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Min
2020-10-26 00:08:06 UTC
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I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
--
Min
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-26 06:23:37 UTC
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Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Wallander (the Swedish one played by Krister Henriksson) has Jussi.
Rebus has acquired Brillo in the latest couple of books (I can't
remember when he appeared).
V.I. Warshawski sort of adopts a dog for a good deal of Dead Land.

I'm sure there are others I can't bring to mind just now.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-10-26 09:24:43 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books.  I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other?  American authors are fine, too!
Wallander (the Swedish one played by Krister Henriksson) has Jussi.
Rebus has acquired Brillo in the latest couple of books (I can't
remember when he appeared).
V.I. Warshawski sort of adopts a dog for a good deal of Dead Land.
I'm sure there are others I can't bring to mind just now.
"Started Early, Took My Dog" Kate Atkinson
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-26 09:17:48 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 17:08:06 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
I have a few of the Braun books and like them.Bruno Chief of police
has a dog and Gamache of the Louise Penny books has one. Nelson in the
Elly Griffiths Ruth books has one and second daughter's Alibi Channel
on Uktv, which she manages, has a series, Cnadian, where the dog is
the actual detective! Hudson and Rex. She says it is a bit pants but
i want to see it anyway :).
Jenny M Benson
2020-10-26 10:58:27 UTC
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Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Min
2020-10-27 00:57:57 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
--
Min
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-27 09:28:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
Min
2020-10-27 22:56:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
krw
2020-10-28 13:48:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
I am worried about the Labrador on Mr Mercedes more than the killer's
alcoholic mother who is bound to eat the rat poisoned beef burgers
intended for said dog.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2020-10-28 18:56:43 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 15:56:45 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
I went to see the Elliot Gould / Nina van Pallandt remake of The Long
Goodbye - only to find out years later that it was a make, not a
remake. Oh well...

Back to my story. There is a scene in which, Philip Marlowe is
followed back to his apartment by two thugs and given a vicious and
prolonged beating. The two women sitting behind me were however
watching a different story.

Oh, look at the lovely cat!
I think it wants to be fed. Has it got any water?
Oooh, Pussy, you should not stay there, you might get hurt.

And later, as Marlow struggles to his feet again , I hope he remembers
to feed the cat before he goes out.

(Maybe slightly misremembered but you get the picture)

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-28 17:06:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 15:56:43 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 15:56:45 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
I went to see the Elliot Gould / Nina van Pallandt remake of The Long
Goodbye - only to find out years later that it was a make, not a
remake. Oh well...
Back to my story. There is a scene in which, Philip Marlowe is
followed back to his apartment by two thugs and given a vicious and
prolonged beating. The two women sitting behind me were however
watching a different story.
Oh, look at the lovely cat!
I think it wants to be fed. Has it got any water?
Oooh, Pussy, you should not stay there, you might get hurt.
And later, as Marlow struggles to his feet again , I hope he remembers
to feed the cat before he goes out.
(Maybe slightly misremembered but you get the picture)
Nick
That was what I really hated in Game of Thrones. The way George
Martin killed off dire wolves.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-28 17:08:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 at 15:56:43, Nick Odell
<***@themusicworkshop.plus.com> wrote:
[]
Post by Nick Odell
I went to see the Elliot Gould / Nina van Pallandt remake of The Long
Goodbye - only to find out years later that it was a make, not a
remake. Oh well...
Back to my story. There is a scene in which, Philip Marlowe is
followed back to his apartment by two thugs and given a vicious and
prolonged beating. The two women sitting behind me were however
watching a different story.
Oh, look at the lovely cat!
I think it wants to be fed. Has it got any water?
Oooh, Pussy, you should not stay there, you might get hurt.
And later, as Marlow struggles to his feet again , I hope he remembers
to feed the cat before he goes out.
(Maybe slightly misremembered but you get the picture)
Nick
Obviously had their priorities right. (Assuming there actually _is_ a
cat in the scene!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Usenet is a way of being annoyed by people you otherwise never would have
met."
- John J. Kinyon
Min
2020-10-28 23:49:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
--
Min
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-29 09:30:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
Steve Hague
2020-10-29 10:49:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
Steve
Penny
2020-10-29 17:16:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 10:49:25 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-10-30 08:43:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
My wife has two phobias, spiders and the M25. I'm reasonably ok with
spiders, but I see her point about the M25, which according to Terry
Pratchett was designed by the demon Crawley.
Steve
Penny
2020-10-30 11:58:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 08:43:09 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
My wife has two phobias, spiders and the M25. I'm reasonably ok with
spiders, but I see her point about the M25, which according to Terry
Pratchett was designed by the demon Crawley.
Steve
Living in Kent I got used to the M25, at least the southern section, but I
have a strong dislike of the M5 and M6 around Birmingham. The first time I
encountered them, travelling from Derby to Redditch, was terrifying.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Joe Kerr
2020-10-30 15:21:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Living in Kent I got used to the M25, at least the southern section, but I
have a strong dislike of the M5 and M6 around Birmingham. The first time I
encountered them, travelling from Derby to Redditch, was terrifying.
Going to Redditch always has that effect on me.
--
Ric
Anne B
2020-11-01 13:51:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
My wife has two phobias, spiders and the M25. I'm reasonably ok with
spiders, but I see her point about the M25, which according to Terry
Pratchett was designed by the demon Crawley.
Steve
I have never seen the M25, and I have no desire to remedy the omission.

My late mother suffered from arachnophobia.

The road I fear most is the A9 between Perth and Inverness
(a) it switches from single to dual to single to dual to single to dual
carriageway all the way, so drivers who don't know the road well
sometimes forget that they are on a single carriageway and imagine that
it's safe to overtake when it isn't
(b) tourists from all points south can get to Luncarty, just north of
Perth, on dual carriageway all the way, and the return to single
carriageway disorientates them
(c) Luncarty is the first place where tourists accustomed to driving on
the right first encounter in earnest the requirement to drive on the
left after having come all the way from Channel ports on dual carriageway
(d) the scenery is impressive - enough to distract drivers' attention
from the road
(e) there are often deer grazing on the hillsides, again potentially
distracting for drivers
(f) it is the only route north for HGVs, caravans and motorhomes and the
only route south again, leading to traffic queues on the single
carriageway sections, which in turn leads to impatience and reckless
overtaking
(g) when I lived in Perth, I acted often enough as court interpreter for
German-speaking motorists who had been involved (usually caused)
accidents on the A9 to be acutely aware just how dangerous a road it is
(h) it regularly gets blocked by snow in winter.

It was my late mother's favourite road, but then she seldom actually
drove on it. She just enjoyed the scenery.

Anne B
BrritSki
2020-11-01 15:51:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
My wife has two phobias, spiders and the M25. I'm reasonably ok with
spiders, but I see her point about the M25, which according to Terry
Pratchett was designed by the demon Crawley.
Steve
I have never seen the M25, and I have no desire to remedy the omission.
My late mother suffered from arachnophobia.
"I'm changing my name to Spiderman".
"Why, can you jump off tall buildings ?"
"No, I can;t get out of the bath".

IGMC
Chris J Dixon
2020-11-01 16:44:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
I have never seen the M25, and I have no desire to remedy the omission.
My first experience of the M25, shortly after it opened, was in a
hired VW 35 cwt van, helping a friend move flats. It was strange
arriving at motorway services realising that I hadn't got a feel
for the gears, because I had only been through the box once, and
the lever seemed to resemble an umbrella in size.

Realised how daft the lorry parking area layout was. With a vast
area of tarmac to play with, why on earth arrange the bays in
chevron, with the exit road on the left - the blind side. I
couldn't see anything through the mirrors at that angle, and
presume truck drivers all had the same problem.

Not a bad drive, but the return trip solo and empty was a bit
interesting in blustery crosswinds.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2020-11-01 23:14:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 01 Nov 2020 16:44:02 +0000, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Realised how daft the lorry parking area layout was. With a vast
area of tarmac to play with, why on earth arrange the bays in
chevron, with the exit road on the left - the blind side. I
couldn't see anything through the mirrors at that angle, and
presume truck drivers all had the same problem.
I think the worst thing about lorry parks at motorway services is often
their feed back onto the road. Those on some roads are fine with no
greenery obstructing the view, the cars have to look out for lorries which
have right-of-way on the slip-road. But I think it is Clacket Lane,
east-bound (M25) where we nearly got wiped out by a Czech lorry because the
lorries have to feed onto the slip-road already carrying cars. There are so
many hedges/bushes around and the lorry lane comes in at an angle such that
the driver of a large left-hand drive vehicle has no chance of seeing a
small vehicle approaching.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-11-05 11:05:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I was told not to brake for any animals. I do, of course.
I once encountered two large dogs dancing about on the carriageway of the
M25 in relatively heavy traffic. It was very scary, my two young daughters
were quite distressed by the sight. We then passed a vehicle on the hard
shoulder where two people were plainly watching with horror as their dogs
ran around in the traffic. I don't think I swerved, all the cars had slowed
down at the sight of them. I took the next exit, onto the M23 and had to
travel as far as the Gatwick exit before I could pull over and deal with my
own shock.
My wife has two phobias, spiders and the M25. I'm reasonably ok with
spiders, but I see her point about the M25, which according to Terry
Pratchett was designed by the demon Crawley.
Steve
I have never seen the M25, and I have no desire to remedy the omission.
My late mother suffered from arachnophobia.
The road I fear most is the A9 between Perth and Inverness
(a) it switches from single to dual to single to dual to single to dual
carriageway all the way, so drivers who don't know the road well
sometimes forget that they are on a single carriageway and imagine that
it's safe to overtake when it isn't
(b) tourists from all points south can get to Luncarty, just north of
Perth, on dual carriageway all the way, and the return to single
carriageway disorientates them
(c) Luncarty is the first place where tourists accustomed to driving on
the right first encounter in earnest the requirement to drive on the
left after having come all the way from Channel ports on dual carriageway
(d) the scenery is impressive - enough to distract drivers' attention
from the road
(e) there are often deer grazing on the hillsides, again potentially
distracting for drivers
(f) it is the only route north for HGVs, caravans and motorhomes and the
only route south again, leading to traffic queues on the single
carriageway sections, which in turn leads to impatience and reckless
overtaking
(g) when I lived in Perth, I acted often enough as court interpreter for
German-speaking motorists who had been involved (usually caused)
accidents on the A9 to be acutely aware just how dangerous a road it is
(h) it regularly gets blocked by snow in winter.
It was my late mother's favourite road, but then she seldom actually
drove on it. She just enjoyed the scenery.
Anne B
Much of that applies to the A303 which has the added distraction of
Stonehenge. The switching between single and dual carriageway every few
miles is particularly galling.
Steve
krw
2020-11-05 11:17:58 UTC
Reply
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Post by Steve Hague
Much of that applies to the A303 which has the added distraction of
Stonehenge. The switching between single and dual carriageway every few
miles is particularly galling.
I feel the A303 and the onward A30 in particular is far better than it
was (much of the latter is dual throughout from my most recent visit).
And soon we will have the fabled Stonehenge Tunnel so that will speed up
the people who go slowly for no reason.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
John Ashby
2020-11-05 12:16:58 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Steve Hague
Much of that applies to the A303 which has the added distraction of
Stonehenge. The switching between single and dual carriageway every
few miles is particularly galling.
I feel the A303 and the onward A30 in particular is far better than it
was (much of the latter is dual throughout from my most recent visit).
And soon we will have the fabled Stonehenge Tunnel so that will speed up
the people who go slowly for no reason.
Some of us go slowly for the reason of enjoying the view of Stonehenge,
and will regret the tunnel taking away that opportunity.

Sometimes it's about the journey as well as the destination.

john
Peter
2020-11-06 17:22:41 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Much of that applies to the A303 which has the added distraction of
Stonehenge. The switching between single and dual carriageway every few
miles is particularly galling.
Big stones and little stones.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
Paul Herber
2020-10-29 11:37:29 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
I can't find that vehicle category on my driving licence.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Nick Leverton
2020-10-29 12:15:09 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
I can't find that vehicle category on my driving licence.
I think they're covered under "spherical cows".

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-29 19:31:38 UTC
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Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
I can't find that vehicle category on my driving licence.
I think they're covered under "spherical cows".
But the square ones are easier to corner.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2020-10-30 09:56:09 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
I can't find that vehicle category on my driving licence.
I think they're covered under "spherical cows".
But the square ones are easier to corner.
... to a degree...
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2020-10-29 13:39:39 UTC
Reply
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
Poison them with cyanide whilst sitting on a park bench - save all that
jamming on (or not) of brakes.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-29 14:04:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 at 13:39:39, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:49:01 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I was told not to drive round pigeons.
Poison them with cyanide whilst sitting on a park bench - save all that
jamming on (or not) of brakes.
It just takes a smidgen!

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Grief generates a huge energy in you and it's better for everybody if you
harness it to do something. - Judi Dench, RT 2015/2/28-3/6
Mike McMillan
2020-10-29 13:37:47 UTC
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Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 17:57:57 -0700 (PDT), Min
Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Min
I am a big fan of Lillian Jackson Braun's books "The Cat Who..."
books. I have also found writer Marian Babson, who writes in
the genre which now seems to have been dubbed 'Cozy Detective'.
There are a lot of these featuring cats - has anyone come across
a detective (preferably a series) with a detective/PC/PI with a dog?
I have read most of the 'Hamish MacBeth' series, but don't know
of any other? American authors are fine, too!
Not necessarily recommending them, but you could look for books by Susan
Conant in the Dog Lover's Mysteries series.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Great - many thanks! The genre is apparently 'Cozy Mystery', but all the
above suggestions will be investigated!
I watched the first Hudson and Rex, which is on Alibi. It was ok but I
was more worried the dog might be hurt than I usually am about the
detectives :)
I'd do that too! Remember the puppy in 'Apocalypse Now'? I'm still worrying
about it....
--
Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
Does that depend on whether you want your meat as a steak or as a sandwich
filler?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-29 19:34:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be

"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"

(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-10-29 20:48:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
ITYM missing the pointer.
Mike McMillan
2020-10-30 09:57:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
ITYM missing the pointer.
Just avoid the Shitzu if you have cleaned the tyres recently.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-30 21:05:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
ITYM missing the pointer.
I setter them up...
--
Sam Plusnet
Steve Hague
2020-10-30 09:01:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which I'll
bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to me.
There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger dashed out
in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't dash, they amble.
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-30 09:18:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 09:01:01, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Steve Hague
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which
I'll bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to
me. There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger
dashed out in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't
dash, they amble.
Steve
Aw.

How do you determine which side they were going towards - or do you come
across them before they roll into a ball?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Let us endeavour so to live so that when we come to die even the undertaker
will be sorry." Mark Twain according to Gyles Brandreth on Twitter, 2020-6-23.
DavidK
2020-10-30 10:43:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Steve Hague
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which
I'll bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to
me. There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger
dashed out in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't
dash, they amble.
Steve
Aw.
How do you determine which side they were going towards - or do you come
across them before they roll into a ball?
PaulP late of this parish, told me he has been on toad patrol.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-30 21:07:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Steve Hague
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which
I'll bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery
to me. There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger
dashed out in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't
dash, they amble.
Steve
Aw.
How do you determine which side they were going towards - or do you
come across them before they roll into a ball?
PaulP late of this parish, told me he has been on toad patrol.
I used to 'work with' an MOD person who did toad patrol on and around
Portland in his spare time.
--
Sam Plusnet
Steve Hague
2020-10-30 17:28:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Steve Hague
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which
I'll bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to
me. There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger
dashed out in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't
dash, they amble.
Steve
Aw.
How do you determine which side they were going towards - or do you come
across them before they roll into a ball?
I saw one in Morrison's car park this morning. It trundled from the
parking area to the hedgerow at the side. I love to see them, they
always make me smile. As an aside, we cleaned out our garden pond a
couple of days ago, and there was a frog with a yellow stripe down its
back, and no, it wasn't a natterjack toad, I know my amphibians, and
this was a frog. Any ideas?
Steve
Jenny M Benson
2020-10-30 17:47:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
I saw one in Morrison's car park this morning. It trundled from the
parking area to the hedgerow at the side. I love to see them, they
always make me smile. As an aside, we cleaned out our garden pond a
couple of days ago, and there was a frog with a yellow stripe down its
back, and no, it wasn't a natterjack toad, I know my amphibians, and
this was a frog. Any ideas?
There are two frogs with yellow stripes down the back: the Pool Frog
and the Marsh Frog. What size was it? The Pool frog is smaller - about
5" max, whereas the Marsh Frog can be twice the size.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Steve Hague
2020-10-30 18:07:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
I saw one in Morrison's car park this morning. It trundled from the
parking area to the hedgerow at the side. I love to see them, they
always make me smile. As an aside, we cleaned out our garden pond a
couple of days ago, and there was a frog with a yellow stripe down its
back, and no, it wasn't a natterjack toad, I know my amphibians, and
this was a frog. Any ideas?
There are two frogs with yellow stripes down the back:  the Pool Frog
and the Marsh Frog.  What size was it?  The Pool frog is smaller - about
5" max, whereas the Marsh Frog can be twice the size.
I know of the Marsh Frog, but it sounds like the Pool Frog is the best
candidate. I've never heard of it, but it's about 4" long and very
athletic. What I really would like to know is how a creature without
wings can get into a garden completely enclosed with five foot high
walls. Perhaps frogs are much more intelligent than we think, and have
developed teleportation.
Steve
Penny
2020-10-30 18:43:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 18:07:55 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I saw one in Morrison's car park this morning. It trundled from the
parking area to the hedgerow at the side. I love to see them, they
always make me smile. As an aside, we cleaned out our garden pond a
couple of days ago, and there was a frog with a yellow stripe down its
back, and no, it wasn't a natterjack toad, I know my amphibians, and
this was a frog. Any ideas?
There are two frogs with yellow stripes down the back:  the Pool Frog
and the Marsh Frog.  What size was it?  The Pool frog is smaller - about
5" max, whereas the Marsh Frog can be twice the size.
I know of the Marsh Frog, but it sounds like the Pool Frog is the best
candidate. I've never heard of it, but it's about 4" long and very
athletic. What I really would like to know is how a creature without
wings can get into a garden completely enclosed with five foot high
walls. Perhaps frogs are much more intelligent than we think, and have
developed teleportation.
My walled Kent garden always had lots of frogs. I stopped wearing my wooden
clogs out there when gardening for fear of squashing too many froglets (and
then slipping over). We had no pond (though neighbours did), I think they
babies liked the corner where mind-your-own-business grew at the base of
the wall - always cool and damp. I did find some large hibernating adults
under the thick ice in an old baby bath one winter. The colour of the frogs
varied a lot but mostly they were some shade of tan.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-30 21:09:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I saw one in Morrison's car park this morning. It trundled from the
parking area to the hedgerow at the side. I love to see them, they
always make me smile. As an aside, we cleaned out our garden pond a
couple of days ago, and there was a frog with a yellow stripe down
its back, and no, it wasn't a natterjack toad, I know my amphibians,
and this was a frog. Any ideas?
There are two frogs with yellow stripes down the back:  the Pool Frog
and the Marsh Frog.  What size was it?  The Pool frog is smaller -
about 5" max, whereas the Marsh Frog can be twice the size.
I know of the Marsh Frog, but it sounds like the Pool Frog is the best
candidate. I've never heard of it, but it's about 4" long and very
athletic.
Of course it's athletic. Why else would it have a go faster stripe?
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-10-30 12:02:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 09:01:01 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which I'll
bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to me.
There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger dashed out
in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't dash, they amble.
Steve
There's a lovely video doing the rounds, of a bird hassling a hedgehog to
get off the road somewhere in Latvia. I suppose it may just have wanted its
lunch in a safer spot

--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-30 21:16:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
There's a lovely video doing the rounds, of a bird hassling a hedgehog to
get off the road somewhere in Latvia. I suppose it may just have wanted its
lunch in a safer spot http://youtu.be/FIqFiQ2MwfA
It looked to me as though the jackdaw wanted the hedgehog for lunch, but
couldn't figure out how to open the container.

We have both jackdaws and hedgehogs in the garden, but I wonder why that
hedgehog was out & about in daylight?
--
Sam Plusnet
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-30 21:12:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Min
Oh, and back in the days when I was learning to drive, my emergency stop
practice was done "As if a small dog has run into the road".....
I think my response would be
"How small is small?"
And
"Is there a size at which I can safely ignore them?"
(Missing the point can be splendid exercise)
I stop for hedgehogs and escort them to the side of the road, which I'll
bet all umrats would do. Why so many get run over is a mystery to me.
There are sometimes unavoidable accidents, like when a badger dashed out
in front of my van a few years ago, but hedgehogs don't dash, they amble.
Hedgehogs can move around pretty sharpish when the want to/need to, but
their default response to a surprise is to freeze on the spot & hope the
big bad thing will not spot them and go away.
--
Sam Plusnet
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