Discussion:
Ask EU: Blackberry connectivity
Add Reply
BrritSki
2020-06-29 12:46:26 UTC
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Permalink
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ? I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.

The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in a
remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?

She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he could
think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character, not a
breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE a breed
from Livorno (formerly Legorno). Please note this is NOT a F'r'Us
opening :)

[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order, singing
and Canada generally....
the Omrud
2020-06-29 16:01:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in a
remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he could
think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character, not a
breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE a breed
from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a F'r'Us
opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order, singing
and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road. This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry. This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all. I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.

They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.

So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.

I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
--
David
BrritSki
2020-06-29 16:05:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in
a remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he
could think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character,
not a breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE
a breed from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a
F'r'Us opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order,
singing and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road.  This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry.  This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all.  I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
Yes, I knew about the keyboard and the connectivity is exactly what I
thought too....
Mike
2020-06-29 16:08:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in a
remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he could
think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character, not a
breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE a breed
from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a F'r'Us
opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order, singing
and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road. This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry. This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all. I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
--
Toodle Pip
the Omrud
2020-06-29 16:12:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in a
remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he could
think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character, not a
breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE a breed
from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a F'r'Us
opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order, singing
and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road. This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry. This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all. I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
--
David
BrritSki
2020-06-29 16:19:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
Mike
2020-06-29 16:37:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
Well, someone must have passed it!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-06-30 07:32:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
Well, someone must have passed it!
<BZZZT> Repetition !
Mike
2020-06-30 09:58:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
Well, someone must have passed it!
<BZZZT> Repetition !
Are you proposing that as an e-motion?
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-29 20:15:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
I heard that coconut shells were good for horses.

Cheaper too.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-06-29 20:38:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
I read somewhere recently about a recipe that called for defecated
coconut. I think I'll pass on that one....
I have always called it desecrated coconut
Mike
2020-06-29 16:36:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in a
remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he could
think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character, not a
breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE a breed
from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a F'r'Us
opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order, singing
and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road. This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry. This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all. I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
Unless you preserved or froze them, shirley those blackberries will be a
bit mouldy by now?
I think they're now fully dessicated.
[Mode=Leslie Philips] Ooh..... narsty!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-29 19:37:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
[]
Post by the Omrud
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
[]
Yes; this
will tell you
which network to try it on.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

/Downton Abbey/ presented a version of the past that appealed to anyone who
had ever bought a National Trust tea towel. - Alison Graham, RT 2015/11/7-13
the Omrud
2020-07-01 16:29:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
[]
Post by the Omrud
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
[]
Yes; this http://youtu.be/kAG39jKi0lI will tell you
which network to try it on.
But do I need a Woofer?
--
David
BrritSki
2020-07-01 19:13:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify
how those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I
assume
[]
Post by the Omrud
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
[]
Yes; this http://youtu.be/kAG39jKi0lI will tell you
which network to try it on.
But do I need a Woofer?
No, you need a bag on your head....
Mike Ruddock
2020-06-30 07:41:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in
a remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he
could think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character,
not a breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE
a breed from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a
F'r'Us opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order,
singing and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road.  This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry.  This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all.  I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.

Mike Ruddock
BrritSki
2020-06-30 09:09:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.
<LW>
Chris McMillan
2020-06-30 11:46:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by the Omrud
Post by BrritSki
I have never owned a Blackberry, but could somerat please clarify how
those devices connected to the Blackberry servers please ?  I assume
they used the mobile phone network somehow, but maybe they had some
other wireless way of connecting for their push messaging. Google is
uninformative.
The reason for asking is that the Gamache story I am reading (The
Beautiful Mystery - no spoilers) is not set in Three Pines [1] but in
a remote Monastery where their only means of communication is their
Blackberries and the landline. Seems unlikely to me, so I wonder if
she's got it wrong ?
She certainly has something else wrong - at a certain point Armand is
discussing chickens and she says something like "the only thing he
could think of was Foghorn Leghorn, but the was a cartoon character,
not a breed" which is correct up to a point, as Leghorns certainly ARE
a breed from Livorno (formerly Legorno).  Please note this is NOT a
F'r'Us opening :)
[1] I am missing the "usual suspects" from 3P, but it's an interesting
story, and I'm learning a lot about an exitinct monastic order,
singing and Canada generally....
Blackberry was a mobile phone. The difference lay in the operating
system, which was very useful in business, providing early access to
email and calendar while on the road.  This was enabled by the use of a
Blackberry Enterprise Server which mediated between the corporate mail
service and the Blackberry.  This also made them very secure at a time
when ordinary phones had no security at all.  I rolled out many
thousands in the UK for our staff and ran a pair of BES to manage them.
They also had a real physical keyboard when other phones only had 0-9
keys which made typing anything more than a few words a job only
suitable for a teenager.
So if you had a Nokia at the time, it connected to the outside world in
the same way.
I still have a couple of them here but I haven't charged them for many
years.
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.
Mike Ruddock
:)

Sincerely Chris
the Omrud
2020-07-01 16:31:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.
Mike Ruddock
Thanks all. I've been semi-lurking, but I have been rather busy. Still
am, but there seems to be a little spare time at the moment for some reason.
--
David
the Omrud
2020-07-02 10:05:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.
Mike Ruddock
Thanks all.  I've been semi-lurking, but I have been rather busy.  Still
am, but there seems to be a little spare time at the moment for some reason.
I discovered that having retired, I'm no longer paid to sit at a desk
looking at a computer for most of the day on three or four days per week
(the other days were travelling or meetings in Manchester). When I was
doing that, at home which is where I worked for the last 20 years before
I retired, I only had to turn by 20 degrees to my left to see my own
PC's screen, where you lot would scroll by all day.

I am far less often in front of my screen, and usually with a task to
perform. And Usenet is hopeless on Android.

Anyway, I'll be around
--
David
Mike Ruddock
2020-07-02 10:23:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Mike Ruddock
I know nothing of the device to which you refer, but would like to
welcome The Omrud (David, I think) back. You have been away a long time.
Mike Ruddock
Thanks all.  I've been semi-lurking, but I have been rather busy.
Still am, but there seems to be a little spare time at the moment for
some reason.
I discovered that having retired, I'm no longer paid to sit at a desk
looking at a computer for most of the day on three or four days per week
(the other days were travelling or meetings in Manchester).  When I was
doing that, at home which is where I worked for the last 20 years before
I retired, I only had to turn by 20 degrees to my left to see my own
PC's screen, where you lot would scroll by all day.
I am far less often in front of my screen, and usually with a task to
perform.  And Usenet is hopeless on Android.
Anyway, I'll be around
Good.

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2020-07-02 12:01:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 2 Jul 2020 11:23:56 +0100, Mike Ruddock <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
I discovered that having retired, I'm no longer paid to sit at a desk
looking at a computer for most of the day on three or four days per week
(the other days were travelling or meetings in Manchester).  When I was
doing that, at home which is where I worked for the last 20 years before
I retired, I only had to turn by 20 degrees to my left to see my own
PC's screen, where you lot would scroll by all day.
I am far less often in front of my screen, and usually with a task to
perform.  And Usenet is hopeless on Android.
Anyway, I'll be around
Good.
+1
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
the Omrud
2020-07-02 15:21:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
I discovered that having retired, I'm no longer paid to sit at a desk
looking at a computer for most of the day on three or four days per week
(the other days were travelling or meetings in Manchester).  When I was
doing that, at home which is where I worked for the last 20 years before
I retired, I only had to turn by 20 degrees to my left to see my own
PC's screen, where you lot would scroll by all day.
I am far less often in front of my screen, and usually with a task to
perform.  And Usenet is hopeless on Android.
Anyway, I'll be around
Good.
+1
<grin>
--
David
DavidK
2020-07-03 16:32:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Jenny M Benson
2020-07-03 17:50:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Ooh, that's clever! Never thought to investigate those numbers before.
They work fine, here.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2020-07-03 18:23:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jul 2020 17:32:58 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Numbers?
I see
References: <***@mid.individual.net> <rdd39f$emo$***@dont-email.me>
<***@mid.individual.net> <rdidob$pfr$***@dont-email.me>
<rdkbhh$i8h$***@dont-email.me> <***@mid.individual.net>
<***@4ax.com> <rdku1u$92i$***@dont-email.me>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2020-07-03 19:04:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Numbers?
I see
Numbers for me, with the most recent one a "proper" message identifier.
The links back work. Like DavidK I am using Thunderbird on Linux, unlike
him I am on version 69.9.0 instead of his 52.9.1.

Moral of the story: keep your software up to date. I'd worry about
security with a TB that old.

john
Penny
2020-07-03 22:31:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Jul 2020 20:04:00 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Numbers?
I see
Numbers for me, with the most recent one a "proper" message identifier.
The links back work. Like DavidK I am using Thunderbird on Linux, unlike
him I am on version 69.9.0 instead of his 52.9.1.
Moral of the story: keep your software up to date. I'd worry about
security with a TB that old.
Mine work as message IDs too, I can jump back to earlier messages in this
thread by clicking on them. But I'm using a truly ancient version of Agent.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2020-07-04 09:02:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
If I look at the post to which this is a reply (in Thunderbird) there is
a field called 'References' with some colored numbers against it.
Experiment with a saved copy of a message shows that they are links to
the previous messages on the thread but clicking on one just gives me a
blank message. Does it show the linked message for anyrat?
Numbers?
I see
Numbers for me, with the most recent one a "proper" message identifier.
The links back work. Like DavidK I am using Thunderbird on Linux, unlike
him I am on version 69.9.0 instead of his 52.9.1.
Moral of the story: keep your software up to date. I'd worry about
security with a TB that old.
Mine work as message IDs too, I can jump back to earlier messages in this
thread by clicking on them. But I'm using a truly ancient version of Agent.
My experience was initially like David's. I see the numbers (underlined)
and a little chevron which if I click it expands the numbers into these
reference email-type addresses. Clicking on any of the antecedents to
David's post produced a blank - until I realised that I had set TB to
only show Unread messages. When I set it to 'All', all those links came
to life. So perhaps the references can only open if they are actually
currently visible on the message list?
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2020-07-04 09:11:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 4 Jul 2020 10:02:40 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
My experience was initially like David's. I see the numbers (underlined)
and a little chevron which if I click it expands the numbers into these
reference email-type addresses. Clicking on any of the antecedents to
David's post produced a blank - until I realised that I had set TB to
only show Unread messages. When I set it to 'All', all those links came
to life. So perhaps the references can only open if they are actually
currently visible on the message list?
Not the case in Agent, it reopened posts already marked as read - which is
what the global search does, so this may be down to the setting I use
there.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
DavidK
2020-07-05 20:58:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
My experience was initially like David's. I see the numbers (underlined)
and a little chevron which if I click it expands the numbers into these
reference email-type addresses. Clicking on any of the antecedents to
David's post produced a blank - until I realised that I had set TB to
only show Unread messages. When I set it to 'All', all those links came
to life. So perhaps the references can only open if they are actually
currently visible on the message list?
Thank you. Same with me. I had naively assumed that it would show the
message if I clicked on the link even if I had previously said only show
unread messages. Maybe I'll upgrade but I get fed up of Mozilla add-ons
stopping working after an upgrade.

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