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Place names not pronounced as they are spelt. Any more?
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s***@gmail.com
2020-05-18 20:32:36 UTC
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Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Anne B
2020-05-18 20:35:48 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty

Anne B
Clive Arthur
2020-05-18 20:46:45 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
--
Cheers
Clive
Marmaduke Jinks
2020-05-18 21:27:57 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
--
Cheers
Clive
Fowey, (in Cornwall donchaknow).

Pronounced Foy

MJ
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-18 21:58:32 UTC
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Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
--
Cheers
Clive
Fowey, (in Cornwall donchaknow).
Pronounced Foy
MJ
Milngavie, three stops on the train from here. Pronounced Mulguy.

R
Mike
2020-05-19 07:35:32 UTC
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Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
--
Cheers
Clive
Fowey, (in Cornwall donchaknow).
Pronounced Foy
MJ
Mousehole
Pronounced Mows’ll.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-05-20 12:00:15 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
--
Cheers
Clive
Fowey, (in Cornwall donchaknow).
Pronounced Foy
MJ
Mousehole
Pronounced Mows’ll.
Wot about those places round Yeovil?

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2020-05-20 12:00:14 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Reading, Berkshire.
Earley, better not confuse the not natives with the other spellings.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-18 22:30:36 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis.
Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Northumberland:
Alnmouth, at the mouth of the river Aln - pronounced exactly as you'd
expect, including the L. Alnwick, not far away - pronounced Annik.
Ulgham - pronounced Uff'm.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Actors are fairly modest...A lot of us have quite a lot to be modest about. -
Simon Greenall (voice of Aleksandr the "Simples!" Meerkat), RT 11-17 Dec 2010
Mike
2020-05-19 07:37:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis.
Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Alnmouth, at the mouth of the river Aln - pronounced exactly as you'd
expect, including the L. Alnwick, not far away - pronounced Annik.
Ulgham - pronounced Uff'm.
‘They don’t like it Ulgham Sir!
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-05-19 07:34:05 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Findochty. Pronounced Fin-ECH-ty
Anne B
Or In-correct-ly.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-18 22:36:36 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Loads of them in Norfolk: Costessey, Happisburgh, Wymondham to name but
three. Cossy, Haysborough, Windham.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-05-19 05:52:58 UTC
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Kirkcudbright = Kircoobree
John Ashby
2020-05-19 06:37:09 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Leominster - Lemster

Darrington - pronounced Hawk Spit

john
Mike
2020-05-19 07:39:20 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Leominster - Lemster
Darrington - pronounced Hawk Spit
john
‘Forthecup’ I thought.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-05-19 07:42:40 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Leominster - Lemster
Darrington - pronounced Hawk Spit
john
‘Forthecup’ I thought.
Featherstonehaugh - Fanshaw.
--
Toodle Pip
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-05-19 07:58:38 UTC
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Plus innumerable places on the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland of ultimately Gaelic origin. I like "Ahoghill" in Co. Antrim. Stress on the "o" and "gh" as "ch" in "loch".
Chris J Dixon
2020-05-19 08:04:34 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Leominster - Lemster
Darrington - pronounced Hawk Spit
Ashby-de-la Zouch - last bit = Zoosh

However, just off the A6 about 10 miles away, Zouch = Zotch

Occasionally the initial letter on the village signs is painted
out.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2020-05-19 07:29:49 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Mousehole in Cornwall pronounced mowzel.

Are you new, or have I not been paying attention at the back ?
If the former, welcome, you can never go back...
Mike Ruddock
2020-05-19 07:39:09 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Mousehole in Cornwall pronounced mowzel.
Are you new, or have I not been paying attention at the back ?
If the former, welcome, you can never go back...
Woolfardisworthy (in Devon) pron Woolsery

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2020-05-19 08:41:09 UTC
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On Mon, 18 May 2020 13:32:36 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com scrawled in
the dust...
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Trottiscliffe in Kent, pronounced Troz-lee.

The nearby big house is the more sensible Trosley Court and the access land
above the village on the North Downs is Trosley Country Park.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2020-05-19 08:43:13 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Boarhunt, in Hampshire, pronounced Borrunt
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
If swimming is so good for your figure, how do you explain whales?
Flop
2020-05-19 13:09:58 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...

Barrow-in-furnace.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Mike
2020-05-19 13:19:43 UTC
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Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Lacks a little Furness I feel.
--
Toodle Pip
John Finlay
2020-05-19 13:24:28 UTC
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Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Mike
2020-05-19 13:28:39 UTC
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Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-05-19 14:05:53 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
Alford - AH-f-rt
Alves - AH-viss
Anstruther - AIN-stir
Athelstaneford - ELSH-n'ford
Aviemore - A-vee-MORE
Avoch - AWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Balloch (Inverness) - Ba-LOCH
Balloch (Loch Lomond) - BAL-och
Balquhidder - Bal-HWID-er
Balquhindachy - Bal-WHY-nickee
Beauly - BEW-ly (same as Beaulieu in England)
Braemar - Bray-MAR
Cockburnspath - CO-burns-path
Cardow/Cardhu - Car-DOO
Crathes - CRATH-iss
Coupar Angus - COO-per ANG-gus
Covesea - COW-see
Crossraguel - Cross-RAY-gel (hard 'g' as in 'get')
Culloden - Cull-ODD-en
Culross - COO-rus
Culter - COOT-er
Culzean - Cull-AIN
Cupar - COO-per
Davoch - DAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Dores - DOHRZ (as 'doors')
Doune - DOON
Dounreay - Doon-RAY
Drumelzier - Drum-ELL-ee-er
Drymen - DRIM-en
Dumyat - Dum-EYE-at
Dundee - Done-DEE
Edinburgh - ed -in-BURR-uh
Eigg - Egg
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Fetterangus - FISH-ie
Findochty - Fin-ECHTy (also fin-DOCH-ty)
Fionnphort - FIN-a-fort
Fochabers - FO-ha-berz
Forfar - FOR-far
Forres - FOR-ess
Friockheim- FREE-come
Gamrie - GAME - ree
Garioch - GEER -ie
Gigha - GEE-a ('g' as in 'get')
Glamis - GLAHMZ
Glasgow - GLASS-go (no, not Glaz- <G>) or GLES-ca
Glendaruel - Glen-da-ROOL
Glenrothes - Glen-ROTH-iss ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Glenzier - GLING-er
Grandtully - GRANT-ly
Hawick - HOYK
Inveraray - Inn-ver-AIR-a
Inverewe - Inn-ver-YOU
Inverness - Inn-ver-NESS
Inverurie - Inn-ver-OO-ree
Islay - EYE-la
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Kilconquhar - Kin-NEW-har
Kilravock - Kill-RAWK
Kingussie - Kin -YOU-see
Kinloss - Kin-LOSS
Kirkcaldy - K-rk-ADDy or K-rk-AWDy
Kirkcudbright - Kir-COO-bry
Knockando - nock-ANN-dough
Knockandhu - nock-an-DOO
Kyleakin - Kyle-AH-kin
Kylesku - KYLE-skew
Langholm - LANG-um
Leochel - LAWH-l (to rhyme with 'loch')
Lesmahagow - Lez-ma-HAY-go
Leuchars - LOO-hers
Longannet - Long-ANN-et
Luing - LING
Lumphanan - Lum-FAN-an
Luncarty - LUNG-car-ty
Lybster - LYE-bster
Machrihanish - Mach-ry-HA-nish
Mallaig - Mall-AGUE (to rhyme with 'vague')
Maryculter - MARY-coo-ter
Meikleour - Mick-LOOR
Milngavie - Mil-GUY
Moniaive - Mon-eh-YVE
Monikie - Mon-EE-key
Moray - MURR-ay
Moulin - MOO-lin
(Loch) Muick - (Loch) MICK
Muthill - MEWTH-ill
Oban - OH-ban
Ordiequish - ORD-ee-fish
Penicuik - PENN-y-cook
Peterculter PETE-er-coot-er
Quhytewoollen - white-ween
Quiraing - Kwirr-ANG
Rosyth - Row-SCYTHE
Rothes - ROTH-ess ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Rothesay - ROTH-say ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Ruthven - RIV-en
St Madoes - Sint MAY-dohs
St Vigeans - Sint VIDGE-anz
Savoch - SAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Schiehallion - She-HAL-yon
Scone - SKOON (definitely *not* either 'Skon' or Skohn')
Scourie - SKOW-ry
Strachan - STRAWN
Stranraer - Stran-RAHR
Strathaven - STRAY-ven
Strontian - Stron-TEE-an
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Anne B
Mike
2020-05-19 14:25:37 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
Alford - AH-f-rt
Alves - AH-viss
Anstruther - AIN-stir
Athelstaneford - ELSH-n'ford
Aviemore - A-vee-MORE
Avoch - AWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Balloch (Inverness) - Ba-LOCH
Balloch (Loch Lomond) - BAL-och
Balquhidder - Bal-HWID-er
Balquhindachy - Bal-WHY-nickee
Beauly - BEW-ly (same as Beaulieu in England)
Braemar - Bray-MAR
Cockburnspath - CO-burns-path
Cardow/Cardhu - Car-DOO
Crathes - CRATH-iss
Coupar Angus - COO-per ANG-gus
Covesea - COW-see
Crossraguel - Cross-RAY-gel (hard 'g' as in 'get')
Culloden - Cull-ODD-en
Culross - COO-rus
Culter - COOT-er
Culzean - Cull-AIN
Cupar - COO-per
Davoch - DAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Dores - DOHRZ (as 'doors')
Doune - DOON
Dounreay - Doon-RAY
Drumelzier - Drum-ELL-ee-er
Drymen - DRIM-en
Dumyat - Dum-EYE-at
Dundee - Done-DEE
Edinburgh - ed -in-BURR-uh
Eigg - Egg
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Fetterangus - FISH-ie
Findochty - Fin-ECHTy (also fin-DOCH-ty)
Fionnphort - FIN-a-fort
Fochabers - FO-ha-berz
Forfar - FOR-far
Forres - FOR-ess
Friockheim- FREE-come
Gamrie - GAME - ree
Garioch - GEER -ie
Gigha - GEE-a ('g' as in 'get')
Glamis - GLAHMZ
Glasgow - GLASS-go (no, not Glaz- <G>) or GLES-ca
Glendaruel - Glen-da-ROOL
Glenrothes - Glen-ROTH-iss ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Glenzier - GLING-er
Grandtully - GRANT-ly
Hawick - HOYK
Inveraray - Inn-ver-AIR-a
Inverewe - Inn-ver-YOU
Inverness - Inn-ver-NESS
Inverurie - Inn-ver-OO-ree
Islay - EYE-la
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Kilconquhar - Kin-NEW-har
Kilravock - Kill-RAWK
Kingussie - Kin -YOU-see
Kinloss - Kin-LOSS
Kirkcaldy - K-rk-ADDy or K-rk-AWDy
Kirkcudbright - Kir-COO-bry
Knockando - nock-ANN-dough
Knockandhu - nock-an-DOO
Kyleakin - Kyle-AH-kin
Kylesku - KYLE-skew
Langholm - LANG-um
Leochel - LAWH-l (to rhyme with 'loch')
Lesmahagow - Lez-ma-HAY-go
Leuchars - LOO-hers
Longannet - Long-ANN-et
Luing - LING
Lumphanan - Lum-FAN-an
Luncarty - LUNG-car-ty
Lybster - LYE-bster
Machrihanish - Mach-ry-HA-nish
Mallaig - Mall-AGUE (to rhyme with 'vague')
Maryculter - MARY-coo-ter
Meikleour - Mick-LOOR
Milngavie - Mil-GUY
Moniaive - Mon-eh-YVE
Monikie - Mon-EE-key
Moray - MURR-ay
Moulin - MOO-lin
(Loch) Muick - (Loch) MICK
Muthill - MEWTH-ill
Oban - OH-ban
Ordiequish - ORD-ee-fish
Penicuik - PENN-y-cook
Peterculter PETE-er-coot-er
Quhytewoollen - white-ween
Quiraing - Kwirr-ANG
Rosyth - Row-SCYTHE
Rothes - ROTH-ess ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Rothesay - ROTH-say ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Ruthven - RIV-en
St Madoes - Sint MAY-dohs
St Vigeans - Sint VIDGE-anz
Savoch - SAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Schiehallion - She-HAL-yon
Scone - SKOON (definitely *not* either 'Skon' or Skohn')
Scourie - SKOW-ry
Strachan - STRAWN
Stranraer - Stran-RAHR
Strathaven - STRAY-ven
Strontian - Stron-TEE-an
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Anne B
(Show-off) ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-05-19 21:40:15 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
Alford - AH-f-rt
Alves - AH-viss
Anstruther - AIN-stir
Athelstaneford - ELSH-n'ford
Aviemore - A-vee-MORE
Avoch - AWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Balloch (Inverness) - Ba-LOCH
Balloch (Loch Lomond) - BAL-och
Balquhidder - Bal-HWID-er
Balquhindachy - Bal-WHY-nickee
Beauly - BEW-ly (same as Beaulieu in England)
Braemar - Bray-MAR
Cockburnspath - CO-burns-path
Cardow/Cardhu - Car-DOO
Crathes - CRATH-iss
Coupar Angus - COO-per ANG-gus
Covesea - COW-see
Crossraguel - Cross-RAY-gel (hard 'g' as in 'get')
Culloden - Cull-ODD-en
Culross - COO-rus
Culter - COOT-er
Culzean - Cull-AIN
Cupar - COO-per
Davoch - DAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Dores - DOHRZ (as 'doors')
Doune - DOON
Dounreay - Doon-RAY
Drumelzier - Drum-ELL-ee-er
Drymen - DRIM-en
Dumyat - Dum-EYE-at
Dundee - Done-DEE
Edinburgh - ed -in-BURR-uh
Eigg - Egg
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Fetterangus - FISH-ie
Findochty - Fin-ECHTy (also fin-DOCH-ty)
Fionnphort - FIN-a-fort
Fochabers - FO-ha-berz
Forfar - FOR-far
Forres - FOR-ess
Friockheim- FREE-come
Gamrie - GAME - ree
Garioch - GEER -ie
Gigha - GEE-a ('g' as in 'get')
Glamis - GLAHMZ
Glasgow - GLASS-go (no, not Glaz- <G>) or GLES-ca
Glendaruel - Glen-da-ROOL
Glenrothes - Glen-ROTH-iss ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Glenzier - GLING-er
Grandtully - GRANT-ly
Hawick - HOYK
Inveraray - Inn-ver-AIR-a
Inverewe - Inn-ver-YOU
Inverness - Inn-ver-NESS
Inverurie - Inn-ver-OO-ree
Islay - EYE-la
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Kilconquhar - Kin-NEW-har
Kilravock - Kill-RAWK
Kingussie - Kin -YOU-see
Kinloss - Kin-LOSS
Kirkcaldy - K-rk-ADDy or K-rk-AWDy
Kirkcudbright - Kir-COO-bry
Knockando - nock-ANN-dough
Knockandhu - nock-an-DOO
Kyleakin - Kyle-AH-kin
Kylesku - KYLE-skew
Langholm - LANG-um
Leochel - LAWH-l (to rhyme with 'loch')
Lesmahagow - Lez-ma-HAY-go
Leuchars - LOO-hers
Longannet - Long-ANN-et
Luing - LING
Lumphanan - Lum-FAN-an
Luncarty - LUNG-car-ty
Lybster - LYE-bster
Machrihanish - Mach-ry-HA-nish
Mallaig - Mall-AGUE (to rhyme with 'vague')
Maryculter - MARY-coo-ter
Meikleour - Mick-LOOR
Milngavie - Mil-GUY
Moniaive - Mon-eh-YVE
Monikie - Mon-EE-key
Moray - MURR-ay
Moulin - MOO-lin
(Loch) Muick - (Loch) MICK
Muthill - MEWTH-ill
Oban - OH-ban
Ordiequish - ORD-ee-fish
Penicuik - PENN-y-cook
Peterculter PETE-er-coot-er
Quhytewoollen - white-ween
Quiraing - Kwirr-ANG
Rosyth - Row-SCYTHE
Rothes - ROTH-ess ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Rothesay - ROTH-say ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Ruthven - RIV-en
St Madoes - Sint MAY-dohs
St Vigeans - Sint VIDGE-anz
Savoch - SAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Schiehallion - She-HAL-yon
Scone - SKOON (definitely *not* either 'Skon' or Skohn')
Scourie - SKOW-ry
Strachan - STRAWN
Stranraer - Stran-RAHR
Strathaven - STRAY-ven
Strontian - Stron-TEE-an
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Anne B
(Show-off) ;-)))
I've been collecting them for years :)

Anne B
Kate B
2020-05-19 16:06:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
Alford - AH-f-rt
Alves - AH-viss
Anstruther - AIN-stir
Athelstaneford - ELSH-n'ford
Aviemore - A-vee-MORE
Avoch - AWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Balloch (Inverness) - Ba-LOCH
Balloch (Loch Lomond) - BAL-och
Balquhidder - Bal-HWID-er
Balquhindachy  - Bal-WHY-nickee
Beauly - BEW-ly (same as Beaulieu in England)
Braemar - Bray-MAR
Cockburnspath - CO-burns-path
Cardow/Cardhu - Car-DOO
Crathes - CRATH-iss
Coupar Angus - COO-per ANG-gus
Covesea - COW-see
Crossraguel - Cross-RAY-gel (hard 'g' as in 'get')
Culloden - Cull-ODD-en
Culross - COO-rus
Culter - COOT-er
Culzean - Cull-AIN
Cupar - COO-per
Davoch - DAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Dores - DOHRZ (as 'doors')
Doune - DOON
Dounreay - Doon-RAY
Drumelzier - Drum-ELL-ee-er
Drymen - DRIM-en
Dumyat - Dum-EYE-at
Dundee - Done-DEE
Edinburgh - ed -in-BURR-uh
Eigg - Egg
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Fetterangus - FISH-ie
Findochty - Fin-ECHTy (also fin-DOCH-ty)
Fionnphort - FIN-a-fort
Fochabers - FO-ha-berz
Forfar - FOR-far
Forres - FOR-ess
Friockheim- FREE-come
Gamrie - GAME - ree
Garioch - GEER -ie
Gigha - GEE-a ('g' as in 'get')
Glamis - GLAHMZ
Glasgow - GLASS-go (no, not Glaz- <G>) or GLES-ca
Glendaruel - Glen-da-ROOL
Glenrothes - Glen-ROTH-iss ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Glenzier - GLING-er
Grandtully - GRANT-ly
Hawick - HOYK
Inveraray  - Inn-ver-AIR-a
Inverewe - Inn-ver-YOU
Inverness - Inn-ver-NESS
Inverurie - Inn-ver-OO-ree
Islay - EYE-la
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Kilconquhar - Kin-NEW-har
Kilravock - Kill-RAWK
Kingussie - Kin -YOU-see
Kinloss - Kin-LOSS
Kirkcaldy - K-rk-ADDy or K-rk-AWDy
Kirkcudbright - Kir-COO-bry
Knockando - nock-ANN-dough
Knockandhu - nock-an-DOO
Kyleakin - Kyle-AH-kin
Kylesku - KYLE-skew
Langholm - LANG-um
Leochel - LAWH-l (to rhyme with 'loch')
Lesmahagow - Lez-ma-HAY-go
Leuchars - LOO-hers
Longannet - Long-ANN-et
Luing - LING
Lumphanan - Lum-FAN-an
Luncarty - LUNG-car-ty
Lybster - LYE-bster
Machrihanish - Mach-ry-HA-nish
Mallaig - Mall-AGUE (to rhyme with 'vague')
Maryculter - MARY-coo-ter
Meikleour - Mick-LOOR
Milngavie - Mil-GUY
Moniaive - Mon-eh-YVE
Monikie - Mon-EE-key
Moray - MURR-ay
Moulin - MOO-lin
(Loch) Muick - (Loch) MICK
Muthill - MEWTH-ill
Oban - OH-ban
Ordiequish - ORD-ee-fish
Penicuik - PENN-y-cook
Peterculter PETE-er-coot-er
Quhytewoollen - white-ween
Quiraing - Kwirr-ANG
Rosyth - Row-SCYTHE
Rothes - ROTH-ess ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Rothesay - ROTH-say ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Ruthven - RIV-en
St Madoes - Sint MAY-dohs
St Vigeans - Sint VIDGE-anz
Savoch - SAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Schiehallion - She-HAL-yon
Scone - SKOON (definitely *not* either 'Skon' or Skohn')
Scourie - SKOW-ry
Strachan - STRAWN
Stranraer - Stran-RAHR
Strathaven - STRAY-ven
Strontian - Stron-TEE-an
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Mornington Crescent!
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2020-05-19 16:18:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 19 May 2020 15:05:53 +0100, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
[...]
Post by Mike
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
How? Why?
Post by Mike
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Blimey!
After that lot I should probably come back with the Welsh place which a
friend of Ray's called Machine-leth.

Machynlleth

The first time I heard it said I was slightly shocked by the middle
syllable (the stress in Welsh is on the penultimate syllable).
Something like Mac-cun-hleth
Most folk around here just call it Mach.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
steve hague
2020-05-20 07:09:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
[...]
Post by Mike
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
How? Why?
Post by Mike
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Blimey!
After that lot I should probably come back with the Welsh place which a
friend of Ray's called Machine-leth.
Machynlleth
The first time I heard it said I was slightly shocked by the middle
syllable (the stress in Welsh is on the penultimate syllable).
Something like Mac-cun-hleth
Most folk around here just call it Mach.
Are you entirely sure that it's not the spelling that's wrong, but the
pronunciation?
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-20 01:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Billericay (Essex) - Bill-uh-RICK-y (not Bill-eh-rick-ay).

Ingatestone, not far away, _is_ pronounced as you'd expect - but several
of us liked to pronounce it in Italianate manner: Inga-tes-toh-knee.

(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
[]
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Like Alnwick (Annick) I've already mentioned. Fenwick's department store
(mainly Newcastle, but I never found out why there's a branch in
Canterbury [Kent] too!) is pronounced the same as the place. (I didn't
know there _was_ such a place.)
[]
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Simple Germanic (J and Y are similar in German and several related
languages).
[]
Post by Anne B
Anne B
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

<This space unintentionally left blank>.
Penny
2020-05-20 09:05:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 May 2020 02:41:54 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ingatestone, not far away, _is_ pronounced as you'd expect - but several
of us liked to pronounce it in Italianate manner: Inga-tes-toh-knee.
Similarly, the family pronunciation of Folkestone is Fol-kes-toh-knee
(which also helps in remembering how to spell it).

Chatham, of course, is Cha'um.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
Since Radiotimes was our TV prophet, we also pronounce it in Greek fashion.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-20 09:31:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Similarly, the family pronunciation of Folkestone is Fol-kes-toh-knee
(which also helps in remembering how to spell it).
There are lots of words I deliberately mis-pronounce, usually to remind
myself of the spelling. Edin-berg is one of them. I lived in Norfolk
for many years but never did discover whether Burgh - near Aylsham -
should be pronounced Berg or Burra.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Joe Kerr
2020-05-20 10:23:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
There are lots of words I deliberately mis-pronounce, usually to remind
myself of the spelling.  Edin-berg is one of them.  I lived in Norfolk
for many years but never did discover whether Burgh - near Aylsham -
should be pronounced Berg or Burra.
Why not Burf?
--
Ric
Clive Arthur
2020-05-20 21:14:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Jenny M Benson
There are lots of words I deliberately mis-pronounce, usually to
remind myself of the spelling.  Edin-berg is one of them.  I lived in
Norfolk for many years but never did discover whether Burgh - near
Aylsham - should be pronounced Berg or Burra.
Why not Burf?
If I could burf I wouldn't need the talcum powder.
--
Cheers
Clive
Nick Leverton
2020-05-21 08:12:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Jenny M Benson
There are lots of words I deliberately mis-pronounce, usually to
remind myself of the spelling.  Edin-berg is one of them.  I lived in
Norfolk for many years but never did discover whether Burgh - near
Aylsham - should be pronounced Berg or Burra.
Why not Burf?
If I could burf I wouldn't need the talcum powder.
Well, I hope you have a happy burf day whenever possible ...

Burfday Monitor
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
steve hague
2020-05-20 11:59:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Similarly, the family pronunciation of Folkestone is Fol-kes-toh-knee
(which also helps in remembering how to spell it).
There are lots of words I deliberately mis-pronounce, usually to remind
myself of the spelling.  Edin-berg is one of them.  I lived in Norfolk
for many years but never did discover whether Burgh - near Aylsham -
should be pronounced Berg or Burra.
There's a place in Cornwall called Praa Sands. Even the locals argue
over whether it sould be pronounced Pray or Prah. Civil wars have been
fought for less reason.
Steve
Mike
2020-05-20 10:36:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 20 May 2020 02:41:54 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ingatestone, not far away, _is_ pronounced as you'd expect - but several
of us liked to pronounce it in Italianate manner: Inga-tes-toh-knee.
Similarly, the family pronunciation of Folkestone is Fol-kes-toh-knee
(which also helps in remembering how to spell it).
Chatham, of course, is Cha'um.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
Since Radiotimes was our TV prophet, we also pronounce it in Greek fashion.
Il fraccom bee.
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-20 18:37:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Wed, 20 May 2020 02:41:54 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ingatestone, not far away, _is_ pronounced as you'd expect - but several
of us liked to pronounce it in Italianate manner: Inga-tes-toh-knee.
Similarly, the family pronunciation of Folkestone is Fol-kes-toh-knee
(which also helps in remembering how to spell it).
Chatham, of course, is Cha'um.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
Since Radiotimes was our TV prophet, we also pronounce it in Greek fashion.
Il fraccom bee.
The home ground of Dundee United FC is of course pronounced Tah-na-DEE-chay.

R
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-20 09:27:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Flop
2020-05-20 09:51:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to
go alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls.  "I say, fellah!" said the chap.  "You're saying that
wrong.  The horse's name is Her-cue=lees."  He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race.  "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
At one stage of my life I worked in the Pascal Laboratory.

I was surprised to hear it pronounced pasc-ul.

In my naivete ..."I thought he was called Pasc-al"

"Nay, its named after the mint sweet makers"

Got my coat.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Penny
2020-05-20 11:32:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 May 2020 10:27:58 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2020-05-20 13:56:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2020-05-20 15:03:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-05-20 15:28:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
Do you have a pink Rolls Royce M’Lady?
--
Toodle Pip
Jim Easterbrook
2020-05-20 18:08:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called
Penelope and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person
baptising me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
Do you have a pink Rolls Royce M’Lady?
I've been aware of the difference between Penelope and Penny-lope since
13 January 1966.

--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sally Thompson
2020-05-20 19:11:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called
Penelope and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person
baptising me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
Do you have a pink Rolls Royce M’Lady?
I've been aware of the difference between Penelope and Penny-lope since
13 January 1966.
http://youtu.be/GBYF8U34XD0
Oh I did enjoy that! I hired a pink car like that one year in Kos with my
son, and he insisted on calling me Lady Penelope through the holiday.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sally Thompson
2020-05-20 18:56:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Joe Kerr
2020-05-20 19:30:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
Bun?
Farthing?
Halfpenny?
Dreadful?
Cillin?
Whistle?
--
Ric
Penny
2020-05-20 20:14:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 May 2020 20:30:33 +0100, Joe Kerr <***@cheerful.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sally Thompson
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
Bun?
Farthing?
Halfpenny?
Dreadful?
Cillin?
Whistle?
Hill?
Oh no, that was me :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-05-21 01:08:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 20 May 2020 18:56:54 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.

Nick
Joe Kerr
2020-05-21 10:28:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.
Nick
That's quite a coincidence. The name of my sister is also not Sally.
(Neither was that of the dog, which my parents acquired several years
later.)
--
Ric
BrritSki
2020-05-21 10:33:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Odell
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.
Nick
That's quite a coincidence. The name of my sister is also not Sally.
(Neither was that of the dog, which my parents acquired several years
later.)
YAmeAICm5siblings although in fact I only have 1 drother.
Mike
2020-05-21 11:32:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Odell
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.
Nick
That's quite a coincidence. The name of my sister is also not Sally.
(Neither was that of the dog, which my parents acquired several years
later.)
My sister’s dog is called Sally.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-05-21 13:46:41 UTC
Reply
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On Thu, 21 May 2020 11:28:32 +0100, Joe Kerr <***@cheerful.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Odell
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.
Nick
That's quite a coincidence. The name of my sister is also not Sally.
(Neither was that of the dog, which my parents acquired several years
later.)
Curiously, my mother had a succession of dogs whose names began with S (I
think her mother started it but I'm only aware of Spot and Splash -
appropriate for a pudelhund).
Not a Sally amongst them.
I have no sisters, none of my brothers is/was called Sally.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-21 15:41:48 UTC
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Post by Penny
Curiously, my mother had a succession of dogs whose names began with S
One of my great-aunts had a succession of Sealyham Terriers who were all
called George.

(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few weeks
short of her 16th birthday.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
BrritSki
2020-05-21 15:43:10 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few weeks
short of her 16th birthday.)
{{{hugs}}}
Serena Blanchflower
2020-05-21 15:53:05 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few
weeks short of her 16th birthday.)
{{{hugs}}}
and from me.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
I am a Quaker. In case of an emergency... Please be quiet.
Nick Odell
2020-05-21 19:17:52 UTC
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On Thu, 21 May 2020 16:53:05 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few
weeks short of her 16th birthday.)
{{{hugs}}}
and from me.
from both of us too.

N+L
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-21 22:15:33 UTC
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On Thu, 21 May 2020 at 16:17:52, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 21 May 2020 16:53:05 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few
weeks short of her 16th birthday.)
{{{hugs}}}
and from me.
from both of us too.
N+L
+1
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Experience is the comb life gives you after you lose your hair. -Judith Stearn
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-21 21:28:15 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few
weeks short of her 16th birthday.)
{{{hugs}}}
So sorry to hear this, Jenny. ISTR your Feisty (so nearly Hyphen IIRC)
and my Tosca appeared at almost exactly the same time. I enjoyed the
occasions when I met Feisty; I recall one occasion in a wood in
Northants and another in Lancaster. She was a dog of great character.

R
Sally Thompson
2020-05-21 15:52:08 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Curiously, my mother had a succession of dogs whose names began with S
One of my great-aunts had a succession of Sealyham Terriers who were all
called George.
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few weeks
short of her 16th birthday.)
I'm sorry to hear that Jenny. Condolences.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-21 16:48:55 UTC
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On Thu, 21 May 2020 16:41:48 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Curiously, my mother had a succession of dogs whose names began with S
One of my great-aunts had a succession of Sealyham Terriers who were all
called George.
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few weeks
short of her 16th birthday.)
I am sorry to hear that, Jenny. Was she ill for a while first? xx
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-21 17:22:46 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I am sorry to hear that, Jenny. Was she ill for a while first? xx
Well, not really ill, as she was still enjoying her food and liked to go
out for a little walk^w potter every day despite arthritis, for which
she had been on a pain killer for a while. But she had really started
to show her age and I knew I'd have to make the decision very soon.
Then on Friday night a growth on her leg began to bleed really badly and
was obviously painful. I had been desperately hoping she'd outlast the
current crisis so I could be with her at the end, but in the event I
couldn't be and that is awful.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-21 18:48:38 UTC
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On Thu, 21 May 2020 18:22:46 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I am sorry to hear that, Jenny. Was she ill for a while first? xx
Well, not really ill, as she was still enjoying her food and liked to go
out for a little walk^w potter every day despite arthritis, for which
she had been on a pain killer for a while. But she had really started
to show her age and I knew I'd have to make the decision very soon.
Then on Friday night a growth on her leg began to bleed really badly and
was obviously painful. I had been desperately hoping she'd outlast the
current crisis so I could be with her at the end, but in the event I
couldn't be and that is awful.
Yes that is very sad. We were not able to be with Molly when it
happened as she was in having a scan and they found something and then
operated to see how much cancer there was and rang to say it weas too
bad to do and did we want her brought round so we could say goodbye.
She was very scared of going in and it would have distressed her to be
brought round and go back to sleep so we just said no. So I do know
how that feels. xx
Kate B
2020-05-21 21:58:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I am sorry to hear that, Jenny. Was she ill for a while first? xx
Well, not really ill, as she was still enjoying her food and liked to go
out for a little walk^w potter every day despite arthritis, for which
she had been on a pain killer for a while.  But she had really started
to show her age and I knew I'd have to make the decision very soon. Then
on Friday night a growth on her leg began to bleed really badly and was
obviously painful.  I had been desperately hoping she'd outlast the
current crisis so I could be with her at the end, but in the event I
couldn't be and that is awful.
Oh dear Jenny, how absolutely miserable for you. A dog leaving is bad
enough anyway, much worse if you can't say goodbye properly. Much love.
--
Kate B
London
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-21 21:37:05 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
(On the subject of dogs, my Feisty passed away last Friday, a few weeks
short of her 16th birthday.)
I am so sorry to hear that.

Sharing that news with umra may be small comfort, but all the support we
can offer is yours.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sally Thompson
2020-05-21 15:43:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Odell
In Indiana Jones style, my parents were going to name my sister after
the dog. But the dog was still alive when my sister was born (and for
many more years after that) and so the name of my sister is not Sally.
Nick
That's quite a coincidence. The name of my sister is also not Sally.
(Neither was that of the dog, which my parents acquired several years
later.)
Even more of a coincidence. My sister is also not called Sally!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2020-05-21 07:34:52 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
Penny Weight / Waite?

Penny Chew?

Penny Swirth?

Penny Wise?

Penny Lane?

(Other Penny’s may be available.)
--
Toodle Pip
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-05-21 08:46:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
Penny Weight / Waite?
Penny Chew?
Penny Swirth?
Penny Wise?
Penny Lane?
(Other Penny’s may be available.)
Penny Van
Penny Ghent
Penny Cuik
krw
2020-05-21 13:33:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
I'm sure the chap who baptised me knew better but I've encountered many
others who didn't. I don't like the name. Only head teachers and
administrators every addressed me as Penelope.
I really like the name. It was going to be my first name but my parents
realised it would be shortened to Penny which would have led to teasing
with my unusual maiden surname (no, I won't say!).
Farthing.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-20 17:08:36 UTC
Reply
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On 20 May 2020 13:56:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
My middle name is Penelope, and my mother told me that the person baptising
me nearly pronounced it Penny-lope.
As a hospital radio DJ I once announced her as Kiley min og yew.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-05-20 17:21:48 UTC
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I sometimes refer to my sil as "Fenelope"
Mike
2020-05-20 17:54:51 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
I sometimes refer to my sil as "Fenelope"
Is that ‘Fenny Lope’?
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-20 21:53:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.

We always called HMS Hermione Hermi-one, but then so did a lot of the navy.
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2020-05-21 00:46:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Wed, 20 May 2020 10:27:58 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to
go alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a
horse call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying
that wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way,
but returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called
Penelope and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.
We always called HMS Hermione Hermi-one, but then so did a lot of the navy.
Are you ex RN, Sam?
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-21 21:40:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Wed, 20 May 2020 10:27:58 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to
go alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a
horse call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying
that wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way,
but returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called
Penelope and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.
We always called HMS Hermione Hermi-one, but then so did a lot of the navy.
Are you ex RN, Sam?
Nooo, defence contractor. We did the sonar that was fitted the Batch
III Leanders (amongst others).
I visited Hermi-one quite a few times, but spent much more time on
Cherry-B.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-05-21 07:37:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I also liked to refer to one of the lesser-known Greek prophets, to go
alongside such luminaries as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, etc: Radi-
otimes. [Could only predict a little over a week ahead.])
A chap went to the races and heard a bookie calling the odds for a horse
call Her-kewls. "I say, fellah!" said the chap. "You're saying that
wrong. The horse's name is Her-cue=lees." He went on his way, but
returned to place a bet on the next race. "Three to one
I-ron-sid-ease!" the bookie was shouting.
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.
We always called HMS Hermione Hermi-one, but then so did a lot of the navy.
I’m quite sure Lynda had a ‘Percy Phone’.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-05-21 07:47:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 20 May 2020 22:53:45 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.
No, the Antelope got called Ant-tel-o-pee because the docks people had
learned how to say Penelope.
Post by Sam Plusnet
We always called HMS Hermione Hermi-one, but then so did a lot of the navy.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-21 21:42:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
Reminds me of the tale my mother would tell about two ships called Penelope
and Antelope which came into port one after the other...
Shirley, Antelope should have been the first to arrive.
No, the Antelope got called Ant-tel-o-pee because the docks people had
learned how to say Penelope.
Someone should have upped the ante.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-05-20 12:00:15 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by John Finlay
Post by Flop
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Not the same but my brothers naive attempt at not spelt as it is
pronounced...
Barrow-in-furnace.
Vale of Belvoir in Leicestershire, Belvoir pronounced Beaver.
Miss-pronouncing this one might be considered bad behavoir.
(Caps indicate the stressed syllable)
Aberchirder - Foggieloan (or Aber-HIR-der)
Aberdeen - Abb-er-DEEN
Aberuthven - Abb-RIV-in
Aberlour - Abb-er-LOWR (to rhyme with 'shower')
Alford - AH-f-rt
Alves - AH-viss
Anstruther - AIN-stir
Athelstaneford - ELSH-n'ford
Aviemore - A-vee-MORE
Avoch - AWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Baledgarno - Bal-EGG-er-nie
Ballingry -Ba-LING-gray
Balloch (Inverness) - Ba-LOCH
Balloch (Loch Lomond) - BAL-och
Balquhidder - Bal-HWID-er
Balquhindachy - Bal-WHY-nickee
Beauly - BEW-ly (same as Beaulieu in England)
Braemar - Bray-MAR
Cockburnspath - CO-burns-path
Cardow/Cardhu - Car-DOO
Crathes - CRATH-iss
Coupar Angus - COO-per ANG-gus
Covesea - COW-see
Crossraguel - Cross-RAY-gel (hard 'g' as in 'get')
Culloden - Cull-ODD-en
Culross - COO-rus
Culter - COOT-er
Culzean - Cull-AIN
Cupar - COO-per
Davoch - DAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Dores - DOHRZ (as 'doors')
Doune - DOON
Dounreay - Doon-RAY
Drumelzier - Drum-ELL-ee-er
Drymen - DRIM-en
Dumyat - Dum-EYE-at
Dundee - Done-DEE
Edinburgh - ed -in-BURR-uh
Eigg - Egg
Fenwick - FEN-ick
Fetterangus - FISH-ie
Findochty - Fin-ECHTy (also fin-DOCH-ty)
Fionnphort - FIN-a-fort
Fochabers - FO-ha-berz
Forfar - FOR-far
Forres - FOR-ess
Friockheim- FREE-come
Gamrie - GAME - ree
Garioch - GEER -ie
Gigha - GEE-a ('g' as in 'get')
Glamis - GLAHMZ
Glasgow - GLASS-go (no, not Glaz- <G>) or GLES-ca
Glendaruel - Glen-da-ROOL
Glenrothes - Glen-ROTH-iss ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Glenzier - GLING-er
Grandtully - GRANT-ly
Hawick - HOYK
Inveraray - Inn-ver-AIR-a
Inverewe - Inn-ver-YOU
Inverness - Inn-ver-NESS
Inverurie - Inn-ver-OO-ree
Islay - EYE-la
Jarlshof - YARLZ-hoff
Kilconquhar - Kin-NEW-har
Kilravock - Kill-RAWK
Kingussie - Kin -YOU-see
Kinloss - Kin-LOSS
Kirkcaldy - K-rk-ADDy or K-rk-AWDy
Kirkcudbright - Kir-COO-bry
Knockando - nock-ANN-dough
Knockandhu - nock-an-DOO
Kyleakin - Kyle-AH-kin
Kylesku - KYLE-skew
Langholm - LANG-um
Leochel - LAWH-l (to rhyme with 'loch')
Lesmahagow - Lez-ma-HAY-go
Leuchars - LOO-hers
Longannet - Long-ANN-et
Luing - LING
Lumphanan - Lum-FAN-an
Luncarty - LUNG-car-ty
Lybster - LYE-bster
Machrihanish - Mach-ry-HA-nish
Mallaig - Mall-AGUE (to rhyme with 'vague')
Maryculter - MARY-coo-ter
Meikleour - Mick-LOOR
Milngavie - Mil-GUY
Moniaive - Mon-eh-YVE
Monikie - Mon-EE-key
Moray - MURR-ay
Moulin - MOO-lin
(Loch) Muick - (Loch) MICK
Muthill - MEWTH-ill
Oban - OH-ban
Ordiequish - ORD-ee-fish
Penicuik - PENN-y-cook
Peterculter PETE-er-coot-er
Quhytewoollen - white-ween
Quiraing - Kwirr-ANG
Rosyth - Row-SCYTHE
Rothes - ROTH-ess ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Rothesay - ROTH-say ('roth' rhymes with 'broth')
Ruthven - RIV-en
St Madoes - Sint MAY-dohs
St Vigeans - Sint VIDGE-anz
Savoch - SAWH (to rhyme with 'loch')
Schiehallion - She-HAL-yon
Scone - SKOON (definitely *not* either 'Skon' or Skohn')
Scourie - SKOW-ry
Strachan - STRAWN
Stranraer - Stran-RAHR
Strathaven - STRAY-ven
Strontian - Stron-TEE-an
Stuartfield - CRI - hee
Suilven - SOOL-ven
Tarves - TAR-vess
Tomintoul - Tom-n-TOWEL
Tyndrum - TYNE-drum
Urquhart - UR-hart
Wemyss - WEEMZ
Anne B
:). I can write sounds but I certainly know lots of those,

Sincerely Chris
Paul Herber
2020-05-19 19:10:09 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
London - pronounced Lunden
Brighton - Brytun
Bournemouth - Bornmuth
Plymouth - Plimuth
Bristol - Brissel
Portsmouth - Portsmuff
Southampton - Sourfamptun
Redhill - Redeew
Guildford - Giwfud
Slough - Slaa

;-)
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
krw
2020-05-19 22:52:21 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Guildford - Giwfud
Not according to one of my satnavs which insists on calling it something
like Geeldford, hard G to start and always both ds.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2020-05-20 09:12:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 19 May 2020 23:52:21 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Paul Herber
Guildford - Giwfud
Not according to one of my satnavs which insists on calling it something
like Geeldford, hard G to start and always both ds.
You should have heard my satnag's attempt at Meadowhall [a large shopping
centre near Sheffield m'lud] it broke up the syllables in a strange way,
stressing the middle one and sounded more like Med-ow-all.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-05-20 12:58:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Paul Herber
Guildford - Giwfud
Not according to one of my satnavs which insists on calling it something
like Geeldford, hard G to start and always both ds.
Last year we drove from the Ook of Olland to south Bavaria and "Brenda the Navigator" (our cat nav) amused us with her renditions of German place names.
Joe Kerr
2020-05-20 16:27:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by krw
Post by Paul Herber
Guildford - Giwfud
Not according to one of my satnavs which insists on calling it something
like Geeldford, hard G to start and always both ds.
Last year we drove from the Ook of Olland to south Bavaria and "Brenda the Navigator" (our cat nav) amused us with her renditions of German place names.
I've had a similar problem in France. Depending on the language it was
set to I either knew where I was going or how to get there, but not both.
--
Ric
Clive Arthur
2020-05-19 20:30:30 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
--
Cheers
Clive
Paul Herber
2020-05-19 21:29:26 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
Brighton - Hove Actually
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-19 21:43:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
No-one has mentioned
Loughborough (Loughabarouga)
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-05-20 12:00:16 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
If you say so. My stepmum and her mum certainly wouldn’t have dreamt of so
doing.

Sincerely Chris
John Ashby
2020-05-20 13:39:07 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
If you say so. My stepmum and her mum certainly wouldn’t have dreamt of so
doing.
Sincerely Chris
Helen Atkinson-wood, I believe, as a wanna-be Sloane when they were a Thing.

There's a Greta Garbo joke in there somewhere if I could be bothered to
find it.

john
BrritSki
2020-05-20 13:42:23 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis.
Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
If you say so.  My stepmum and her mum certainly wouldn’t have dreamt
of so
doing.
Sincerely Chris
Helen Atkinson-wood, I believe, as a wanna-be Sloane when they were a Thing.
There's a Greta Garbo joke in there somewhere if I could be bothered to
find it.
Harlow.
Sally Thompson
2020-05-20 13:57:48 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
If you say so. My stepmum and her mum certainly wouldn’t have dreamt of so
doing.
Not to forget Ball-ham, Gateway to the South.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Clive Arthur
2020-05-20 16:43:16 UTC
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On 20/05/2020 14:57, Sally Thompson wrote:

<snip>
Post by Sally Thompson
Not to forget Ball-ham, Gateway to the South.
I was once stopped near Maidenhead by some Americans who asked me if I
knew the way to cook ham. Really.
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike
2020-05-20 16:59:52 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Sally Thompson
Not to forget Ball-ham, Gateway to the South.
I was once stopped near Maidenhead by some Americans who asked me if I
knew the way to cook ham. Really.
I trust you replied ‘Oh Hock!’
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2020-05-20 22:06:24 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
If you say so. My stepmum and her mum certainly wouldn’t have dreamt of so
doing.
Not to forget Ball-ham, Gateway to the South.
Or St. Ockwell
--
Kate B
London
steveski
2020-05-20 14:01:01 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
And 'Batt-er-seeya'.
--
Steveski
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-20 18:43:12 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by s***@gmail.com
Chideock, a Dorset village between Bridport and Lyme Regis. Pronounced Chid-dick
Clapham - Claahm.
And 'Batt-er-seeya'.
Hoveacksherly

R
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