Discussion:
EU: wiring in bathrroms
(too old to reply)
Derek Turner
2019-01-16 16:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height for
a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if it
would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia
Derek.
Jim Easterbrook
2019-01-16 17:28:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
overview:
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>

I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-16 17:50:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.

I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating,
though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"This is a one line proof... if we start sufficiently far to the left."
[Cambridge University Math Dept.]
John Ashby
2019-01-16 19:13:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.
I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating, though.
You can fit (as I have) a double pole pull-cord isolator for a 10kW
shower, which I would expect to be more than adequate for a washing machine.

john
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-16 21:16:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.
I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating, though.
You can fit (as I have) a double pole pull-cord isolator for a 10kW
shower, which I would expect to be more than adequate for a washing machine.
john
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to. I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-17 10:38:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to. I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
Also years ago, my Mum had her twin-tub washing machine sited in the
bathroom, with an on/off switch on the wall outside the door. The chap
who fixed it up had been somewhat reluctant but I can't now recall if
that was solely on safety grounds or if consideration of the law came
into it.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2019-01-17 11:02:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to.  I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
Also years ago, my Mum had her twin-tub washing machine sited in the
bathroom, with an on/off switch on the wall outside the door.  The chap
who fixed it up had been somewhat reluctant but I can't now recall if
that was solely on safety grounds or if consideration of the law came
into it.
The pragmatic solution (FSVO "pragmatic" which includes "dishonest") is
to do whatever you want but use the old red and black T+E cable.
Swearing that it was all wired up like that before you moved into the
property is unlikely to convince anybody if the house is a new-build,
though.

Nick
Chris McMillan
2019-01-17 12:07:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.
I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating, though.
You can fit (as I have) a double pole pull-cord isolator for a 10kW
shower, which I would expect to be more than adequate for a washing machine.
john
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to. I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
That is because we’re now governed by a whole set of EU rules and anyone
thinking of upgrading their bathroom will find they need to lay out lotsa
dosh for switches and new lighting.

Sincerely Chris
John Ashby
2019-01-17 14:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.
I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating, though.
You can fit (as I have) a double pole pull-cord isolator for a 10kW
shower, which I would expect to be more than adequate for a washing machine.
john
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to. I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
That is because we’re now governed by a whole set of EU rules and anyone
thinking of upgrading their bathroom will find they need to lay out lotsa
dosh for switches and new lighting.
Sincerely Chris
Just wait until April, then. Unless Article 50 gets extended.

john
Mike
2019-01-17 14:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Derek Turner
Sur la continent, I often see washing machines plumbed-in in bathrooms.
Here I sometimes see standard 3-pin sockets mounted at ceiling height
for a bathroom heater (with a cord-switch, natch). Does anyrat know if
it would be legal in the UK to plumb- and wire-in a washer-drier in a
bathroom by either (1) having the socket at ceiling height or (2) wiring
it in permanently with a pull-cord isolator?
tia Derek.
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
Jim knows more than I. I think he's right that a permanently-wired one
might be OK.
I don't think you'll get a pull-cord isolator of sufficient rating, though.
You can fit (as I have) a double pole pull-cord isolator for a 10kW
shower, which I would expect to be more than adequate for a washing machine.
john
Years ago I had a washing machine and tumble dryer stacked on it in a
tiny downstairs shower room(shower, tiny basin, toilet) It was an
extension built with room too as a possible granny room, that my mum
refused to move to. I don't recall any quibbles about safety.
That is because we’re now governed by a whole set of EU rules and anyone
thinking of upgrading their bathroom will find they need to lay out lotsa
dosh for switches and new lighting.
Sincerely Chris
Just wait until April, then. Unless Article 50 gets extended.
john
Will electricity be an April Fuel? Start collecting your back stop of logs
now....
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-17 18:07:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris McMillan
That is because we’re now governed by a whole set of EU rules and anyone
thinking of upgrading their bathroom will find they need to lay out lotsa
dosh for switches and new lighting.
Just wait until April, then. Unless Article 50 gets extended.
Yep. Then the French won't sell us electricity any more[1] so the point
will become moot. :o)


[1]Just in case anyone says "Project Fear," I should make clear that I'm
exaggerating/making it up for comic effect. I hope.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2019-01-17 19:37:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris McMillan
That is because we’re now governed by a whole set of EU rules and anyone
thinking of upgrading their bathroom will find they need to lay out lotsa
dosh for switches and new lighting.
Just wait until April, then. Unless Article 50 gets extended.
Yep.  Then the French won't sell us electricity any more[1] so the point
will become moot.  :o)
[1]Just in case anyone says "Project Fear," I should make clear that I'm
exaggerating/making it up for comic effect.  I hope.
It's all right, there'll be plenty of electricity from Wylf... Oh.

john

Chris J Dixon
2019-01-17 13:07:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
That is pretty much it.

<http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Bathroom_electrics>

uk.d-i-y is the place to go if you want more discussion.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-17 13:42:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jim Easterbrook
The UK rules changed a few years ago, dividing bathrooms into "zones"
that say what sort of equipment can be installed where. This gives an
<https://www.drench.co.uk/blog/what-are-bathroom-electrical-zones/>
I think a normal socket is still verboten as someone could plug in any
appliance and use it too closer to the bath / shower. A permanently wired
in washing machine might be OK.
That is pretty much it.
<http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Bathroom_electrics>
uk.d-i-y is the place to go if you want more discussion.
Chris
This is the EU that I _don't_ want to leave (-:!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Grammar is there to help, not hinder."
-- Mark Wallace, APIHNA, 2nd December 2000 (quoted by John Flynn 2000-12-6)
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