Discussion:
Totally O/T; Just the ramblings of an old git.
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Mike
2019-09-22 10:53:13 UTC
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As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...

Now, I take a delight in looking out of the window to see the heavy rain
that will be filling our empty water butts, providing the flowers, fruit
and vegetables in the garden with much needed rain - but then, I no longer
have the kite, the rocket or friends outside waiting to play on the
building site.

Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-09-22 11:53:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
I don't remember whether I did as a child or not. (Though I did like
family favourites - more than I'd have admitted when at secondary
school. I was of course on one of the other ends ...)
Post by Mike
Now, I take a delight in looking out of the window to see the heavy rain
that will be filling our empty water butts, providing the flowers, fruit
and vegetables in the garden with much needed rain - but then, I no longer
have the kite, the rocket or friends outside waiting to play on the
building site.
I don't have the gardening bonuses, but I love a good downpour, or even
just steady rain: it means I have no guilt feelings at all about not
going outside and _doing_ something, which nice weather always does!
[Though I'm managing to resist more and more (-:.] Either outdoor
housework (what little gardening I have, repairs, car matters ...), or
just "I should go for a walk".

[Mined ewe, it makes a big difference having someone else to do so with.
When staying with friends a few weeks ago, I went for walks a lot more,
and enjoyed it. And blackberrying/elderberrying. When I _had_ to walk a
bit in nice weather a week ago Friday (after leaving my car for MoT and
when going to collect it), I sort of enjoyed it - but kept thinking
"Julia would enjoy this".]
Post by Mike
Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
Unless Chris licks her lips and feels sublime ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And every day in Britain, 33 properties are sold for around that price [a
million pounds or so]. - Jane Rackham, RT 2015/4/11-17
Chris McMillan
2019-09-22 13:01:41 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
I don't remember whether I did as a child or not. (Though I did like
family favourites - more than I'd have admitted when at secondary
school. I was of course on one of the other ends ...)
Post by Mike
Now, I take a delight in looking out of the window to see the heavy rain
that will be filling our empty water butts, providing the flowers, fruit
and vegetables in the garden with much needed rain - but then, I no longer
have the kite, the rocket or friends outside waiting to play on the
building site.
I don't have the gardening bonuses, but I love a good downpour, or even
just steady rain: it means I have no guilt feelings at all about not
going outside and _doing_ something, which nice weather always does!
[Though I'm managing to resist more and more (-:.] Either outdoor
housework (what little gardening I have, repairs, car matters ...), or
just "I should go for a walk".
[Mined ewe, it makes a big difference having someone else to do so with.
When staying with friends a few weeks ago, I went for walks a lot more,
and enjoyed it. And blackberrying/elderberrying. When I _had_ to walk a
bit in nice weather a week ago Friday (after leaving my car for MoT and
when going to collect it), I sort of enjoyed it - but kept thinking
"Julia would enjoy this".]
Post by Mike
Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
Unless Chris licks her lips and feels sublime ...
I wasn’t here.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-09-22 18:45:03 UTC
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Permalink
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
Unless Chris licks her lips and feels sublime ...
I wasn’t here.
Sincerely Chris
Ah, Barry^WMike would have been relieved ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Heaven forbid today's audience should feel bombarded with information or
worse, lectured. Dont'scare the horses by waving facts around.
- David Butcher, RT 2014/11/29-12/5
John Finlay
2019-09-22 11:56:52 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
Now, I take a delight in looking out of the window to see the heavy rain
that will be filling our empty water butts, providing the flowers, fruit
and vegetables in the garden with much needed rain - but then, I no longer
have the kite, the rocket or friends outside waiting to play on the
building site.
Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne? Then followed by either The
Clitheroe Kid or Al Read.
Mike
2019-09-22 12:46:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Finlay
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
Now, I take a delight in looking out of the window to see the heavy rain
that will be filling our empty water butts, providing the flowers, fruit
and vegetables in the garden with much needed rain - but then, I no longer
have the kite, the rocket or friends outside waiting to play on the
building site.
Just ignore me and the ramblings of an old gardening git. Ooh! It will soon
be time for GQT on Radio 4!
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne? Then followed by either The
Clitheroe Kid or Al Read.
Never cared for CK or AR but RTH / BOK and NL, yes.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-09-22 14:53:21 UTC
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Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-22 16:57:03 UTC
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Permalink
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-22 18:34:41 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.

I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2019-09-22 21:09:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-09-24 22:43:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
I agree: I don't think you can neglect the nostalgia factor in these
things. As a sweeping staement, I'd be hard pressed to think of a Muir
and Norden, Jay and Lynn or Galton and Simpson comedy that hasn't
stood the test of time but though I enjoyed TNL at the time - being
friends in and out of school with Pertwee's nephew might have had
something to do with it - I now listen with a sense of "Did I really
find that funny at the time?" about me. Ditto Radio Active and ISIRTA.

And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.

I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-25 07:56:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Sep 2019 23:43:09 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
I agree: I don't think you can neglect the nostalgia factor in these
things. As a sweeping staement, I'd be hard pressed to think of a Muir
and Norden, Jay and Lynn or Galton and Simpson comedy that hasn't
stood the test of time but though I enjoyed TNL at the time - being
friends in and out of school with Pertwee's nephew might have had
something to do with it - I now listen with a sense of "Did I really
find that funny at the time?" about me. Ditto Radio Active and ISIRTA.
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Ah TNL has aged but I loved it and we played it in school so it still
has charm for me, and I still enjoy the Paul Temple stories on 4E.
Ilove the voices. I didn'e hear them originally anyway.
Mike
2019-09-25 07:59:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
I agree: I don't think you can neglect the nostalgia factor in these
things. As a sweeping staement, I'd be hard pressed to think of a Muir
and Norden, Jay and Lynn or Galton and Simpson comedy that hasn't
stood the test of time but though I enjoyed TNL at the time - being
friends in and out of school with Pertwee's nephew might have had
something to do with it - I now listen with a sense of "Did I really
find that funny at the time?" about me. Ditto Radio Active and ISIRTA.
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Just to let all Umrats know that all 7 water butts are now full and I am
still waiting to go out and play with my catapulta(i)ble [SWIDT?] rocket
with its’ parachute.;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-09-25 10:01:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
I agree: I don't think you can neglect the nostalgia factor in these
things. As a sweeping staement, I'd be hard pressed to think of a Muir
and Norden, Jay and Lynn or Galton and Simpson comedy that hasn't
stood the test of time but though I enjoyed TNL at the time - being
friends in and out of school with Pertwee's nephew might have had
something to do with it - I now listen with a sense of "Did I really
find that funny at the time?" about me. Ditto Radio Active and ISIRTA.
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Paul Temple certainly does not stand up to anything! Though I haven’t read
any so that might be different. Not sure I want to pay more than a few
pence to find out either.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-09-25 10:12:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sun, 22 Sep 2019 19:34:41 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
I agree about TNL but think Round the Horne and Beyond our Ken stand up
pretty well. Whether youngsters who do not have the nostalgia factor would
agree, I've no idea.
I agree: I don't think you can neglect the nostalgia factor in these
things. As a sweeping staement, I'd be hard pressed to think of a Muir
and Norden, Jay and Lynn or Galton and Simpson comedy that hasn't
stood the test of time but though I enjoyed TNL at the time - being
friends in and out of school with Pertwee's nephew might have had
something to do with it - I now listen with a sense of "Did I really
find that funny at the time?" about me. Ditto Radio Active and ISIRTA.
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Paul Temple certainly does not stand up to anything! Though I haven’t read
any so that might be different. Not sure I want to pay more than a few
pence to find out either.
Sincerely Chris
I think the revamped PT episodes were dire; they used the original
recording of the theme music and made a big thing about using ‘the original
microphones’ - this is no great surprise as those Neumann microphones are
still in current use widely as they were well designed and built. The
episodes were to me, very stilted, laboured and so predictable. ‘Look out!
He’s got a gun!’ Type of thing. Nah bury the recordings say I.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-09-25 12:46:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 10:12:47 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Paul Temple certainly does not stand up to anything! Though I haven’t read
any so that might be different. Not sure I want to pay more than a few
pence to find out either.
Sincerely Chris
I think the revamped PT episodes were dire; they used the original
recording of the theme music and made a big thing about using ‘the original
microphones’ - this is no great surprise as those Neumann microphones are
still in current use widely as they were well designed and built. The
episodes were to me, very stilted, laboured and so predictable. ‘Look out!
He’s got a gun!’ Type of thing. Nah bury the recordings say I.
Paul Temple, in either version is dire. I didn't hear them first time
round, although seem to recall some Francis Durbridge Presents. Paul Temple
was written for people with no visual imagination, it always tries to paint
too much of a picture - I've read books like that, it gets in the way.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-25 12:55:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
And whilst scriptwriter Francis Durbridge was considered to be close
to God in those days (Didn't the churches ask the Beeb to reschedule
The World of Tim Frazer because their evening worship was lacking bums
on seats?) the Paul Temple stories strain my credulity a little too
much despite all the re-recording effort that's gone into the latest
batch.
I still listen though: that's the nostalgia factor, isn't it?
Nick
Paul Temple certainly does not stand up to anything! Though I haven’t read
any so that might be different. Not sure I want to pay more than a few
pence to find out either.
Sincerely Chris
I think the revamped PT episodes were dire; they used the original
recording of the theme music and made a big thing about using ‘the original
microphones’ - this is no great surprise as those Neumann microphones are
still in current use widely as they were well designed and built. The
episodes were to me, very stilted, laboured and so predictable. ‘Look out!
He’s got a gun!’ Type of thing. Nah bury the recordings say I.
Paul Temple, in either version is dire. I didn't hear them first time
round, although seem to recall some Francis Durbridge Presents. Paul Temple
was written for people with no visual imagination, it always tries to paint
SNIFF. I like listening to them. But admit itis during siestas and I
only hear a few minutes.
Post by Penny
too much of a picture - I've read books like that, it gets in the way.
Steve Hague
2019-09-26 11:20:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought.  Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny.  Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Mike
2019-09-26 17:37:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought.  Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny.  Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-09-27 09:08:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.

Anne B
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-27 11:04:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 27 Sep 2019 10:08:35 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
YANAOU
Mike
2019-09-27 11:22:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-09-27 12:39:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.

Nick
John Ashby
2019-09-27 15:11:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?

john
Nick Odell
2019-09-27 23:45:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.

Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.

Nick
Chris McMillan
2019-09-28 11:29:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2019-09-28 12:39:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 11:29:47 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)
It takes me less time to fly to BsAs than it used to take me to travel
by coach down from Huddersfield to my late mother's house in Sussex.
Flying back and forth so many times (sorry Greta!) has become so
normal that I no longer spend time choosing a seat. All that bother
for just 13hrs? What's the point?

...and when I was a youngster we had lessons about Canada and
Australia and other parts of the empire^W commonwealth but I don't
think I ever really understood where South America was at that time or
even what it was. Manchester being far away was one of those things
that was engrained in me as a youngster and deep down I still feel
that when it is patently untrue.

Nick
Chris McMillan
2019-09-29 10:18:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sat, 28 Sep 2019 11:29:47 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)
It takes me less time to fly to BsAs than it used to take me to travel
by coach down from Huddersfield to my late mother's house in Sussex.
Flying back and forth so many times (sorry Greta!) has become so
normal that I no longer spend time choosing a seat. All that bother
for just 13hrs? What's the point?
...and when I was a youngster we had lessons about Canada and
Australia and other parts of the empire^W commonwealth but I don't
think I ever really understood where South America was at that time or
even what it was. Manchester being far away was one of those things
that was engrained in me as a youngster and deep down I still feel
that when it is patently untrue.
Nick
LOL. All relative ain’t it! You gotta do what you gotta do.

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-09-28 15:29:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)
Sincerely Chris
But is the journey possible on a bus pass?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-09-28 22:13:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)
Sincerely Chris
But is the journey possible on a bus pass?
Not very much of it is within the remit of my ENBP but I'm fairly
confident that, if done at the right time of year nearly all of it
could be done by bus. There's a 55 mile stretch which needs to be
walked or sledded during winter and there's an inconveniently
dangerous section to be overcome but it seems African refugees are
using that route to get to the USA so it might be worth a try going
the other way. (Though last time I took the bus from Canada to Buenos
Aires, I admit that I flew over that bit.)

Nick
Chris McMillan
2019-09-29 10:18:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
Nick
And Buenos Aires is but a short hop away! :)
Sincerely Chris
But is the journey possible on a bus pass?
Not very much of it is within the remit of my ENBP but I'm fairly
confident that, if done at the right time of year nearly all of it
could be done by bus. There's a 55 mile stretch which needs to be
walked or sledded during winter and there's an inconveniently
dangerous section to be overcome but it seems African refugees are
using that route to get to the USA so it might be worth a try going
the other way. (Though last time I took the bus from Canada to Buenos
Aires, I admit that I flew over that bit.)
Nick
ROTFLMAO

Sincerely Chris
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-09-29 08:14:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
When we drive to Orkney, Inverness is about 2/3 of the way. Last time we think we found a magnificent second hand bookshop just closing.
Anne B
2019-09-29 11:44:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
When we drive to Orkney, Inverness is about 2/3 of the way. Last time we think we found a magnificent second hand bookshop just closing.
That would be Leakey's.

Closing as in closing at the end of a business day, not as in shutting
down permanently.

Never any problem occupying oneself in Inverness on a wet day (or any
other day in fact, there being nothing else in the city worth spending
time in).

Anne B
Mike
2019-09-29 12:50:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
When we drive to Orkney, Inverness is about 2/3 of the way. Last time we
think we found a magnificent second hand bookshop just closing.
That would be Leakey's.
Closing as in closing at the end of a business day, not as in shutting
down permanently.
Never any problem occupying oneself in Inverness on a wet day (or any
other day in fact, there being nothing else in the city worth spending
time in).
Anne B
Is there still a telephone-box-sized cop-shop in a shopping arcade in
Inverness?
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-09-29 21:23:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
When we drive to Orkney, Inverness is about 2/3 of the way. Last time we
think we found a magnificent second hand bookshop just closing.
That would be Leakey's.
Closing as in closing at the end of a business day, not as in shutting
down permanently.
Never any problem occupying oneself in Inverness on a wet day (or any
other day in fact, there being nothing else in the city worth spending
time in).
Anne B
Is there still a telephone-box-sized cop-shop in a shopping arcade in
Inverness?
Sorry, Leakey's is the only shop I ever go into in Inverness these days.
I haven't been in the arcade for years. But when I am next in Inverness
I'll go and look.

I'll be surprised if there is because most villages here, and some
towns, no longer have cop shops at all.

Anne B
Chris McMillan
2019-09-30 13:09:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
When we drive to Orkney, Inverness is about 2/3 of the way. Last time we
think we found a magnificent second hand bookshop just closing.
That would be Leakey's.
Closing as in closing at the end of a business day, not as in shutting
down permanently.
Never any problem occupying oneself in Inverness on a wet day (or any
other day in fact, there being nothing else in the city worth spending
time in).
Anne B
Is there still a telephone-box-sized cop-shop in a shopping arcade in
Inverness?
Sorry, Leakey's is the only shop I ever go into in Inverness these days.
I haven't been in the arcade for years. But when I am next in Inverness
I'll go and look.
I'll be surprised if there is because most villages here, and some
towns, no longer have cop shops at all.
Anne B
How on earth did he remember that nugget? That was in 1982.

Sincerely Chris

Serena Blanchflower
2019-09-30 09:32:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Is there still a telephone-box-sized cop-shop in a shopping arcade in
Inverness?
What an original tardis?
--
Best wishes, Serena
Illness is neither an indulgence for which people have to pay, nor an
offence for which they should be penalised, but a misfortune, the cost
of which should be shared by the community. (Aneurin Bevan)
Anne B
2019-09-29 11:41:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by John Ashby
Too northern?
I'm not sure that, as a Londoner, (well, a Sunbury-on-Thamesoner) I
had a concept of what The North might be. Manchester was a long, long
way off: far too far to go there.
Now I live in Huddersfield, about 35mts away from Manchester by train
but I hardly ever go there: it's far too far.
I'm a Sarf Londoner (born and bred in Brixton), and always thought that
north of the river was north enough, an opinion still held by our
neighbours who once actually got their car serviced before venturing to
Hampstead.
And then I started working in Scotland, and took a show up to Wick and
Thurso, and realised that Inverness is astonishingly far south.
<beam>

Anne B
Anne B
2019-09-29 11:39:41 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated
usually
with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
Nick
Too northern?
john
Too southern, ackshly.

Anne B
Penny
2019-09-27 18:55:37 UTC
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On Fri, 27 Sep 2019 13:39:32 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
We all had radios in our bedrooms - a benefit of the radiogram fashion, all
the old sets ended up at the jumble sales we frequented and could be had
for pennies. I also acquired a huge wind-up gramophone so I didn't have to
wrestle the lily horn model (another jumble sale find along with a stack of
78s, largely music hall songs) away from my brothers in order to listen to
Billy Williams, the man in the velvet suit.

I didn't really like the Clitheroe Kid, it was all very foreign to me, but
I listened to it anyway in an effort to understand other cultures.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-09-28 00:00:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 27 Sep 2019 13:39:32 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Mike
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Finlay
Didn't you listen to The Navy Lark at 2pm, which alternated usually with
Beyond Our Ken or Round the Horne?
Yes.
My gran lived next door and my cousin did too and I'd go to her room
and we'd listen to A Life of Bliss. I liked The Navy Lark too and
Educating Archie.
I like The Navy Lark in those days, too, although I preferred Round The
Horne.
I listened to an episode of TNL on R4x a couple of years ago and it was
dire, I thought. Thin, incredibly slow and stretched out and just not
very funny. Never go back, eh?
The Sunday lunchtime Home Service period was the highlight of the week
for me. Beyond our Ken and Round the Horne would possibly stand up (Ooh,
Mr 'Orne!)today but TNL was definitely of it's time, as was the
Clitheroe Kid. Didn't Ken Dodd have a programme around that time as well?
Steve
Yes, ISTR the Den Kodd show too; tickling stick and Diddymen etc.
Oh, yes. I couldn't stand him, even when I was quite young. Fortunately
no-one else at home could stand him either, so it was a sort of contest
who could get to the off switch fastest when he appeared.
Anne B
The Clitheroe Kid had that effect on me.
I -erme- wasn't allowed to like The Clitherow Kid or Ken Dodd or Al
Read or several other similar shows. My parents wielded the 50s
equivalent of the remote control (the "Off" switch) without mercy.
We all had radios in our bedrooms - a benefit of the radiogram fashion, all
the old sets ended up at the jumble sales we frequented and could be had
for pennies. I also acquired a huge wind-up gramophone so I didn't have to
wrestle the lily horn model (another jumble sale find along with a stack of
78s, largely music hall songs) away from my brothers in order to listen to
Billy Williams, the man in the velvet suit.
I didn't really like the Clitheroe Kid, it was all very foreign to me, but
I listened to it anyway in an effort to understand other cultures.
After a bit of Googling I see some of those shows continued well past
the fifties and sixties but I must say I wasn't really aware of them
then having grown into other things.

My first radio was a crystal set with an aerial that stretched to the
top of a pole at the far end of the garden. That aerial continued to
come in useful when I had my first valve radio - a battery-powered job
built for me by the local dentist and housed in a little fibre
suitcase like those "spy" radios that featured in war films of the
day. That's where I discovered evening programmes like Hancock's Half
Hour and The Goon Show but the Saturday and Sunday lunchtime
programmes were definitely under the control of the parents.

Nick
Clive Arthur
2019-09-22 11:58:32 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
<snip>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Dark_Tea-Time_of_the_Soul

"In the end, it was the Sunday afternoons he couldn't cope with, and
that terrible listlessness which starts to set in at about 2:55, when
you know that you've had all the baths you can usefully have that day,
that however hard you stare at any given paragraph in the papers you
will never actually read it, or use the revolutionary new pruning
technique it describes, and that as you stare at the clock the hands
will move relentlessly on to four o'clock, and you will enter the long
dark teatime of the soul."

Cheers
--
Clive
Mike
2019-09-22 12:48:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike
As a child, I don’t think I ever enjoyed rainy days - a Sunday afternoon,
first listening to The Billy Cotton Bandshow and 2/3 way family favourites
whilst helping lunch preparation by stirring the gravy and preparing
vegetables would culminate in a family roast dinner followed by .... well
what? Nothing much after lunch really if it was raining, indoor play was
not top of the list, I wanted to fly my kite, I wanted to play with my
catapulted rocket that would open its’ parachute as its’ ascent slowed and
then float to the ground, friends weren’t outside to play with either.
There was just the drizzle of rain on the windows and in colder months,
condensation on the inside of the windows from the boiled cabbage...
<snip>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Dark_Tea-Time_of_the_Soul
"In the end, it was the Sunday afternoons he couldn't cope with, and
that terrible listlessness which starts to set in at about 2:55, when
you know that you've had all the baths you can usefully have that day,
that however hard you stare at any given paragraph in the papers you
will never actually read it, or use the revolutionary new pruning
technique it describes, and that as you stare at the clock the hands
will move relentlessly on to four o'clock, and you will enter the long
dark teatime of the soul."
Cheers
And as Tony Hancock would have it, ‘yes.......20 years......long time...’.
--
Toodle Pip
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