Discussion:
OT: It's not just we Brits, then
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Jenny M Benson
2020-03-25 09:54:01 UTC
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Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.

Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart both
adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk bottle
tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did people in one
country hear of people doing it in the other and follow suit? EMNTK.
(Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-25 10:02:12 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart both
adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk bottle
tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did people in one
country hear of people doing it in the other and follow suit?  EMNTK.
(Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
I think I've heard stories of it happening in Oz, as well. In fact one
theory doing the rounds is that the panic started with pictures on the
internet of Australian supermarket shelves bereft of loo roll. It
doesn't help that a lot of memes travel rapidly around the world, having
been stripped of any context so that, if you see a picture of bare
shelves, there's nothing to tell you whether this is local, or relevant,
to you or if it's somewhere in a different continent (or even a
different decade) and under different circumstances.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do
better. (Maya Angelou)
steve hague
2020-03-25 12:07:22 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and follow
suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
I think I've heard stories of it happening in Oz, as well.  In fact one
theory doing the rounds is that the panic started with pictures on the
internet of Australian supermarket shelves bereft of loo roll.  It
doesn't help that a lot of memes travel rapidly around the world, having
been stripped of any context so that, if you see a picture of bare
shelves, there's nothing to tell you whether this is local, or relevant,
to you or if it's somewhere in a different continent (or even a
different decade) and under different circumstances.
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Steve
Jenny M Benson
2020-03-25 12:50:01 UTC
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Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day. I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!

(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Mike
2020-03-25 14:07:44 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day. I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Cooh! I have pressed that ‘button’ each time I have visited their site but
they still haven’t offered me any slots...
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-25 16:18:10 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 at 12:50:01, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
wrote:
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Nor do I (think of you as elderly); you're just you!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You'll need to have this fish in your ear. (First series, fit the first.)
Mike
2020-03-25 16:27:55 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Nor do I (think of you as elderly); you're just you!
All Umrats are the age they were at the BBQ’s in Reading a ‘little while
ago’;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-25 16:46:38 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Nor do I (think of you as elderly); you're just you!
All Umrats are the age they were at the BBQ’s in Reading a ‘little while
ago’;-)))
You may say that in jest, but in most cases, it's true for me - that is
indeed how I think of mostrats I met there!

And the ones I didn't meet (or did but have forgotten), I have an image
of them from how they post. Actually, not a physical image, but
definitely a personality one. Much like the characters in The Archers;
with the exception of ones where I've known the best friend before they
joined - which I don't think is the case for any of the regulars - I
_don't_ have a physical image of them, which subsequently seeing
pictures of them doesn't change (though sometimes I think "xxx doesn't
look like that). I do have _some_ idea for some characters - I think of
Clarrie as big and cuddly, for example; but I've never had any feel for
whether she's dark or blonde. (And I suspect she's now grey anyway - as
are many of the main characters - but I don't think of them as such.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You'll need to have this fish in your ear. (First series, fit the first.)
krw
2020-03-25 23:15:03 UTC
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I think of Clarrie as big and cuddly,
That will be the wood pigeons.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-03-26 08:38:34 UTC
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Post by krw
I think of Clarrie as big and cuddly,
That will be the wood pigeons.
Brace yourself...
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-03-26 12:17:16 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by krw
I think of Clarrie as big and cuddly,
That will be the wood pigeons.
Brace yourself...
Now now, no squabbling

R
Anne B
2020-03-25 17:32:12 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Nor do I (think of you as elderly); you're just you!
All Umrats are the age they were at the BBQ’s in Reading a ‘little while
ago’;-)))
That means my age is 0.

Anne B
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-03-25 17:36:35 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 at 12:50:01, Jenny M Benson
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Nor do I (think of you as elderly); you're just you!
All Umrats are the age they were at the BBQ’s in Reading a ‘little while
ago’;-)))
Wooo! I am eternally 46 on Umra!

R
steve hague
2020-03-25 16:29:13 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of
Redruth look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day.  I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
Steve
Anne B
2020-03-25 17:32:49 UTC
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Post by steve hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of
Redruth look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in
and because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for
the next day.  I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report
back if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was
neither!
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
Steve
+1

Anne B
Clive Arthur
2020-03-25 18:03:15 UTC
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Post by steve hague
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
Steve
I had it brought home to me some years back when talking to a youngish
engineer at work, and he opined that it must have been really special to
be alive during the first moon landing. It hadn't occurred to me that
there are adults who weren't.

[Same bloke explained how vinyl records work as if they were some
historical artefact. I was once a BBC radio studio technician.]
--
Cheers
Clive
Chris J Dixon
2020-03-25 19:09:14 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steve hague
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
I had it brought home to me some years back when talking to a youngish
engineer at work, and he opined that it must have been really special to
be alive during the first moon landing. It hadn't occurred to me that
there are adults who weren't.
[Same bloke explained how vinyl records work as if they were some
historical artefact. I was once a BBC radio studio technician.]
As I'm sure I have mentioned before, about 30 years ago a student
was in the office when, for some reason, the subject of Jeeps
came up. When I said that I knew little about them, he asked how
I had avoided National Service. :-(

OTOH, whilst watching a programme (long since forgotten) about
the dawning of the 20th century, the realisation dawned that my
birth was significantly closer to that moment than the present
day.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-03-25 20:39:27 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steve hague
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
I had it brought home to me some years back when talking to a youngish
engineer at work, and he opined that it must have been really special to
be alive during the first moon landing. It hadn't occurred to me that
there are adults who weren't.
[Same bloke explained how vinyl records work as if they were some
historical artefact. I was once a BBC radio studio technician.]
As I'm sure I have mentioned before, about 30 years ago a student was in
the office when, for some reason, the subject of Jeeps came up. When I
said that I knew little about them, he asked how I had avoided National
Service. :-(
OTOH, whilst watching a programme (long since forgotten) about the
dawning of the 20th century, the realisation dawned that my birth was
significantly closer to that moment than the present day.
My daughter will be 40 in a few weeks. That means the day of her birth
will be as close to the evacuation of Dunkirk as to the present day.

R
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-25 22:26:14 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steve hague
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
Steve
I had it brought home to me some years back when talking to a youngish
engineer at work, and he opined that it must have been really special to
be alive during the first moon landing. It hadn't occurred to me that
there are adults who weren't.
When son was little we had a babysitter who was watching a film of the Gary
Powers/U2 incident when we got back. I said something along the lines of,
well, at least you know how it ends, and she said she hadn't been born
then. I felt very old.
I once described some of the problems we had to overcome to support the
navy during the Falklands war, to a young-ish co worker.
I thought he gave me an odd look, and he pointed out that he'd been 2
years old at that time.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike Headon
2020-03-26 11:53:42 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steve hague
I still do a sort of mental double- take when I realise I'm an OAP. I
don't feel elderly or vulnerable.
Steve
I had it brought home to me some years back when talking to a youngish
engineer at work, and he opined that it must have been really special to
be alive during the first moon landing.  It hadn't occurred to me that
there are adults who weren't.
When son was little we had a babysitter who was watching a film of the Gary
Powers/U2 incident when we got back. I said something along the lines of,
well, at least you know how it ends, and she said she hadn't been born
then. I felt very old.
I once described some of the problems we had to overcome to support the
navy during the Falklands war, to a young-ish co worker.
I thought he gave me an odd look, and he pointed out that he'd been 2
years old at that time.
I had a young colleague from Pakistan. I asked him if he remembered the
India-Pakistan war of 1972. He was not born until 76!
--
Mike Headon
R69S R850R
IIIc IIIg FT FTn FT2 EOS450D
e-mail: mike dot headon at enn tee ell world dot com
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Anne B
2020-03-25 17:31:39 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of
Redruth look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day.  I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Me neither, with a 'little brother' who turned 71 yesterday.

And I now understand why disabled people dislike the term 'the disabled'
so much. 'The elderly' makes me cringe.

Anne B
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-26 02:40:36 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 at 17:31:39, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Anne B
And I now understand why disabled people dislike the term 'the
disabled' so much. 'The elderly' makes me cringe.
Anne B
What term _do_ you prefer? (Genuine question.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat itself.
Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat themselves." "By
exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have to be aboard a train
loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been taken over by terrorists, and
were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?" "Exactly." "Understood."
steveski
2020-03-26 03:01:22 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat
itself. Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat
themselves." "By exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have
to be aboard a train loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been
taken over by terrorists, and were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?"
"Exactly." "Understood."
I loved 'Due South' and that was my favourite scene when the Mounties
woke up in *exactly* the same place.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2020-03-26 07:54:48 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat
itself. Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat
themselves." "By exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have
to be aboard a train loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been
taken over by terrorists, and were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?"
"Exactly." "Understood."
I loved 'Due South' and that was my favourite scene when the Mounties
woke up in *exactly* the same place.
I loved Due South, too. I miss Diefenbaker even now.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Anne B
2020-03-26 17:15:36 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Anne B
And I now understand why disabled people dislike the term 'the
disabled' so much. 'The elderly' makes me cringe.
Anne B
What term _do_ you prefer? (Genuine question.)
.
Fair question.

'Disabled people' and 'elderly people' respectively. Emphasis on the
people, not the adjective.

Anne B
Penny
2020-03-26 18:06:41 UTC
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2020 17:15:36 +0000, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Anne B
And I now understand why disabled people dislike the term 'the
disabled' so much. 'The elderly' makes me cringe.
Anne B
What term _do_ you prefer? (Genuine question.)
.
Fair question.
'Disabled people' and 'elderly people' respectively. Emphasis on the
people, not the adjective.
'Seniors' is used elsewhere in the world. It's ok I suppose but does make
me think of pupils in their last 4 years of school.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Min
2020-03-26 19:17:01 UTC
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Post by Penny
but does make
me think of pupils in their last 4 years of school.
I *think* you can be locked up for that...
--
Min
Nick Odell
2020-03-27 20:06:12 UTC
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2020 12:17:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Penny
but does make
me think of pupils in their last 4 years of school.
I *think* you can be locked up for that...
BTN!

N.

Anne B
2020-03-27 00:15:37 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Anne B
And I now understand why disabled people dislike the term 'the
disabled' so much. 'The elderly' makes me cringe.
Anne B
What term _do_ you prefer? (Genuine question.)
.
Fair question.
'Disabled people' and 'elderly people' respectively. Emphasis on the
people, not the adjective.
'Seniors' is used elsewhere in the world. It's ok I suppose but does make
me think of pupils in their last 4 years of school.
That is just as objectionable; it's using an adjective as if it were a
noun to anonymise the people so described and lump them all together.
'Senior citizen' is fine; emphasis on the citizen, not the seniorness.

My school uses the word 'Senior' to indicate former pupils.

Anne B
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-25 22:21:27 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
I was quite deeply shocked when I discovered that being 70 made me
"vulnerable". It was completely at odds with my own view of myself.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Withey
2020-03-26 09:40:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 12:50:01 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day. I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!
That's how it worked for me. Not ask for proof of age or vulnerabilty.
Like you I wondered whether the drivers would be reporting back. Not
that would be a problem here <g>

Received an email this morning - items that were in stock when I
placed the order were now out of stock. I'll wait and see what arrives
this afternoon then try and reorder.
--
Pete
Chris McMillan
2020-03-26 12:42:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by steve hague
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Iceland just asked "Are you elderly or vulnerable?" when I logged in and
because I said I was (1) promptly offered me a delivery slot for the
next day. I did wonder if their drivers were instructed to report back
if they suspected they had just delivered to someone who was neither!
(1) I never think of myself as elderly, but I am 75!
Still waiting.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-25 13:45:38 UTC
Reply
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 12:07:22 +0000, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Ju
Our local Tesco have introduced an hour (9-10am) on three days in the
week for the elderly and vulnerable to do their shopping. I was
surprised this morning how many of the elderly and vulnerable of Redruth
look so young and fit. Must be something in the air.
Steve
Sainsburys have 8-9 M/W/F and NHS from 7.30 every day. Because Tescos
omitted a large part of my order last night I went to the carpark at
7,45 and ther was a long queue then of OAPs with trolleys waiting to
go in, being let in one out, one in. To keep distance. It stretched a
long way and not all left big enough spaces. I was told they'd let in
several at 8 so 5 minutes before when a few went in I did, having
waited at the side, not close. I did wonder if I'd be shouted at as a
queue jumper, but if I had queued up at the end and waited I'd not
have been able to go round to shop.

Got in about 7.55 and did large shop of everything nuggering Tescos
didn't bring last night. They had all the things Tescos left out, more
or less. I did want enough sausage rolls for the week's breakfasts for
B, so as not to go again, but was scared to take more than 3 and got a
couple of breakfast muffins, which cost more, but he likes. They had
milk and veg and fruit, unlike Tescos last night. No frozen berries
though.

The checkouts didn't have queues as far as I saw. I went to one where
the last customer was paying and so was able to keep distance and load
my stuff onto the belt. The checkout person asked if she could start
to check through while I was still doing this which made me feel
rushed even though nobody else was waiting which added more stress.

The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons But did I get the things Tescos didn't
deliver. In an order booked 2 weeks ago. And amended each time they
said stuff not available. The delivery person is the picker too and
said the place was lacking in lots when he went to get my shopping. I
wonder if it was because I get an 8-9pm delivery?

I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that?? Should all this not die down soon and shopping get less
frenzied?
krw
2020-03-25 13:56:29 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Should all this not die down soon and shopping get less
frenzied?
Hopefully.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Clive Arthur
2020-03-25 13:57:26 UTC
Reply
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On 25/03/2020 13:45, Vicky Ayech wrote:
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that??
Tesco don't sell skimmed milk now...

https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/24/tesco-12451170/
--
Cheers
Clive
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-25 17:26:32 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 13:57:26 +0000, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that??
Tesco don't sell skimmed milk now...
https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/24/tesco-12451170/
I have used skimmed for years and if for cereal don't like semi or
full. I usually use my litre for coffee anyway. I don't often have
milk oncereal. Porridge made with water and just cinnamon and sweetner
on it. Sainsburys had skimmed today and full cream.Tescos didn't send
any full cream either, which was for B
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-25 17:29:02 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 13:57:26 +0000, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that??
Tesco don't sell skimmed milk now...
https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/24/tesco-12451170/
some products have gone back to their pre-promotion prices. We are
working tirelessly with our suppliers to maintain supply and keep
stores stocked.’

They mean they put the prices up.Profiteering
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-25 14:28:02 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that?? Should all this not die down soon and shopping get less
frenzied?
That's something which often annoys me, as well. I've found it's always
worth checking my order as late as possible, the day before it's due,
mostly to see if there's anything out of stock, so I can choose my own
substitutions. It also means that I can revert any substitutions I'd
previously had to make, if my original preference is now back in stock.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The 'good life' begins when you stop wanting a better one (Nkosiphambili
E. Molapis)
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-25 17:31:52 UTC
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 14:28:02 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
That's something which often annoys me, as well. I've found it's always
worth checking my order as late as possible, the day before it's due,
mostly to see if there's anything out of stock, so I can choose my own
substitutions. It also means that I can revert any substitutions I'd
previously had to make, if my original preference is now back in stock.
I did reverse some that were apparently back in stock but they were
not when the order arrived.
Kate B
2020-03-25 23:38:30 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that??  Should all this not die down soon and shopping get less
frenzied?
That's something which often annoys me, as well.  I've found it's always
worth checking my order as late as possible, the day before it's due,
mostly to see if there's anything out of stock, so I can choose my own
substitutions.  It also means that I can revert any substitutions I'd
previously had to make, if my original preference is now back in stock.
Gosh, I'm glad I just read that and went straight into tomorrow's Tesco
order. They have run out of nearly all their dairy stuff, it's bizarre!
But I managed to get most of it in more expensive brands :(

Does anyone know what it means when the price suddenly appears as £0.00
even though it doesn't say 'out of stock'? I suppose I shall find out
tomorrow...
--
Kate B
London
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-25 23:51:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
That's something which often annoys me, as well.  I've found it's
always worth checking my order as late as possible, the day before
it's due, mostly to see if there's anything out of stock, so I can
choose my own substitutions.  It also means that I can revert any
substitutions I'd previously had to make, if my original preference is
now back in stock.
Gosh, I'm glad I just read that and went straight into tomorrow's Tesco
order. They have run out of nearly all their dairy stuff, it's bizarre!
But I managed to get most of it in more expensive brands :(
It isn't unknown to do that and then, when your order arrives you find
the replacement brand is now out of stock and they've substituted it
with the version you originally wanted! I've had this happen quite often.
Post by Kate B
Does anyone know what it means when the price suddenly appears as £0.00
even though it doesn't say 'out of stock'? I suppose I shall find out
tomorrow...
No, I'm not sure I've come across that.
--
Best wishes, Serena
People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day. (A.A. Milne)
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-26 08:57:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
I checked the delivery ordered for 7/4 from Tescos and it already says
no half litre of skimmed milk. How can they know now they will be out
of that??  Should all this not die down soon and shopping get less
frenzied?
That's something which often annoys me, as well.  I've found it's always
worth checking my order as late as possible, the day before it's due,
mostly to see if there's anything out of stock, so I can choose my own
substitutions.  It also means that I can revert any substitutions I'd
previously had to make, if my original preference is now back in stock.
Gosh, I'm glad I just read that and went straight into tomorrow's Tesco
order. They have run out of nearly all their dairy stuff, it's bizarre!
But I managed to get most of it in more expensive brands :(
Does anyone know what it means when the price suddenly appears as £0.00
even though it doesn't say 'out of stock'? I suppose I shall find out
tomorrow...
I will be interested in whether you get the subs. I substituted items
that were supposedly available but got no milk at all. And no veg.
Jenny M Benson
2020-03-26 10:28:31 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I will be interested in whether you get the subs. I substituted items
that were supposedly available but got no milk at all. And no veg.
When Asda delivered my order on Monday night the driver said it was the
first time for a week that he'd delivered any milk.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-25 16:29:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 at 13:45:38, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
The checkouts didn't have queues as far as I saw. I went to one where
the last customer was paying and so was able to keep distance and load
my stuff onto the belt. The checkout person asked if she could start
to check through while I was still doing this which made me feel
rushed even though nobody else was waiting which added more stress.
Yes, that bothers me too - especially if there's no-one behind. Even if
there is and they go _too_ fast, I point out - I hope politely - that if
they go faster than I can pack, I'll still hold them up.

(There was the principle of one beeper/beepeuse being able to feed two
"chutes", with a hinged divider bar which she was supposed to swing over
so the next person's shopping went down the other chute, while the first
was still finishing their packing. That worked fine in Germany even in
the 1960s. In many UK stores - where obviously it had been thought of -
I saw the operators using their end of the divider to hang things on
[usually carrier bags], which meant it couldn't be moved. It then
disappeared. I think I saw it back and even being used somewhere in UK
in the last year, but it's certainly not the norm.)
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You'll need to have this fish in your ear. (First series, fit the first.)
Mike
2020-03-25 16:49:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(There was the principle of one beeper/beepeuse being able to feed two
"chutes", with a hinged divider bar which she was supposed to swing over
so the next person's shopping went down the other chute, while the first
was still finishing their packing. That worked fine in Germany even in
the 1960s. In many UK stores - where obviously it had been thought of -
I saw the operators using their end of the divider to hang things on
[usually carrier bags], which meant it couldn't be moved.
...divided we fall...
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-25 16:58:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons  But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
If it was the reference to Vicky being out of spoons which you didn't
understand, it was a reference to Spoon Theory, in which spoons are used
as a metaphor for energy, amongst people with chronic health problems.

If you're interested, you can read more at
<https://www.healthline.com/health/spoon-theory-chronic-illness-explained-like-never-before#2>.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Dreaming, I dreamt that life was all joy. Waking, I found that life
demands service. Serving, I found that joy is in service.
(Rabindranath Tagore)
Min
2020-03-26 00:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons  But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
If it was the reference to Vicky being out of spoons which you didn't
understand, it was a reference to Spoon Theory, in which spoons are used
as a metaphor for energy, amongst people with chronic health problems.
If you're interested, you can read more at
<https://www.healthline.com/health/spoon-theory-chronic-illness-explained-like-never-before#2>.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Dreaming, I dreamt that life was all joy. Waking, I found that life
demands service. Serving, I found that joy is in service.
(Rabindranath Tagore)
Should have read down. Wot Serena said, JPG - and much better than I did!
--
Min
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-25 17:33:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 16:29:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
[]
https://www.healthline.com/health/spoon-theory-chronic-illness-explained-like-never-before#1
Penny
2020-03-25 23:37:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 16:29:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
The typo is 'because'.
The 'out of spoons' is spoon theory.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Min
2020-03-26 00:43:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
The checkouts didn't have queues as far as I saw. I went to one where
the last customer was paying and so was able to keep distance and load
my stuff onto the belt. The checkout person asked if she could start
to check through while I was still doing this which made me feel
rushed even though nobody else was waiting which added more stress.
Yes, that bothers me too - especially if there's no-one behind. Even if
there is and they go _too_ fast, I point out - I hope politely - that if
they go faster than I can pack, I'll still hold them up.
(There was the principle of one beeper/beepeuse being able to feed two
"chutes", with a hinged divider bar which she was supposed to swing over
so the next person's shopping went down the other chute, while the first
was still finishing their packing. That worked fine in Germany even in
the 1960s. In many UK stores - where obviously it had been thought of -
I saw the operators using their end of the divider to hang things on
[usually carrier bags], which meant it couldn't be moved. It then
disappeared. I think I saw it back and even being used somewhere in UK
in the last year, but it's certainly not the norm.)
Post by Vicky Ayech
The reason we have deliveries is beaue doing a full shop leaves me
very tired and out of spoons But did I get the things Tescos didn't
I haven't come across that expression before. Even if it was autocorrect
working, I can't think what you might have typed!
[]
--
You'll need to have this fish in your ear. (First series, fit the first.)
Google 'Out of spoons', JPG. It's a very good way of describing what life is
like with various autoimmune/neurological (and probably other) conditions.
--
Min
OzTony
2020-03-26 01:32:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think I've heard stories of it happening in Oz, as well. In fact one
theory doing the rounds is that the panic started with pictures on the
internet of Australian supermarket shelves bereft of loo roll. It
doesn't help that a lot of memes travel rapidly around the world, having
been stripped of any context so that, if you see a picture of bare
shelves, there's nothing to tell you whether this is local, or relevant,
to you or if it's somewhere in a different continent (or even a
different decade) and under different circumstances.
Yes, it was mad here last week: my local supermarket was stripped bare of toilet rolls, pasta, rice, flour, tinned vegetables and mince. Normality now seems to be returning but I'm minimising my number of shopping trips so don't know the latest.
Nick Odell
2020-03-26 18:32:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 18:32:27 -0700 (PDT), OzTony
Post by OzTony
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think I've heard stories of it happening in Oz, as well. In fact one
theory doing the rounds is that the panic started with pictures on the
internet of Australian supermarket shelves bereft of loo roll. It
doesn't help that a lot of memes travel rapidly around the world, having
been stripped of any context so that, if you see a picture of bare
shelves, there's nothing to tell you whether this is local, or relevant,
to you or if it's somewhere in a different continent (or even a
different decade) and under different circumstances.
Yes, it was mad here last week: my local supermarket was stripped bare of toilet rolls, pasta, rice, flour, tinned vegetables and mince. Normality now seems to be returning but I'm minimising my number of shopping trips so don't know the latest.
Take care of yourself, Tony. Are you still living in that same
apartment? My sister is living in Tasmania, near Cygnet and things
seem quieter in the shops by comparison with the mainland.
Unfortunately the Brave New Telecomms system rolled out across all
Australia doesn´t quite work where she is and there are times when she
is pretty well cut off.

Nick
Clive Arthur
2020-03-25 10:21:57 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
<snip>

It would seem so...

https://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/toilet-paper
--
Cheers
Clive
BrritSki
2020-03-25 10:50:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart both
adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk bottle
tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did people in one
country hear of people doing it in the other and follow suit?  EMNTK.
(Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?

That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
Kate B
2020-03-25 11:06:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and follow
suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?
That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
Morphic resonance. Rupert Sheldrake. Daft but amusing.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2009/feb/04/morphic-paranormal-science-sheldrake
--
Kate B
London
Anne B
2020-03-25 17:35:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and follow
suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?
That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
I don't think you should be accusing tits of idiocy for working out that
they can peck bottle tops.

Anne B
steve hague
2020-03-26 07:43:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and follow
suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?
That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
I don't think you should be accusing tits of idiocy for working out that
they can peck bottle tops.
Anne B
Around here, we had magpies doing it too. I thought all birds lacked the
enzymes to digest dairy products. Perhaps they just like the taste.
Steve
John Ashby
2020-03-26 08:02:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and
follow suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?
That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
 >
I don't think you should be accusing tits of idiocy for working out
that they can peck bottle tops.
Anne B
Around here, we had magpies doing it too. I thought all birds lacked the
enzymes to digest dairy products. Perhaps they just like the taste.
Steve
It was when the magpies started doing it that foil topped bottles became
regarded as dangerous. As magpies are carrion feeders there was the
possibility of their beaks passing on pathogens if they didn't wash
between meals.

One for sorrow,
two for grief,
three for misery,
four's no relief.

john
steve hague
2020-03-26 09:20:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by steve hague
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll
has been happening across the Pond, too.
Now, there's a word for when 2 populations thousands of miles apart
both adopt a new practice at the same time (like tits pecking milk
bottle tops, I believe) so is this another example of that or did
people in one country hear of people doing it in the other and
follow suit?  EMNTK. (Perhaps that should be OEMNTK!)
Convergent evolution ?
That's the 2 word answer, the 1 word answer is idiocy.
 >
I don't think you should be accusing tits of idiocy for working out
that they can peck bottle tops.
Anne B
Around here, we had magpies doing it too. I thought all birds lacked
the enzymes to digest dairy products. Perhaps they just like the taste.
Steve
It was when the magpies started doing it that foil topped bottles became
regarded as dangerous. As magpies are carrion feeders there was the
possibility of their beaks passing on pathogens if they didn't wash
between meals.
One for sorrow,
two for grief,
three for misery,
four's no relief.
john
I quite like magpies. Our cat doesn't though, he's terrified of them. He
won't go out when there are gulls around either.
Steve
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-03-25 13:20:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
Yes. Americans are obsessed with loo rolls in a way that we don't come
close to.

R
Mike
2020-03-25 14:08:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
Yes. Americans are obsessed with loo rolls in a way that we don't come
close to.
R
Crack squad?
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-25 22:34:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jenny M Benson
Judging by a couple of things said by Bill Gates in an open letter
forwarded to me by a friend yesterday, the panic buying of loo roll has
been happening across the Pond, too.
Yes. Americans are obsessed with loo rolls in a way that we don't come
close to.
The situation in the US is quite different.
Here 'we' panic buy loo rolls.
There they are panic buying loo rolls, guns and ammunition.

See? No comparison.
--
Sam Plusnet
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