Discussion:
Umra book club...ish.
(too old to reply)
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-17 18:49:32 UTC
Permalink
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.

The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.


[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2021-09-17 22:23:10 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?

On the other hand, I enjoy audio books and with them I don't feel the
need to go back and check details: I just get carried along on the
current of the story.

There was an excellent little programme on Radio 4 back in 2018 about
why we like physical things and get comfort from holding books and
touching album covers etc. It was called "The Persistence of Analogue"
and is still available to listen again on BBC Sounds at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bgmxgc


Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-09-18 07:51:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?
On the other hand, I enjoy audio books and with them I don't feel the
need to go back and check details: I just get carried along on the
current of the story.
There was an excellent little programme on Radio 4 back in 2018 about
why we like physical things and get comfort from holding books and
touching album covers etc. It was called "The Persistence of Analogue"
and is still available to listen again on BBC Sounds at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bgmxgc
Nick
Shouldn’t it be available as a PDF so you may print it out? ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Vicky Ayech
2021-09-18 08:37:02 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:23:10 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?
On the other hand, I enjoy audio books and with them I don't feel the
need to go back and check details: I just get carried along on the
current of the story.
There was an excellent little programme on Radio 4 back in 2018 about
why we like physical things and get comfort from holding books and
touching album covers etc. It was called "The Persistence of Analogue"
and is still available to listen again on BBC Sounds at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bgmxgc
Nick
I like physical books best too for the same reasons. You can turn back
easily to check things and I feel comfortable with the pages, although
I prefer paperbacks now as my hands are arthritic. I can read on a
tablet with the kindle ap or a kindle but it is a nuisance if i want
to find something. I can't read long pieces on a PC though;.

I like audible books but use them to go to sleep to so set 10 minute
timers. If I forget I have to go to find where I saw, and do with the
timer but it's easier. Listening is a different experience. Hearing
it brings out things I miss when reading text. Not all voices are
right for the book too.
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-18 17:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?
Yes, I agree with quite a lot of that, especially knowing where in the
book and on the page what you want to find is. The not being able to go
back can be a nuisance sometimes, but I've learned to live with it and
it's a sacrifice I'm prepared to make in exchange for being able to read
so many books from NetGalley.

As to the screen business, it took me a little while to adjust to the
Kindle, but the screen of my Paperwhite seems very like a paper page in
that it's not backlit but has script in black on a white background like
a book. It also has an internal light which I find invaluable when
reading in paces where the illumination isn't all it might be.

I do still enjoy the sensation of reading physical books, though. I
also miss the happy hours I used to spend in bookshops (not to mention
the happy pounds) and the pleasure of finding a second-hand bookshop in
a place I was visiting, the feeling of contentment while browsing and
the small thrill of finding something I'd been looking for for ages.

Anyrat who feels something similar would enjoy The Boosellers Diary, I
think, and I shall be reading the follow-ups (plus Jen Campbell's Weird
Things Customers Say In Bookshops) soon, too.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2021-09-18 22:12:51 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 18 Sep 2021 18:44:27 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
I shall be reading the follow-ups (plus Jen Campbell's Weird
Things Customers Say In Bookshops) soon, too.
I'd forgotten about her - I used to follow her on Facebook. Whether she is
still posting there and Facebook has decided I should no longer see her
output* needs investigating.

*At the moment it seems to think I only want to see the local police
messages and what the GOG mosaic makers are up to. Ignoring my actual
friends and family :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris
2021-09-19 08:05:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?
Yes, I agree with quite a lot of that, especially knowing where in the
book and on the page what you want to find is. The not being able to go
back can be a nuisance sometimes, but I've learned to live with it and
it's a sacrifice I'm prepared to make in exchange for being able to read
so many books from NetGalley.
As to the screen business, it took me a little while to adjust to the
Kindle, but the screen of my Paperwhite seems very like a paper page in
that it's not backlit but has script in black on a white background like
a book. It also has an internal light which I find invaluable when
reading in paces where the illumination isn't all it might be.
I do still enjoy the sensation of reading physical books, though. I
also miss the happy hours I used to spend in bookshops (not to mention
the happy pounds) and the pleasure of finding a second-hand bookshop in
a place I was visiting, the feeling of contentment while browsing and
the small thrill of finding something I'd been looking for for ages.
Anyrat who feels something similar would enjoy The Boosellers Diary, I
think, and I shall be reading the follow-ups (plus Jen Campbell's Weird
Things Customers Say In Bookshops) soon, too.
I have a Paperwhite, I dislike it’s formatting with a passion and only use
it in bed because of the not reading last thing on a computer. White on
black doesn’t work for my eyes. I mourn for the original Kindle but he
bought hwmbo advised not getting a second as it was very old technology.
It was worth buying my iPhone just to be able to use Kindle anywhere (but
Covid has stopped me going away so far. Glad we’ll be in line for jab No 3.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-19 08:30:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
I have a Paperwhite, I dislike it’s formatting with a passion and only use
it in bed because of the not reading last thing on a computer. White on
black doesn’t work for my eyes. I mourn for the original Kindle but he
bought hwmbo advised not getting a second as it was very old technology.
It was worth buying my iPhone just to be able to use Kindle anywhere (but
Covid has stopped me going away so far. Glad we’ll be in line for jab No 3.
Er...white on black? The normal black-on-white is the default for all
Kindles. If you don't want the white-on-black you can easily switch out
of Dark Mode. This tells you how to switch between the two modes:
https://www.howtogeek.com/715036/how-to-use-dark-mode-on-kindle/

HTH, and apologies if we're in a grandmother/egg situation.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike Ruddock
2021-09-19 08:36:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:49:32 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Since NetGalley came into my life and with a real and present danger of
mariticide if I should bring any more books or CDs into Nuncius Towers,
almost all my reading has been on my Kindle. Yesterday I was inspired
to take a real book[1] from the shelves and read one of Orwell's essays.
As I needed to do something else quite soon, I found myself looking
several times at the top of the page to see what time it was. Oh dear.
Time I read more real books, I think.
The book which inspired me to read the Orwell, btw, was The Diary Of A
Bookseller by Shaun Bethell. Very warmly recommended. The Orwell
essay, which he quotes a number of times, is Bookshop memories - also
warmly recommended.
[1]Volume 1 of Penguin's The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of
George Orwell, which I realise to my horror that I bought new about 45
years ago(!) in a booksop in Edinburgh. Volumes 2-4 were the original
1971 printing at 50p each, but had to pay a ruinous £1.25 for a later
printing of Volume 1. I am sure you are all much the better for knowing
that.
I'm not sure whether to admire or be perplexed by your ability to be
comfortable reading books on a screen. I just can't do it. A Guardian
"Long Read" is a bit too long for me to be at ease on a computer; I
loose my sense of place with the scrolling and I would say I am
happiest reading physical books because I see them in 3D. By which I
mean that if I want to go back and check something, I have a sense of
how deep into the thickness of the pages I have to go and I have a
mental image of what the paragraphs looked like and where on the page
I ought to look. I just don't get this when scrolling. I know e-books
have search features but how do you instruct a search feature to look
for the first time whoosit said thingummy about whatsername when you
are not really sure who was whosit and what the thingummy was anyway
but you know what shapes that bit of the book made on the page?
Yes, I agree with quite a lot of that, especially knowing where in the
book and on the page what you want to find is. The not being able to go
back can be a nuisance sometimes, but I've learned to live with it and
it's a sacrifice I'm prepared to make in exchange for being able to read
so many books from NetGalley.
As to the screen business, it took me a little while to adjust to the
Kindle, but the screen of my Paperwhite seems very like a paper page in
that it's not backlit but has script in black on a white background like
a book. It also has an internal light which I find invaluable when
reading in paces where the illumination isn't all it might be.
I do still enjoy the sensation of reading physical books, though. I
also miss the happy hours I used to spend in bookshops (not to mention
the happy pounds) and the pleasure of finding a second-hand bookshop in
a place I was visiting, the feeling of contentment while browsing and
the small thrill of finding something I'd been looking for for agesrat who feels something similar would enjoy The Boosellers Diary, I
think, and I shall be reading the follow-ups (plus Jen Campbell's Weird
Things Customers Say In Bookshops) soon, too.
I have a Paperwhite, I dislike it’s formatting with a passion and only use
it in bed because of the not reading last thing on a computer. White on
black doesn’t work for my eyes. I mourn for the original Kindle but he
bought hwmbo advised not getting a second as it was very old technology.
It was worth buying my iPhone just to be able to use Kindle anywhere (but
Covid has stopped me going away so far. Glad we’ll be in line for jab No 3.
Sincerely Chris
With a change of subject . . . I am currently reading False Values, by
Ben Aaronovitch. I don't really know why since it is Fantasy genre with
police and magic in the same story. I am astonished to see that BA has
poached from the late Douglas Adams, with Magrathea mentioned and, with
a slight change, the Serious Cybernetics Corporation, which fools no-one.
Can you do this? Nick concepts from another author without, as far as I
can see (I am reading on a Kindle) any acknowledgement?

Mike Ruddock
Serena Blanchflower
2021-09-19 13:09:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
With a change of subject . . . I am currently reading False Values, by
Ben Aaronovitch. I don't really know why since it is Fantasy genre with
police and magic in the same story. I am astonished to see that BA has
poached from the late Douglas Adams, with Magrathea mentioned and, with
a slight change, the Serious Cybernetics Corporation, which fools no-one.
Can you do this? Nick concepts from another author without, as far as I
can see (I am reading on a Kindle) any acknowledgement?
I'm not sure what the precise legal requirements are (although I'm sure
Ben Aaronovitch and his publisher know them) but this was very much an
homage to Douglas Adams rather than a rip-off. The reader was,
absolutely, meant to recognise all the Hitch-hiker's references in the
book and it was clear that the Serious Cybernetics Corporation in the
book was deliberately referencing Douglas Adams stuff in all their
terminology.

There are assorted references to other writers, largely but not
exclusively fantasy writers, throughout the Rivers of London books but
not generally as many as there are in False Values.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Don't part with your illusions. When they are gone, you may still exist,
but you have ceased to live.
(Mark Twain)
Tony Smith
2021-09-19 14:00:48 UTC
Permalink
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate a very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-19 14:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate a very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
<envious>
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-20 05:07:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton
Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate
a very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
Ginger Tiffin sounds like a minor character in a Biggles book.
I had a similar thought, but I pictured her as a dashed good egg in a
Wodehouse novel - after whom a 60s band named themselves, of course.
The less said about their second album, the better.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-20 07:34:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton
Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate
a very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
Ginger Tiffin sounds like a minor character in a Biggles book.
I had a similar thought, but I pictured her as a dashed good egg in a
Wodehouse novel - after whom a 60s band named themselves, of course.
The less said about their second album, the better.
You wait ‘til you hear that acoustic group Cinnamon & Garlic Supper then,
to avoid the ‘second album was rubbish’ problem, they started with Vol. 3.
;-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Mike McMillan
2021-09-20 07:36:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton
Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate
a very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
Ginger Tiffin sounds like a minor character in a Biggles book.
I had a similar thought, but I pictured her as a dashed good egg in a
Wodehouse novel - after whom a 60s band named themselves, of course.
The less said about their second album, the better.
You wait ‘til you hear that acoustic group Cinnamon & Garlic Supper then,
to avoid the ‘second album was rubbish’ problem, they started with Vol. 3.
;-)))
Mine Dew, back in the 70’s, a lot of graffiti appeared on the walls of
public buildings in the Reading Area for a band called ‘Lemon Kittens’ -
don’t know what their second album was like, never even heard their first!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sally Thompson
2021-09-20 08:03:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
I went to a new (to me) bookshop on Friday; Aardvark books in Brampton
Bryan in Herefordshire (but almost Shropshire). Good two books and ate a
very nice Ginger Tiffin in the tearoom.
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what. Must get there again. Are you near there then Tony? Near
Ludlow, myself.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-20 08:18:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what.
TMI.

Eh?

Oh, sorry - I see what you menn now.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-20 09:02:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what.
TMI.
Eh?
Oh, sorry - I see what you menn now.
Sid, the male gender only has one ‘n’ you know! Anyway, what Sally gets up
to ….
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sally Thompson
2021-09-20 09:30:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what.
TMI.
Eh?
Oh, sorry - I see what you menn now.
Sid, the male gender only has one ‘n’ you know! Anyway, what Sally gets up
to ….
You know what they say. What happens in Aardvark, stays in Aardvark!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike McMillan
2021-09-20 13:16:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what.
TMI.
Eh?
Oh, sorry - I see what you menn now.
Sid, the male gender only has one ‘n’ you know! Anyway, what Sally gets up
to ….
You know what they say. What happens in Aardvark, stays in Aardvark!
Unless as Kenneth Horn once said: ‘He has been Varking too Ard’.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
John Ashby
2021-09-20 13:57:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what.
TMI.
Eh?
Oh, sorry - I see what you menn now.
Sid, the male gender only has one ‘n’ you know! Anyway, what Sally gets up
to ….
You know what they say. What happens in Aardvark, stays in Aardvark!
Well, Aardvark never did anyone any haarm.

john

Tony Smith
2021-09-20 08:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I love Aardvark books; used to meet a friend there for coffee and a browse
pre-you-know-what. Must get there again. Are you near there then Tony? Near
Ludlow, myself.
No, near Cheltenham. 60-70 miles away. But one of my ss-i-l is in Ross and knew of Aardvark and said it was good.
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