Discussion:
Completely OT: Benita Mehra
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Sid Nuncius
2020-01-26 19:31:12 UTC
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This is a wholly irrelevant ramble, but I'd like to tell someone. It's
probably best to ignore the whole thing; you won't miss much.

I got a bit of a start when I heard the name Benita Mehra on the news
and then saw pictures of her. (She's the distinguished engineer who has
stood down from the Grenfell Enquiry.) I taught her A level physics and
remember her as a good physicist and a thoroughly nice young woman, but
I have heard almost nothing of her for almost 35 years. It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.

I'm sad that she's had to stand down in such circumstances, although as
far as I can tell it doesn't seem that she did anything wrong; she was
simply simply accepted a harmless-looking donation to the Women's
Engineering Society. She is right not to take part in the Enquiry
because any connection whatsoever to the cladding company would rightly
be unacceptable in a judicial procedure but I hope her reputation
doesn't suffer as a result.

Er...that's it. I told you not to bother.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2020-01-26 20:27:48 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-01-27 20:00:04 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
I'm a frayed knot. I can't remember one teacher who took me aside and
encouraged me. They all had me written off as a plodding mediocrity who
would never amount to anything. Although they did help me become the
person I am today by thoroughly demolishing any self-esteem I ever had.

R
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-28 19:13:24 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
I'm a frayed knot. I can't remember one teacher who took me aside and
encouraged me. They all had me written off as a plodding mediocrity who
would never amount to anything. Although they did help me become the
person I am today by thoroughly demolishing any self-esteem I ever had.
I'm sorry to hear that, Rosie. Sadly, bad teachers can (and do) do at
least as much harm as inspiring teachers do good.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-28 21:47:26 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 19:13:24 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
I'm a frayed knot. I can't remember one teacher who took me aside and
encouraged me. They all had me written off as a plodding mediocrity who
would never amount to anything. Although they did help me become the
person I am today by thoroughly demolishing any self-esteem I ever had.
I'm sorry to hear that, Rosie. Sadly, bad teachers can (and do) do at
least as much harm as inspiring teachers do good.
Yes, I had mostly good but maths up to 5th form wasn't good and I
failed GCSE. Then our lovely form master in the lower 6th, who was
also a maths teacher, gave me maths coaching in his own time in a
spare private study period and continued for another 3 resits until I
passed.

The English staff at the school were brilliant too. Chaucer made very
accessible, and enjoyable, Shakespeare too. We had small groups in the
6th and we actually wrote extra exam questions for homework in the
upper 6th we were made so enthusiastic.
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-01-28 22:02:09 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 19:13:24 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
I'm a frayed knot. I can't remember one teacher who took me aside and
encouraged me. They all had me written off as a plodding mediocrity who
would never amount to anything. Although they did help me become the
person I am today by thoroughly demolishing any self-esteem I ever had.
I'm sorry to hear that, Rosie. Sadly, bad teachers can (and do) do at
least as much harm as inspiring teachers do good.
Yes, I had mostly good but maths up to 5th form wasn't good and I
failed GCSE. Then our lovely form master in the lower 6th, who was
also a maths teacher, gave me maths coaching in his own time in a
spare private study period and continued for another 3 resits until I
passed.
The English staff at the school were brilliant too. Chaucer made very
accessible, and enjoyable, Shakespeare too. We had small groups in the
6th and we actually wrote extra exam questions for homework in the
upper 6th we were made so enthusiastic.
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive. He also agreed with me that The Prelude was
good for propping open the window in the stuffy basement room of the LSE
but not for much else.

R
Nick Odell
2020-01-28 22:46:28 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.

Nick
steveski
2020-01-29 02:33:06 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.
Ethpethially if you haven't got thutable headgear, thur.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-29 06:25:26 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.
Ethpethially if you haven't got thutable headgear, thur.
Oopth. Thorry, Thevethki - I should have read to the end of the thread.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steveski
2020-01-30 00:41:51 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.
Ethpethially if you haven't got thutable headgear, thur.
Oopth. Thorry, Thevethki - I should have read to the end of the thread.
Thould, Thid, thould . . .
--
Thevthki :-)
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-29 06:08:17 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.
But thome of uth are thtill thtriving to keep the old tradithionth alive.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-29 22:36:38 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 22:02:09 +0000, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive.
That Mary Shelley, eh? Did she do that as an encore to Frankenstein?
Doesn't happen too much these days: you just can't get the
thunderstorms, y'know.
But thome of uth are thtill thtriving to keep the old tradithionth alive.
Let me give you a hand.

How many do you want?
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-29 06:22:01 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Which reminds me that while I had no helpful teachers at school there
were certainly a couple of excellent OU tutors, not least the resting
actor whose name I now forget who tutored me for A362 Romantic Poetry
and made Byron come alive. He also agreed with me that The Prelude was
good for propping open the window in the stuffy basement room of the LSE
but not for much else.
I know at least one other English graduate who takes a very similar view
of The Prelude, having been compelled to study it. That's why I've
never attempted to read it and have been very selective in my reading of
Wordsworth in general.

(I quoted J.K. Steven's parody of Wordsworth here relatively recently
and I'm sorry to bore umrats with it again, but it's very apposite:
https://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2008/11/j-k-stephens-pa.html
)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Steve Hague
2020-01-29 15:28:39 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
And so it should. I hope we can all remember at least one good teacher
who helped make us the people we are today.
I'm a frayed knot. I can't remember one teacher who took me aside and
encouraged me. They all had me written off as a plodding mediocrity
who would never amount to anything. Although they did help me become
the person I am today by thoroughly demolishing any self-esteem I ever
had.
I'm sorry to hear that, Rosie.  Sadly, bad teachers can (and do) do at
least as much harm as inspiring teachers do good.
This is so true. I had wonderful teachers in English and physics who
inspired me to do well with what they taught me, and a dreadful
geography teacher who killed the subject stone dead for me for a great
number of years. I can't remember any teacher who went out of their way
to attack my self esteem, apart from when I was about eight years old we
had a sadistic woman who wouldn't get anywhere near the teaching
profession today. I didn't feel singled out though, she did her best to
make all the kids lives a misery. One day the mother of one of the kids
came in and beat her up with an umbrella (a literal one).
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-29 17:30:21 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2020 15:28:39 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I had wonderful teachers in English and physics who
inspired me to do well with what they taught me, and a dreadful
geography teacher who killed the subject stone dead for me for a great
number of years. I can't remember any teacher who went out of their way
to attack my self esteem, apart from when I was about eight years old we
had a sadistic woman who wouldn't get anywhere near the teaching
profession today. I didn't feel singled out though, she did her best to
make all the kids lives a misery. One day the mother of one of the kids
came in and beat her up with an umbrella (a literal one).
Steve
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either. She wasn't
unpleasant but I recall the subject as having to colour in maps and
keep inthe lines. I dropped it after a year or maybe two in secondary
school and was able to take German as I was bilingual. Otherwise I'd
not have been able to as was in the B stream. I'm sorry now as I
might have enjoyed it later on.
Jenny M Benson
2020-01-29 17:40:09 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand. Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car. He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
John Ashby
2020-01-29 20:08:46 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand.  Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car.  He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
The main thing I remember being taught by my Geog teacher was the
meaning and importance of NIBMR.

john
BrritSki
2020-01-30 09:27:56 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject
in hand.  Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car.
He had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will -
to u, hilarious - consequences.
The main thing I remember being taught by my Geog teacher was the
meaning and importance of NIBMR.
Not In Back My R???
John Ashby
2020-01-30 11:28:08 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by John Ashby
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject
in hand.  Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car.
He had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will -
to u, hilarious - consequences.
The main thing I remember being taught by my Geog teacher was the
meaning and importance of NIBMR.
Not In Back My R???
No Independence Before Majority Rule.

It's a Southern Rhodesia Thing.

john
steveski
2020-01-30 01:14:30 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand. Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car. He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
We had a TD teacher who was equally malleable.
--
Steveski
SODAM
2020-01-30 08:58:21 UTC
Reply
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Post by steveski
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand. Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car. He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
We had a TD teacher who was equally malleable.
When I worked at an independent school, the Music teacher used to bore the
pupils witless with lengthy anecdotes about her husband and her dogs. They
used to complain because they wanted to learn about music. Obviously, the
anecdotes weren’t very good.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2020-01-30 09:00:06 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by steveski
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand. Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car. He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
We had a TD teacher who was equally malleable.
When I worked at an independent school, the Music teacher used to bore the
pupils witless with lengthy anecdotes about her husband and her dogs. They
used to complain because they wanted to learn about music. Obviously, the
anecdotes weren’t very good.
Bach rather than Bark?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-01-30 19:11:07 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by steveski
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either.
We had a Geog teacher who was very easily distracted from the subject in
hand. Our favourite ploy was to ask her about her husband's car. He
had an ancient Rolls Royce which was forever breaking down will - to u,
hilarious - consequences.
We had a TD teacher who was equally malleable.
When I worked at an independent school, the Music teacher used to bore the
pupils witless with lengthy anecdotes about her husband and her dogs. They
used to complain because they wanted to learn about music. Obviously, the
anecdotes weren’t very good.
Bach rather than Bark?
Welsh, were they?

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-30 21:28:11 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Bach rather than Bark?
Welsh, were they?
Well, just a little bit.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-01-30 12:24:15 UTC
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On Wed, 29 Jan 2020 17:30:21 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 29 Jan 2020 15:28:39 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I had wonderful teachers in English and physics who
inspired me to do well with what they taught me, and a dreadful
geography teacher who killed the subject stone dead for me for a great
number of years. I can't remember any teacher who went out of their way
to attack my self esteem, apart from when I was about eight years old we
had a sadistic woman who wouldn't get anywhere near the teaching
profession today. I didn't feel singled out though, she did her best to
make all the kids lives a misery. One day the mother of one of the kids
came in and beat her up with an umbrella (a literal one).
Steve
I don't think our Geography teacher was very good either. She wasn't
unpleasant but I recall the subject as having to colour in maps and
keep inthe lines. I dropped it after a year or maybe two in secondary
school and was able to take German as I was bilingual. Otherwise I'd
not have been able to as was in the B stream. I'm sorry now as I
might have enjoyed it later on.
I enjoyed geography at primary school when it was all about maps and
topography with a bit about how people lived. I went off it in secondary -
partly because, with a change of school when we moved house (same county),
I did 'the southern continents' twice from the same book but also because
it was all about economics and politics.

At some point (I forget just when) many of those African countries I'd been
taught about twice changed their names. This didn't help.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-26 23:26:53 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Engineering Society. She is right not to take part in the Enquiry
because any connection whatsoever to the cladding company would rightly
be unacceptable in a judicial procedure but I hope her reputation
doesn't suffer as a result.
I haven't heard any of this story, other than that yet another chair has
stood down from the enquiry. I presume this donation was from the
cladding company, in which case I agree she did right to stand down;
assuming that was well before she had anything to do with the enquiry,
then I agree, I hope it does her no harm - mud-slinging is far too
common these days. (Without knowing details, it's tempting to say she
shouldn't have accepted the enquiry chair post, but in practice she
probably had no idea the company from whom she'd accepted a donation -
presumably on behalf of a charity - possibly years before, was the one
behind the Grenfell cladding; I couldn't name that company even now.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Er...that's it. I told you not to bother.
Not at all.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the God who endowed me with sense,
reason, and intellect intends me to forego their use". - Gallileo Gallilei
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-27 06:34:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Engineering Society.  She is right not to take part in the Enquiry
because any connection whatsoever to the cladding company would
rightly be unacceptable in a judicial procedure but I hope her
reputation doesn't suffer as a result.
I haven't heard any of this story, other than that yet another chair has
stood down from the enquiry. I presume this donation was from the
cladding company, in which case I agree she did right to stand down;
assuming that was well before she had anything to do with the enquiry,
then I agree, I hope it does her no harm - mud-slinging is far too
common these days. (Without knowing details, it's tempting to say she
shouldn't have accepted the enquiry chair post, but in practice she
probably had no idea the company from whom she'd accepted a donation -
presumably on behalf of a charity - possibly years before, was the one
behind the Grenfell cladding; I couldn't name that company even now.)
She wasn't the Chair, but an expert engineer appointed to advise on
engineering matters. It seems that a donation was accepted by the
Women's Engineering Society last year while she was its President. The
donation came from the charitable foundation of Arconic, the company
which made the cladding for Grenfell and was for funding an apprentice
conference. I don't know whether Benita was aware of the source of the
donation when she accepted the appointment to the Inquiry Panel, but
especially given the extreme sensitivity of the matter, the donation
makes her position on the panel untenable whether she knew or not.

It is arguable that if she was aware, then she shouldn't have accepted
the appointment to the Inquiry Panel. There has been criticism of the
Government for putting her and the Inquiry this position, but I am
pleased to see that her resignation has been accepted with grace by the
survivors' group and I've read no criticism of Benita herself so far.

HTH.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-27 11:26:33 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
She wasn't the Chair, but an expert engineer appointed to advise on
engineering matters. It seems that a donation was accepted by the
Yes, sorry, I've picked up on that since.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Women's Engineering Society last year while she was its President. The
donation came from the charitable foundation of Arconic, the company
(Which foundation may not even had Arconic in its name. But even if it
did ...)
Post by Sid Nuncius
which made the cladding for Grenfell and was for funding an apprentice
conference. I don't know whether Benita was aware of the source of the
donation when she accepted the appointment to the Inquiry Panel, but
especially given the extreme sensitivity of the matter, the donation
makes her position on the panel untenable whether she knew or not.
It is arguable that if she was aware, then she shouldn't have accepted
the appointment to the Inquiry Panel. There has been criticism of the
Government for putting her and the Inquiry this position, but I am
pleased to see that her resignation has been accepted with grace by the
survivors' group and I've read no criticism of Benita herself so far.
I am pleased too. A rare example of common sense in such matters.
Post by Sid Nuncius
HTH.
Yes, thanks.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Q. How much is 2 + 2?
A. Thank you so much for asking your question.
Are you still having this problem? I'll be delighted to help you. Please
restate the problem twice and include your Windows version along with
all error logs.
- Mayayana in alt.windows7.general, 2018-11-1
Chris McMillan
2020-01-27 19:16:00 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
This is a wholly irrelevant ramble, but I'd like to tell someone. It's
probably best to ignore the whole thing; you won't miss much.
I got a bit of a start when I heard the name Benita Mehra on the news
and then saw pictures of her. (She's the distinguished engineer who has
stood down from the Grenfell Enquiry.) I taught her A level physics and
remember her as a good physicist and a thoroughly nice young woman, but
I have heard almost nothing of her for almost 35 years. It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
I'm sad that she's had to stand down in such circumstances, although as
far as I can tell it doesn't seem that she did anything wrong; she was
simply simply accepted a harmless-looking donation to the Women's
Engineering Society. She is right not to take part in the Enquiry
because any connection whatsoever to the cladding company would rightly
be unacceptable in a judicial procedure but I hope her reputation
doesn't suffer as a result.
Er...that's it. I told you not to bother.
:).

Sincerely Chris
b***@gmail.com
2020-01-28 23:27:20 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I got a bit of a start when I heard the name Benita Mehra on the news
and then saw pictures of her. (She's the distinguished engineer who has
stood down from the Grenfell Enquiry.) I taught her A level physics and
remember her as a good physicist and a thoroughly nice young woman, but
I have heard almost nothing of her for almost 35 years. It does give me
great pleasure to find out that students of mine have done well and are
doing good things - in Benita's case championing women in engineering.
That's delightful. You should be proud.

Just last year, I started corresponding with my form tutor (for all five years of secondary school). I'd been in touch just once in nearly 30 years. He's a remarkable man, a renaissance man - who writes music (including an opera) and books, keeps a fabulous garden, rides motorbikes, and thinks. Writing to him, and reading his responses has been a real joy for me. He will never truly know what an influence he has been on me, but I hope he has a glimmer of an idea.
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