Discussion:
I need an update.
(too old to reply)
Mike Ruddock
2020-08-25 11:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody point
me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2020-08-25 11:50:56 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 25 Aug 2020 12:13:33 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody point
me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Well, you could listen at 14:15 but the bbc sounds site gives a good
summary <https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2> (you may need to click
on 'see more').
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2020-08-25 11:54:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody point
me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.

You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
--
Best wishes, Serena
If all goes well, this year's drama will be next year's anecdote
(Humphrey Littleton)
DavidK
2020-08-26 09:02:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Nick Leverton
2020-08-26 09:15:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Mike
2020-08-26 09:59:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Nick
And kept warm and moist.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Leverton
2020-08-26 10:05:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Nick
And kept warm and moist.
Mmmm moist ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
BrritSki
2020-08-26 10:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Nick
And kept warm and moist.
Mmmm moist ...
And miced probably.
Mike
2020-08-26 11:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Nick
And kept warm and moist.
Mmmm moist ...
And miced probably.
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-08-26 15:11:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Nick
And kept warm and moist.
Mmmm moist ...
And miced probably.
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
I now find that it is some 72 hours.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-26 23:57:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
the sprouting stage?

Wasn't that an album by Joan Armatrading?
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2020-08-28 14:42:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
the sprouting stage?
Wasn't that an album by Joan Armatrading?
:o))

BTW, there's rather a good documentary about her still available on iPlayer:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0008rm4
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Peter
2020-08-28 17:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
the sprouting stage?
Wasn't that an album by Joan Armatrading?
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where the
phrase 'drop the pilot' came from. That was some years ago, so no doubt
she's found out since.
krw
2020-08-28 21:15:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
the sprouting stage?
Wasn't that an album by Joan Armatrading?
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where the
phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so no doubt
she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy. I wonder if we can
convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sid Nuncius
2020-08-29 05:00:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so no
doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we can
convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2020-08-29 06:52:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so no
doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we can
convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Now, where did I put that box of golden ‘good-byes’?
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-29 21:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so
no doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we
can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.

p.s. Trouble sleeping Sid?
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2020-08-29 23:47:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so
no doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we
can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
Signals Passed At Danger?

Hmmm, interesting . . .
--
Steveski
Chris McMillan
2020-08-30 08:57:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so
no doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we
can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
Signals Passed At Danger?
Hmmm, interesting . . .
:)

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2020-08-30 10:54:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so
no doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we
can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
Signals Passed At Danger?
Hmmm, interesting . . .
:)
Sincerely Chris
I just call a Spad a Spad...
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-08-30 08:57:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so
no doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we
can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
p.s. Trouble sleeping Sid?
Signals passed at danger? What else does it mean?

Sincerely Chris (blame my ex employers)
Sid Nuncius
2020-08-30 18:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
p.s. Trouble sleeping Sid?
6.00am is a lie-in for me. It's not moral rectitude, it's just that I
can't often sleep beyond 5.30. Don't know why. I've come to like the
early mornings when few others are around.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-30 20:21:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
If - heaven forfend! - the PM should be found to have told untruths,
shurely the only fair and just response would be to sack a couple of
senior civil servants.
Certainly, but we must spare the SPADS at all costs.
p.s. Trouble sleeping Sid?
6.00am is a lie-in for me.  It's not moral rectitude, it's just that I
can't often sleep beyond 5.30.  Don't know why.  I've come to like the
early mornings when few others are around.
I too like the early mornings - when seen from the other end.
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2020-08-31 01:32:50 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
p.s. Trouble sleeping Sid?
6.00am is a lie-in for me.  It's not moral rectitude, it's just that I
can't often sleep beyond 5.30.  Don't know why.  I've come to like the
early mornings when few others are around.
I too like the early mornings - when seen from the other end.
<extremely languid wave>
--
Steveski
BrritSki
2020-08-29 07:49:49 UTC
Permalink
...  I wonder if we can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
Which one ? PM, that is, not Queen or lies...
John Ashby
2020-08-29 09:29:54 UTC
Permalink
...  I wonder if we can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
Which one ?  PM, that is, not Queen or lies...
Both the one with the hair and the one with the beanie.

john
BrritSki
2020-08-29 10:21:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
...  I wonder if we can convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
Which one ?  PM, that is, not Queen or lies...
Both the one with the hair and the one with the beanie.
I was thinking more historically; May, Cameron, Brown, Blair etc.

Although of course none of those are now sackable from the job of PM...
Peter
2020-08-29 11:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
I think the sprouting stage is some 24-36 hours (BIMBAM) so with a few cats
around...
the sprouting stage?
Wasn't that an album by Joan Armatrading?
I was surprised to learn that Joan Armour Plating did not know where
the phrase 'drop the pilot' came from.  That was some years ago, so no
doubt she's found out since.
Sacking Bismark according to that interwebby thingy.  I wonder if we can
convince HM The Queen to sack the PM for telling lies?
If PM are to be sacked for lying we'd get through them at the rate of
about one a week!
Penny
2020-08-26 11:35:59 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 09:15:27 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton <***@leverton.org>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Undoubtedly intended for malting. If it's sprouted already the maltsters
won't want it.

One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2020-08-26 14:50:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Undoubtedly intended for malting. If it's sprouted already the maltsters
won't want it.
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.

Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.

Which is probably TMI.

john
Vicky Ayech
2020-08-26 16:59:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Undoubtedly intended for malting. If it's sprouted already the maltsters
won't want it.
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
john
Not TMI at all. Very interesting.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-08-26 17:10:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 at 15:50:09, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by John Ashby
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one
(A fork seems an odd implement to turn with.)
Post by John Ashby
of the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging
the fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he
left a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent
on what they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a
tailor, but also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and
insulated him from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father,
the youngest but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware
of the fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables
(unlike his father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have
had too great an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly
didn't enjoy the task when we were given the occasional brace of
pheasants). And I seem to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any
time one's world can be shattered, but if you have potatoes and
cabbages and beans and onions, you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all; it was interesting.

(I'm pretty sure I have at least one maltster among my ancestors, too.)
Post by John Ashby
john
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Why doesn't DOS ever say "EXCELLENT command or filename!"
BrritSki
2020-08-26 20:21:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 09:15:27 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect.  It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Undoubtedly intended for malting. If it's sprouted already the maltsters
won't want it.
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all. A sad, but nonetheless fascinating personal history.

My grandads had a) a mint patch and b) a small flower garden (he had the
excuse of a withered leg though). Dad always had an allotment though and
we've always had veg patches if the garden was big enough.
Sid Nuncius
2020-08-28 14:39:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 09:15:27 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect.  It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Undoubtedly intended for malting. If it's sprouted already the maltsters
won't want it.
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went
out and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt
was turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into
one of the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that
night was windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him,
dislodging the fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he
left a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent
on what they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a
tailor, but also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and
insulated him from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father,
the youngest but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware
of the fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables
(unlike his father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have
had too great an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly
didn't enjoy the task when we were given the occasional brace of
pheasants). And I seem to have imbibed that same sense from him: at
any time one's world can be shattered, but if you have potatoes and
cabbages and beans and onions, you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all. A sad, but nonetheless fascinating personal history.
<languid wave>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jane Vernon
2020-08-27 07:40:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all, it's extremely interesting. How different all our lives are
here on umra and yet there are so many common threads and growing our
own vegetables is one of them.

--
I seem to have lost all my sig files somehow. Abnormal service will be
returned once the tuit has turned up.
Mike
2020-08-27 11:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all, it's extremely interesting. How different all our lives are
here on umra and yet there are so many common threads and growing our
own vegetables is one of them.
--
I seem to have lost all my sig files somehow. Abnormal service will be
returned once the tuit has turned up.
McToodle villas has / have grown this year, beetroot, spring onions,
carrots, tomatoes, sweet peppers, courgettes, patty pans, lettuce, pak
choy, garlic chives, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme but... have not been
to Scarborough fayre.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-08-27 14:05:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
McToodle villas has / have grown this year, beetroot, spring onions,
carrots, tomatoes, sweet peppers, courgettes, patty pans, lettuce, pak
choy, garlic chives, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme but... have not been
to Scarborough fayre.
There is a communal garden area where I live but no one bothers with it
and we no longer have a gardener, so I have some ground to do with as I
will. I used to have a strip with black, red and white currants in
until the HA dug them up to build a new fence. In another strip I have
rhubarb, a gooseberry bush, a blackcurrant and a jostaberry. On my
patio I have a family pear tree and a family apple tree in pots, plus a
few pots of beans and carrots. At the end of our drying area I have a
lot more pots and tubs with some parsnips and beans, 2 gooseberry
bushes, a jostaberry, a blueberry (it's twin died and is yet to be
replaced), a chokeberry and a dwarf blackberry. A dwarf raspberry is on
order. There were 2 pots of sugar snap peas but they are finished now.

I am thinking of replacing some of the pots with lidded troughs next
year, and also have my eye on a small fruit cage because the birds
especially wood pigeons - are a boodly pest.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Mike
2020-08-27 14:37:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike
McToodle villas has / have grown this year, beetroot, spring onions,
carrots, tomatoes, sweet peppers, courgettes, patty pans, lettuce, pak
choy, garlic chives, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme but... have not been
to Scarborough fayre.
There is a communal garden area where I live but no one bothers with it
and we no longer have a gardener, so I have some ground to do with as I
will. I used to have a strip with black, red and white currants in
until the HA dug them up to build a new fence. In another strip I have
rhubarb, a gooseberry bush, a blackcurrant and a jostaberry. On my
patio I have a family pear tree and a family apple tree in pots, plus a
few pots of beans and carrots. At the end of our drying area I have a
lot more pots and tubs with some parsnips and beans, 2 gooseberry
bushes, a jostaberry, a blueberry (it's twin died and is yet to be
replaced), a chokeberry and a dwarf blackberry. A dwarf raspberry is on
order. There were 2 pots of sugar snap peas but they are finished now.
I am thinking of replacing some of the pots with lidded troughs next
year, and also have my eye on a small fruit cage because the birds
especially wood pigeons - are a boodly pest.
Oh! And I forgot the French climbing beans (Hunter, a stringless variety
loved by many children ‘cos it squeaks on their teeth) and the rhubarb
which really is enjoying this weather! I didn’t mention the basil either,
but, that’s looking a little sorry for itself just now.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-08-27 14:30:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all, it's extremely interesting. How different all our lives are
here on umra and yet there are so many common threads and growing our
own vegetables is one of them.
--
I seem to have lost all my sig files somehow. Abnormal service will be
returned once the tuit has turned up.
McToodle villas has / have grown this year, beetroot, spring onions,
carrots, tomatoes, sweet peppers, courgettes, patty pans, lettuce, pak
choy, garlic chives, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme but... have not been
to Scarborough fayre.
And we don’t have an allotment.

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2020-08-27 14:30:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
One of my (few) happy memories of attending school in a town with a
maltings was the glorious smell on roasting days - mmmm.
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all, it's extremely interesting. How different all our lives are
here on umra and yet there are so many common threads and growing our
own vegetables is one of them.
--
I seem to have lost all my sig files somehow. Abnormal service will be
returned once the tuit has turned up.
My paternal family were general store owners, with various amounts of
success. Although I know one shop personally, I have a photo of great
grandad outside a different with my dad as a small boy, by the time I was
conscious of anything, my grandad had left shop opening to his rather
younger bro in law, who with a friend, employed my paternal uncle as
accountant, his wife was p/t secretary, and my mum’s bro was their
refrigeration engineer. Grandad went to work in a Reading 1950s - 1970s
retail institution, Tuttys, as a debt collector. They’d moved from the
flat over the shop near where we two live now to a Victorian terrace house.
Ruthlessly I binned the paperwork on the house sale in the 1970s the other
week. My gran had an allotment: locals may well know Millman Rd/Swainstone
Rd for one or several reasons. The allotments were on very unstable
ground. When I showed McT the roads in the early 21st cent, the whole
allotment area is locked off from Swainstone Rd with danger signs!

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-08-27 16:35:55 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 15:50:09 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
My great-grandfather was a maltster. Back then the malt needed regular
turning by hand, even in the middle of the night. One night he went out
and later on his wife woke to find he had not returned. The malt was
turned using large forks, and it was the habit to stick them into one of
the ceiling beams of the malting floor. Unfortunately that night was
windy so when he went in the door banged shut behind him, dislodging the
fork which killed him.
Which, in my opinion, explains why I have an allotment. You see, he left
a wife and young son, and they would have been largely dependent on what
they could grow to eat. The son, my grandfather, became a tailor, but
also had a smallholding that fed his seven children and insulated him
from the hard times of the nineteen twenties. My father, the youngest
but one of those seven, injured in WW2 and acutely aware of the
fragility of life grew a large proportion of our vegetables (unlike his
father he didn't keep hens, probably because he would have had too great
an aversion to plucking and drawing them - he certainly didn't enjoy the
task when we were given the occasional brace of pheasants). And I seem
to have imbibed that same sense from him: at any time one's world can be
shattered, but if you have potatoes and cabbages and beans and onions,
you'll pull through.
Which is probably TMI.
Not at all, very interesting and, even without the horrors of the demise of
your great-grandfather, inheriting the wish (if not understanding the
possible need) to grow ones own basic necessities does seem to be a
'thing'. I'm pleased my children do it too.

In the time-travelling tale which forms the basis of the Outlander books, I
was quite moved by the advice the time-traveller gave to her 18th century
sister-in-law shortly before Culloden to 'grow potatoes'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-08-26 18:59:33 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 09:15:27 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by DavidK
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike Ruddock
Listening to Alice droning on last night I realised that I haven't a
clue about what it is that she did and blamed Ed for. Can somebody
point me to a site where I can read summaries like what there used to be?
Alice had told Ed to unload the wheat into a bay which already contained
malting barley. Ed then got the blame for having emptied it into the
wrong bay. The combined mixed grain will be worth only a fraction of the
price they should have got for either one in its unadulterated state.
You can see the synopsis (or listen again, if you really want to) at
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000m0p2>
I'm wondering if that is barley that is malting, or barley that is to be
malted.
Barley intended for malting, I would expect. It's an unfortunately
long time since I went round a brewery, but IIRC barley in the process of
being malted would usually be spread out on the brewery's malting floor.
Last time I went around a brewery, (Magic Rock, since you asked) they
bought in ready-malted barley from a number of sources and used them
as required to make a number of varieties of beer. I went around a
working Suffolk maltings years ago: amazing aroma!

Nick
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