Discussion:
Ask EU: Laptop advice
(too old to reply)
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-07 11:47:27 UTC
Permalink
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life. It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit. I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.

I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice. I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this. Good screen quality is
desirable. More than one USB port would be good. Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.

Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along. I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.

Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.

[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages. Worrying. I've
run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the look of it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-03-07 12:21:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life. It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
I doubt it.
Post by Sid Nuncius
generally creaking a bit. I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
Unless it is a hardware problem, I'd consider reinstalling Windows (and
all your software - but you'd need to do that on a new one too).
Post by Sid Nuncius
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
For all of those other than the TV (if you mean with a TV stick), and
probably even for that, almost any conventional laptop you can find
should handle that.
Post by Sid Nuncius
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice. I'd prefer an SSD, I
I presume you mean storage. (256G RAM would be very expensive, and
probably not available in a laptop!) If you mean an SSD (solid state
drive), that will indeed push the cost near your budget; personally, I'm
not convinced of the long-term reliability of SSDs (at least, of how
they behave when they do fail): if you go for a machine with a
conventional drive, you won't find one with that _little_ - you might
even have difficulty finding one with as little as 500G; 1T is becoming
common now.

The main thing about getting a new machine is that you'd only be able to
get Windows 10; I won't enter into the version wars here, but it is very
_different_ to earlier versions, at least to 7 and XP (I've only about
half-an-hour's experience with 8).
Post by Sid Nuncius
think, but am happy to be advised on this. Good screen quality is
desirable. More than one USB port would be good. Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
I agree, you want USB sockets.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along. I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
I don't think there's a _lot_ of difference between the makes. To me,
that's quite a high budget - but then I tend to buy refurbished. Where I
think you'd get something more than adequate for your needs for 200-300,
possibly quite a bit less - plus _maybe_ 40-60 for a bigger drive, if
they come with 150 or less.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages. Worrying. I've
run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the look of it.
Memory _management_ sounds to me like some configuration has got
corrupted, hence my suggestion of a restore/repair of your existing
Windows (which one do you have?). It _could_ be bad memory - apparently
it does go bad, though I've never had any do so - or, it could just be
loose in its slot: might be worth taking it out and putting it back.
(Some people say also clean the contacts, some say with a pencil
eraser.) If the memory is bad, it should be replaceable for a few tens
of pounds. You can test it - the most popular testing utility is called
something like memtest86, and is free.

HTH
JPG


What do you think about petitions? See 255soft.uk; #fairpetitions @jpeg_G6
--
How about a three-way referendum with second choices being taken into account?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The people here are more educated and intelligent. Even stupid people in
Britain are smarter than Americans." Madonna, in RT 30 June-6July 2001 (page
32)
steveski
2019-03-07 12:23:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.
[snip laptop woes]

Before you ditch it, try taking out, and then reseating, the memory and
checking (i.e. wiggling) anything else where there might be contact
corrosion.

Also, it might be the OS - can you reinstall it? Or load another one?
--
Steveski
Mike
2019-03-07 18:13:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.
[snip laptop woes]
Before you ditch it, try taking out, and then reseating, the memory and
checking (i.e. wiggling) anything else where there might be contact
corrosion.
Also, it might be the OS - can you reinstall it? Or load another one?
Is it not time that there was a Formby Windows Cleaner? (Possibly available
via: http:formbycleaner.uke?
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2019-03-07 20:50:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.
[snip laptop woes]
Before you ditch it, try taking out, and then reseating, the memory and
checking (i.e. wiggling) anything else where there might be contact
corrosion.
Also, it might be the OS - can you reinstall it? Or load another one?
Is it not time that there was a Formby Windows Cleaner? (Possibly
available via: http:formbycleaner.uke?
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 06:36:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
I had a slightly bad experience with CCleaner's registry function tears
(TWATBILI) ago, when it irretrievably deleted/disabled whatever
recognised my camera at the time. It wasn't a disaster - I just stuck
the card directly into the machine, which was actually better - but did
make me nervous about what else it might do. I remember somerats
suggesting that registries should be left well alone.

Nowadays I run Glary Utilities, but as a result of the CCleaner
experience I only use the Spyware and Temporary Files removers. Do
umrats find it safe/advisable to run the other features? They are:
Registry Cleaner
Shortcuts Fixer
Disk Repair
Tracks Eraser
Startup Manager
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-03-08 08:37:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
I had a slightly bad experience with CCleaner's registry function tears
(TWATBILI) ago, when it irretrievably deleted/disabled whatever
recognised my camera at the time.  It wasn't a disaster - I just stuck
the card directly into the machine, which was actually better - but did
make me nervous about what else it might do.  I remember somerats
suggesting that registries should be left well alone.
Nowadays I run Glary Utilities, but as a result of the CCleaner
experience I only use the Spyware and Temporary Files removers.  Do
Registry Cleaner
Shortcuts Fixer
Disk Repair
Tracks Eraser
Startup Manager
I run all of those functions in Glary except
1. Disk repair which istr takes a long time and anyway it's not usually
brokenand
2. Tracks eraser, because I like being able to go back in history and I
don't leave any dodgy tracks anyway ;)

I also stop Chrome before I run it so Tracks Eraser so it cleans up all
the extra Chrap (see what I did there). If like me you like to have
several tabs open in multiple windows and don't want the hassle of
re-opening them all, I close and save anything else open like XL
spreadsheets and Word docs and then I shutdown by holding the on/off
switch down for several seconds. Then reboot and before starting Chrome
run Glary 1-click maintenance. When that is done, I then start Chrome
and it asks if I want to restore all tabs and hey presto, there they are...
Nick Odell
2019-03-08 09:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
I had a slightly bad experience with CCleaner's registry function
tears (TWATBILI) ago, when it irretrievably deleted/disabled whatever
recognised my camera at the time.  It wasn't a disaster - I just stuck
the card directly into the machine, which was actually better - but
did make me nervous about what else it might do.  I remember somerats
suggesting that registries should be left well alone.
Nowadays I run Glary Utilities, but as a result of the CCleaner
experience I only use the Spyware and Temporary Files removers.  Do
Registry Cleaner
Shortcuts Fixer
Disk Repair
Tracks Eraser
Startup Manager
I run all of those functions in Glary except
1. Disk repair which istr takes a long time and anyway it's not usually
brokenand
2. Tracks eraser, because I like being able to go back in history and I
don't leave any dodgy tracks anyway ;)
I also stop Chrome before I run it so Tracks Eraser so it cleans up all
the extra Chrap (see what I did there). If like me you like to have
several tabs open in multiple windows and don't want the hassle of
re-opening them all, I close and save anything else open like XL
spreadsheets and Word docs and then I shutdown by holding the on/off
switch down for several seconds. Then reboot and before starting Chrome
run Glary 1-click maintenance. When that is done, I then start Chrome
and it asks if I want to restore all tabs and hey presto, there they are...
Maybe famous last words, I know, but I got so fed up with the overheads
involved and had read such good things about Microsoft's own security
products that I wiped all the other stuff and now just use Windows
Defender and Windows Firewall on my Win 8.1 machine. Defender quietly
updates itself in the background and hasn't given me any reason to
worry. So far...

I only use Firefox in Windows but in that case, and in Chromium and
Firefox in Linux, I just use the browser's own menu to flush unwanted
stuff out.

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 09:50:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Maybe famous last words, I know, but I got so fed up with the overheads
involved and had read such good things about Microsoft's own security
products that I wiped all the other stuff and now just use Windows
Defender and Windows Firewall on my Win 8.1 machine. Defender quietly
updates itself in the background and hasn't given me any reason to
worry. So far...
<languid wave>
It was here that severalrats said that Windows Defender was good and
they didn't feel the need for anything more. I've taken that advice and
been happy with it; it just seems to do a good job with almost no fuss.
Post by Nick Odell
I only use Firefox in Windows but in that case, and in Chromium and
Firefox in Linux, I just use the browser's own menu to flush unwanted
stuff out.
I find that using Glary to remove temporary files every week or so does
speed things up. It clears the browser caches but seems to flush out a
load of other stuff, too.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-03-08 16:09:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Post by steveski
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
- but did make me nervous about what else it might do.  I remember
somerats suggesting that registries should be left well alone.
(See below)
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Nowadays I run Glary Utilities, but as a result of the CCleaner
experience I only use the Spyware and Temporary Files removers.  Do
Registry Cleaner
The commonest view is that registry cleaners offer little benefit, and
can Really Break Things; given that, it's best not to use them.
Especially since they may break things that don't come to light until a
long time after, and you might not connect the fault with having done a
registry "clean". However, many of us don't like knowing there are bugs
in the registry, even if they're doing no harm! I run one occasionally
(Registry First Aid), making sure it makes a restore point first.
Realistically, it probably _is_ best not to run them. But I don't like
giving in (to sloppy software that doesn't clean up properly)!
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Shortcuts Fixer
Assuming that just corrects short cuts that no longer work, I can't see
any harm; the worst it could do was "repair" them to point to the wrong
things. (If it is known to "fix" ones that _aren't_ broken, that's a
different matter, of course.)
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Disk Repair
I don't know what that does. I can't _imagine_ it doing any more than
the built-in tools (scandisk/chkdisk and defrag), or if it does,
_possibly_ doing harm.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Tracks Eraser
From what otherrats have said, sounds that's to do with browser history;
depends how paranoid you are (or don't want people [including those you
share the computer with] knowing you visit _very_ dodgy sites);
personally, I leave my browser histories be, as I find it useful to be
able to go back to things.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
Startup Manager
I think it's useful to run _some_ startup manager from time to time,
just to have a look at what you _have_ got running at startup. On the
whole, I'd not use a startup manager's option(s) to _change_ such
things, but instead I'd use the application's own settings (turn off
"start when Windows starts" or similar); if you've got something that
insists on starting with Windows, you don't want it to, and it _doesn't_
have a setting to turn it off (or it ignores you changing that setting),
I'd be strongly tempted to uninstall it and find an alternative. If you
_do_ use startup managers, and use their option to _temporarily_ stop
something running at startup, only use one such manager - since they all
have their own place to put/move such temporary suspensions. The best
startup manager I know of (in terms of finding as many as possible of
the various places things can put themselves to run at startup) is
autoruns from SysInternals (free from
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/sysinternals/downloads/autoruns, though
I found I was getting so many of the SysInternals utilities that I just
got the whole suite, and launch it from the NirSoft launcher [as I was
using so many of his utilities too] - but it's fine as a standalone).
Post by Nick Odell
Post by BrritSki
I run all of those functions in Glary except
1. Disk repair which istr takes a long time and anyway it's not
usually brokenand
2. Tracks eraser, because I like being able to go back in history and
I don't leave any dodgy tracks anyway ;)
I also stop Chrome before I run it so Tracks Eraser so it cleans up
all the extra Chrap (see what I did there). If like me you like to
I like "Chrap" - good word!
[]
Post by Nick Odell
I only use Firefox in Windows but in that case, and in Chromium and
Firefox in Linux, I just use the browser's own menu to flush unwanted
stuff out.
Nick
John
----


What do you think about petitions? See 255soft.uk; #fairpetitions @jpeg_G6
--
How about a three-way referendum with second choices being taken into account?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 18:49:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The commonest view is that registry cleaners offer little benefit, and
can Really Break Things; given that, it's best not to use them.
Especially since they may break things that don't come to light until a
long time after, and you might not connect the fault with having done a
registry "clean". However, many of us don't like knowing there are bugs
in the registry, even if they're doing no harm! I run one occasionally
(Registry First Aid), making sure it makes a restore point first.
Realistically, it probably _is_ best not to run them. But I don't like
giving in (to sloppy software that doesn't clean up properly)!
<large snip>

Thanks, John - and everyone else. Your advice is much appreciated.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2019-03-08 20:10:17 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 16:09:53 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Startup Manager
I think it's useful to run _some_ startup manager from time to time,
just to have a look at what you _have_ got running at startup. On the
whole, I'd not use a startup manager's option(s) to _change_ such
things, but instead I'd use the application's own settings (turn off
"start when Windows starts" or similar); if you've got something that
insists on starting with Windows, you don't want it to, and it _doesn't_
have a setting to turn it off (or it ignores you changing that setting),
I'd be strongly tempted to uninstall it and find an alternative.
I'm still using the free version of Avast for all these things. I also
installed their browser which I use when doing online banking and similar
stuff. It has some annoying quirks, like letting me get well into a log-in
process before it decides I should be in 'Bank Mode' so I then have to
start the log-in process again. I have tried to figure out how to start
Bank Mode myself without success :(

One of its most annoying quirks is turning on the bit about launching when
Windows starts. This seems to happen just after a big Windows (10) update -
but may be more frequent, I don't use that browser every day.

I was almost tempted to upgrade to the 'premium' version recently. I know
my computer gets very slow at times and Avast keeps telling me it could
speed things up for me if I paid the price. Trouble is, I don't altogether
trust it. Some of the programs it suggests I stop launching on start-up are
ones I use every day and it seems like a daft idea to have to launch them
myself when I rely upon their reminders and such so much.

I've never used any sort of 'cleaner' (AFAIK), perhaps I should.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2019-03-08 20:56:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 16:09:53 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Startup Manager
I think it's useful to run _some_ startup manager from time to time,
just to have a look at what you _have_ got running at startup. On the
whole, I'd not use a startup manager's option(s) to _change_ such
things, but instead I'd use the application's own settings (turn off
"start when Windows starts" or similar); if you've got something that
insists on starting with Windows, you don't want it to, and it _doesn't_
have a setting to turn it off (or it ignores you changing that setting),
I'd be strongly tempted to uninstall it and find an alternative.
I'm still using the free version of Avast for all these things. I also
installed their browser which I use when doing online banking and similar
stuff. It has some annoying quirks, like letting me get well into a log-in
process before it decides I should be in 'Bank Mode' so I then have to
start the log-in process again. I have tried to figure out how to start
Bank Mode myself without success :(
Do the instructions here:

https://support.avast.com/en-ww/article/Use-Bank-Mode

not work?

john
steveski
2019-03-08 12:36:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Well, there is CCleaner (formerly Crap Cleaner) which has a registry
function.
I had a slightly bad experience with CCleaner's registry function tears
(TWATBILI) ago, when it irretrievably deleted/disabled whatever
recognised my camera at the time.
That's why you make a back up of the registry (with CCleaner's tool)
before running it.
--
Steveski
Chris J Dixon
2019-03-07 21:46:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Is it not time that there was a Formby Windows Cleaner? (Possibly available
via: http:formbycleaner.uke?


(Reinstalling Windows - Les Barker)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Clive Arthur
2019-03-07 18:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying.  I've
run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the look of it.
Lenovo have a bad reputation for loading the PC with loads of extraneous
software.

It might not be the hardware. If it's not, then for the sort of use you
outline above, I'd install Peppermint Linux. No, wait! It's all very
familiar, no awkward command line stuff. I've installed it on two older
laptops for my SILs (SsIL) who are fairly computer illiterate and it
does what they want with the added advantage of probably being safer.

I use it myself on my cheap old holiday laptop, Windows is needed for work.

Libreoffice, Firefox, Thunderbird etc.

Cheers
--
Clive
Sam Plusnet
2019-03-07 20:09:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Lenovo have a bad reputation for loading the PC with loads of extraneous
software.
Don't they all?

This household has acquired three different Lenovo laptops in the last
year (two were refurbished Thinkpad T420s) and we had no problems (until
Wofe baptised one with lager[1]).
It's not too difficult to muck out the stables & remove the silly stuff.

[1] Replaced via household insurance with a Lenovo V130 - which is OK,
but not built to the same standard as the Thinkpads which are designed
for heavy use & have a more finger-friendly keyboard.
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2019-03-07 20:56:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying. 
I've run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the
look of it.
Lenovo have a bad reputation for loading the PC with loads of extraneous
software.
It might not be the hardware. If it's not, then for the sort of use you
outline above, I'd install Peppermint Linux.
Or Linux Mint which is Ubuntu with 3rd party apps for sound, video etc.
etc. and is just as 'user friendly' [1] in that it is an 'Aunt Maud' OS
i.e. your Aunt Maud could run it and have no problems with the interface
or applications.
--
Steveski

[1] I *hate* that phrase but sometimes . . .
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 06:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Clive Arthur
It might not be the hardware. If it's not, then for the sort of use you
outline above, I'd install Peppermint Linux.
Or Linux Mint which is Ubuntu with 3rd party apps for sound, video etc.
etc. and is just as 'user friendly' [1] in that it is an 'Aunt Maud' OS
i.e. your Aunt Maud could run it and have no problems with the interface
or applications.
This is starting to look like a software problem to my inexperienced
eye. I am - amazingly - becoming more tempted to try Linux. If I were
to install it and find that I don't get on with it, could I switch back
to Windows 10 relatively easily?

Update for those interested: no crashes after posting yesterday
morning...until I tried to shut it down for the night. 2 BSODs and
restarts in a row...but it shut down OK the third time.

This morning it started up without problems (phew!) as compared to 2
BSODs and restarts during startup yesterday (finally starting OK the
third time). I am hopeful that each crash/restart is mending a little
bit of the problem and that it will stabilise eventually. I'm also
hoping that eventually won't be too long in arriving.

In the meantime, I am ensuring I'm well backed up and that my crappy
little notebook, usually used for TV only, has the basics I need
installed so it's an interim solution if the laptop goes buggerup.

Fingers crossed for now. Thanks for your advice and patience, pals. It
means a lot.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2019-03-08 07:29:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Update for those interested: no crashes after posting yesterday
morning...until I tried to shut it down for the night. 2 BSODs and
restarts in a row...but it shut down OK the third time.
This morning it started up without problems (phew!) as compared to 2
BSODs and restarts during startup yesterday (finally starting OK the
third time).
There's your problem - you keep turning it off and on again!
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
John Ashby
2019-03-08 08:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Update for those interested: no crashes after posting yesterday
morning...until I tried to shut it down for the night. 2 BSODs and
restarts in a row...but it shut down OK the third time.
This morning it started up without problems (phew!) as compared to 2
BSODs and restarts during startup yesterday (finally starting OK the
third time).
There's your problem - you keep turning it off and on again!
The other problem is that that is also the solution.

john
BrritSki
2019-03-08 08:43:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Update for those interested: no crashes after posting yesterday
morning...until I tried to shut it down for the night. 2 BSODs and
restarts in a row...but it shut down OK the third time.
This morning it started up without problems (phew!) as compared to 2
BSODs and restarts during startup yesterday (finally starting OK the
third time).
There's your problem - you keep turning it off and on again!
YANAhelpdeskdroidAICM5powersupplyfailures ;)
Paul Herber
2019-03-08 08:34:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Clive Arthur
It might not be the hardware. If it's not, then for the sort of use you
outline above, I'd install Peppermint Linux.
Or Linux Mint which is Ubuntu with 3rd party apps for sound, video etc.
etc. and is just as 'user friendly' [1] in that it is an 'Aunt Maud' OS
i.e. your Aunt Maud could run it and have no problems with the interface
or applications.
This is starting to look like a software problem to my inexperienced
eye. I am - amazingly - becoming more tempted to try Linux. If I were
to install it and find that I don't get on with it, could I switch back
to Windows 10 relatively easily?
Update for those interested: no crashes after posting yesterday
morning...until I tried to shut it down for the night. 2 BSODs and
restarts in a row...but it shut down OK the third time.
This morning it started up without problems (phew!) as compared to 2
BSODs and restarts during startup yesterday (finally starting OK the
third time). I am hopeful that each crash/restart is mending a little
bit of the problem and that it will stabilise eventually. I'm also
hoping that eventually won't be too long in arriving.
If you can, open up the machine and press down on the RAM chips to ensure they are making
good contact in their sockets. I fixed a machine recently that was completely freezing by
doing this.Heat cycling causes the chips to slowly move out of their sockets.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Sam Plusnet
2019-03-08 20:50:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
If you can, open up the machine and press down on the RAM chips to ensure they are making
good contact in their sockets. I fixed a machine recently that was completely freezing by
doing this.Heat cycling causes the chips to slowly move out of their sockets.
There's always the risk of a fluffed up fan causing overheating.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2019-03-08 08:42:03 UTC
Permalink
On 08/03/2019 06:52, Sid Nuncius wrote> > Update for those interested:
no crashes after posting yesterday> morning...until I tried to shut it
down for the night.  2 BSODs and > restarts in a row...but it shut down
OK the third time.
Oh dear. As a matter of interest, why do you turn off overnight ? I
don't bother, it just runs for a week or three until I restart using the
method described a minute or 2 ago.

Incidentally, is your Chrome current ? There was an article about a
very serious bug that's just become apparent and neither of our laptops
had done the auto-update yesterday until I forced them...
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 09:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
no crashes after posting yesterday> morning...until I tried to shut it
down for the night.  2 BSODs and > restarts in a row...but it shut down
OK the third time.
Oh dear. As a matter of interest, why do you turn off overnight ?  I
don't bother, it just runs for a week or three until I restart using the
method described a minute or 2 ago.
Incidentally, is your Chrome current ?  There was an article about a
very serious bug that's just become apparent and neither of our laptops
had done the auto-update yesterday until I forced them...
Er...dunno why I turn it off overnight, really. I've always done that,
partly because I don't like to leave things on when they're not in use.
Is that not normal?

And Chrome is up-to-date now. I almost never use it, but I've just
started it up; both it and Ninite say it's up-to-date (Version
72.0.3626.121) so I suspect the delay in it starting just now was it
updating itself. If I need an alternative to Firefox I tend to use
SRWare Iron (recommended by Sebastian, late of this parish) which seems
effectively to be Chrome with the spyware stripped out. I'm nuggered if
I can find out how to update it, though. I'll keep looking.

(I've been known to use Edge occasionally on this machine, and I use it
consistently for TV on my crappy notebook, for which it works very well.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Peter Withey
2019-03-08 10:51:26 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 09:42:59 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
no crashes after posting yesterday> morning...until I tried to shut it
down for the night.  2 BSODs and > restarts in a row...but it shut down
OK the third time.
Oh dear. As a matter of interest, why do you turn off overnight ?  I
don't bother, it just runs for a week or three until I restart using the
method described a minute or 2 ago.
Incidentally, is your Chrome current ?  There was an article about a
very serious bug that's just become apparent and neither of our laptops
had done the auto-update yesterday until I forced them...
Er...dunno why I turn it off overnight, really. I've always done that,
partly because I don't like to leave things on when they're not in use.
Is that not normal?
It is to me. Unless I leave something running overnight, which rarely
happens nowdays (with the speed of broadband, downloads don't take
forever, any more) I always power it down overnight). I'll even be
powering it down very shortly when we go out shopping.

I'm sure I'm shortening the life of the PC by doing so (extra strain
on the components, etc) but "peace of mind" makes it worth it for me.
Post by Sid Nuncius
And Chrome is up-to-date now. I almost never use it, but I've just
started it up; both it and Ninite say it's up-to-date (Version
72.0.3626.121) so I suspect the delay in it starting just now was it
updating itself. If I need an alternative to Firefox I tend to use
SRWare Iron (recommended by Sebastian, late of this parish) which seems
effectively to be Chrome with the spyware stripped out. I'm nuggered if
I can find out how to update it, though. I'll keep looking.
(I've been known to use Edge occasionally on this machine, and I use it
consistently for TV on my crappy notebook, for which it works very well.)
--
Pete
BrritSki
2019-03-08 11:26:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 09:42:59 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
no crashes after posting yesterday> morning...until I tried to shut it
down for the night.  2 BSODs and > restarts in a row...but it shut down
OK the third time.
Oh dear. As a matter of interest, why do you turn off overnight ?  I
don't bother, it just runs for a week or three until I restart using the
method described a minute or 2 ago.
Incidentally, is your Chrome current ?  There was an article about a
very serious bug that's just become apparent and neither of our laptops
had done the auto-update yesterday until I forced them...
Er...dunno why I turn it off overnight, really. I've always done that,
partly because I don't like to leave things on when they're not in use.
Is that not normal?
What is normal ? I do it because as Peter mentioned in the bit below
that I snipped, it allegedly wears some components faster.

I also do it because I am very OCD about what windows are open on the
desktop and I'd rather not have to open everything and reposition every
morning.

OTOH, some of it is just habit from when startup took a couple of
minutes - now with the SSD [1] it doesn't take anywhere near as long.

[1] I was rather reluctant to only have an SSD, but it certainly is fast
and at 500MB is big enough and has been reliable so far (but I do make
sure I backup regularly !).
Sam Plusnet
2019-03-08 20:53:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
[1] I was rather reluctant to only have an SSD, but it certainly is fast
and at 500MB is big enough and has been reliable so far (but I do make
sure I backup regularly !).
My C: drive is an SSD half that size, but when it starts to fill up I
offload things onto one of several HDDs which this machine contains.
--
Sam Plusnet
krw
2019-03-10 16:32:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
OTOH, some of it is just habit from when startup took a couple of
minutes - now with the SSD [1] it doesn't take anywhere near as long.
I leave my desktop on all the time, because even with a large SSD the
startup from cold is uncertain and takes a "long" time.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-03-08 09:15:13 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 06:52:40 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is starting to look like a software problem to my inexperienced
eye. I am - amazingly - becoming more tempted to try Linux. If I were
to install it and find that I don't get on with it, could I switch back
to Windows 10 relatively easily?
I had a laptop some years ago and think we made it dual boot. I could
choose which to use. It was something about some aps I needed began
faster on linux and it was to use with toddlers so I didn't want to
spend time waiting. I have a feeling things were accessible via both
windows, earlier than 10, maybe ..7 or 8, and linux, can't recall
which version. In about 2008.
steveski
2019-03-08 12:49:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 06:52:40 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
This is starting to look like a software problem to my inexperienced
eye. I am - amazingly - becoming more tempted to try Linux. If I were
to install it and find that I don't get on with it, could I switch back
to Windows 10 relatively easily?
I had a laptop some years ago and think we made it dual boot. I could
choose which to use. It was something about some aps I needed began
faster on linux and it was to use with toddlers so I didn't want to
spend time waiting. I have a feeling things were accessible via both
windows, earlier than 10, maybe ..7 or 8, and linux, can't recall which
version. In about 2008.
Yes, you just install linux alongside your Windows installation (it
doesn't work work the other way way round because of windows wilful
inability to see other file systems - think of the joke about Catholics
and the wall across heaven) and then just choose which OS you want at
bootup.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 13:57:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Yes, you just install linux alongside your Windows installation (it
doesn't work work the other way way round because of windows wilful
inability to see other file systems - think of the joke about Catholics
and the wall across heaven) and then just choose which OS you want at
bootup.
Thanks, Steveski. Your use of the word "just" doesn't quite fit with my
perception of the process, but I may well try it. Not just now, though;
frankly, I've got enough on my proverbial plate without interfering with
something which, for now at least, is working.

Would all my installed apps just appear in Linux, btw, or do you have to
do something more?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2019-03-08 14:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Yes, you just install linux alongside your Windows installation (it
doesn't work work the other way way round because of windows wilful
inability to see other file systems - think of the joke about Catholics
and the wall across heaven) and then just choose which OS you want at
bootup.
Thanks, Steveski.  Your use of the word "just" doesn't quite fit with my
perception of the process, but I may well try it.  Not just now, though;
frankly, I've got enough on my proverbial plate without interfering with
something which, for now at least, is working.
Would all my installed apps just appear in Linux, btw, or do you have to
do something more?
No, you would have to install Linux versions (or software with
equivalent functionality where no Linux version exists) in the Linux
partition. The two systems use different binary representations for
their executables and different shell scripts to launch apps, so (other
than using emulators like WINE) it's not possible for software to be
shared between the two universes.

john
steveski
2019-03-08 21:52:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by steveski
Yes, you just install linux alongside your Windows installation (it
doesn't work work the other way way round because of windows wilful
inability to see other file systems - think of the joke about
Catholics and the wall across heaven) and then just choose which OS
you want at bootup.
Thanks, Steveski.  Your use of the word "just" doesn't quite fit with
my perception of the process, but I may well try it.  Not just now,
though;
frankly, I've got enough on my proverbial plate without interfering
with something which, for now at least, is working.
Would all my installed apps just appear in Linux, btw, or do you have
to do something more?
No, you would have to install Linux versions (or software with
equivalent functionality where no Linux version exists) in the Linux
partition. The two systems use different binary representations for
their executables and different shell scripts to launch apps, so (other
than using emulators like WINE) it's not possible for software to be
shared between the two universes.
WINE is an acronym for Wine Is Not (an) Emulator. It is a compatibility
layer which is why, strangely, some things run faster on WINE than
natively in M$.
--
Steveski
Peter Withey
2019-03-08 10:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying. 
I've run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the
look of it.
Lenovo have a bad reputation for loading the PC with loads of extraneous
software.
It might not be the hardware. If it's not, then for the sort of use you
outline above, I'd install Peppermint Linux.
Or Linux Mint which is Ubuntu with 3rd party apps for sound, video etc.
etc. and is just as 'user friendly' [1] in that it is an 'Aunt Maud' OS
i.e. your Aunt Maud could run it and have no problems with the interface
or applications.
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux using
"wine".

I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on
Mint using "wine"

https://www.winehq.org/


You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb
stick or dvd and try it out before installing it.

https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

HTH
--
Pete
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 11:40:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux using
"wine".
I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on
Mint using "wine"
https://www.winehq.org/
You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb
stick or dvd and try it out before installing it.
https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
HTH
Thanks, Peter. I may try that when I'm feeling strong...
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steveski
2019-03-08 12:51:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Withey
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux using
"wine".
I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on Mint
using "wine"
https://www.winehq.org/
You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb stick
or dvd and try it out before installing it.
https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
HTH
Thanks, Peter. I may try that when I'm feeling strong...
It's really not as scary as it seems with a dual-boot.
--
Steveski
Jim Easterbrook
2019-03-08 12:58:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Withey
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux using
"wine".
I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on Mint
using "wine"
https://www.winehq.org/
You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb
stick or dvd and try it out before installing it.
https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
HTH
Thanks, Peter. I may try that when I'm feeling strong...
It's really not as scary as it seems with a dual-boot.
Although stopping a Windows boot "repairing" the boot loader so it can
only see Windows can be a problem.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
steveski
2019-03-08 21:59:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Withey
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux
using "wine".
I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on
Mint using "wine"
https://www.winehq.org/
You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb
stick or dvd and try it out before installing it.
https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
HTH
Thanks, Peter. I may try that when I'm feeling strong...
It's really not as scary as it seems with a dual-boot.
Although stopping a Windows boot "repairing" the boot loader so it can
only see Windows can be a problem.
Yes, plug in a USB stick that's formatted with ext4 (or any other FS that
Windoze doesn't recognise (remember the Catholic wall in Heaven joke) and
it offers to 'repair' the error :-(

Never accept the 'repair' option that M$ offers for stuff it can't (or,
more likely, won't), recognise . . .
--
Steveski
Peter Withey
2019-03-08 13:33:35 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Mar 2019 11:40:08 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Peter Withey
My choice FWIW. Linux Mint 18.3 Mate desktop on the main PC. 19.1,
cinnamon desktop on the laptop. I have a PC with Win 10 on it but it
only gets used for those applications that will not run on linux using
"wine".
I use Agent v8, a "windows" only programme which run perfectly on
Mint using "wine"
https://www.winehq.org/
You can, of course download Mint, and install it on either a usb
stick or dvd and try it out before installing it.
https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
HTH
Thanks, Peter. I may try that when I'm feeling strong...
Be brave, be strong <g> At the most it will cost you a few minutes D/L
time and a dvd. Not even a dvd if you go the USB route.

I use Mint but there are many more distros out there and they all
allow you to try before installing.

The Zorin distro gets good reviews for making the transition between
Windows and Linux relatively easy.

https://zorinos.com/
--
Pete
Nick Odell
2019-03-07 18:31:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying.  I've
run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the look of it.
Apart from spending £1700 on a 386 PC when that was such a bargain it
was worth traveling the 200 miles to the shop selling it, I've never
spent more than £300 on a computer and I've been able to do all the
things you mention with ease. Did you forget to say that you run
SETI-at-home with your spare processor cycles? Are you searching for the
next prime number in between downloads? If neither of those apply then
why not look at some of the end-of-range machines sold by people like
Morgan/Ebuyer/Laptops Direct? If your current machine was bought more
than about four or five years ago then an "End of Range" machine at a
bargain price will almost certainly be newer, faster and better and with
bigger capacity than that.

I'd be reluctant to poke too hard at your current machine if it is the
only suitable computer you've got - we don't want to lose you for a week
or so - but, if/when you've got something else that meets your needs,
I'd give it a good seeing too as others have described. If you end up
with an extra working laptop after doing that well - it's better than
chucking it in the bin, isn't it?

Nick
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-07 19:10:10 UTC
Permalink
On 07/03/2019 18:31, Nick Odell wrote:

<snip>
Post by Nick Odell
I'd be reluctant to poke too hard at your current machine if it is the
only suitable computer you've got - we don't want to lose you for a week
or so - but, if/when you've got something else that meets your needs,
I'd give it a good seeing too as others have described. If you end up
with an extra working laptop after doing that well - it's better than
chucking it in the bin, isn't it?
Many thanks, Nick and others for excellent, sound advice.

I'm going to wait for a bit, making sure that everything is well
backed-up.

This machine has always crashed a few times before a Windows Update, and
yesterday's Update didn't install all that well, taking two restarts and
what looked like a crash during the first one. I'm hoping it will
settle down as things bed in/fix themselves. If not, there is always
the Reinstall Windows option, which I could probably cope with; I did it
on a troublesome notebook which has behaved fine since.

I'm very nervous about a different OS, but I may look into Linux if I'm
going to have to reinstall anyway.

I am very appreciative, chums. Thank you. I'll let you know how it goes.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steveski
2019-03-07 20:59:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying. 
I've run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the
look of it.
Apart from spending £1700 on a 386 PC when that was such a bargain
£2,000 for a Viglen 486 DX2 when I was higgerent and callow :-)
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2019-03-07 21:20:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying.
I've run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the
look of it.
Apart from spending £1700 on a 386 PC when that was such a bargain
£2,000 for a Viglen 486 DX2 when I was higgerent and callow :-)
I'm sure you weren't. That was just the price those days. I was content
with my BBC-B but because I was the IT specialist governor[1] at the
village primary school and ran little BBC-B sessions teeching the
teechers how to get one step ahead of the little blighters they were
supposed to be teeching to use them[2] I ended up as IT consultant[4]
for several of the village businesses and so I thought I ought to run
the same hardware and software as they did.


Nick
[1]Who? Me??
[2]Rule number 1: If you don't know how it is done, let the kids show
you how it's done[3]
[3]A very, very, very big step for many of the teaching staff
[4]Generally on the recommendation of the business-owners schoolchildren
"You should ask Mr Odell: I bet he'd know how to do that."
steveski
2019-03-08 01:09:59 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
Apart from spending £1700 on a 386 PC when that was such a bargain
£2,000 for a Viglen 486 DX2 when I was higgerent and callow :-)
I'm sure you weren't.
I was - I'd only worked on mainframes before.

However, since that initial blunder into PCs, I've only ever done second
hand or put together my own machines. Micro$oft lasted a little while but
ever since I've done Open Source esp. Linux [1] . . . I wish I knew then
what I know now, as the song goes :-)
--
Steveski

[1] Apart from a couple of programs that don't work well with WINE. Bah!
Jenny M Benson
2019-03-07 20:05:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
I think it was on the reomm of Umra that I bought my desky from PC
Specialist (www.pcspecialist.co.uk) and after several years of contented
usage I bought a laptop from them a year or 2 ago. Very pleased with
that too. Can't fault them for friendly, helpful customer service and I
think they're good on price too. You can get off-the-peg or add what
you want to a basic start, which is what I did on both occasions.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 06:16:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
I think it was on the reomm of Umra that I bought my desky from PC
Specialist (www.pcspecialist.co.uk) and after several years of contented
usage I bought a laptop from them a year or 2 ago.  Very pleased with
that too.  Can't fault them for friendly, helpful customer service and I
think they're good on price too.  You can get off-the-peg or add what
you want to a basic start, which is what I did on both occasions.
Thanks, Jenny. Noted.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2019-03-07 20:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
This Lenovo laptop has done very good service, but seems to be
approaching the end of its life.  It's crashing rather a lot[1] and
generally creaking a bit.  I'm therefore thinking, provisionally at the
moment, of buying a new one and I'd welcome the benefit of umrats'
experience if poss.
I use it mainly for web browsing, some TV/video, emails, documents and
music, which is stored on an EHD (and backed up on another). I'd like
decent RAM for speed, but I don't game or anything like that. I don't
need masses of memory, but 256GB would be nice.  I'd prefer an SSD, I
think, but am happy to be advised on this.  Good screen quality is
desirable.  More than one USB port would be good.  Beyond that, I'm not
all that fussy.
Budget probably around £500 - £700, but that's not fixed in either
direction if the right machine comes along.  I've been very happy with
my Lenovo, but other suggestions are welcome.
Any advice/experience/recommendations would be most gratefully received.
[1]3 BSODs today with Memory Management error messages.  Worrying.  I've
run chkdsk and am about to run Glary again, but I don't like the look of it.
Son and I both have Lenovo Ideapads and we both have issues with the
build quality (esp the hinges). Mine is currently gaffer taped together,
his is held with araldite and has needed a new power input port. OTOH,
we're both cheapskates dwelling at the bargain end of the market (lower
than your budget), so perhaps we're getting what we deserve. Previously
we had Toshibas which were more rugged but they've abandoned the
consumer market, and I had an HP which was very ropy (plus I couldn't
get its wifi adapter to work with Linux so had to use a USB dongle).

It seems to me that standard laptops are on their way out at the low
end. Gaming jobs for a grand or the ultra lightweight small
pearl-handled ones are where it's at. Or something which can't make up
its mind if it's a laptop, a tablet or a rather unwieldy phone.

I usually get mine from Laptops Direct, and I've heard good things of
the Dell refurb outlet.

john
Sid Nuncius
2019-03-08 06:20:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Son and I both have Lenovo Ideapads and we both have issues with the
build quality (esp the hinges). Mine is currently gaffer taped together,
his is held with araldite and has needed a new power input port. OTOH,
we're both cheapskates dwelling at the bargain end of the market (lower
than your budget), so perhaps we're getting what we deserve. Previously
we had Toshibas which were more rugged but they've abandoned the
consumer market, and I had an HP which was very ropy (plus I couldn't
get its wifi adapter to work with Linux so had to use a USB dongle).
It seems to me that standard laptops are on their way out at the low
end. Gaming jobs for a grand or the ultra lightweight small
pearl-handled ones are where it's at. Or something which can't make up
its mind if it's a laptop, a tablet or a rather unwieldy phone.
I usually get mine from Laptops Direct, and I've heard good things of
the Dell refurb outlet.
Thanks, John. Noted all that, too.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
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