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Min
2020-06-11 23:03:21 UTC
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When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
steveski
2020-06-12 00:09:23 UTC
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Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice)
Hartley's jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems
the gelling agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No
gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-12 01:56:07 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice)
Hartley's jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems
the gelling agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No
gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never. For me, there has to be a meaning. There's not much meaning in eating
bugs. - Darcey Bussell (on whether she'd appear on /I'm a Celebrity/), in RT
2015/11/28-12/4
Mike
2020-06-12 07:31:38 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice)
Hartley's jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems
the gelling agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No
gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-06-12 07:32:15 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice)
Hartley's jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems
the gelling agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No
gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-12 17:09:49 UTC
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[]
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
Er - -1 there. I dislike custard skin quite strongly. (And cold custard,
as does my brother's partner. So my brother has been known to take a jug
of it out of the 'fridge and eat it with a spoon in front of us!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Quantum particles: the dreams that stuff is made of - David Moser
Mike
2020-06-12 17:39:45 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
Er - -1 there. I dislike custard skin quite strongly. (And cold custard,
as does my brother's partner. So my brother has been known to take a jug
of it out of the 'fridge and eat it with a spoon in front of us!)
Then there’s the skin on rice pudding.... another favourite! (Well done
Peter, I’m with you all the way!) ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2020-06-12 23:39:02 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
Er - -1 there. I dislike custard skin quite strongly. (And cold custard,
as does my brother's partner. So my brother has been known to take a
jug of it out of the 'fridge and eat it with a spoon in front of us!)
Then there’s the skin on rice pudding.... another favourite! (Well done
Peter, I’m with you all the way!) ;-)))
Oh, yes.
--
Steveski
Vicky Ayech
2020-06-13 06:43:38 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
Er - -1 there. I dislike custard skin quite strongly. (And cold custard,
as does my brother's partner. So my brother has been known to take a
jug of it out of the 'fridge and eat it with a spoon in front of us!)
Then there’s the skin on rice pudding.... another favourite! (Well done
Peter, I’m with you all the way!) ;-)))
Oh, yes.
Definitely no to both.
steveski
2020-06-12 23:40:16 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Min
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
+1.
+1 more, with bells on!
And the skin on custard!
Er - -1 there. I dislike custard skin quite strongly. (And cold custard,
as does my brother's partner. So my brother has been known to take a jug
of it out of the 'fridge and eat it with a spoon in front of us!)
Would that be on a farm?
--
Steveski
Chris McMillan
2020-06-12 10:55:11 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice)
Hartley's jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems
the gelling agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No
gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the
jelly/ nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I don't know the answer to that but I used to love eating them (if
anything, more than the finished dish) when I was a lad.
Likewise. I only went off this, drinking bovril and woolfing twiglets post
pregnancy. These had been things I’d done all my adult life.

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2020-06-12 07:31:51 UTC
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Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Jim Easterbrook
2020-06-12 07:33:40 UTC
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Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
My mum did that as well, but I think her mould was aluminium.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2020-06-12 07:52:42 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
My mum did that as well, but I think her mould was aluminium.
So it wasn’t copper bottomed my man?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-12 17:57:12 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
What's a milk jelly?

Mine made something called fresh-air pudding - ordinary jelly, but with
the addition of either condensed or evaporated milk (I don't remember),
then whipped up into a froth and left to set; very nice light texture.
(Not firm enough to use moulds, though, IIRR.

As an engineer/scientist, it's always irritated me that evaporated and
condensed milk both exist, but are different things!
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
My mum did that as well, but I think her mould was aluminium.
So it wasn’t copper bottomed my man?
"Are you copper-bottoming 'em, my man?" "No, I'm aluminiuming'm, ma'am."
(Can't remember where that came from; just stuck in my mind.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The advantage with David Attenborough is that people just want to hear him
talk. About anything.
- Kirsty Young (Desert Island Discs presenter), RT 2015/9/25-10/2
steveski
2020-06-12 23:41:57 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes
of jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
What's a milk jelly?
Blancmange BIMBAM
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2020-06-13 19:17:44 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes
of jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
What's a milk jelly?
Blancmange BIMBAM
I do not think that a blancmange has been anywhere near a
slaughterhouse or the vegan equivalent but, to continue the equine
theme, seems to come from the same stable as Birds-style custard
powder.

Nick
Penny
2020-06-13 09:05:18 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:57:12 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
What's a milk jelly?
Diluted with milk instead of water. Not as straightforward as that sounds
for reasons I still don't understand.

I stayed the weekend with a school friend once. She had a Sunday morning
job preparing big bowls of jelly in the kitchen of a nearby girls public
school and I went with her. There was a big box of assorted jellies and the
task was to pull the squares apart, dissolve, dilute and pour into the
bowls to set. I asked why the different flavours were being mixed together.
She explained this was how she had been told to do it and had got into
trouble the one time she had separated the colours/flavours into different
bowls - making interesting mixes of lemon and lime, strawberry and
raspberry etc. Layers might have been nice but there wasn't time.

Presumably there was one bowl per table and if they didn't all look the
same there would be disputes over which table got which bowl.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-06-13 19:25:15 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:57:12 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass
mould shaped like a rabbit.
What's a milk jelly?
Diluted with milk instead of water. Not as straightforward as that sounds
for reasons I still don't understand.
My method - which may well be the same as your method:

The jelly pack usually says to dissolve the cubes in a certain
fraction of the amount of water required and then add cold water up to
the total. I do the first part, let it cool down but not start to set
then add milk up to the final amount then whisk it all up before
letting it set in the fridge. Trying to dissolve jelly into hot milk
or adding the milk whilst the concentrated water jelly is still hot
always seems to curdle the milk.

Nick
Penny
2020-06-13 09:18:22 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:57:12 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
As an engineer/scientist, it's always irritated me that evaporated and
condensed milk both exist, but are different things!
Seems quite reasonable to me. Evap is runny - continue to evaporate and you
end up with thick, fudgy condensed.

Rather like my recently made marmalade. I haven't made marmalade for ages
having discovered the very cheap and quite acceptable Lidl version. I had a
couple of kilos of Seville oranges in the bottom of the freezer (obviously
had been there for years) and some sugar so early in lockdown I made up 1
kilo-worth into marmalade. It was too runny and some of the peel was too
hard.

I couldn't pick out all the hard peel but I did boil it all up again and
rather overdid it in my effort to get it to set better (should have added
fresh lemon juice I think) and ended up with a toffee which was difficult
to spread and most of the peel was too hard. I finished eating it last
week, blitzing each jar's content with a little water and ending up with
something which looked cloudy like set honey with small bits in. It was
very tasty - far better than the Lidl version I am now eating. I may have
another go with the rest of the frozen fruit now I've managed to stock up
on sugar for the jam season.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2020-06-13 09:57:26 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:57:12 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
As an engineer/scientist, it's always irritated me that evaporated and
condensed milk both exist, but are different things!
Seems quite reasonable to me. Evap is runny - continue to evaporate and you
end up with thick, fudgy condensed.
Rather like my recently made marmalade. I haven't made marmalade for ages
having discovered the very cheap and quite acceptable Lidl version. I had a
couple of kilos of Seville oranges in the bottom of the freezer (obviously
had been there for years) and some sugar so early in lockdown I made up 1
kilo-worth into marmalade. It was too runny and some of the peel was too
hard.
I couldn't pick out all the hard peel but I did boil it all up again and
rather overdid it in my effort to get it to set better (should have added
fresh lemon juice I think) and ended up with a toffee which was difficult
to spread and most of the peel was too hard. I finished eating it last
week, blitzing each jar's content with a little water and ending up with
something which looked cloudy like set honey with small bits in. It was
very tasty - far better than the Lidl version I am now eating. I may have
another go with the rest of the frozen fruit now I've managed to stock up
on sugar for the jam season.
Next time, you could try boiling the oranges first until they soften.
Then scoop out the innards, put them in a muslin, and keep it in the pan
as you make the marmalade (you can re-use the orangey boiled water in
the marmalade-making process). The peel should be already quite soft and
therefore also easier to cut. FWIW I always add a lemon or two (also
boiled, eviscerated, shredded) anyway.

I am a complete marmalade-making junkie. The smell of the boiling
oranges is utterly delicious and the process addictive. In January I
regularly make around 70 jars, mostly for us (himself eats almost a jar
a week) plus presents and a batch for the church Christian Aid sale.
This year there was no sale so I offered it to our road one Sunday
morning for donations and made about £10 per pot. Yes, I'm afraid I did
call it MarmalAid.

Finally, if you have one or two left over, save them for mulled wine at
Christmas - they give a much more interesting flavour than ordinary oranges.
--
Kate B
London
Chris McMillan
2020-06-13 10:47:38 UTC
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I Christian Aid
Thanks Kate!! Writing something to be turned into a memorial service piece
for probably months hence I couldn’t come up with this, the only door to
door collecting both mum and dad ever did together.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-13 16:10:02 UTC
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Post by Penny
Post by Penny
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 18:57:12 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
As an engineer/scientist, it's always irritated me that evaporated and
condensed milk both exist, but are different things!
Seems quite reasonable to me. Evap is runny - continue to evaporate and you
end up with thick, fudgy condensed.
To me, evaporated milk should be steam. (Leaving behind milk powder.
[Isn't that how milk powder is made?])

Is evaporated milk any runnier than - er - milk?

What, to others, does the process of "evaporation" in "evaporated milk"
actually _mean_?
Post by Penny
Post by Penny
Rather like my recently made marmalade. I haven't made marmalade for
[]
Post by Penny
I couldn't pick out all the hard peel but I did boil it all up again
Post by Penny
and
rather overdid it in my effort to get it to set better (should have added
fresh lemon juice I think) and ended up with a toffee which was difficult
Sounds (and I bet smelt) delicious, _as a toffee_!
[]
Post by Penny
I am a complete marmalade-making junkie. The smell of the boiling
oranges is utterly delicious and the process addictive. In January I
regularly make around 70 jars, mostly for us (himself eats almost a jar
Wow!
[]
Post by Penny
call it MarmalAid.
Finally, if you have one or two left over, save them for mulled wine at
Christmas - they give a much more interesting flavour than ordinary oranges.
Sounds nice. Except I've recently decided I maybe no longer like wine -
being unable to find almost _any_ German wine in Sainsburys, I bought
something of rating 8, thinking I _must_ like that, but didn't. Maybe if
I manage to find a Spatlese or Auslese somewhere I will regain my
liking. (Never been keen on mulled wine anyway, as it's always made with
red, which I have never liked.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said Pooh, as he tasted the bacon in his sandwich.
Mike
2020-06-13 16:32:51 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
To me, evaporated milk should be steam. (Leaving behind milk powder.
[Isn't that how milk powder is made?])
When on a school trip around the Ambrosia factory near Crediton, I
experienced the milk powder production line; basically milk is sprayed onto
a heated stainless steel sheet (belt) which when the moisture has
evaporated away leaves powder which came off the sheet as it went through a
tight curve in the belt. The smell was very pungent and the whole area
seemed to contain air heavy with something that caught me in the back of
the throat. Best watched on a video rather than in situ!
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-06-13 18:03:12 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds nice. Except I've recently decided I maybe no longer like wine -
being unable to find almost _any_ German wine in Sainsburys, I bought
something of rating 8, thinking I _must_ like that, but didn't. Maybe if
I manage to find a Spatlese or Auslese somewhere I will regain my
liking. (Never been keen on mulled wine anyway, as it's always made with
red, which I have never liked.)
I am very partial to what I like to call Pink Wine, not so keen on most
reds. But once acquired a bottle of red wine which was a raffle prize
and it was absolutely delish. Stupidly, I threw the bottle away without
making a note of what it said on the label. Have now spent years
wishing I knew what it was.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Paul Herber
2020-06-13 18:11:38 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds nice. Except I've recently decided I maybe no longer like wine -
being unable to find almost _any_ German wine in Sainsburys, I bought
something of rating 8, thinking I _must_ like that, but didn't. Maybe if
I manage to find a Spatlese or Auslese somewhere I will regain my
liking. (Never been keen on mulled wine anyway, as it's always made with
red, which I have never liked.)
I am very partial to what I like to call Pink Wine, not so keen on most
reds. But once acquired a bottle of red wine which was a raffle prize
and it was absolutely delish. Stupidly, I threw the bottle away without
making a note of what it said on the label. Have now spent years
wishing I knew what it was.
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Sid Nuncius
2020-06-13 18:52:14 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Jenny M Benson
I am very partial to what I like to call Pink Wine, not so keen on most
reds. But once acquired a bottle of red wine which was a raffle prize
and it was absolutely delish. Stupidly, I threw the bottle away without
making a note of what it said on the label. Have now spent years
wishing I knew what it was.
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
The trouble is, there's no accounting for taste in wine and one person's
delish is another's yuck.

Can you remember anything about it, Jenny? Where it may have come from
or anything you liked about how it tasted?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-13 20:48:05 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 19:03:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds nice. Except I've recently decided I maybe no longer like wine -
being unable to find almost _any_ German wine in Sainsburys, I bought
something of rating 8, thinking I _must_ like that, but didn't. Maybe if
I manage to find a Spatlese or Auslese somewhere I will regain my
liking. (Never been keen on mulled wine anyway, as it's always made with
red, which I have never liked.)
I am very partial to what I like to call Pink Wine, not so keen on most
So do I (like to call it that, that is). But then I irritate my brother
by anglicising lots of things.
Post by Jenny M Benson
reds. But once acquired a bottle of red wine which was a raffle prize
and it was absolutely delish. Stupidly, I threw the bottle away without
making a note of what it said on the label. Have now spent years
wishing I knew what it was.
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
Can you get a non-red one? (And isn't the j pronounced H?) [I thought
rioja _meant_ red.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward. -Ellen Glasgow,
novelist (1874-1945)
Sid Nuncius
2020-06-14 05:19:31 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Paul Herber
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
Can you get a non-red one? (And isn't the j pronounced H?) [I thought
rioja _meant_ red.]
Yes, you can get white Riojas - e.g.
https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/0243818 , which is a very
palatable drop. Rioja is the region of Spain where it is produced - so
if there is redundancy in Paul's post it is in recommending a Spanish
Rioja because a true Rioja must be produced in that region. IANA
Spanish speaker, but I think the pronunciation is somewhere between
Paul's and yours, with the j pronounced like a back-of-the throat-ch, as
in Bach.

Er...I seem to know a suspiciously large amount about Spanish wine. I
cannot imagine how I have picked up this knowledge.

The Spanish for red is rojo (m) or roja (f), btw.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-14 14:06:33 UTC
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2020 at 06:19:31, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Paul Herber
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
Can you get a non-red one? (And isn't the j pronounced H?) [I thought
rioja _meant_ red.]
Yes, you can get white Riojas - e.g.
https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/0243818 , which is a very
palatable drop. Rioja is the region of Spain where it is produced - so
if there is redundancy in Paul's post it is in recommending a Spanish
Rioja because a true Rioja must be
Ah. I've learnt something. I always thought it was just Spanish for red.
Let me go look ... ah, rojo/roja. You can see why I was confused!
Post by Sid Nuncius
produced in that region. IANA Spanish speaker, but I think the
pronunciation is somewhere between Paul's and yours, with the j
pronounced like a back-of-the throat-ch, as in Bach.
Indeed. A strong h. Also in Scots (loch, och).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Er...I seem to know a suspiciously large amount about Spanish wine. I
cannot imagine how I have picked up this knowledge.
(-: [I'd like to make the same claim about German wine, but can't -
though I know more than the average Brit, judging by the size (zero) of
the German section in the average supermarket.]
Post by Sid Nuncius
The Spanish for red is rojo (m) or roja (f), btw.
That'll teach me to read to the end before starting my reply!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Who is Art, and why does life imitate him?
Chris McMillan
2020-06-16 11:32:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Paul Herber
try a nice red rioja (pron. ree-ocka), preferably a Spanish one.
Can you get a non-red one? (And isn't the j pronounced H?) [I thought
rioja _meant_ red.]
Yes, you can get white Riojas - e.g.
https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/0243818 , which is a very
palatable drop. Rioja is the region of Spain where it is produced - so
if there is redundancy in Paul's post it is in recommending a Spanish
Rioja because a true Rioja must be produced in that region. IANA
Spanish speaker, but I think the pronunciation is somewhere between
Paul's and yours, with the j pronounced like a back-of-the throat-ch, as
in Bach.
Er...I seem to know a suspiciously large amount about Spanish wine. I
cannot imagine how I have picked up this knowledge.
The Spanish for red is rojo (m) or roja (f), btw.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rioja_(wine). More than you ever wanted to
know here.

BBQ-rats will remember Vicenta, our Spanish neighbour. I know rioja is
grown in her area, so I looked around to see if I could find her province,
Extramadura, and I know Caceres is a couple of hours from her village, so
FWIW, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montánchez. She doesn’t drink so I’m
not going to try this one as a conversation.

Sincerely Chris

Nick Odell
2020-06-13 19:29:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
MarmalAid.
Brilliant! Hope you have already copywrited and trademarked that and
registered the design in the name of your favourite charity.

Nick
Penny
2020-06-13 19:49:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 10:57:26 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
Rather like my recently made marmalade. I haven't made marmalade for ages
having discovered the very cheap and quite acceptable Lidl version. I had a
couple of kilos of Seville oranges in the bottom of the freezer (obviously
had been there for years) and some sugar so early in lockdown I made up 1
kilo-worth into marmalade. It was too runny and some of the peel was too
hard.
[...]
Post by Kate B
Next time, you could try boiling the oranges first until they soften.
Then scoop out the innards, put them in a muslin, and keep it in the pan
as you make the marmalade (you can re-use the orangey boiled water in
the marmalade-making process). The peel should be already quite soft and
therefore also easier to cut. FWIW I always add a lemon or two (also
boiled, eviscerated, shredded) anyway.
That is my normal method and is pretty much what I did (I use a pressure
cooker for the first stage then continue in the same pan sans lid). Bear in
mind these had been in the freezer for maybe 8 years and that will have had
a dehydrating effect. I was foolish to include the very dried up
looking/feeling skins. When I've done it before with frozen fruit the skins
are pretty soft once thawed, even before cooking. I included one frozen and
one fresh lemon.
Post by Kate B
I am a complete marmalade-making junkie. The smell of the boiling
oranges is utterly delicious and the process addictive. In January I
regularly make around 70 jars, mostly for us (himself eats almost a jar
a week)
That's about my rate of consumption too.

My Scottish Granny used to make the family marmalade. My father (and his
brother, for his branch) took over when she died and he continued to gift
me some from time to time - very good it was.
Post by Kate B
Finally, if you have one or two left over, save them for mulled wine at
Christmas - they give a much more interesting flavour than ordinary oranges.
I've can't take mulled wine at all - much too scary. Both red wine and
sweet oranges are migraine triggers for me - even just the smell :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-06-13 15:15:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
As an engineer/scientist, it's always irritated me that evaporated and
condensed milk both exist, but are different things!
We often had ‘evap’ as a family (never bothered about cream as I’n not a
fan of it) but didn’t really come across condensed - though I can no longer
recall which we used to simmer in the sealed can for a long time to use in
the making of ice cream.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-06-13 18:06:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
We often had ‘evap’ as a family (never bothered about cream as I’n not a
fan of it) but didn’t really come across condensed - though I can no longer
recall which we used to simmer in the sealed can for a long time to use in
the making of ice cream.
Back in the wilder days of my yoof I had a boyfriend who had a brother
known to most people as Connie because of his passion for Connie-onnie.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2020-06-13 20:04:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 13 Jun 2020 15:15:47 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
didn’t really come across condensed - though I can no longer
recall which we used to simmer in the sealed can for a long time to use in
the making of ice cream.
That'll be condensed - most likely sweetened condensed. I think my
favourite ice cream was chestnut - made by my mother with a can of chestnut
puree and a can of sweetened condensed. Served with whipped cream, she
called it Mont Blanc.

I think boiled sweetened condensed milk is also a prime ingredient in the
Kent favourite, Gypsy Tart and in Banoffee Pie.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-06-13 23:30:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
didn’t really come across condensed - though I can no longer
recall which we used to simmer in the sealed can for a long time to use in
the making of ice cream.
That'll be condensed - most likely sweetened condensed. I think my
favourite ice cream was chestnut - made by my mother with a can of chestnut
puree and a can of sweetened condensed. Served with whipped cream, she
called it Mont Blanc.
I think boiled sweetened condensed milk is also a prime ingredient in the
Kent favourite, Gypsy Tart and in Banoffee Pie.
We call it Dulce de Leche.

In fact the <spit>Nestle<spit> ready-boiled-in-the-tin version of
condensed milk that probably sits alongside the regular variety on the
English supermarket shelf is already labelled as Dulce de Leche.

Nick
Sally Thompson
2020-06-13 22:22:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
in the dust...
didn’t really come across condensed - though I can no longer
recall which we used to simmer in the sealed can for a long time to use in
the making of ice cream.
That'll be condensed - most likely sweetened condensed. I think my
favourite ice cream was chestnut - made by my mother with a can of chestnut
puree and a can of sweetened condensed. Served with whipped cream, she
called it Mont Blanc.
I think boiled sweetened condensed milk is also a prime ingredient in the
Kent favourite, Gypsy Tart and in Banoffee Pie.
We call it Dulce de Leche.
In fact the <spit>Nestle<spit> ready-boiled-in-the-tin version of
condensed milk that probably sits alongside the regular variety on the
English supermarket shelf is already labelled as Dulce de Leche
Really? <spit x 2>

I buy the genuine article via Mr A. Mazon and use it in ice cream. It's
very mmmmmmm.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Rosemary Miskin
2020-06-12 09:54:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I suddthat ism and theyhad a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a glass 
mould shaped like a rabbit.
My mum did that as well, but I grandchildren think her mould was aluminium. 
I've got one of those, and one shaped like a tortoise and, I think, another one, but
I can't remember what shape that one is, and they're somewhere in the depths
of a cupboard.

I must dig them out if the grandchildren are ever able to visit again.

Rosemary
Jim Easterbrook
2020-06-12 10:18:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I suddthat ism and theyhad a flashback to my mum making milk jellies
in a glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
My mum did that as well, but I grandchildren think her mould was
aluminium.
Have we got a crossed line?
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I've got one of those, and one shaped like a tortoise and, I think,
another one, but I can't remember what shape that one is, and they're
somewhere in the depths of a cupboard.
A hare would go with a tortoise.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2020-06-12 10:21:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I suddthat ism and theyhad a flashback to my mum making milk jellies
in a glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
My mum did that as well, but I grandchildren think her mould was
aluminium.
Have we got a crossed line?
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I've got one of those, and one shaped like a tortoise and, I think,
another one, but I can't remember what shape that one is, and they're
somewhere in the depths of a cupboard.
A hare would go with a tortoise.
The hare would be behind the tortoise of course...
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-12 21:58:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
The hare would be behind the tortoise of course...
Indeed.
I went to school and that's the first thing they tortoise.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-06-12 10:55:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
Chris
Yes, but when Wunderkind was little it was conventional jelly in a silicone
orange jelly mould.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-06-12 15:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jun 2020 08:31:51 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
I loved milk jellies when I was a child. I discovered the first time I made
one, there is some special skill to making a jelly with milk which my
mother had failed to impart before she died. I made something almost nearly
like a milk jelly but it looked sort of curdled - still tasted good though.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jane Vernon
2020-06-12 17:08:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
Ooh yes, mine did that as well. I think the mould was metal, though.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-12 22:02:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
Ooh yes, mine did that as well.  I think the mould was metal, though.
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
--
Sam Plusnet
(I'm really getting the hang of this descriptive prose lark.)
Jenny M Benson
2020-06-12 22:49:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
Gosh! Are you my brother?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
steveski
2020-06-12 23:53:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
Gosh! Are you my brother?
[mode=deep, leaden but breathy voice]

We are all your brother . . . [1]

[/mode=deep, leaden but breathy voice]
--
Steveski [1] :-)
Jim Easterbrook
2020-06-13 07:03:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sam Plusnet
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
An ebay search for aluminium jelly mould finds many of these. Didn't spot
a tortoise though.
Post by steveski
Post by Jenny M Benson
Gosh! Are you my brother?
[mode=deep, leaden but breathy voice]
We are all your brother . . . [1]
[/mode=deep, leaden but breathy voice]
"All men are brothers, but some are more brothers than others." -- Reggie
Perrin.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-13 21:06:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
Gosh!  Are you my brother?
My siblings are no longer extant, so I don't think we need to do the
whole DNA checking thing.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-06-13 08:01:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong.
I suddenly had a flashback to my mum making milk jellies in a
glass mould shaped like a rabbit.
Ooh yes, mine did that as well.  I think the mould was metal, though.
I recall two.
One was rabbit-shaped, and the other was... jelly shaped - sort of
domed, with fluted sides & roundy bits on top.
[Mode: One Upmanship]
We had a family of rabbit jelly moulds. Nerrrrrr....
--
Toodle Pip
Mike Ruddock
2020-06-12 07:36:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I think there has been a nod towards the vegetarian/vegan lobby.
Gelatine used to be extracted from animal bones and now some
manufacturers use other ways of setting jellies etc.

Mike Ruddock
And no, I don't know if the gums you mention would strengthen human
nails, which are largely made from keratin.
Penny
2020-06-12 08:16:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Jun 2020 16:03:21 -0700 (PDT), Min <***@googlemail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
I remember being told gelatine was good for nails but I first came across
the idea of eating the jelly cubes straight out of the packet when we moved
across the county and it was a 'thing' at my new school. To the extent that
any fund-raising event included the sale of cubes of jelly. I did try them,
they are very sweet.

Later, in my teens, I spent several weeks on an archaeological dig in
Wiltshire, camping on-site and walking to the pub every night where I would
nurse and consume half a pint of bitter. Whether it was the beer or some
other aspect of the change in diet (we were fed on-site, cornflakes for
breakfast, jam sandwiches (with margarine) for lunch and soup followed by a
stew, followed by a dessert of some sort for tea/supper/dinner) I don't
know, but my fingernails were certainly stronger and generally 'better'
from the experience. I always blamed the beer.

I think you can still buy actual gelatine in those thin sheets - not nice
to eat but you could mix them with something sugary I expect.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-06-13 19:43:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I think you can still buy actual gelatine in those thin sheets - not nice
to eat but you could mix them with something sugary I expect.
I think you can still buy powdered gelatin in the bakery section.
There is the ubiquitous Doctor Oetker brand (or however he is
spielded) and probably other manufacturers too. As well as food uses
such as making matambre(1) I have, in extremis(2), used it as a
woodworking adhesive(3)and a bookbinding glue(4)

Nick
(1)Google will tell all if you really want to know
(2)As in an extremely long way from where I keep my regular glues
(3)Argentina and Paraguay
(4)Australia
Flop
2020-06-12 08:31:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
Gelatine is a surprisingly healthy product especially for hair, skin and
nails.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/gelatin-benefits#section6

Is is produced from boiled animal bones and skin.
So it is not vegan.

Replacements are usually gums from seaweed and so are vegan.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Nick Odell
2020-06-12 17:45:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Flop
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
Gelatine is a surprisingly healthy product especially for hair, skin and
nails.
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/gelatin-benefits#section6
Is is produced from boiled animal bones and skin.
So it is not vegan.
Replacements are usually gums from seaweed and so are vegan.
Yes, as Mike said up ^^^^ thataway, as the vegan/vegetarian market has
become worth selling to, lots of products that are associated with
animal ingredients are no longer made in the same way.

As a teenager I used to eat gelatin containing jelly cubes to
strengthen my weak and tearing nails (I was starting to learn to play
classical guitar and there was a limit to how much tissue paper and
superglue I could fix to my nails to hold them together). Now the
reverse it true: my nail have become so hard - especially my toenails
- that it is a real effort clipping them at all.

Nick
steveski
2020-06-12 23:49:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
As a teenager I used to eat gelatin containing jelly cubes to strengthen
my weak and tearing nails (I was starting to learn to play classical
guitar and there was a limit to how much tissue paper and superglue I
my nail have become so hard - especially my toenails - that it is a real
effort clipping them at all.
It's easier with bass - you just let the callouses make the ends of your
fingers go square and turn up the 'crunch' settings :-)
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-12 21:59:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
When I was small(er), my Mum used to encourage me to eat small cubes of
jelly, in order to make my nails strong. I have some (rather nice) Hartley's
jellies (strawberry) but, on reading the ingredients, it seems the gelling
agents are Locust Bean Gum, Xanthum Gum and Gellan Gum. No gelatine at all.
So, I guess they're not going to make my nails strong? Or was the jelly/
nails thing just an Old Wives' tale?
If there were any old wives on UMRA we could ask, but I'm sure no-rat
matches that description.
--
Sam Plusnet
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