Discussion:
Ask EU: Tablets
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Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-18 14:54:33 UTC
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Permalink
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.

I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.

At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.

Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
--
Best wishes, Serena
I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure.
Paul Herber
2019-06-18 15:09:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-18 17:38:01 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
--
Best wishes, Serena
Expect nothing. Live frugally on surprise (Alice Walker)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-18 19:46:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
(I'd be interested in that too - but my experience of Android is limited
to finding it goes out of date at least as fast as Windows.)

Do you do much typing - that is, do you compose emails, or just read
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases that
has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then how about
an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're worried about
battery life. If the cost of that is beyond your budget, or you don't
like the idea of Windows 10, then the applications you describe -
emails, browsing, and non-demanding games - will run happily on even a
moderate second-hand Windows 7 one: the only thing I'm not sure about is
TV. When you say it's your TV, do you mean you plug an aerial into it,
or just get it online? If the latter, then again the s/h 7 laptop should
suffice, unless you're going to watch a lot of 4K TV. (If an aerial,
then that means a TV stick: I _think_ again the s/h 7 laptop will handle
it, but I won't say so for sure as I've not tried it.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I've never really "got" sport or physical exercise. The only muscle I've ever
enjoyed exercising is the one between my ears. - Beryl Hales, Radio Times
24-30 March 2012
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-19 08:06:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
 My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
(I'd be interested in that too - but my experience of Android is limited
to finding it goes out of date at least as fast as Windows.)
Do you do much typing - that is, do you compose emails, or just read
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases that
has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then how about
an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're worried about
battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that
changing all that much). As I think that, even if I end up using it for
slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this
would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth
keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing on it, at
the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that much). As I
think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more things which
would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be occasional, so
I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I could get out when
needed.

For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have) is
that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on and
it's ready to go. My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it when
I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
If the cost of that is beyond your budget, or you don't
like the idea of Windows 10, then the applications you describe -
emails, browsing, and non-demanding games - will run happily on even a
moderate second-hand Windows 7 one: the only thing I'm not sure about is
TV.
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
When you say it's your TV, do you mean you plug an aerial into it,
or just get it online? If the latter, then again the s/h 7 laptop should
suffice, unless you're going to watch a lot of 4K TV. (If an aerial,
then that means a TV stick: I _think_ again the s/h 7 laptop will handle
it, but I won't say so for sure as I've not tried it.)
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online. That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I got
rid of my TV.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I like nonsense; it wakes up the brain cells (Dr. Seuss)
Mike
2019-06-19 08:19:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
 My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
(I'd be interested in that too - but my experience of Android is limited
to finding it goes out of date at least as fast as Windows.)
Do you do much typing - that is, do you compose emails, or just read
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases that
has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then how about
an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're worried about
battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that
changing all that much). As I think that, even if I end up using it for
slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this
would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth
keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing on it, at
the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that much). As I
think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more things which
would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be occasional, so
I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I could get out when
needed.
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have) is
that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on and
it's ready to go. My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it when
I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
If the cost of that is beyond your budget, or you don't
like the idea of Windows 10, then the applications you describe -
emails, browsing, and non-demanding games - will run happily on even a
moderate second-hand Windows 7 one: the only thing I'm not sure about is
TV.
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
When you say it's your TV, do you mean you plug an aerial into it,
or just get it online? If the latter, then again the s/h 7 laptop should
suffice, unless you're going to watch a lot of 4K TV. (If an aerial,
then that means a TV stick: I _think_ again the s/h 7 laptop will handle
it, but I won't say so for sure as I've not tried it.)
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online. That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I got
rid of my TV.
I see your current set up works well for ‘copy and paste’ commands anyway!
;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-19 09:56:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
 My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
(I'd be interested in that too - but my experience of Android is limited
to finding it goes out of date at least as fast as Windows.)
Do you do much typing - that is, do you compose emails, or just read
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases that
has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then how about
an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're worried about
battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that
changing all that much). As I think that, even if I end up using it for
slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this
would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth
keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing on it, at
the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that much). As I
think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more things which
would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be occasional, so
I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I could get out when
needed.
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have) is
that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on and
it's ready to go. My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it when
I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
If the cost of that is beyond your budget, or you don't
like the idea of Windows 10, then the applications you describe -
emails, browsing, and non-demanding games - will run happily on even a
moderate second-hand Windows 7 one: the only thing I'm not sure about is
TV.
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
When you say it's your TV, do you mean you plug an aerial into it,
or just get it online? If the latter, then again the s/h 7 laptop should
suffice, unless you're going to watch a lot of 4K TV. (If an aerial,
then that means a TV stick: I _think_ again the s/h 7 laptop will handle
it, but I won't say so for sure as I've not tried it.)
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online. That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I got
rid of my TV.
I see your current set up works well for ‘copy and paste’ commands anyway!
;-)))
On my current set up, I only have access to usenet from my desktop
machine, downstairs or my "proper" laptop, both running Windows 10. I
don't have it available on my tablet. Copy and paste is something I
struggle with on Android and just the sort of thing I might find easier
with a Windows machine.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns
it on, I go to the library and read a good book (Groucho Marx)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-19 10:36:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@brightview.co.uk>, Serena
Blanchflower <***@blanchflower.me.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases
that has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then
how about an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're
worried about battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate
that changing all that much). As I think that, even if I end up using
it for slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard,
this would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a
bluetooth keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing
Well, most (all I think) of the tablet-cases-with-a-keyboard-in are
bluetooth anyway ...
Post by Serena Blanchflower
on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that
much). As I think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more
things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be
occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I could
get out when needed.
... so it wouldn't need "getting out".
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have)
is that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on
and it's ready to go. My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it
when I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
AIUI, Windows 10 can be used in - I can't remember which is the right
term, hibernate or sleep mode, sleep I think - which means you don't
actually shut it down, so it comes up almost immediately anyway.
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online. That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I
got rid of my TV.
I suspect a W10 ultralight laptop (the sort with no hard disc or optical
drive) would suit your needs best, other than cost; I haven't really
looked into them, but I rather suspect they cost more than a
tablet-plus-keyboard-case. (Especially as you can split the latter - buy
the tablet now and the case/keyboard later.) Have a look!

jpeg
--


Three- (or four-) way referendum, if we _have_ to have another one.

(Where has the "treat northern Ireland differently" option gone?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Science isn't about being right every time, or even most of the time. It is
about being more right over time and fixing what it got wrong.
- Scott Adams, 2015-2-2
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 14:24:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases
that  has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then
how about  an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if you're
worried about  battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate
that changing all that much).  As I think that, even if I end up using
it for slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard,
this would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a
bluetooth keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing
Well, most (all I think) of the tablet-cases-with-a-keyboard-in are
bluetooth anyway ...
That sounds useful.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that
much).  As I think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more
things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be
occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I
could get out when needed.
.... so it wouldn't need "getting out".
Except, the point is that most of the time, I'd rather not have the
keyboard out. It's easier reading / watching a tablet without a
keyboard around than one with a keyboard attached, at least when you're
in bed.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have)
is that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on
and it's ready to go.  My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it
when I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
AIUI, Windows 10 can be used in - I can't remember which is the right
term, hibernate or sleep mode, sleep I think - which means you don't
actually shut it down, so it comes up almost immediately anyway.
Still not as quick as a tablet to wake up.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online.  That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I
got rid of my TV.
I suspect a W10 ultralight laptop (the sort with no hard disc or optical
drive) would suit your needs best, other than cost; I haven't really
looked into them, but I rather suspect they cost more than a
tablet-plus-keyboard-case. (Especially as you can split the latter - buy
the tablet now and the case/keyboard later.) Have a look!
Except that, most of the time, I don't want a laptop with keyboard.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns
it on, I go to the library and read a good book (Groucho Marx)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-21 01:10:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases
that  has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then
how about  an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if
you're worried about  battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate
that changing all that much).  As I think that, even if I end up
using it for slightly more things which would benefit from a real
keyboard, this would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better
with a bluetooth keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do much typing
Well, most (all I think) of the tablet-cases-with-a-keyboard-in are
bluetooth anyway ...
That sounds useful.
This is an example of the sort of thing I'm talking about:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Universal-Bluetooth-UK-Layout-Keyboard-Case-Cover-For-Samsung-Galaxy-Tab-A-10-1/401622406922?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX
%3AIT&var=671366775176&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
That's the one I just bought my brother for his birthday for his Galaxy
tablet. As you'll see, it's just a wraparound case for the tablet, with
a keyboard the same sort of size as the tablet - it's not a full-size
keyboard. For something that's basically a piece of glass (or seems to
me to be that), I don't think I'd ever have a tablet for long without at
least getting some sort of cover for it anyway, but maybe you're a lot
less clumsy than I am. And if I was bothering with a case, I might as
well get a keyboard too. The ability of the case to prop up the tablet
you don't have to use.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that
much).  As I think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more
things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be
occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I
could get out when needed.
.... so it wouldn't need "getting out".
Except, the point is that most of the time, I'd rather not have the
keyboard out. It's easier reading / watching a tablet without a
keyboard around than one with a keyboard attached, at least when you're
in bed.
See the link. The keyboard is part of the case, and doesn't add width or
length to the tablet.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also
have) is that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up,
switch it on and it's ready to go.  My tablet generally lives
upstairs and I use it when I'm in bed and I really don't want the
faff of the laptop.
AIUI, Windows 10 can be used in - I can't remember which is the right
term, hibernate or sleep mode, sleep I think - which means you don't
actually shut it down, so it comes up almost immediately anyway.
Still not as quick as a tablet to wake up.
There's anotherrat in this thread who (I think) has implied that, if it
does take longer, it's not enough longer to cause him/her inconvenience.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online.  That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I
got rid of my TV.
I suspect a W10 ultralight laptop (the sort with no hard disc or
optical drive) would suit your needs best, other than cost; I haven't
really looked into them, but I rather suspect they cost more than a
tablet-plus-keyboard-case. (Especially as you can split the latter -
buy the tablet now and the case/keyboard later.) Have a look!
Except that, most of the time, I don't want a laptop with keyboard.
Well, there are those odd swivelly ones, that you use as a tablet some
of the time. They have odd hinges (or whatever). I don't know if they're
still "the thing" - I don't think I've seen any lately (but I haven't
been into new-computer stores much).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Bread is lovely, don't get me wrong. But it's not cake. Or it's rubbish cake.
I always thought that bread needed more sugar and some icing. - Sarah Millican
(Radio Times 11-17 May 2013)
the Omrud
2019-06-22 09:45:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
them, on your tablet? If so, then I presume one of the tablet cases
that  has a keyboard in it is tempting. If _that_ is tempting, then
how about  an ultralight laptop? One with an SSD, probably, if
you're  worried about  battery life.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate
that changing all that much).  As I think that, even if I end up
using  it for slightly more things which would benefit from a real
keyboard,  this would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better
with a  bluetooth keyboard I could get out when needed.I don't do
much typing
 Well, most (all I think) of the tablet-cases-with-a-keyboard-in are
bluetooth anyway ...
That sounds useful.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Universal-Bluetooth-UK-Layout-Keyboard-Case-Cover-For-Samsung-Galaxy-Tab-A-10-1/401622406922?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX
%3AIT&var=671366775176&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
That's the one I just bought my brother for his birthday for his Galaxy
tablet. As you'll see, it's just a wraparound case for the tablet, with
a keyboard the same sort of size as the tablet - it's not a full-size
keyboard. For something that's basically a piece of glass (or seems to
me to be that), I don't think I'd ever have a tablet for long without at
least getting some sort of cover for it anyway, but maybe you're a lot
less clumsy than I am. And if I was bothering with a case, I might as
well get a keyboard too. The ability of the case to prop up the tablet
you don't have to use.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that changing all that
much).  As I think that, even if I end up using it for slightly more
things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this would only be
occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth keyboard I
could get out when needed.
 .... so it wouldn't need "getting out".
Except, the point is that most of the time, I'd rather not have the
keyboard out.  It's easier reading / watching a tablet without a
keyboard around than one with a keyboard attached, at least when
you're in bed.
See the link. The keyboard is part of the case, and doesn't add width or
length to the tablet.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also
have)  is that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up,
switch it on  and it's ready to go.  My tablet generally lives
upstairs and I use it  when I'm in bed and I really don't want the
faff of the laptop.
AIUI, Windows 10 can be used in - I can't remember which is the right
term, hibernate or sleep mode, sleep I think - which means you don't
actually shut it down, so it comes up almost immediately anyway.
Still not as quick as a tablet to wake up.
There's anotherrat in this thread who (I think) has implied that, if it
does take longer, it's not enough longer to cause him/her inconvenience.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Windows 10 is fine for me and would be my preference.
I don't have a TV and rarely watch programmes but, when I do, it's
online.  That was the original reason I bought my old tablet, when I
got rid of my TV.
I suspect a W10 ultralight laptop (the sort with no hard disc or
optical  drive) would suit your needs best, other than cost; I
haven't really  looked into them, but I rather suspect they cost more
than a tablet-plus-keyboard-case. (Especially as you can split the
latter - buy  the tablet now and the case/keyboard later.) Have a look!
Except that, most of the time, I don't want a laptop with keyboard.
Well, there are those odd swivelly ones, that you use as a tablet some
of the time. They have odd hinges (or whatever). I don't know if they're
still "the thing" - I don't think I've seen any lately (but I haven't
been into new-computer stores much).
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
--
David
krw
2019-06-22 11:58:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it. The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that I
have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.

It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2019-06-22 12:04:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it.  The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that I
have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Yebbut if it's not booting from a kernel on the SSD it will be just the
same as if the SSD wasn't there.
Peter Withey
2019-06-23 09:23:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it. The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that I
have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.
Reboots after an update it usually takes longer but on my Win 10
system messages are displayed saying how far along the process it is
at that moment. Doesn't yours?
Post by krw
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Just checked mine. 40 seconds from power-up to log-in screen.
No complaints here.
--
Pete
krw
2019-06-23 13:54:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
Post by krw
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it. The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that I
have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.
Reboots after an update it usually takes longer but on my Win 10
system messages are displayed saying how far along the process it is
at that moment. Doesn't yours?
Blank screen for considerable periods at each reboot.
Post by Peter Withey
Post by krw
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Just checked mine. 40 seconds from power-up to log-in screen.
No complaints here.
If it was 40 seconds I doubt I could make a cup of coffee whilst it
reboots. I have done so.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
the Omrud
2019-06-24 10:10:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it.  The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that I
have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Strange.

I just checked my laptop (SSDs only). 25 seconds from pressing the ON
button to my being able to enter the login PIN. About 45 seconds in
total before all my many background processes had loaded and the CPU
usage dropped down.
--
David
BrritSki
2019-06-24 11:49:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it.  The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long that
I have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has died a
death, turned the power off at the back of the machine (impossible to
reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up from scratch.
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Strange.
I just checked my laptop (SSDs only).  25 seconds from pressing the ON
button to my being able to enter the login PIN.  About 45 seconds in
total before all my many background processes had loaded and the CPU
usage dropped down.
Mine takes about 5 seconds to wake from sleep. Not sure about a complete
reboot. Not as fast as yours, but less than a minute though.
the Omrud
2019-06-24 13:44:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
W10 on an SSD starts so fast that it's not work using sleep or hibernate.
Not in this house does it.  The PC is left on permanently and reboots
needed in connection with Microsoft product releases take so long
that I have in the past come to the conclusion that the machine has
died a death, turned the power off at the back of the machine
(impossible to reach easily) pulled the plug out and started it up
from scratch.
It is clearly the slowest booting PC I have experienced and it
definitely has an SSD because I upgraded it personally.
Strange.
I just checked my laptop (SSDs only).  25 seconds from pressing the ON
button to my being able to enter the login PIN.  About 45 seconds in
total before all my many background processes had loaded and the CPU
usage dropped down.
Mine takes about 5 seconds to wake from sleep. Not sure about a complete
reboot. Not as fast as yours, but less than a minute though.
Fair enough, it is quicker. 4 seconds to login screen, then another
couple of seconds to be back in full working mode. But Sleep Mode
drains the battery, so I've set my laptop to Hibernate when on battery.
That's probably what I was subconsciously comparing with full Boot.

Yep, I just tried it. Similar 25 seconds from Hibernated to login,
although the system was then fully available, so the final 20 seconds is
gained. I mostly gave up hibernation once on SSDs, but I have got the
laptop set to use it when I close the lid if on battery. If it's on
mains power then it Sleeps.
--
David
Penny
2019-06-19 13:29:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:06:00 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Serena Blanchflower
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
I don't do much typing on it, at the moment (and I don't anticipate that
changing all that much). As I think that, even if I end up using it for
slightly more things which would benefit from a real keyboard, this
would only be occasional, so I'd probably do better with a bluetooth
keyboard I could get out when needed
For me, the benefits of a tablet over a laptop (which I do also have) is
that it's small and light, and I can just pick it up, switch it on and
it's ready to go. My tablet generally lives upstairs and I use it when
I'm in bed and I really don't want the faff of the laptop.
I can understand that, I make most use of my tablet in bed but it's
portability means it also accompanies me in the garden (reading me a book
while I garden) and to college as a means of carrying digital photos etc.

I bought it in the first instance in order to use an app which scans
barcodes on books and CDs for cataloguing purposes. Since then, finding
apps which do all sorts of things is very easy.

I've had no problem transferring stuff from tablet to Windows 10 desktop
and vise versa - Google is my friend in this regard and many things will
sync between devices.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 14:44:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:06:00 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
The odd bit of word processing or spreadsheets mainly. One of the
things I prefer about Windows is that I know where files are likely to
be, which isn't something I can say about Android. Any documents I'm
working on are going to be set up in MS Office, so I would need to
maintain compatibility with that.

I think that's probably *possible* with Android but is likely to be a
lot simpler with MS.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most
vulnerable members (Gandhi)
BrritSki
2019-06-20 15:18:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:06:00 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
The odd bit of word processing or spreadsheets mainly.  One of the
things I prefer about Windows is that I know where files are likely to
be, which isn't something I can say about Android.  Any documents I'm
working on are going to be set up in MS Office, so I would need to
maintain compatibility with that.
I think that's probably *possible* with Android but is likely to be a
lot simpler with MS.
<https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/p/office-365-personal/CFQ7TTC0K5BF/007R?source=googleshopping&OCID=AID737191_SEM_c907JMER&MarinID=sc907JMER%7c277746931094%7c%7c%7cc%7c%7c56117139563%7cpla-429247766603&lnkd=Google_O365SMB_&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIiuqJmqz44gIVRJ3VCh3OXwwlEAQYASABEgJABPD_BwE&activetab=pivot%3aoverviewtab?>

I much prefer to have my small 7" tablet running Android, but I really
just use it as a reading device either in bed, or like today where I was
going to be waiting for my car service and wanted to read the Times.

I am very happy with the keyboard on it, but I certainly wouldn't want
to write anything lengthy on it. I have a bluetooth keyboard, but I have
never used it except for a handful of times when I first used it.

I also like having a separate OS so if something goes t!ts up with MS I
have an alternative. My Nexus hasn't updated for years but still rund
perfectly well.

Your needs/wants are different though, so a bigger tablet running Win10
may make more choice for you. Not sure I'd go with an Atom processor
though unless they're a LOT faster than when I last looked into things.
My Win10 laptop wakes up very quickly from sleep, but it has a lot of
memory, an i5 processor and an SSD, all of which help.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 19:47:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I also like having a separate OS so if something goes t!ts up with MS I
have an alternative. My Nexus hasn't updated for years but still rund
perfectly well.
That's a very good point, given how dependent on the internet I am.
--
Best wishes, Serena
England has no kidney bank, but it does have a Liverpool.
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-20 16:56:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:44:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:06:00 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
The odd bit of word processing or spreadsheets mainly. One of the
things I prefer about Windows is that I know where files are likely to
be, which isn't something I can say about Android. Any documents I'm
working on are going to be set up in MS Office, so I would need to
maintain compatibility with that.
I think that's probably *possible* with Android but is likely to be a
lot simpler with MS.
Ah this is the reply to the question I just asked. I haven't got Msoft
Office, just the Open Office on my pc. And I tend to do any documents
on the PC as don't find a tablet or where I use it comfortable.
Usually upstairs bedroom or chez daughter. I only do fb on the pc.
Penny
2019-06-20 21:46:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:44:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
The odd bit of word processing or spreadsheets mainly. One of the
things I prefer about Windows is that I know where files are likely to
be, which isn't something I can say about Android. Any documents I'm
working on are going to be set up in MS Office, so I would need to
maintain compatibility with that.
Ah, I never got the hang of Office - too many bells and whistles to my
mind. It annoys me that it has become the 'norm' when there are other, to
my mind more user friendly, options out there.

I use Google Sheets for spreadsheets and update a couple of them on my
tablet daily - this can be done offline to be synced later. The advantage
of online storage like that, you can access it from anywhere.

I have little use for word processing as such these days, most of my
communication being electronic, an email can do all I need in that regard.
If I just want to create and store text to work on elsewhere I don't need
an office suite to write it in. I can edit or add comments to shared docs
in Google docs.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-21 00:48:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:44:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
I have no experience with Windows tablets and have been happy with the
Android ones I've had. What is this wider range of things you anticipate
doing with it and why do you think they can't be done on an Android device?
The odd bit of word processing or spreadsheets mainly. One of the
things I prefer about Windows is that I know where files are likely to
be, which isn't something I can say about Android. Any documents I'm
working on are going to be set up in MS Office, so I would need to
maintain compatibility with that.
Ah, I never got the hang of Office - too many bells and whistles to my
mind. It annoys me that it has become the 'norm' when there are other, to
my mind more user friendly, options out there.
It does me a little bit, but I think a lot of people just say "Office"
for short when they mean office-compatible.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I use Google Sheets for spreadsheets and update a couple of them on my
tablet daily - this can be done offline to be synced later. The advantage
of online storage like that, you can access it from anywhere.
I clearly operate a very different lifestyle! I can't imagine _wanting_
to access a document from anywhere I haven't brought my laptop to. (No
criticism implied or intended - just different!)
Post by Vicky Ayech
I have little use for word processing as such these days, most of my
communication being electronic, an email can do all I need in that regard.
I suspect "word processing" included emails.
Post by Vicky Ayech
If I just want to create and store text to work on elsewhere I don't need
an office suite to write it in. I can edit or add comments to shared docs
in Google docs.
I wouldn't want to compose emails on anything that doesn't have physical
keys. Again, YMMV!

jpeg
--


Three- (or four-) way referendum, if we _have_ to have another one.

(Where has the "treat northern Ireland differently" option gone?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Bread is lovely, don't get me wrong. But it's not cake. Or it's rubbish cake.
I always thought that bread needed more sugar and some icing. - Sarah Millican
(Radio Times 11-17 May 2013)
Paul Herber
2019-06-19 15:28:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
More and better apps available.
Less likely to become a brick with a software update.
Much less likely to catch a virus.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
John Ashby
2019-06-19 15:59:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
More and better apps available.
Less likely to become a brick with a software update.
Much less likely to catch a virus.
That last is not so true any more, unfortunately. Virus writers will
always look for the greatest impact, and with so many android devices
about these days, it must be very tempting to write an android virus.

john
Mike
2019-06-19 16:21:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
More and better apps available.
Less likely to become a brick with a software update.
Much less likely to catch a virus.
That last is not so true any more, unfortunately. Virus writers will
always look for the greatest impact, and with so many android devices
about these days, it must be very tempting to write an android virus.
john
Pain in the diodes all down the left side maybe?
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 14:27:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
More and better apps available.
Less likely to become a brick with a software update.
Much less likely to catch a virus.
Thanks. I certainly need to check that the apps I use are available on
Windows. I know that a lot of them are, as I use them on my desktop /
laptop already, either as a separate app or, more often, via a web browser.
--
Best wishes, Serena
You meet saints everywhere. They can be anywhere. They are people
behaving decently in an indecent society. (Kurt Vonnegut)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-21 00:55:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@brightview.co.uk>, Serena
Blanchflower <***@blanchflower.me.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Thanks. I certainly need to check that the apps I use are available on
Windows. I know that a lot of them are, as I use them on my desktop /
laptop already, either as a separate app or, more often, via a web browser.
Them being available via a web browser implies an internet connection.
If you're going to use at home (or other places with wifi), fine, but if
you're hoping to use them anywhere, then you'll need something with a
SIM socket, which is still quite rare in both tablets and laptops. Or
the ability to use your fobile as a hotspot - which most fobiles can
these days, but you need to check that your fobile contract allows
"tethering" which is what the fobile companies call hotspot usage. A lot
of PAYG ones don't, for reasons I don't understand - surely if you're
paying as you go, why should they be bothered how you use your data, but
some of them do.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Bread is lovely, don't get me wrong. But it's not cake. Or it's rubbish cake.
I always thought that bread needed more sugar and some icing. - Sarah Millican
(Radio Times 11-17 May 2013)
Fenny
2019-06-19 22:32:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 18:38:01 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
Purely a personal view, but I find the Google Play store has a better
range than the Windows app store (whatever it's called). Also, I have
a google account, so using the Play store uses the same log in and I
can synch my apps across all my Android devices.

I don't have a Windows store log in, nor do I want one. But Windows
10 requires you to have one to install apps. So I tend to stick to
things that I already own the software for on Windows and avoid
anything that requires me to have yet another account and give away
yet more personal details to another massive data miner.

I bought a Windows tablet for Pa, but Bro & I decided quite quickly it
would be better to get him an Adroid one as it's easier for us to
provide support. The Windows tablet has languished unused because I'd
rather take my laptop when I travel and I CBA to work out what else I
can use it for.
--
Fenny
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 14:31:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 18:38:01 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
My 2p. Stick to Android.
Why?
Purely a personal view, but I find the Google Play store has a better
range than the Windows app store (whatever it's called). Also, I have
a google account, so using the Play store uses the same log in and I
can synch my apps across all my Android devices.
I don't have a Windows store log in, nor do I want one. But Windows
10 requires you to have one to install apps. So I tend to stick to
things that I already own the software for on Windows and avoid
anything that requires me to have yet another account and give away
yet more personal details to another massive data miner.
Yes, that's a good thought about having to set up an account with
Windows 10 to use their app store. For me, though, that's more a matter
of not wanting the potential hassle, as I'm not as worried about having
an MS account as you are.
Post by Fenny
I bought a Windows tablet for Pa, but Bro & I decided quite quickly it
would be better to get him an Adroid one as it's easier for us to
provide support. The Windows tablet has languished unused because I'd
rather take my laptop when I travel and I CBA to work out what else I
can use it for.
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android. I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy
enough people to make it worth the effort. (Herm Albright)
r***@gmail.com
2019-11-11 12:31:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android. I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
ANd now you get your wish ! :/

Britters...
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-11 14:27:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android. I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
ANd now you get your wish ! :/
Yup, and I suspect I've had more success both getting solutions /
suggestions, and in understanding what's being suggested than I would
have done with an Android tablet ;)

How the chances of hitting problems differs between Microsoft and
Android is another question, of course, and one that I don't know tha
answer to.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Hard work pays off in the future! Laziness pays off NOW!
BrritSki
2019-11-11 14:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android.  I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
ANd now you get your wish !  :/
Yup, and I suspect I've had more success both getting solutions /
suggestions, and in understanding what's being suggested than I would
have done with an Android tablet ;)
Sorry if that sounded a bit harsh - I just recalled the earlier
discussion and went back to look at why you insisted on Windows and
thought that comment was rather ironic.

Hope you get it sorted...
Penny
2019-11-11 19:11:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 14:27:15 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android. I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
ANd now you get your wish ! :/
Yup, and I suspect I've had more success both getting solutions /
suggestions, and in understanding what's being suggested than I would
have done with an Android tablet ;)
How the chances of hitting problems differs between Microsoft and
Android is another question, of course, and one that I don't know tha
answer to.
I'm on my second android tablet and haven't encountered this problem. I
don't 'put it to sleep', I usually fall asleep while reading a library book
on it. I know it does beep quietly when an email or messenger message
arrives but have set those notification noises to be quiet and unobtrusive
enough not to wake me.

Settings are quite easy to find and I have now instructed several members
of the same art class how to stop their tablet (ipad or android) from
turning off the display every 2-5 minutes while they are trying to work
from a picture reference on it.

Figuring out where stuff is stored and how to access it from various apps
is a different problem, as is getting it to store large files on the
perfectly adequate sd card I bought instead of cluttering up the built-in
memory but I haven't put much effort into it yet.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2019-11-12 08:22:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 14:27:15 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
For me, trouble shooting is one of the attractions of getting a Windows
tablet, rather than an Android. I'm far more confident that I
understand, at least vaguely, what's going on and where to find things
on Windows than I am on Android.
ANd now you get your wish ! :/
Yup, and I suspect I've had more success both getting solutions /
suggestions, and in understanding what's being suggested than I would
have done with an Android tablet ;)
How the chances of hitting problems differs between Microsoft and
Android is another question, of course, and one that I don't know tha
answer to.
I'm on my second android tablet and haven't encountered this problem. I
don't 'put it to sleep', I usually fall asleep while reading a library book
on it. I know it does beep quietly when an email or messenger message
arrives but have set those notification noises to be quiet and unobtrusive
enough not to wake me.
On my new Android tablet there is a setting for Digital Wellbeing and
then under that there's a Wind Down feature which lets you set a time
for Do Not Disturb.

Nick Odell
2019-06-18 15:51:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
No personal experience - but when did that ever stop me?

If nobody here is a Windows tablet user you could always Ask Jack

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/askjack+tablet-computer brings
up a number of articles over the years. March 2017 is somewhat in the
distant past but I think the principles would still hold and there are
some interesting snippets to be dug out of the other articles in that
list too.

I don't know what your budget is but I've had a quick look at ebuyer
https://www.ebuyer.com/store/Computer/cat/Tablet-PC?a05471=Windows
I was struck by what I thought was a jolly big price difference between
two identical models, one with 2Gb+32Gb and the other 4Gb+64Gb
especially considering the current price of memory seems to be rock bottom.

I've no idea if that is any help but I hope it is.

Nick
John Finlay
2019-06-18 16:15:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android,
as that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I
likely to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets
seem to be Android?
No personal experience - but when did that ever stop me?
If nobody here is a Windows tablet user you could always Ask Jack
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/askjack+tablet-computer  brings
up a number of articles over the years. March 2017 is somewhat in the
distant past but I think the principles would still hold and there are
some interesting snippets to be dug out of the other articles in that
list too.
I don't know what your budget is but I've had a quick look at ebuyer
https://www.ebuyer.com/store/Computer/cat/Tablet-PC?a05471=Windows
I was struck by what I thought was a jolly big price difference between
two identical models, one with 2Gb+32Gb and the other 4Gb+64Gb
especially considering the current price of memory seems to be rock bottom.
I've no idea if that is any help but I hope it is.
Nick
Best not to buy a Huawei tablet though at the present - they're fairly
good but future upgrades are in jeopardy.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-18 18:23:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Finlay
Best not to buy a Huawei tablet though at the present - they're fairly
good but future upgrades are in jeopardy.
Yes, I agree that, at the moment at least, they would be a high risk option.
--
Best wishes, Serena
"It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves." - Sir Edmund Hillary
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-18 18:22:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android,
as that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I
likely to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets
seem to be Android?
No personal experience - but when did that ever stop me?
If nobody here is a Windows tablet user you could always Ask Jack
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/askjack+tablet-computer  brings
up a number of articles over the years. March 2017 is somewhat in the
distant past but I think the principles would still hold and there are
some interesting snippets to be dug out of the other articles in that
list too.
Thanks. A comment he made in Sept 2018 seems pertinent about Windows 2
in 1s, saying "They aren’t great tablets, but they work well enough to
replace dedicated tablets while still functioning as laptops". I
clearly need to consider which is more important: being an excellent
tablet or being able, on occasion, to use it as a small laptop.
Post by Nick Odell
I don't know what your budget is but I've had a quick look at ebuyer
https://www.ebuyer.com/store/Computer/cat/Tablet-PC?a05471=Windows
I was struck by what I thought was a jolly big price difference between
two identical models, one with 2Gb+32Gb and the other 4Gb+64Gb
especially considering the current price of memory seems to be rock bottom.
Yes, that was something I'd noticed, as well.
Post by Nick Odell
I've no idea if that is any help but I hope it is.
Thank you, yes, it is.
--
Best wishes, Serena
My mind not only wanders, it sometimes leaves completely.
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-18 17:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 15:54:33 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with. I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets? If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it? Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
Happy Android user here. Email, kindle ap, tv (cbbc) google.
the Omrud
2019-06-19 10:53:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
I have both. You'll get much better value in a Windows tablet, and
you'll get guaranteed updates to the OS, which doesn't happen for long
with Android. Look at Lynx tablets, some of which come with detachable
keyboards.

I've also recently bought a "secondhand" (although it appeared to be
unused) lightweight Dell Windows laptop, which cost £150 before I loaded
it with extras. It does have a touch screen, but it's not a tablet as
it has a fixed keyboard. It came from a massive batch on eBay - they
had thousands available.

OTOH, there's nothing wrong with Android tablets, and there is a much
greater choice of apps.

In general, I would say that if you intend to use a device on the move
then pick Android, and if it's just for use in the home then choose Windows.
--
David
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 14:36:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I have both.  You'll get much better value in a Windows tablet, and
you'll get guaranteed updates to the OS, which doesn't happen for long
with Android.  Look at Lynx tablets, some of which come with detachable
keyboards.
Thanks a lot, that's just the sort of feedback I had been hoping for.

One of the tablets I'd been eyeing up was this one:
<https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Linx-12X64-12-5-inch-Detachable-Processor/dp/B06Y2W2NJX/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=windows+tablet&qid=1561041201&s=gateway&sr=8-4>,
or <https://is.gd/QWppko>.
I've also recently bought a "secondhand" (although it appeared to be
unused) lightweight Dell Windows laptop, which cost £150 before I loaded
it with extras.   It does have a touch screen, but it's not a tablet as
it has a fixed keyboard.  It came from a massive batch on eBay - they
had thousands available.
OTOH, there's nothing wrong with Android tablets, and there is a much
greater choice of apps.
In general, I would say that if you intend to use a device on the move
then pick Android, and if it's just for use in the home then choose Windows.
Thanks. This one is unlikely to ever leave the house or, at least, not
go further afield than an occasional foray into the garden.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A man who trusts nobody is apt to be the kind of man nobody trusts
(Harold MacMillan)
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-20 16:54:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:36:53 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
<https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Linx-12X64-12-5-inch-Detachable-Processor/dp/B06Y2W2NJX/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=windows+tablet&qid=1561041201&s=gateway&sr=8-4>,
or <https://is.gd/QWppko>.
That does look nice, although I don't really need a new device. What
does this do that the android tablets do not?
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-20 19:50:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
That does look nice, although I don't really need a new device. What
does this do that the android tablets do not?
It's not so much that it does stuff that an Android tablet can't do but
that it might be easier to do stuff in Windows (which I'm familiar with
and which my other machines run) rather than Android which is much more
impenetrable, so far as I'm concerned.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-20 20:50:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 20:50:06 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
That does look nice, although I don't really need a new device. What
does this do that the android tablets do not?
It's not so much that it does stuff that an Android tablet can't do but
that it might be easier to do stuff in Windows (which I'm familiar with
and which my other machines run) rather than Android which is much more
impenetrable, so far as I'm concerned.
I do struggle sometimes with the tablet. And then daughter has ipads.
Granddaughter has her own! I can't do anything onthat.She is better at
finding the tv she wants.
Fenny
2019-06-20 20:16:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Jun 2019 15:36:53 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Thanks a lot, that's just the sort of feedback I had been hoping for.
<https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Linx-12X64-12-5-inch-Detachable-Processor/dp/B06Y2W2NJX/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=windows+tablet&qid=1561041201&s=gateway&sr=8-4>,
or <https://is.gd/QWppko>.
That does look pretty nice. The one I bought was a Linx 10 with the
associated keyboard. If it wasn't for the fact that I like a full
sized laptop with a decent keyboard, I'd be interested. As it is, I
might keep an eye on it for when Ma manages to run over her laptop and
the screen needs replacing again.
--
Fenny
the Omrud
2019-06-22 09:50:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I have both.  You'll get much better value in a Windows tablet, and
you'll get guaranteed updates to the OS, which doesn't happen for long
with Android.  Look at Lynx tablets, some of which come with
detachable keyboards.
Thanks a lot, that's just the sort of feedback I had been hoping for.
<https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Linx-12X64-12-5-inch-Detachable-Processor/dp/B06Y2W2NJX/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=windows+tablet&qid=1561041201&s=gateway&sr=8-4>,
My W10 tablet is an older version of this. It was fine at the time
(about five years ago) but the newer generation are lighter and more
convenient. The only particular problem with it is that the keyboard
attachment isn't very secure, which means it can flex and think the
keyboard isn't attached, so switching between PC and Tablet modes.

But it's still pretty good.
--
David
Jane Vernon
2019-06-19 14:04:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I think my elderly Samsung Android tablet is coming to the end of its
useful life and I'm thinking about what to replace it with.  I'm
thinking of getting a Windows one, rather than sticking with Android, as
that would be useful for a wider range of things and I'm more
comfortable, in general, with Windows than with Android.
At the moment, my tablet is generally used as my TV, for glancing at
emails, reading Facebook, or playing games such as Sudoku or Solitaire
or listening to audiobooks.
Do any umrats use Windows tablets?  If I switch to Windows, am I likely
to regret it?  Is there good reason why the bulk of tablets seem to be
Android?
I tried a Windows tablet (fortunately I didn't buy it, it was an unused
one that I had the use of) and it was completely useless. Many apps are
unavailable for Windows and on the other hand it is too small to take
any 'programs' that you'd expect to use on a Windows computer.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Anne B
2019-06-19 16:03:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I have an Android tablet. I hate it. it is fiddly and difficult to do
the most basic tasks (save a file somewhere and then find it when you
need it; cut and paste; correct a typo; type anything more than about a
line in length etc etc etc) and it doesn't have menus or anything
sensible to help you find your way around it. Just a whole collection of
hieroglyphics.

I bought it because I saw someone with an app for identifying birds, and
I thought it would be a good idea to carry one tablet with apps for
identifying birds, wild flowers, butterflies etc rather than a small
library in my pocket.

The bird ID app is not too bad, aprt from being a bit mixed up as to
which corvid is which, but the wild flower one is hopeless. I can can
forgive it for not having Diapensia lapponica, which only grows on one
mountain top in Lochaber (yes, I have been there to see it), but how you
can produce an app for identifying wild flowers that doesn't include
Broom, or that returns Yellow Flag Iris when you type in the
characteristics of a Cranesbill, is quite beyond me. Fairy nuff, that's
the fault of the apps, not of Android, but it doesn't make me warm to
the wretched thing.

It's small and light to carry if I am on holiday, and just about copes
with keeping up to date with e-mail, and it was handy when I was
photographing Recumbent Stone Circles, because it supports Dropbox so I
was able to put the RSC Gazetteer into Dropbox (couldn't see any other
way to save the Gazetteer as a document to the tablet's own memory, let
alone find it again) and access it out in the field, but otherwise it's
not a lot of use.

Never again any device without a keyboard, thank you.

Anne B
Kate B
2019-06-19 17:59:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I'm looking for advice or thoughts on tablets - the computer type,
rather than pharmacological advice.
I have an Android tablet. I hate it. it is fiddly and difficult to do
the most basic tasks (save a file somewhere and then find it when you
need it; cut and paste; correct a typo; type anything more than about a
line in length etc etc etc) and it doesn't have menus or anything
sensible to help you find your way around it. Just a whole collection of
hieroglyphics.
I bought it because I saw someone with an app for identifying birds, and
I thought it would be a good idea to carry one tablet with apps for
identifying birds, wild flowers, butterflies etc rather than a small
library in my pocket.
The bird ID app is not too bad, aprt from being a bit mixed up as to
which corvid is which, but the wild flower one is hopeless. I can can
forgive it for not having Diapensia lapponica, which only grows on one
mountain top in Lochaber (yes, I have been there to see it), but how you
can produce an app for identifying wild flowers that doesn't include
Broom, or that returns Yellow Flag Iris when you type in the
characteristics of a Cranesbill, is quite beyond me. Fairy nuff, that's
the fault of the apps, not of Android, but it doesn't make me warm to
the wretched thing.
It's small and light to carry if I am on holiday, and just about copes
with keeping up to date with e-mail, and it was handy when I was
photographing Recumbent Stone Circles, because it supports Dropbox so I
was able to put the RSC Gazetteer into Dropbox (couldn't see any other
way to save the Gazetteer as a document to the tablet's own memory, let
alone find it again) and access it out in the field, but otherwise it's
not a lot of use.
Never again any device without a keyboard, thank you.
I'm on my second Samsung tablet. The first one was a Note and I liked
the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen and paper
are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff. The next one,
now over three years old and still going strong, I mainly use for news
(I have the Guardian and the Times and the New York Times. News junkie,
me?), Facebook and Twitter, reading but not writing email unless
unavoidable, the weather, image-based apps like Houzz and Instagram,
watching YouTube clips, looking at old photos. It takes surprisingly
good photos too.

But I'd never use it voluntarily for composing anything longer than a
Facebook remark. There's an Office suite on it but I use it for reading
only - if I need to write anything I go and find the solid old laptop.
Ditto editing photos, updating websites, or anything that involves
having more than one window open.

However, we are always looking up things on it (is Chelmsford more
important than Colchester? How old *is* Rory Stewart? Where exactly is
Samarkand?) and there's an app linked to the TiVo recorder that is
invaluable, so much easier to use than the TiVo tv interface, so we can
argue about what to watch after dinner while washing up. I also take it
to meetings where I need to refer to papers which I don't want to print out.

I wouldn't be without it.
--
Kate B
London
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-19 18:30:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
I'm on my second Samsung tablet. The first one was a Note and I liked
the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen and paper
are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff. The next one,
now over three years old and still going strong,
I've got an old tablet, my first, a newer one for upstairs email and
books and one to read books in the gym on the treadmill. Also a Kindle
B no longer uses with books on. And I've got two paperbacks onthe go
too. It's good brain exercise remembering who is doing what in which
book. Currently a Poirot for the gym, Call the Midwife downstairs and
that is much harsher than the tv series. A Georgette Heyer upstairs
and a Gamache downstairs, the last two I am re-reading.
Nick Odell
2019-06-19 21:14:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 19/06/2019 18:59, Kate B wrote:

<snip>
Post by Kate B
I liked
the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen and paper
are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff.
<snip>
Have you seen what David Hockney has been doing with his iPad?

(Google David Hockney iPad Art)
We went to see the exhibition at Saltaire Mill. I'm not sure if it was a
permanent exhibition or just for a season so I'd check first before
slogging all the way up the M1 to see it.

Nick
Kate B
2019-06-19 22:12:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
I liked the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen
and paper are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff.
<snip>
Have you seen what David Hockney has been doing with his iPad?
(Google David Hockney iPad Art)
We went to see the exhibition at Saltaire Mill. I'm not sure if it was a
permanent exhibition or just for a season so I'd check first before
slogging all the way up the M1 to see it.
Oh yes! It was wonderfully inspiring. A few years ago when he exhibited
at the RA we went five times. But I never managed to do anything on the
Samsung that I liked - I love colour but am not good at painting, and
never got the hang of the stylus. I think the art apps for Ipad were
always more sophisticated, too.
--
Kate B
London
LFS
2019-06-21 08:20:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
I liked the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen
and paper are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff.
<snip>
Have you seen what David Hockney has been doing with his iPad?
(Google David Hockney iPad Art)
We went to see the exhibition at Saltaire Mill. I'm not sure if it was
a permanent exhibition or just for a season so I'd check first before
slogging all the way up the M1 to see it.
Oh yes! It was wonderfully inspiring. A few years ago when he exhibited
at the RA we went five times.
I went six times! I kept watching the film of the places he'd painted
and then going back to look at the paintings. My RA Friends subscription
was certainly good value that year.

But I never managed to do anything on the
Post by Kate B
Samsung that I liked - I love colour but am not good at painting, and
never got the hang of the stylus. I think the art apps for Ipad were
always more sophisticated, too.
I have tinkered on my iPad but even with an Apple pen I find it
difficult. I've just discovered that you can get a screen cover that
makes it feel as if you're writing on paper so I may try that.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Chris J Dixon
2019-06-21 08:48:42 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Kate B
Post by Nick Odell
(Google David Hockney iPad Art)
We went to see the exhibition at Saltaire Mill. I'm not sure if it was
a permanent exhibition or just for a season so I'd check first before
slogging all the way up the M1 to see it.
Oh yes! It was wonderfully inspiring. A few years ago when he exhibited
at the RA we went five times.
I went six times! I kept watching the film of the places he'd painted
and then going back to look at the paintings. My RA Friends subscription
was certainly good value that year.
We only went the once, but really enjoyed it. One of the nice
aspects was that, with most of the material being quite large,
you didn't have to shuffle past in a crocodile to press your nose
(metaphorically, honest) against the glass to be able to see
anything.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-21 18:01:17 UTC
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On Friday, 21 June 2019 09:48:45 UTC+1, Chris J Dixon wrote:
<snipped>
Post by Chris J Dixon
to press your nose
(metaphorically, honest) against the glass to be able to see
anything.
We were once in Bonn, at the Beethoven museum, and the stewards were on the alert to stop anyone leaning on the glass cases. A few days later we were in Eisenstadt, at the Haydn Haus museum, where a keyboard that had once been attached to some instrument that Haydn had played could be touched and even played. Our son did play it.

The difference between Germany and Austria.
LFS
2019-06-21 08:27:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
I liked the idea of using a stylus, but found (as so often) that pen
and paper are actually quicker and finer for sketching out stuff.
<snip>
Have you seen what David Hockney has been doing with his iPad?
(Google David Hockney iPad Art)
We went to see the exhibition at Saltaire Mill. I'm not sure if it was a
permanent exhibition or just for a season so I'd check first before
slogging all the way up the M1 to see it.
I think it's permanent. But Salts Mill is a splendid place to visit
anyway. The bookshop is great, the Home shop has some stunning things to
buy, the historical stuff is fascinating and the food is good. My friend
who plays the baroque bassoon says that the music shop is *the* place to
go for anyone interested in early music.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
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