causing a spark and a very
satisfactory bang and flash as the acetylene[1] combusted.  I have no
idea whether they were ever available/legal here.  I doubt it; neither
of us blew any of our fingers off, but it's potentially pretty
dangerous, I'd think.  For a couple of 9/10-year-old boys it was
terrific fun, though.
[1] Or ethyne, for the more modern organic chemist.
Don't try this at home kids:


--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-08-03 07:43:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
The book, calcium carbide, or the greenhouse?
Well, not the greenhouse, that was a smashing hit.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-03 22:00:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
The book, calcium carbide, or the greenhouse?
Well, not the greenhouse, that was a smashing hit.
It started out as a 6 x 8, but ended up as a 12 x 20?
(he asked, expansively)
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2021-08-04 07:28:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
I can't remember the name of children's book in which the gang make a
bomb that shatters the neighbours greenhouse. I don't suppose it is on
sale any more.
The book, calcium carbide, or the greenhouse?
Well, not the greenhouse, that was a smashing hit.
It started out as a 6 x 8, but ended up as a 12 x 20?
(he asked, expansively)
Ooh, panefull.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-08-03 08:03:46 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 2 Aug 2021 16:54:07 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
When we lived in Chicago for a year in 1963/64, my friend Jay had a
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/big-bang-60mm-carbide-cannon-vintage-1854274683
My memory is that we loaded it with calcium carbide, closed the breech
and added some water down the barrel, then left it for a short while
(probably 15 seconds or so). Then you hit the gubbins sticking out of
the breech (the "striker" apparently) causing a spark and a very
satisfactory bang and flash as the acetylene[1] combusted. I have no
idea whether they were ever available/legal here. I doubt it; neither
of us blew any of our fingers off, but it's potentially pretty
dangerous, I'd think. For a couple of 9/10-year-old boys it was
terrific fun, though.
[1] Or ethyne, for the more modern organic chemist.
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2021-08-03 08:49:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.

I don't know whether others did. I didn't.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2021-08-03 13:44:22 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 3 Aug 2021 09:49:01 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.
He sang of poisoning pigeons in the park, rather than causing them to
explode.

Was it Eddie Grundy who talked of leaving brandy-soaked raisins out for
pheasants so they got drunk and fell off their roosts in the evening, or
did I read that somewhere?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-08-03 15:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.
He sang of poisoning pigeons in the park, rather than causing them to
explode.
Was it Eddie Grundy who talked of leaving brandy-soaked raisins out for
pheasants so they got drunk and fell off their roosts in the evening, or
did I read that somewhere?
Pre marinated?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
John Ashby
2021-08-03 17:23:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.
He sang of poisoning pigeons in the park, rather than causing them to
explode.
Was it Eddie Grundy who talked of leaving brandy-soaked raisins out for
pheasants so they got drunk and fell off their roosts in the evening, or
did I read that somewhere?
Danny, the Champion of the World.

john
Penny
2021-08-03 22:10:50 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 3 Aug 2021 18:23:08 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.
He sang of poisoning pigeons in the park, rather than causing them to
explode.
Was it Eddie Grundy who talked of leaving brandy-soaked raisins out for
pheasants so they got drunk and fell off their roosts in the evening, or
did I read that somewhere?
Danny, the Champion of the World.
Of course! Thank you.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-03 21:58:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Was it Eddie Grundy who talked of leaving brandy-soaked raisins out for
pheasants so they got drunk and fell off their roosts in the evening, or
did I read that somewhere?
I'm sure that if I tried that, it would cost me far more in brandy (and
raisins) than I would gain from any potential pheasants.

We have plenty of hedgehogs in the garden, but the wrong sort of clay.
--
Sam Plusnet
steve hague
2021-08-03 15:08:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YA Tom Lehrer AICM5 satirical songs.
I don't know whether others did.  I didn't.
Neither did I. I thought it would ruin the flavour.
Steve
Mike McMillan
2021-08-03 09:11:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
When we lived in Chicago for a year in 1963/64, my friend Jay had a
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/big-bang-60mm-carbide-cannon-vintage-1854274683
My memory is that we loaded it with calcium carbide, closed the breech
and added some water down the barrel, then left it for a short while
(probably 15 seconds or so). Then you hit the gubbins sticking out of
the breech (the "striker" apparently) causing a spark and a very
satisfactory bang and flash as the acetylene[1] combusted. I have no
idea whether they were ever available/legal here. I doubt it; neither
of us blew any of our fingers off, but it's potentially pretty
dangerous, I'd think. For a couple of 9/10-year-old boys it was
terrific fun, though.
[1] Or ethyne, for the more modern organic chemist.
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YAJakeThackeryAICM£5
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-08-03 09:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I remember being able to buy calcium carbide for a bicycle lamp but I
don't remember buying it or anyone using it.
When we lived in Chicago for a year in 1963/64, my friend Jay had a
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/big-bang-60mm-carbide-cannon-vintage-1854274683
My memory is that we loaded it with calcium carbide, closed the breech
and added some water down the barrel, then left it for a short while
(probably 15 seconds or so). Then you hit the gubbins sticking out of
the breech (the "striker" apparently) causing a spark and a very
satisfactory bang and flash as the acetylene[1] combusted. I have no
idea whether they were ever available/legal here. I doubt it; neither
of us blew any of our fingers off, but it's potentially pretty
dangerous, I'd think. For a couple of 9/10-year-old boys it was
terrific fun, though.
[1] Or ethyne, for the more modern organic chemist.
Was it carbide pellets which small boys used to feed to pigeons?
YAJakeThackeryAICM£5
Sorry, scrap that, Sid was right, I was wrong.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-08-01 16:27:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 at 11:34:37, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 00:11:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Train sets are like breasts: they are intended for children but it's dads who
have the most fun playing with them. - Nick Odell in UMRA, 2021-2-10
No, no, no. Definitely no.
I was quoting somebody else when I said that.
Nick
Quote file now amended to make this clear! (You don't remember who you
were quoting, do you?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

More people watch live theatre every year than Premier League football
matches. - Libby Purves, RT 2017/9/30-10/6
Nick Odell
2021-08-01 17:27:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 17:27:13 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 at 11:34:37, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 1 Aug 2021 00:11:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Train sets are like breasts: they are intended for children but it's dads who
have the most fun playing with them. - Nick Odell in UMRA, 2021-2-10
No, no, no. Definitely no.
I was quoting somebody else when I said that.
Nick
Quote file now amended to make this clear! (You don't remember who you
were quoting, do you?)
Looking back at the Feb 10th post I followed it up with a somewhat
cryptic disclaimer but must apologise for not making it clearer.

I don't know who said it first but if you Google breasts train sets or
train sets breasts[1] you will find plenty of occurrences that predate
mine.

Nick
[1]I checked both variations to make sure they were SFW[2]
[2]Up to the end of the first page, at any rate
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