Discussion:
VCR players
Add Reply
Tony Smith
2020-11-03 10:54:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
We still have the technology to watch VCR films, but seldom do. Yesterday we watched the BBC version of "Persuasion", my favourite Jane Austen novel.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-11-03 11:26:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
We still have the technology to watch VCR films, but seldom do.
Yesterday we watched the BBC version of "Persuasion", my favourite Jane
Austen novel.
Probably not a bad idea to use the equipment occasionally to ensure that
it hasn't decayed - using it probably redistributes lubricant anyway.

If lockdown is a change of lifestyle, it might be an opportunity to
transfer some of your videotapes to another medium*; start with truly
irreplaceable ones, like family tapes. Unless you already have such,
though, it would involve obtaining and learning to use some extra
hardware (and software). [The hardware's probably very cheap -
VHS/Beta/V2000 don't require anything fancy.]

*I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
Hard drives might be the way to go. (If doing that, don't forget to scan
any cover material; not sure about booklets etcetera.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The advantage with David Attenborough is that people just want to hear him
talk. About anything.
- Kirsty Young (Desert Island Discs presenter), RT 2015/9/25-10/2
Philip Hole
2020-11-03 12:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith
We still have the technology to watch VCR films, but seldom do.
Yesterday we watched the BBC version of "Persuasion", my favourite
Jane Austen novel.
Probably not a bad idea to use the equipment occasionally to ensure that
it hasn't decayed - using it probably redistributes lubricant anyway.
If lockdown is a change of lifestyle, it might be an opportunity to
transfer some of your videotapes to another medium*; start with truly
irreplaceable ones, like family tapes. Unless you already have such,
though, it would involve obtaining and learning to use some extra
hardware (and software). [The hardware's probably very cheap -
VHS/Beta/V2000 don't require anything fancy.]
*I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
Hard drives might be the way to go. (If doing that, don't forget to scan
any cover material; not sure about booklets etcetera.)
----

Can anyone suggest how to copy videos and retain the subtitles.
They can be very useful at times and essential at other times.
--
Flop
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-11-03 12:30:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 3 Nov 2020 at 12:00:16, Philip Hole <***@theholefamily.org>
wrote:
[]
Post by Philip Hole
Can anyone suggest how to copy videos and retain the subtitles.
They can be very useful at times and essential at other times.
How do you turn them on? If it's a function purely of your video
machine, then the video stream from the video stream will contain them
when they're turned on, and that's what you'd capture. (Of course,
they'd then be "burned in" to the video, i. e. you couldn't turn them
_off_.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Grammar is there to help, not hinder."
-- Mark Wallace, APIHNA, 2nd December 2000 (quoted by John Flynn 2000-12-6)
krw
2020-11-03 15:59:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
If it had not been for the new lockdown we were going to have to visit
the daughter's house to babysit the grandchildren. Dearly beloved wife
suggested we would take some dvds with us to watch after the youngest
had gone to bed (the rest are old enough to look after themselves now).

Daughter responded that we could take them but could not play them
because they only ever stream things these days.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Steve Hague
2020-11-03 17:18:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
If it had not been for the new lockdown we were going to have to visit
the daughter's house to babysit the grandchildren.  Dearly beloved wife
suggested we would take some dvds with us to watch after the youngest
had gone to bed (the rest are old enough to look after themselves now).
Daughter responded that we could take them but could not play them
because they only ever stream things these days.
Yes, it's sad. We were babysitting for the leader of our church and wife
(late 30s), and took a DVD. No means to play it, no CD player, streaming
and mp3 only. I can understand the people who yearn for the days of the
vinyl disc.
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-11-03 17:29:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
If it had not been for the new lockdown we were going to have to
visit the daughter's house to babysit the grandchildren.  Dearly
beloved wife suggested we would take some dvds with us to watch after
the youngest had gone to bed (the rest are old enough to look after
themselves now).
Daughter responded that we could take them but could not play them
because they only ever stream things these days.
Yes, it's sad. We were babysitting for the leader of our church and
wife (late 30s), and took a DVD. No means to play it, no CD player,
streaming and mp3 only. I can understand the people who yearn for the
days of the vinyl disc.
Steve
Any computer they have probably could (might have to download a player
software) - unless they're ultra-modern and don't have a computer with
an optical drive in it. (Or even only have 'phones, and maybe a tablet.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I use science as my model here. We will crawl toward the truth without ever
knowing if we are all the way there. - Scott Adams, 2015-3-20
Steve Hague
2020-11-03 17:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Steve Hague
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
 If it had not been for the new lockdown we were going to have to
visit  the daughter's house to babysit the grandchildren.  Dearly
beloved wife  suggested we would take some dvds with us to watch
after the youngest  had gone to bed (the rest are old enough to look
after themselves now).
 Daughter responded that we could take them but could not play them
because they only ever stream things these days.
Yes, it's sad. We were babysitting for the leader of our church and
wife (late 30s), and took a DVD. No means to play it, no CD player,
streaming and mp3 only. I can understand the people who yearn for the
days of the vinyl disc.
Steve
Any computer they have probably could (might have to download a player
software) - unless they're ultra-modern and don't have a computer with
an optical drive in it. (Or even only have 'phones, and maybe a tablet.)
I've only ever seen them with phones and tablets.
Tony Smith
2020-11-04 11:15:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tuesday, 3 November 2020 at 17:34:25 UTC, Steve Hague wrote:
- unless they're ultra-modern and don't have a computer with
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
an optical drive in it.
My current desk top doesn't have an optical drive, so I spent about £15 getting a small external one to plug in.
DavidK
2020-11-04 12:32:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
- unless they're ultra-modern and don't have a computer with
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
an optical drive in it.
My current desk top doesn't have an optical drive, so I spent about £15 getting a small external one to plug in.
Does it play blu-ray, and does one need a powerful pc/laptop to play
blu-rays?
Tony Smith
2020-11-05 16:22:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
- unless they're ultra-modern and don't have a computer with
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
an optical drive in it.
My current desk top doesn't have an optical drive, so I spent about £15 getting a small external one to plug in.
Does it play blu-ray, and does one need a powerful pc/laptop to play
blu-rays?
I doubt it. My intended use was to play soothing music while I mark my OU TMA scripts.
Steve Hague
2020-11-03 17:09:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith
We still have the technology to watch VCR films, but seldom do.
Yesterday we watched the BBC version of "Persuasion", my favourite
Jane Austen novel.
Probably not a bad idea to use the equipment occasionally to ensure that
it hasn't decayed - using it probably redistributes lubricant anyway.
If lockdown is a change of lifestyle, it might be an opportunity to
transfer some of your videotapes to another medium*; start with truly
irreplaceable ones, like family tapes. Unless you already have such,
though, it would involve obtaining and learning to use some extra
hardware (and software). [The hardware's probably very cheap -
VHS/Beta/V2000 don't require anything fancy.]
*I was going to say "to DVD", but not sure if _that_ is obsolescent now.
Hard drives might be the way to go. (If doing that, don't forget to scan
any cover material; not sure about booklets etcetera.)
In my not inconsiderable experience, VHS machines far outlast the tapes.
You can usually forestall any disaster by looking at the top of the
cassette. If there's any white or grey powder visible, put the cassette
in the bin rather than in the VHS player. There again, I made money out
of people not doing this when I was in business.
Steve
Loading...