Discussion:
Equinox
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Sid Nuncius
2021-09-21 18:02:06 UTC
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Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.

Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith
2021-09-21 18:41:07 UTC
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Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-22 06:08:47 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh! Typo. I meant Jeremiah 8:20.

"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."

Boy, do I feel like a fool.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-22 07:14:37 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh! Typo. I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Mine Dew, that sharing of wives around a bit, are we talking Ambridge?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-09-22 08:02:17 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:08:47 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh! Typo. I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Ah, that makes more sense.
I wandered around Jeramiah a bit, trying out possible typos. I did find
some unexpected dragons (are there many mentioned in these books?) but
nothing seemed to fit with your mood.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Well you can't have one!
We all make mastikes.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-22 08:12:24 UTC
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Post by Penny
Post by Sid Nuncius
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Well you can't have one!
We all make mastikes.
:o))
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith
2021-09-22 08:28:50 UTC
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Post by Penny
I wandered around Jeramiah a bit, trying out possible typos. I did find
some unexpected dragons (are there many mentioned in these books?) but
nothing seemed to fit with your mood.
So did I, but I didn't even notice any dragons.
Penny
2021-09-22 12:34:09 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 01:28:50 -0700 (PDT), Tony Smith
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Penny
I wandered around Jeramiah a bit, trying out possible typos. I did find
some unexpected dragons (are there many mentioned in these books?) but
nothing seemed to fit with your mood.
So did I, but I didn't even notice any dragons.
Your fung shui must be good :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2021-09-22 08:38:17 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh! Typo. I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Ah, that makes more sense.
I wandered around Jeramiah a bit, trying out possible typos. I did find
some unexpected dragons (are there many mentioned in these books?) but
nothing seemed to fit with your mood.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Well you can't have one!
We all make mastikes.
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!

Nick
Tony Smith
2021-09-22 09:02:33 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland "cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
steve hague
2021-09-22 09:38:56 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Nick Odell
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland "cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
The Message isn't so much a translation as a paraphrase/ commentary.
There are some beautiful passages. Matthew 11:28-30 is very good I love
the line "Learn from me the unforced rhythms of grace." A lot of it's
very American, but there's some good stuff in there.
Steve
Nick Odell
2021-09-22 13:39:02 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:38:56 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Nick Odell
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland "cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
The Message isn't so much a translation as a paraphrase/ commentary.
There are some beautiful passages. Matthew 11:28-30 is very good I love
the line "Learn from me the unforced rhythms of grace." A lot of it's
very American, but there's some good stuff in there.
My morning meanderings have been to look up stuff about modern(ish)
versions of the Bible and their origins and I was surprised at how
many claim to be genuine new translations from the original
Hebrew/Greek/Aramaic into up-to-date language. According to the
Wikipedia page on "The Message" it claims to be a new translation with
a host of scholars given attributions and I must admit that surprised
me.

My only Bible which doesn't claim to be a fresh translation from the
original languages is "Good News Australia." This is a rewrite of the
essentially American TEV/Good News for Modern Man/Good News Bible into
language that could be understood by Australians.


...so who is my mate, cobber?

Strewth! That's a toughie, Bruce. Put it this way, Bruce: a drover set
out from Back O'Bourke on the trail to Wooloomooloo when he gets
mugged by bushrangers....

(Sadly that's not what I found at Luke 10:25 - perhaps there's still a
gap in the market?)


Nick
Chris
2021-09-22 14:30:15 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:38:56 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Nick Odell
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland
"cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation.
I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message"
a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
The Message isn't so much a translation as a paraphrase/ commentary.
There are some beautiful passages. Matthew 11:28-30 is very good I love
the line "Learn from me the unforced rhythms of grace." A lot of it's
very American, but there's some good stuff in there.
My morning meanderings have been to look up stuff about modern(ish)
versions of the Bible and their origins and I was surprised at how
many claim to be genuine new translations from the original
Hebrew/Greek/Aramaic into up-to-date language. According to the
Wikipedia page on "The Message" it claims to be a new translation with
a host of scholars given attributions and I must admit that surprised
me.
My only Bible which doesn't claim to be a fresh translation from the
original languages is "Good News Australia." This is a rewrite of the
essentially American TEV/Good News for Modern Man/Good News Bible into
language that could be understood by Australians.
...so who is my mate, cobber?
Strewth! That's a toughie, Bruce. Put it this way, Bruce: a drover set
out from Back O'Bourke on the trail to Wooloomooloo when he gets
mugged by bushrangers....
(Sadly that's not what I found at Luke 10:25 - perhaps there's still a
gap in the market?)
Nick
Snigger

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-22 10:07:10 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland "cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
Isn't there an American version of the Old Testament which mentions
someone going "to the bathroom"?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-22 17:28:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Tony Smith
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland
"cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation.
I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message"
a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
Isn't there an American version of the Old Testament which mentions
someone going "to the bathroom"?
There's 1 Samuel 24:3,

"And he came to the sheepcotes by the way, where was a cave; and Saul
went in to cover his feet: and David and his men remained in the sides
of the cave."
where "cover his feet" means defecate. There are some pretty
euphemistic translations, but I haven't found a bathroom anywhere. No
doubt otherrats may find one elsewhere in the Bible.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith
2021-09-22 20:05:44 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Tony Smith
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland
"cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation.
I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message"
a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
Isn't there an American version of the Old Testament which mentions
someone going "to the bathroom"?
There's 1 Samuel 24:3,
"And he came to the sheepcotes by the way, where was a cave; and Saul
went in to cover his feet: and David and his men remained in the sides
of the cave."
where "cover his feet" means defecate. There are some pretty
euphemistic translations, but I haven't found a bathroom anywhere. No
doubt otherrats may find one elsewhere in the Bible.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Acc. Google, the TLB (the living bible) uses "bathroom" in this verse.
steve hague
2021-09-23 09:11:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Tony Smith
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland
"cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation.
I later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message"
a 20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
Isn't there an American version of the Old Testament which mentions
someone going "to the bathroom"?
There's 1 Samuel 24:3,
"And he came to the sheepcotes by the way, where was a cave; and Saul
went in to cover his feet: and David and his men remained in the sides
of the cave."
where "cover his feet" means defecate. There are some pretty
euphemistic translations, but I haven't found a bathroom anywhere. No
doubt otherrats may find one elsewhere in the Bible.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Acc. Google, the TLB (the living bible) uses "bathroom" in this verse.
According to the NASB, Saul went in to relieve himself.
Steve
Sally Thompson
2021-09-22 18:06:18 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Tony Smith
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland
"cathedral" and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I
later googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a
20th century version by an american Presbyterian.
Isn't there an American version of the Old Testament which mentions
someone going "to the bathroom"?
As do dogs in America, apparently. One of my pet hates. I'm always tempted
to enquire whether they wash their paws afterwards.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Chris
2021-09-22 14:30:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Nick Odell
I had wondered if this had been one of the victims of the different
numbering/editing traditions (the Psalms are a very visible example)
so I enjoyed browsing a number of different versions including a
somewhat niche Argentine-Spanish translation to find out. A perfect
displacement activity and an ideal adjunct to a nice afternoon. Thank
you, Sid!
Last month we went to morning service in a church of Scotland "cathedral"
and came across a weird, colloquial, american translation. I later
googled for a phrase in it and found it was from "The Message" a 20th
century version by an american Presbyterian.
Whispers: weird, you’re not wrong there.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-22 09:25:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
I'm sure we can find you one somewhere.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
carolet
2021-09-22 09:55:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh!  Typo.  I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
The equinox is at 8:20 this evening.
Is that just a coincidence?
--
CaroleT
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-09-22 11:49:48 UTC
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[]
Post by carolet
D'oh!  Typo.  I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Nice.
Post by carolet
The equinox is at 8:20 this evening.
Is that just a coincidence?
I always thought it was on the 21st; in recent years I've learnt it can
be a bit either side, but that's _well_ into the next day. Presumably
the instant is more widely known these days.
(Arguably, from the etymology of the word, it isn't an instant but a
day/night pair anyway, but I understand the concept of the instant.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, Video (I came, I saw, I'll watch it again later) - Mik from S+AS
Limited (***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Penny
2021-09-22 12:57:32 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 12:49:48 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by carolet
The equinox is at 8:20 this evening.
Is that just a coincidence?
I always thought it was on the 21st; in recent years I've learnt it can
be a bit either side, but that's _well_ into the next day. Presumably
the instant is more widely known these days.
My mother was born on 22 December which I was told was the shortest day - I
felt that was very unfair.
These days the Solstice usually seems to be on 21st - is this a leap year
thing or something?

Thinking about dates, man-made and natural calendars - something has always
bothered me...
If William I was crowned on Christmas Day 1066, as most references say, and
Christmas was on the 6 January at that time, did he actually invade England
in 1065?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-22 18:11:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Thinking about dates, man-made and natural calendars - something has always
bothered me...
If William I was crowned on Christmas Day 1066, as most references say, and
Christmas was on the 6 January at that time, did he actually invade England
in 1065?
He invaded in September 1066. Was New Year's Day in January, March or
somewhere else entirely in those days?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-23 05:53:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Thinking about dates, man-made and natural calendars - something has always
bothered me...
If William I was crowned on Christmas Day 1066, as most references say, and
Christmas was on the 6 January at that time, did he actually invade England
in 1065?
He invaded in September 1066.  Was New Year's Day in January, March or
somewhere else entirely in those days?
The date of the Battle Of Hastings was 14th October 1066. (I collected
stamps when I were a lad and remember the First Day Covers I posted on
14 October 1966, marking the 900th anniversary.)

DINTAFPOU?
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2021-09-23 12:08:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 19:11:39 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Thinking about dates, man-made and natural calendars - something has always
bothered me...
If William I was crowned on Christmas Day 1066, as most references say, and
Christmas was on the 6 January at that time, did he actually invade England
in 1065?
He invaded in September 1066. Was New Year's Day in January, March or
somewhere else entirely in those days?
Having consulted https://www.timeanddate.com/, I learn that in the Julian
Calendar, the Year started in March, so the actual calendar date of
Christmas day is irrelevant. I suppose the date of coronation is better
quoted as Christmas Day, than whatever calendar date it fell upon in this
case, as the significant day would have been the important thing.

OK, now my bother about year names and dates moves back a monarch.
According to Brewer's section on Harold II (who does not sound like a good
egg), he was 'elected king by the nobles (though he had no valid hereditary
claim) and crowned at Westminster Abbey immediately after King Edward[the
confessor]'s burial on 6 January 1066.

<sigh>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
carolet
2021-09-23 00:00:08 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by carolet
 D'oh!  Typo.  I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
 "The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
 Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Nice.
Post by carolet
The equinox is at 8:20 this evening.
Is that just a coincidence?
I always thought it was on the 21st; in recent years I've learnt it can
be a bit either side, but that's _well_ into the next day. Presumably
the instant is more widely known these days.
(Arguably, from the etymology of the word, it isn't an instant but a
day/night pair anyway, but I understand the concept of the instant.)
I also used to think that the solstices and equinoxes were all on the
21st of the month most years, but actually the autumnal equinox is only
rarely on the 21st, the 22nd and 23rd are far more common, and even the
24th seems to be more common than the 21st. This is illustated in
https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/seasons.html?year=2000&n=136, which
gives the date of equinoxes and solstices over time.


The variation from year to year is explained by the oddities of the
calendar. A year is actually nearly 6 hours longer than 365 days. We
happily say that it is 365 days long most years, but the earth keeps to
the exact length of year and so the equinox appears to happen nearly 6
hours later than the previous year. When we try to make amends and have
a leap year, the extra day means that the equinox is a day earlier than
it would otherwise have been, bringing it to fairly close to the time of
the equinox of 4 years earlier. Over the the complete 400 year cycle of
the calendar, the times come even closer to repeating.

(Some time ago I found an interesting (or so I thought) graph of how the
time of equinox varies over time, but I can't find it now.)
--
CaroleT
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-23 05:58:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by carolet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by carolet
 D'oh!  Typo.  I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
 "The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
 Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Nice.
Post by carolet
The equinox is at 8:20 this evening.
Is that just a coincidence?
I always thought it was on the 21st; in recent years I've learnt it
can be a bit either side, but that's _well_ into the next day.
Presumably the instant is more widely known these days.
(Arguably, from the etymology of the word, it isn't an instant but a
day/night pair anyway, but I understand the concept of the instant.)
I also used to think that the solstices and equinoxes were all on the
21st of the month most years, but actually the autumnal equinox is only
rarely on the 21st, the 22nd and 23rd are far more common, and even the
24th seems to be more common than the 21st. This is illustated in
https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/seasons.html?year=2000&n=136, which
gives the date of equinoxes and solstices over time.
The variation from year to year is explained by the oddities of the
calendar. A year is actually nearly 6 hours longer than 365 days. We
happily say that it is 365 days long most years, but the earth keeps to
the exact length of year and so the equinox appears to happen nearly 6
hours later than the previous year. When we try to make amends and have
a leap year, the extra day means that the equinox is a day earlier than
it would otherwise have been, bringing it to fairly close to the time of
the equinox of 4 years earlier. Over the the complete 400 year cycle of
the calendar, the times come even closer to repeating.
(Some time ago I found an interesting (or so I thought) graph of how the
time of equinox varies over time, but I can't find it now.)
And let us not forget the precession of the equinoxes (as those of us
brought up on Kipling's The Elephants Child never can) which causes a
variation with a period of 25,772 years.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2021-09-23 07:27:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by carolet
The variation from year to year is explained by the oddities of the
calendar. A year is actually nearly 6 hours longer than 365 days. We
happily say that it is 365 days long most years, but the earth keeps to
the exact length of year and so the equinox appears to happen nearly 6
hours later than the previous year. When we try to make amends and have
a leap year, the extra day means that the equinox is a day earlier than
it would otherwise have been, bringing it to fairly close to the time
of the equinox of 4 years earlier. Over the the complete 400 year cycle
of the calendar, the times come even closer to repeating.
(Some time ago I found an interesting (or so I thought) graph of how
the time of equinox varies over time, but I can't find it now.)
And let us not forget the precession of the equinoxes (as those of us
brought up on Kipling's The Elephants Child never can) which causes a
variation with a period of 25,772 years.
As shown on this clock. https://flic.kr/p/oh9TZV
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike McMillan
2021-09-23 07:34:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by carolet
The variation from year to year is explained by the oddities of the
calendar. A year is actually nearly 6 hours longer than 365 days. We
happily say that it is 365 days long most years, but the earth keeps to
the exact length of year and so the equinox appears to happen nearly 6
hours later than the previous year. When we try to make amends and have
a leap year, the extra day means that the equinox is a day earlier than
it would otherwise have been, bringing it to fairly close to the time
of the equinox of 4 years earlier. Over the the complete 400 year cycle
of the calendar, the times come even closer to repeating.
(Some time ago I found an interesting (or so I thought) graph of how
the time of equinox varies over time, but I can't find it now.)
And let us not forget the precession of the equinoxes (as those of us
brought up on Kipling's The Elephants Child never can) which causes a
variation with a period of 25,772 years.
As shown on this clock. https://flic.kr/p/oh9TZV
‘There’s a slow-hand, Look!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-09-23 10:59:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 23 Sep 2021 07:27:41 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
And let us not forget the precession of the equinoxes (as those of us
brought up on Kipling's The Elephants Child never can) which causes a
variation with a period of 25,772 years.
As shown on this clock. https://flic.kr/p/oh9TZV
Looking at the main face of the big multi-dialled clock, two frames later
(earlier?), the date dial seems to be half a day slow...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2021-09-23 11:02:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Sep 2021 11:59:20 +0100, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
And let us not forget the precession of the equinoxes (as those of us
brought up on Kipling's The Elephants Child never can) which causes a
variation with a period of 25,772 years.
As shown on this clock. https://flic.kr/p/oh9TZV
Looking at the main face of the big multi-dialled clock, two frames later
(earlier?), the date dial seems to be half a day slow...
Hm, on second thoughts, a whole day slow - unless your camera clock was
fast.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jim Easterbrook
2021-09-23 12:37:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
Looking at the main face of the big multi-dialled clock, two frames
later (earlier?), the date dial seems to be half a day slow...
Hm, on second thoughts, a whole day slow - unless your camera clock was
fast.
My camera clocks are never fast. (-:
(Or certainly not a day fast. A minute or two perhaps, if I've forgotten
to sync with the computer for a few days. Although back in 2014 I might
not have had that facility.)

I assume you're talking about the outer dial in the 8 o'clock position in
this photo: https://flic.kr/p/nZWLt1

It looks to me as if it's somewhere between the 9 and 10 position. Maybe
it reaches 10 a bit later.

The Exif data on that pic says it was taken at 11:05:20 (UK time)
although the clock shows 12:07.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Penny
2021-09-23 22:29:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 23 Sep 2021 12:37:51 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
Looking at the main face of the big multi-dialled clock, two frames
later (earlier?), the date dial seems to be half a day slow...
Hm, on second thoughts, a whole day slow - unless your camera clock was
fast.
(Or certainly not a day fast. A minute or two perhaps, if I've forgotten
to sync with the computer for a few days. Although back in 2014 I might
not have had that facility.)
I assume you're talking about the outer dial in the 8 o'clock position in
this photo: https://flic.kr/p/nZWLt1
Yes
Post by Jim Easterbrook
It looks to me as if it's somewhere between the 9 and 10 position. Maybe
it reaches 10 a bit later.
The Exif data on that pic says it was taken at 11:05:20 (UK time)
although the clock shows 12:07.
So it's half way through the day.

The EXIF (and Flickr) also says you took it on 10th, not the 9th - the big
clock is a day slow.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris
2021-09-23 07:49:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
 D'oh!  Typo.  I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
 "The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
 Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Judges 3:24
When the king’s servants returned and saw that the doors were locked, they
waited, thinking that perhaps he was using the bathroom.


1 Samuel 24:3
At the place where the road passes some sheepfolds, Saul went into a cave
to go to the bathroom, but as it happened, David and his men were hiding in
the cave!

By the wonders of t’internet

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-23 09:04:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris
Judges 3:24
When the king’s servants returned and saw that the doors were locked, they
waited, thinking that perhaps he was using the bathroom.
1 Samuel 24:3
At the place where the road passes some sheepfolds, Saul went into a cave
to go to the bathroom, but as it happened, David and his men were hiding in
the cave!
By the wonders of t’internet
<wince>
I'm sure there is a case for making the Bible's language more
accessible, but I am put in mind of this, from Alan Bennett's essay
Comfortable Words:

""Those who rewrote the Prayer Book complained very much at the time  -
and understandably - that many of the protests came from those, such as
myself, whose connection with the Church was tenuous, the argument
implicit in this
being that the clergy know what is best for their congregations.  This is
the same argument that is advanced by farmers in answer to protests about
the grubbing-up of hedges and the destruction of field patterns.  The land
is the farmer's bread and butter, the argument goes, and so he must
therefore have its welfare more at heart than the occasional visitor.  So in
their own field the liturgical reformers grub up the awkward thickets of
language that make the harvest of souls more difficult, plough in the
sixteenth century hedges that are hard to penetrate but for that reason
shelter all manner of rare creatures: poetry, mystery, transcendence.  All
must be flat, dull, accessible and rational.  Fields and worship."
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-23 09:33:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
<wince>
I'm sure there is a case for making the Bible's language more
accessible, but I am put in mind of this, from Alan Bennett's essay
""Those who rewrote the Prayer Book complained very much at the time  -
and understandably - that many of the protests came from those, such as
myself, whose connection with the Church was tenuous, the argument
implicit in this
being that the clergy know what is best for their congregations.  This is
the same argument that is advanced by farmers in answer to protests about
the grubbing-up of hedges and the destruction of field patterns.  The land
is the farmer's bread and butter, the argument goes, and so he must
therefore have its welfare more at heart than the occasional visitor.  So in
their own field the liturgical reformers grub up the awkward thickets of
language that make the harvest of souls more difficult, plough in the
sixteenth century hedges that are hard to penetrate but for that reason
shelter all manner of rare creatures: poetry, mystery, transcendence.  All
must be flat, dull, accessible and rational.  Fields and worship."
HUGE thank you for posting that, Sid! I didn't know of it before and I
think it's brilliant.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2021-09-23 09:50:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 23 Sep 2021 10:04:51 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris
Judges 3:24
When the king’s servants returned and saw that the doors were locked, they
waited, thinking that perhaps he was using the bathroom.
1 Samuel 24:3
At the place where the road passes some sheepfolds, Saul went into a cave
to go to the bathroom, but as it happened, David and his men were hiding in
the cave!
By the wonders of t’internet
<wince>
I'm sure there is a case for making the Bible's language more
accessible, but I am put in mind of this, from Alan Bennett's essay
""Those who rewrote the Prayer Book complained very much at the time  -
and understandably - that many of the protests came from those, such as
myself, whose connection with the Church was tenuous, the argument
implicit in this
being that the clergy know what is best for their congregations.  This is
the same argument that is advanced by farmers in answer to protests about
the grubbing-up of hedges and the destruction of field patterns.  The land
is the farmer's bread and butter, the argument goes, and so he must
therefore have its welfare more at heart than the occasional visitor.  So in
their own field the liturgical reformers grub up the awkward thickets of
language that make the harvest of souls more difficult, plough in the
sixteenth century hedges that are hard to penetrate but for that reason
shelter all manner of rare creatures: poetry, mystery, transcendence.  All
must be flat, dull, accessible and rational.  Fields and worship."
Thank you for that, Sid, a great analogy couched in wonderful language.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-25 18:05:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris
Judges 3:24
When the king’s servants returned and saw that the doors were locked, they
waited, thinking that perhaps he was using the bathroom.
1 Samuel 24:3
At the place where the road passes some sheepfolds, Saul went into a cave
to go to the bathroom, but as it happened, David and his men were hiding in
the cave!
By the wonders of t’internet
<wince>
I'm sure there is a case for making the Bible's language more
accessible, but I am put in mind of this, from Alan Bennett's essay
""Those who rewrote the Prayer Book complained very much at the time  -
and understandably - that many of the protests came from those, such as
myself, whose connection with the Church was tenuous, the argument
implicit in this
being that the clergy know what is best for their congregations.  This is
the same argument that is advanced by farmers in answer to protests about
the grubbing-up of hedges and the destruction of field patterns.  The land
is the farmer's bread and butter, the argument goes, and so he must
therefore have its welfare more at heart than the occasional visitor.  So in
their own field the liturgical reformers grub up the awkward thickets of
language that make the harvest of souls more difficult, plough in the
sixteenth century hedges that are hard to penetrate but for that reason
shelter all manner of rare creatures: poetry, mystery, transcendence.  All
must be flat, dull, accessible and rational.  Fields and worship."
With uncanny timing, I have just come across a passage in A Second
Chance, (the fourth in the Chronicles of St Mary's series) in which Max
notes approvingly that someone has quoted the King James version, and
she adds, "Only Christians could replace the majesty and awe of the King
James Bible with something as dreary and uninspiring as a directive from
the English Egg Marketing Board and then wonder why no one takes them
seriously any more."

It's over-harsh, of course, and plenty of people still do take them
seriously but the gist has my sympathy.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steve hague
2021-09-26 07:41:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 25/09/
Post by Sid Nuncius
With uncanny timing, I have just come across a passage in A Second
Chance, (the fourth in the Chronicles of St Mary's series) in which Max
notes approvingly that someone has quoted the King James version, and
she adds, "Only Christians could replace the majesty and awe of the King
James Bible with something as dreary and uninspiring as a directive from
the English Egg Marketing Board and then wonder why no one takes them
seriously any more."
It's over-harsh, of course, and plenty of people still do take them
seriously but the gist has my sympathy.
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Steve
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-26 08:00:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
On 25/09/
Post by Sid Nuncius
With uncanny timing, I have just come across a passage in A Second
Chance, (the fourth in the Chronicles of St Mary's series) in which
Max notes approvingly that someone has quoted the King James version,
and she adds, "Only Christians could replace the majesty and awe of
the King James Bible with something as dreary and uninspiring as a
directive from the English Egg Marketing Board and then wonder why no
one takes them seriously any more."
It's over-harsh, of course, and plenty of people still do take them
seriously but the gist has my sympathy.
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Fair enough.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris J Dixon
2021-09-26 08:05:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike McMillan
2021-09-26 08:07:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?
Chris
Athemas are extra luv.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Nick Odell
2021-09-26 16:33:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Sep 2021 08:07:57 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?
Chris
Athemas are extra luv.
I believe you can get an inhaler for that nowadays.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2021-09-26 08:33:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?
Chris
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-26 08:42:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
--
Jenny M Benson
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-26 08:57:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?

EMNTK.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-26 09:08:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
Even more difficult if one has a stammer!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Paul Herber
2021-09-26 13:21:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
Even more difficult if one has a stammer!
That was the KGVI version.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike McMillan
2021-09-26 13:46:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
Even more difficult if one has a stammer!
That was the KGVI version.
:-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
steve hague
2021-09-26 17:12:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
Even more difficult if one has a stammer!
That was the KGVI version.
😁
Penny
2021-09-26 20:19:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Sep 2021 09:57:16 +0100, Sid Nuncius <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
I agree with you and know I have come across "an anathema" from time to
time.
Google found me this, from https://www.tribpub.com/gdpr/courant.com/ (who
won't let me see it) :
"When you use "anathema" to denote a curse or denunciation, place an "an"
before it ("the witch hurled an anathema at Hansel"). But when you use it
to mean something you detest, drop the "an" ("the witch's cannibalism was
anathema to Hansel, especially when he spotted her menu")."

There are other opinions here which depend on whether the usage is as a
noun or a 'pseudo adjective'
https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/242967/does-anathema-need-an-an
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-27 05:44:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Nowadays it is the former but was (maybe still is) originally a Church
thing involving excommunication.
Something which puzzles me about the word anathema is that it is a noun,
but is seldom afforded an article before it. People (including
authoritative works and even dictionaries, I think) say, for example,
"It was anathema to him," but I'd have thought that either "an anathema"
or "anathematic" would be correct. Is it just that the an- at the
beginning of anathema sounds as though the "an" is already there so
people don't use the indefinite article as well?
EMNTK.
I agree with you and know I have come across "an anathema" from time to
time.
Google found me this, from https://www.tribpub.com/gdpr/courant.com/ (who
"When you use "anathema" to denote a curse or denunciation, place an "an"
before it ("the witch hurled an anathema at Hansel"). But when you use it
to mean something you detest, drop the "an" ("the witch's cannibalism was
anathema to Hansel, especially when he spotted her menu")."
There are other opinions here which depend on whether the usage is as a
noun or a 'pseudo adjective'
https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/242967/does-anathema-need-an-an
Thanks, Penny. Very interesting, if not entirely conclusive.
Er...predicate nominative? I think I'll just accept the non-article
usage, thanks. 😊 It has plainly become standard even though it still
sounds odd to me.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris J Dixon
2021-09-26 15:07:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?
Is that the normal meaning of anathema as in someone or some body
hates it or is there a special religious meaning?
Sorry, nothing special, but I was referring to my understanding
that the available (FSVO available) bibles were in Latin, which
was not comprehensible to the community at large, a situation
supported by those in power.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-26 18:48:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
Isn't it the case that, back in the day, the whole concept that
the average person could have access to the volume in their own
language was anathema?
I did like the quote from one contemporary scholar:

"he would rather be torn in pieces by wild horses than that this
abominable translation (KJV) should ever be foisted upon the English people"

Perhaps the KJV wasn't universally loved.
Serena Blanchflower
2021-09-26 11:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
The analogy I've always liked is to church windows. KJV is like a
beautiful stained glass window: beautiful to look at and casting
wonderful colours on the floor but not always the best if you want to
actually look out of the window. Some of the better modern translations
are clear glass: not as decorative but give you a wonderful view of
what's behind them.

Sadly, some of the translations one comes across are made of cheap,
rather cloudy glass, which is neither beautiful nor gives a clear view
through them :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
Damn right I'm good in bed - I can sleep for days
Tony Smith
2021-09-26 14:01:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
I agree that the KJV has some beautiful language, but unfortunately the
language was archaic when it was first published, making it
incomprehensible in places. I prefer a translation I can understand.
The analogy I've always liked is to church windows. KJV is like a
beautiful stained glass window: beautiful to look at and casting
wonderful colours on the floor but not always the best if you want to
actually look out of the window. Some of the better modern translations
are clear glass: not as decorative but give you a wonderful view of
what's behind them.
Sadly, some of the translations one comes across are made of cheap,
rather cloudy glass, which is neither beautiful nor gives a clear view
through them :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
Damn right I'm good in bed - I can sleep for days
I like the NRSV translation.
tiny hadron
2021-09-22 19:35:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
In my bible the equine ox is not mentioned there. Is your citation correct?
D'oh! Typo. I meant Jeremiah 8:20.
"The harvest is past, the summer has ended, and we are not saved."
Boy, do I feel like a fool.
Eeh, but that 8:10 were a reet belter too.

We all make mistakes. I were thinking to break out a nice little 2018
M&S haggis from the freezer to celebrate t'equinox, but dozed off and
forgot.
--
tiny
on t'other side of hill
John Ashby
2021-09-21 18:41:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me.  I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it.  Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
Therefore will I give their wives unto others, and their fields to them
that shall inherit them: for every one from the least even unto the
greatest is given to covetousness, from the prophet even unto the priest
every one dealeth falsely. [KJV]

?????

john
steve hague
2021-09-21 18:54:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me.  I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it.  Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
Not exactly the cheeriest of prophets. He wouldn't be on my list of
prophets to invite to a party. Ezekiel might have been fun though, if he
shared what he was smoking. Any road up, "Season of mists and mellow
fruitfulness, close bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with
him how to load and bless the vines that round the thatch eves run." I
remember much of that poem, but perhaps not word perfect. Here in
Cornwall we've had a couple of beautiful warm days, but with that
autumnal freshness in the air. I find it very pleasant.
Steve
Nick Odell
2021-09-21 19:59:15 UTC
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2021 19:02:06 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's all getting to me now...

I looked at the subject heading and my first thought was:

Berloimey: not another fake cure for Covid?

Nick
Jim Easterbrook
2021-09-21 21:16:27 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sally Thompson
2021-09-22 08:01:23 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first time
ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Nick Odell
2021-09-22 08:07:53 UTC
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On 22 Sep 2021 08:01:23 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first time
ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
Must have been the right sort of year for that sort of fruit. The wild
plums around here have gone -erme- wild and I'm running out of jars.

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-09-22 11:54:22 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 at 09:07:53, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On 22 Sep 2021 08:01:23 GMT, Sally Thompson
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first time
ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
Must have been the right sort of year for that sort of fruit. The wild
plums around here have gone -erme- wild and I'm running out of jars.
Nick
Coming back from the garage last night, I saw that the blackberry crop
looks like it might still be good, but _much_ delayed from previous
years (might even get into frost and thus not be good after all).

I also noticed a couple of sloe trees looking good. Can anything other
than gin be made with them? Seems a pity to waste what looks nice, but
I'm not a gin (or any other spirit) drinker. I presume they're bitter,
but I probably shouldn't do anything involving lots of sugar.

(Actually, being so much a non-cook, I almost certainly _won't_ do
anything, but I have often wondered if you _can_ do anything with sloes
other than make gin. [Or rather flavour it; I don't think you _make_ it
from them.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, Video (I came, I saw, I'll watch it again later) - Mik from S+AS
Limited (***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Penny
2021-09-22 14:48:03 UTC
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On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 12:54:22 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I also noticed a couple of sloe trees looking good. Can anything other
than gin be made with them? Seems a pity to waste what looks nice, but
I'm not a gin (or any other spirit) drinker. I presume they're bitter,
but I probably shouldn't do anything involving lots of sugar.
(Actually, being so much a non-cook, I almost certainly _won't_ do
anything, but I have often wondered if you _can_ do anything with sloes
other than make gin. [Or rather flavour it; I don't think you _make_ it
from them.])
I have made Sloe Gin and Sloe Vodka - I don't like juniper gin (not that
you can taste it when mixed with sloes) and vodka can be a much cheaper
spirit. I've done the same with Damsons.

I don't bother these days. They make pleasant drinks but on the whole I'd
rather create base drinks with elderflowers and with elderberries. It's a
heavy syrup which keeps well and a little goes a long way. Then I can enjoy
the flavours hot or cold, with or without added alcohol. I'm told
elderberries have anti-viral properties - I dare say sloes and damsons do
too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jim Easterbrook
2021-09-22 08:59:04 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first
time ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
I've had my first ever damson harvest from the tree I planted a couple of
years ago. (Next pic to the one of my cider, right arrow key should get
you there.) Damson gin is underway already.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Tony Smith
2021-09-22 09:05:29 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sally Thompson
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first
time ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
I've had my first ever damson harvest from the tree I planted a couple of
years ago. (Next pic to the one of my cider, right arrow key should get
you there.) Damson gin is underway already.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Our three year old plum tree bore the null plum this year, as the frost got all its flowers. Plums had to be p-y-o and are now mostly jammed.
Mike McMillan
2021-09-22 18:06:35 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sally Thompson
And we've had a wonderful harvest from our damson tree for the first
time ever, so damson gin will be made:-)
I've had my first ever damson harvest from the tree I planted a couple of
years ago. (Next pic to the one of my cider, right arrow key should get
you there.) Damson gin is underway already.
10lb damsons picked already, and more to come. I do get old-fashioned looks
when I buy multiple bottles of gin, though, and feel the need to explain.
Damsons in distress?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Chris J Dixon
2021-09-22 08:27:57 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
I do like salads, and during the summer that is almost
exclusively what we eat. The problem is the transition period
when we have bought the makings, but the weather turns, and we
consult the freezer list to find something that is more
attractive on a cold, wet evening.

Conversely, in the spring, we have planned something hearty, and
we get a glorious warm day.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Kate B
2021-09-22 10:04:58 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
Apparently kids these days think toad in the hole involves real toads.
--
Kate B
London
Mike McMillan
2021-09-22 12:41:18 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
Apparently kids these days think toad in the hole involves real toads.
Warts an’ all?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
tiny hadron
2021-09-22 19:57:48 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
Jeremiah 8:10 rather sums it up for me. I always find the autumn
equinox a very melancholy time.
Er...that's it. Just thought I'd cheer everyone up.
It's also the time of year when, in a good year, I start turning apple
juice into cider. And I resume cooking my favourite sort of food like
hotpots, casseroles, toads in the hole, crumbles, etc.
https://flic.kr/p/2msaLhB
Apparently kids these days think toad in the hole involves real toads.
I think I won't ask about the hole.
--
tiny
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