Discussion:
I know, I know - it's my fault . . .
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steveski
2018-11-24 21:56:53 UTC
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Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?

It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
--
Steveski
Mike
2018-11-25 09:05:41 UTC
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Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
O deer! Fings have gone from baa’d to worst haven’t they? Have the news
servers all gone on strike for more bytes in their breaks or summat???
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-11-25 09:52:28 UTC
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On 24 Nov 2018 21:56:53 GMT, steveski <***@invalid.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
I ain't'n't dead... yet.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2018-11-25 11:07:50 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
I ain't'n't dead... yet.
:o)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-25 16:44:34 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
I ain't'n't dead... yet.
:o)
I am ... bwahahaha ... (-:

Or "I know; I just haven't stopped moving yet." (C) Zaphod Beeblebrox.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

Never be led astray onto the path of virtue.
Penny
2018-11-25 17:14:07 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 16:44:34 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
I ain't'n't dead... yet.
:o)
Or "I know; I just haven't stopped moving yet." (C) Zaphod Beeblebrox.
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).

Personally, while not actually dead I am hibernating until the sun breaks
through again - less than 1kwh generated here since Wednesday :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Fenny
2018-11-25 19:33:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
--
Fenny
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-25 22:26:35 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 19:33:05 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I haven't seen that but have been reading them and there are a few
with alternate universes. I get very confused. One of those puddle
jumpers has a time machine element, or I think it was a puddle jumper.
Fenny
2018-11-25 23:38:24 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 22:26:35 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 19:33:05 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I haven't seen that but have been reading them and there are a few
with alternate universes. I get very confused. One of those puddle
jumpers has a time machine element, or I think it was a puddle jumper.
Yes, now that they are running alongside S1 of Atlantis, *we* know
what puddle jumpers are, but as yet, the SGC haven't made contact with
Atlantis. SG1 have just found the puddle jumper with time travel
capabilities, but it will be a few more eps until alternate-SG1 have
to go back and rescue real-SG1 from history, changing the timeline,
and causing there to be fish in Jack's pond.
--
Fenny
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-26 09:04:48 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 23:38:24 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 22:26:35 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 19:33:05 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I haven't seen that but have been reading them and there are a few
with alternate universes. I get very confused. One of those puddle
jumpers has a time machine element, or I think it was a puddle jumper.
Yes, now that they are running alongside S1 of Atlantis, *we* know
what puddle jumpers are, but as yet, the SGC haven't made contact with
Atlantis. SG1 have just found the puddle jumper with time travel
capabilities, but it will be a few more eps until alternate-SG1 have
to go back and rescue real-SG1 from history, changing the timeline,
and causing there to be fish in Jack's pond.
I'm about to begin from the beginning for my afternoon viewing. Sg1
first. I like the Atlantis books better than the programmes. One SG1
book was when they first meet wraith and have not been to Atlantis. It
is on a different world and the wraith are I think ones they make
friends with later.It's a trilogy. 3 books but forgot the names.
Fenny
2018-11-26 21:45:25 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 09:04:48 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Fenny
Yes, now that they are running alongside S1 of Atlantis, *we* know
what puddle jumpers are, but as yet, the SGC haven't made contact with
Atlantis. SG1 have just found the puddle jumper with time travel
capabilities, but it will be a few more eps until alternate-SG1 have
to go back and rescue real-SG1 from history, changing the timeline,
and causing there to be fish in Jack's pond.
I'm about to begin from the beginning for my afternoon viewing. Sg1
first. I like the Atlantis books better than the programmes. One SG1
book was when they first meet wraith and have not been to Atlantis. It
is on a different world and the wraith are I think ones they make
friends with later.It's a trilogy. 3 books but forgot the names.
Oddly, although I'm a huge SG1 fan, I like a lot of Atlantis episodes
more than I like the SG1 episodes, even though I'm not a huge fan of
the Wraith, the Geniii and the Athosians.

And even though I've seen all of SG1 several times, I seem to have
forgotten a lot of the "less famous" eps.

A friend of mine has written a couple of SG1 books - Four Dragons and
The Drift. She's working on a third.
--
Fenny
Penny
2018-11-25 23:41:57 UTC
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On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 19:33:05 +0000, Fenny <***@removethis.gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I seem to recall an episode where alternative SG1s turned up through the
stargate from many many different alt-universes. They all got along with
themselves rather well :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-26 09:06:27 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I seem to recall an episode where alternative SG1s turned up through the
stargate from many many different alt-universes. They all got along with
themselves rather well :)
In one of the books someone makes android SG1 teams. I think there are
8 teams. Not all are good. They adapt them, changing more each
subsequent one. Removing ethics and replacing with obedience.
Fenny
2018-11-26 21:48:04 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
Post by Penny
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative universe
(or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Well, in the episode I just watched, the stargate has been stolen by
The Trust, who are using the Tok'ra symbiote poison to kill off
Go'auld and Jaffa. No more alternate timelines until the end of S8, I
think. But there is a duplicate Carter in the next ep.
I seem to recall an episode where alternative SG1s turned up through the
stargate from many many different alt-universes. They all got along with
themselves rather well :)
Yes, there is an ep where lots of different SG1 teams arrive. Each
has a different combination of members and relationships. Quite a few
have Sam & Jack together. Some have Janet still alive (so it must
have been after S7).
--
Fenny
steveski
2018-11-26 04:10:06 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sun, 25 Nov 2018 16:44:34 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
I ain't'n't dead... yet.
:o)
Or "I know; I just haven't stopped moving yet." (C) Zaphod Beeblebrox.
Hm, perhaps the answer lies in the mixing of Terry Pratchett and Douglas
Adams 'realities'. Perhaps usenet has slipped into an alternative
universe (or would that bring SG1 into the equation?).
Personally, while not actually dead I am hibernating until the sun
breaks through again - less than 1kwh generated here since Wednesday :(
And that's just you standing around.
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2018-11-26 21:46:03 UTC
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Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".

Or is that just me?
--
Sam Plusnet
Fenny
2018-11-26 22:21:49 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
Aldi is fine, as are the self scan tills at Waitrose. But I had more
than 15 items in Ikea yesterday, so couldn't use the self scan
machines. The people 3 in front of me had not bought the correct
combination of boxes for whatever it was they had on their trolley.
After 20 minutes [1] of faffing, they went back to the warehouse to
get all the right boxes.

I'd only gone in to buy a bunch of toys for the Christmas charity
collection. If it weren't for the pesky restriction on self scan
items, I could have been in and out in less than half an hour.

[1] Well, maybe nearer 5, but it certainly felt like 20!
--
Fenny
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-26 22:55:39 UTC
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 22:21:49 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
Aldi is fine, as are the self scan tills at Waitrose. But I had more
than 15 items in Ikea yesterday, so couldn't use the self scan
machines. The people 3 in front of me had not bought the correct
combination of boxes for whatever it was they had on their trolley.
After 20 minutes [1] of faffing, they went back to the warehouse to
get all the right boxes.
I'd only gone in to buy a bunch of toys for the Christmas charity
collection. If it weren't for the pesky restriction on self scan
items, I could have been in and out in less than half an hour.
[1] Well, maybe nearer 5, but it certainly felt like 20!
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
Fenny
2018-11-26 23:37:52 UTC
Reply
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 22:55:39 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
They have them in Waitrose and quite a lot of people use them. I've
started to use them, as it saves me from having to add up in my head
when I'm trying to hit £10 for a free paper or £40 when I have a money
off voucher [1] They are very good at telling you if you've bought
something where there's a BOGOF or similar offer.

[1] I have to remember to scan the coffee code as well as the paper to
get both counted within the £10 spend for a free paper (and free
coffee).
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2018-11-27 09:19:46 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 22:55:39 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
They have them in Waitrose and quite a lot of people use them. I've
started to use them, as it saves me from having to add up in my head
when I'm trying to hit £10 for a free paper or £40 when I have a money
off voucher [1] They are very good at telling you if you've bought
something where there's a BOGOF or similar offer.
[1] I have to remember to scan the coffee code as well as the paper to
get both counted within the £10 spend for a free paper (and free
coffee).
W/rose have had them for years.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2018-11-26 23:49:09 UTC
Reply
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2018 22:55:39 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
Tesco has something like that here, I've never used it.

For me the worst thing about it is they replaced all the sensibly shallow
small trolleys with deeper ones with a holder for the scanning device. I
also find the beeping each handset does while I'm wandering around the
store and others are using them is distracting and confusing.

I do self-scan (at the s-s tills) on the rare occasions I visit when all
the tills are busy but mostly I find a bored-but-friendly checkout person
to do it for me so I can add interaction to the exercise of the whole
excursion. I go days without physically speaking to anyone and once on such
an excursion discovered, to my embarrassment, I had lost my voice.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-11-27 08:25:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
Tesco has something like that here, I've never used it.
For me the worst thing about it is they replaced all the sensibly shallow
small trolleys with deeper ones with a holder for the scanning device. I
also find the beeping each handset does while I'm wandering around the
store and others are using them is distracting and confusing.
I do self-scan (at the s-s tills) on the rare occasions I visit when all
the tills are busy but mostly I find a bored-but-friendly checkout person
to do it for me so I can add interaction to the exercise of the whole
excursion. I go days without physically speaking to anyone and once on such
an excursion discovered, to my embarrassment, I had lost my voice.
Do you have Amazon Echo?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-27 08:53:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
Tesco has something like that here, I've never used it.
For me the worst thing about it is they replaced all the sensibly shallow
small trolleys with deeper ones with a holder for the scanning device. I
also find the beeping each handset does while I'm wandering around the
store and others are using them is distracting and confusing.
I do self-scan (at the s-s tills) on the rare occasions I visit when all
the tills are busy but mostly I find a bored-but-friendly checkout person
to do it for me so I can add interaction to the exercise of the whole
excursion. I go days without physically speaking to anyone and once on such
an excursion discovered, to my embarrassment, I had lost my voice.
Do you have Amazon Echo?
I miss her when I am walking the dog or in the car and I want to ask a
question or hear a particular song. And a couple of days ago I tried
to swipe a paper book to turn the page.
Muddled of Watford.
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-27 09:51:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Do you have Amazon Echo?
I miss her when I am walking the dog or in the car and I want to ask a
question or hear a particular song. And a couple of days ago I tried
to swipe a paper book to turn the page.
Muddled of Watford.
Just before I read this out to her, my sister had asked if "these
people" (referring to a tv prog) were "always that stupid or have they
just lost their marbles through old age?"
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-27 11:11:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:51:38 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Do you have Amazon Echo?
I miss her when I am walking the dog or in the car and I want to ask a
question or hear a particular song. And a couple of days ago I tried
to swipe a paper book to turn the page.
Muddled of Watford.
Just before I read this out to her, my sister had asked if "these
people" (referring to a tv prog) were "always that stupid or have they
just lost their marbles through old age?"
I think it is just forming new automatic habits rather than
age-related in this case. I'm reading 2 paper books at the same time
as one kindle and another kindle now and then. Like when you speak a
different language the another one you sometimes speak interferes.
Nick Odell
2018-11-27 11:08:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Asda has those hand scan machines. You register, I think it was using
my phone, and then pick one up each time you go in and can then scan
as you select and go to a special area where the machine connects to a
computer. I've used it twice since I got it some months ago. I mostly
forget to take the machine at the entrance or cant be bothered. A few
times when wandering past that area looking for a checkout with no
queue the assistant in there invited me in and just scanned all my
stuff as she had nobody tehre on those computers. It is not much used.
Tesco has something like that here, I've never used it.
For me the worst thing about it is they replaced all the sensibly shallow
small trolleys with deeper ones with a holder for the scanning device. I
also find the beeping each handset does while I'm wandering around the
store and others are using them is distracting and confusing.
I do self-scan (at the s-s tills) on the rare occasions I visit when all
the tills are busy but mostly I find a bored-but-friendly checkout person
to do it for me so I can add interaction to the exercise of the whole
excursion. I go days without physically speaking to anyone and once on such
an excursion discovered, to my embarrassment, I had lost my voice.
Increasingly, I find I'm choosing a trolley over a basket even for just
a few items. It's my knees, you know. And I prefer the shallow type.
It's my back, you know.

I prefer the human contact with the beepeuse over an impersonal machine
and am willing to wait in a queue to be served by one. Apart from the
chat whilst being served, at the back of my mind is the thought that any
mistake is their mistake and I'm unlikely to be hauled off by security
as a result.

There are three situations in which I use the self-service tills.

Midnight at Asda - there are no checkout staff on the night shift. I
have to use the self-service if I have to shop.

If the queue is very deep/there's a beepeuso rather than a beepeusa on
duty[1]/somebody ahead is in a very complicated shopping situation/etc
and my bus leaves in five minutes from the bus stop six minutes away,
then I'll use the self-service.

Coinstar charge 9.9% commission for taking spare change so as a point of
principle I won't use it and I won't subject human staff to counting out
piles of pennies. So I use the self-service tills and pile the pennies
in there. Useful tip, if you didn't know this already: the machine won't
stop you overpaying so you can unload as much coinage as you like and it
will give you change in the highest denominations that it has available.

Nick
[1]Sorry, that's very sexist but blokes are invariably slower than women
at that sort of thing.
Penny
2018-11-27 15:36:29 UTC
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 11:08:31 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Coinstar charge 9.9% commission for taking spare change so as a point of
principle I won't use it and I won't subject human staff to counting out
piles of pennies. So I use the self-service tills and pile the pennies
in there. Useful tip, if you didn't know this already: the machine won't
stop you overpaying so you can unload as much coinage as you like and it
will give you change in the highest denominations that it has available.
Brilliant! Tip of the year :)
(not that I generally have too much change - quite the opposite)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
[1]Sorry, that's very sexist but blokes are invariably slower than women
at that sort of thing.
Hm, not IME, in fact in recent months I've encountered eager-beaver male
retail staff at least twice who start scanning my stuff before the previous
customer has left and before I have unloaded it all onto the belt. Most
annoying and makes everyone feel rushed for zero actual gain - but maybe
that's what you meant...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2018-11-27 18:02:05 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
If the queue is very deep/there's a beepeuso rather than a beepeusa on
duty
Beepeur/beepeuse? (I am relying on ancient O level French here, so I am
probably AM.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2018-11-27 18:51:53 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
If the queue is very deep/there's a beepeuso rather than a beepeusa on
duty
Beepeur/beepeuse?  (I am relying on ancient O level French here, so I am
probably AM.)
Thinking in another Latin language, I always took umra's beepeuse to be
gender neutral because of the 'e' ending as in Presidente. So I mangled
a masculine 'o' and feminine 'a' ending as in Silvio/Silvia.

I like your beepeur/beepeuse better, though.

Nick
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-27 19:43:53 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Coinstar charge 9.9% commission for taking spare change so as a point of
principle I won't use it and I won't subject human staff to counting out
piles of pennies. So I use the self-service tills and pile the pennies
in there. Useful tip, if you didn't know this already: the machine won't
stop you overpaying so you can unload as much coinage as you like and it
will give you change in the highest denominations that it has available.
Indeed so. The Co-op (clockwise) in the village has just such a
facility, and I have even taken away notes as "change" for a
large handful of coins.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Odell
2018-11-28 13:35:26 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
Coinstar charge 9.9% commission for taking spare change so as a point of
principle I won't use it and I won't subject human staff to counting out
piles of pennies. So I use the self-service tills and pile the pennies
in there. Useful tip, if you didn't know this already: the machine won't
stop you overpaying so you can unload as much coinage as you like and it
will give you change in the highest denominations that it has available.
Indeed so. The Co-op (clockwise) in the village has just such a
facility, and I have even taken away notes as "change" for a
large handful of coins.
I'm beginning to recall that I originally read about laundering loose
change through self-service checkouts somewhere on usenet and I'm now
wondering, Chris, whether I nicked your idea and didn't give you credit
for it? If so, I apologise and hope this mention might go some way
towards making it up to you.

Nick
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-28 13:55:49 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris J Dixon
Indeed so. The Co-op (clockwise) in the village has just such a
facility, and I have even taken away notes as "change" for a
large handful of coins.
I'm beginning to recall that I originally read about laundering loose
change through self-service checkouts somewhere on usenet and I'm now
wondering, Chris, whether I nicked your idea and didn't give you credit
for it? If so, I apologise and hope this mention might go some way
towards making it up to you.
I really can't remember if I have mentioned it here before, but
you certainly don't need to concern yourself.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2018-11-28 09:30:00 UTC
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So I use the self-service tills and pile the pennies in there. Useful
tip, if you didn't know this already: the machine won't stop you
overpaying so you can unload as much coinage as you like and it will
give you change in the highest denominations that it has available.
Ooh, thanks for that, waife will be very pleased to learn of a quick way
of getting rid of shrapnel.
Nick
[1]Sorry, that's very sexist but blokes are invariably slower than women
at that sort of thing.
It depends on the bloke. What really annoys me is people who don't start
serious packing of bags until the beeping is finished and then look
amazed at having to pay and start scrabbling for card/money/etc.
This was MUCH worse in Italy than the UK, where queues are much shorter
as well.

When it was busy (most of the time) at Gonads (our local supermarket
Conad/LeClerc, widdershins) I always chose a queu near the office and
kept an eye on the door for a new beepeuse to emerge and then quikckly
followed her to the new till and was first in line.
BrritSki
2018-11-27 08:46:51 UTC
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Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
Aldi is fine, as are the self scan tills at Waitrose. But I had more
than 15 items in Ikea yesterday, so couldn't use the self scan
machines. The people 3 in front of me had not bought the correct
combination of boxes for whatever it was they had on their trolley.
After 20 minutes [1] of faffing, they went back to the warehouse to
get all the right boxes.
We used the IKEA delivery service to save getting large, heavy boxes off
shelves, humping then into the car and then out again and it worked
beautifully and was delivered at 7.15 this morning ! We were given a
7-11 slot. Excellent service.

OTOH, they would not deliver the bedside tables for some reason and
although the stock check saying they had them in the Exeter store in
fact there were only 2, not the 4 we required. The nearest store now is
MK and that is showing as out of stock, but "More arriving in store on
24.11.18." It's been saying that since the 23rd now :/
BrritSki
2018-11-27 08:41:54 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
YAmywaifeAICM5gri... +++ NO CARRIER +++
Chris McMillan
2018-11-27 09:19:46 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2018-11-27 09:35:19 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME. My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it. Normally, changing makes very little
difference and find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage. There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.

The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
LFS
2018-11-27 11:04:50 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME.  My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it.
How very sensible. Over 47 years I have finally managed to persuade
Husband to do this but he tuts a great deal.

Normally, changing makes very little
difference and  find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage.  There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.
Queuing theory. A very boring man once tried to explain it to me.
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases. In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Fenny
2018-11-27 18:46:20 UTC
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Post by LFS
Queuing theory. A very boring man once tried to explain it to me.
He may have been boring, but the subject itself is interesting. And
it was one of the questions I could guarantee to get right in my stats
exams.
--
Fenny
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-28 09:49:41 UTC
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Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!

In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.

I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
--
Jenny M Benson
Mike
2018-11-28 10:06:26 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.
I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
Perhaps they were both about to undertake an evening class or summat
similar and needed things for a project they were doing?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 10:21:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.
I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
Perhaps they were both about to undertake an evening class or summat
similar and needed things for a project they were doing?
Competitive silver polishing with lumps of jelly to chew or to tarnish
the items first.
Mike
2018-11-28 10:54:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.
I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
Perhaps they were both about to undertake an evening class or summat
similar and needed things for a project they were doing?
Competitive silver polishing with lumps of jelly to chew or to tarnish
the items first.
A silver plated bunny jelly mould in need of a clean before the party?
Competitive jelly making? Ready, Steady, Pour?
--
Toodle Pip
Sally Thompson
2018-11-28 12:05:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.
I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
Perhaps they were both about to undertake an evening class or summat
similar and needed things for a project they were doing?
I have it! They were going to apply the silver polish with the dishcloth to
an ornate jelly mould for a jelly competition.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2018-11-28 12:39:53 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
In Sainsburys recently a women some way in front of me bought
Post by LFS
a yoga mat and a six pack of beer. By the time I got to the cashier I'd
written a whole short story about her in my head.
The strangest i have ever seen was in the Co-op in Stalham (<mode=Peter
Sellers>StalHAM, Gateway to the Broads/)many years ago when 2 elderly
ladies - obviously friends and shopping together - had purchased exactly
the same three items. I forget, after all these many years, exactly
what the items were, but they were something lie a tin of silver polish,
a packet of jelly and a dishcloth.
I could imagine one person finding herself in need of an odd item and
popping out to get it, adding a couple of other purchases while she was
at it, but the chances of the two of them both requiring the same
diverse trio beggared belief.
Perhaps they were both about to undertake an evening class or summat
similar and needed things for a project they were doing?
I have it! They were going to apply the silver polish with the dishcloth to
an ornate jelly mould for a jelly competition.
Is there an echo around here?
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-11-28 10:29:34 UTC
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I have seen trollies with loads of cat food and wine and nothing else.
Nick Odell
2018-11-28 11:17:41 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
I have seen trollies with loads of cat food and wine and nothing else.
I've seen trollies like that. And 10Kg bags of rice. And drums of
cooking oil. And mountains of toilet rolls. I have always presumed that
sometimes the supermarket offers make it a cheaper place than the cash
and carry to buy stock for the corner store or takeaway.

Nick
Sally Thompson
2018-11-28 12:05:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
I have seen trollies with loads of cat food and wine and nothing else.
I don't see a problem here.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2018-11-28 12:40:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
I have seen trollies with loads of cat food and wine and nothing else.
I don't see a problem here.
Milk is not good for cats I’m told, so ....
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-11-28 15:01:05 UTC
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I did ask him if his cat was having a party.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-28 18:08:28 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
I did ask him if his cat was having a party.
What was his reply?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-11-28 18:42:57 UTC
Reply
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He agreed that his cat was indeed having a party.
Mike
2018-11-28 18:52:51 UTC
Reply
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
He agreed that his cat was indeed having a party.
... leaving staff to do the buying and organising of course.
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-11-28 19:13:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
He agreed that his cat was indeed having a party.
... leaving staff to do the buying and organising of course.
--
Toodle Pip
At my own 21st, at home during the university vacation, we offered our cat a saucer of champagne. She didn't like it. Perhaps the bubbles on her whiskers was uncomfortable.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-28 19:41:34 UTC
Reply
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
He agreed that his cat was indeed having a party.
... leaving staff to do the buying and organising of course.
--
Toodle Pip
At my own 21st, at home during the university vacation, we offered our
cat a saucer of champagne. She didn't like it. Perhaps the bubbles on
her whiskers was uncomfortable.
Seriously, I remember reading somewhere that xxx can't metabolise
alcohol: sure, it makes them drunk as it does humans, but it can do them
serious harm too. I can't remember whether xxx was cats or dogs, though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

Wisdom is the ability to cope. - the late (AB of C) Michael Ramsey,
quoted by Stephen Fry (RT 24-30 August 2013)
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-11-28 20:01:27 UTC
Reply
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Poisonous to dogs, certainly; dunno about cats.
Nick Odell
2018-11-28 22:05:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Poisonous to dogs, certainly; dunno about cats.
Presumably not drop-down-dead poisonous since I've know one or two pub
dogs who've been partial to a drop of beer every now and then.

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-28 20:22:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
At my own 21st, at home during the university vacation, we offered our cat a saucer of champagne. She didn't like it. Perhaps the bubbles on her whiskers was uncomfortable.
I remember my late, lamented Lucy cat used to love an occasional taste
of cream. One Christmas, she was very unimpressed when she tried a bit
of brandy cream - she clearly thought I'd ruined a good piece of cream
for her.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened.
(Terry Pratchett)
Penny
2018-11-28 13:29:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 09:49:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
Because I shop infrequently and buy different things from the three
supermarkets I regularly frequent (one clockwise, two widdershins) I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example - is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-28 13:33:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
Because I shop infrequently and buy different things from the three
supermarkets I regularly frequent (one clockwise, two widdershins) I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example - is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...

I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
--
Best wishes, Serena
I dropped out of communism class because of lousy Marx.
Penny
2018-11-28 13:51:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 13:33:04 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
:)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
For me that would mean jam season, I guess it's a different time of year
for bees.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-28 15:41:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 13:33:04 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
:)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
For me that would mean jam season, I guess it's a different time of year
for bees.
No, more or less the same time of year (depending on what kind of jam
you were making).
--
Best wishes, Serena
I changed my iPod's name to Titanic. It's syncing now.
Penny
2018-11-28 18:13:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 15:41:17 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 13:33:04 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
:)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
For me that would mean jam season, I guess it's a different time of year
for bees.
No, more or less the same time of year (depending on what kind of jam
you were making).
Ah, cos you've nicked their honey?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2018-11-28 17:48:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
Because I shop infrequently and buy different things from the three
supermarkets I regularly frequent (one clockwise, two widdershins) I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example - is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
Making Damson Gin is fun, with a trolley full of cheap gin and sugar.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Nick Odell
2018-11-28 22:08:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
Because I shop infrequently and buy different things from the three
supermarkets I regularly frequent (one clockwise, two widdershins) I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example - is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
Making Damson Gin is fun, with a trolley full of cheap gin and sugar.
Making Damson Gin is even more fun with a few buckets-full of failed
home made wine and a lot of glass tubing.

Nick
steveski
2018-11-28 23:39:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Making Damson Gin is fun, with a trolley full of cheap gin and sugar.
Making Damson Gin is even more fun with a few buckets-full of failed
home made wine and a lot of glass tubing.
Copper's better . . .
--
Steveski
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 21:42:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 13:33:04 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by LFS
I like supermarket queues because I enjoy looking at other people's
purchases.
Likewise!
Because I shop infrequently and buy different things from the three
supermarkets I regularly frequent (one clockwise, two widdershins) I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example - is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
I used to enjoy it, in the days when I kept bees, when my mostly
virtuously healthy shopping trolley was topped with a dozen or more bags
of white sugar. I generally got quite a few sideways looks, from people
wondering what I wanted it for. On the odd occasions when someone
actually asked, I very much enjoyed answering simply "pet food"...
I would generally then explain properly, if asked ;)
Bees?
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-28 13:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example
I was once followed at a checkout by somebody buying half a dozen
bottles of spirit and a (IIRC) pack of bread rolls. I couldn't
help asking if he didn't think he might have overdone the food.
;-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-28 18:12:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I often
wonder what fellow shoppers might make of my purchases - three loaves of
bread but no butter, cold meat or cheese for example
I was once followed at a checkout by somebody buying half a dozen
bottles of spirit and a (IIRC) pack of bread rolls. I couldn't
help asking if he didn't think he might have overdone the food.
;-)
Chris
Reminds me of the Foster's lager commercial a few years ago: showed some
Australian cobbers at the store, having loaded their ute* to groaning
with crates of the product: "and a bottle of sherry for the ladies".
Puts on bottle of sherry, ute's suspension collapses. "Looks like you
overdid it with the sherry, Bruce."

*utility vehicle - Australian for pickup truck.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand
krw
2018-11-28 22:24:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
Strange some of the cheese from our local outlet is quite acceptable
once the use by date was several weeks ago.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-11-28 23:47:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 22:24:29 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Penny
is it just my local
eTsco who can't keep cheese?
Strange some of the cheese from our local outlet is quite acceptable
once the use by date was several weeks ago.
It's not the flavour but the texture which is wrong. All appear to have
been frozen - or maybe just over-chilled :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-27 19:48:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME. My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it.
+1
Post by Sid Nuncius
Normally, changing makes very little
difference and find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage. There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
When doing the weekly shop, I don't like it if there is an empty
checkout, as I prefer to have the time to load the belt without
undue haste, and open up my shopping bags ready to be filled.

I also resist invitations to head to another till if the belt is
on the right, as I find my shoulder bag gets in the way.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-27 20:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Sid Nuncius
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME. My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it.
+1
And when it's not quite a crawl, but _heavy_ traffic, I often prefer
_not_ to be in the fast lane, as they all travel far to close to each
other there. (But I can't leave as much space in front of me as I'd
like, as some idiot pulls into it.)
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Sid Nuncius
Normally, changing makes very little
difference and find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage. There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
When doing the weekly shop, I don't like it if there is an empty
checkout, as I prefer to have the time to load the belt without
undue haste, and open up my shopping bags ready to be filled.
This reminds me of something else: some supermarkets _used_ to have the
bit downhill from the till wide enough for two people to be loading
their bags; some even had a divider bar, hinged at the downhill end,
with its free end towards the beepeuse. The idea was, once one customer
had paid or whatever, the bar was swung over, so that the next
customer's purchases were guided to the other side, while the first
customer was still bagging. I never once saw an English operator use it:
in fact they often kept the swinging bar in the centre, so that it stuck
out into their space, where they'd hang things on it (such as carrier
bags), meaning it _couldn't_ be moved anyway.

(This sort of checkout has now disappeared, I think.)
Post by Chris J Dixon
I also resist invitations to head to another till if the belt is
on the right, as I find my shoulder bag gets in the way.
Can you not swing it to your other shoulder?
Post by Chris J Dixon
Chris
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

# 10^-12 boos = 1 picoboo # 2*10^3 mockingbirds = 2 kilo mockingbird
# 10^21 piccolos = 1 gigolo # 10^12 microphones = 1 megaphone
# 10**9 questions = 1 gigawhat
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-28 08:16:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
I also resist invitations to head to another till if the belt is
on the right, as I find my shoulder bag gets in the way.
Can you not swing it to your other shoulder?
Is it possible? Yes. Would it feel right? No. Do I have any
intention of doing it? No.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2018-11-28 09:33:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
I also resist invitations to head to another till if the belt is
on the right, as I find my shoulder bag gets in the way.
Can you not swing it to your other shoulder?
Is it possible? Yes. Would it feel right? No. Do I have any
intention of doing it? No.
I am sure we are all interested to hear that you don't swing both ways
Chris (NTTAWWT).
Rosemary Miskin
2018-11-28 10:45:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I also resist invitations to head to another till if the belt is 
on the right, as I find my shoulder bag gets in the way. 
+1

and my slightly gammy left shoulder makes
unloading that side less easy.

Rosemary
Sam Plusnet
2018-11-27 20:32:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME.  My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it.  Normally, changing makes very little
difference and  find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage.  There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.
In Sainsbugs, last week, just that happened and I was invited to be the
first customer at that new till and a "colleague" would be with me
shortly...
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
I was given ample opportunity for meditation.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 09:25:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:35:19 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
It's like traffic tailbacks, IME. My tactic is almost always to choose
a lane/queue and then stay in it. Normally, changing makes very little
difference and find it much less stressful to simply accept that I'm
staying where I am than constantly scanning for some possible, usually
negligible, advantage. There are exceptions, like when a new till opens
immediately next to you, but they are rare.
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
I was a queue hopper, weaving in and out to find the fastest traffic
lane. I come out of London on the A1, then M1 in the rush hour after
looking after granddaughter. I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
lanes and clog it further. After reading your post I began to stop
hustling and it is quite relaxing :). Thank you. I shall stop trying
to will B to lane hop too when he drives.
Penny
2018-11-28 13:37:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 09:25:03 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:35:19 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
I was a queue hopper, weaving in and out to find the fastest traffic
lane. I come out of London on the A1, then M1 in the rush hour after
looking after granddaughter. I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
lanes and clog it further. After reading your post I began to stop
hustling and it is quite relaxing :). Thank you. I shall stop trying
to will B to lane hop too when he drives.
I was chatting to one of Ray's nephews at a funeral recently and he was
telling me about the speed awareness course he had done rather than pay a
fine. He said it had transformed his driving style, he was now more relaxed
and, generally speaking, got about more quickly (without breaking the speed
limit) than he had before.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 21:44:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:35:19 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
The beginning of supermarket wisdom, Grasshopper, is to meditate upon
respect for chirality and upon the need to conquer the impulse to haste.
I was a queue hopper, weaving in and out to find the fastest traffic
lane. I come out of London on the A1, then M1 in the rush hour after
looking after granddaughter. I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
lanes and clog it further. After reading your post I began to stop
hustling and it is quite relaxing :). Thank you. I shall stop trying
to will B to lane hop too when he drives.
I was chatting to one of Ray's nephews at a funeral recently and he was
telling me about the speed awareness course he had done rather than pay a
fine. He said it had transformed his driving style, he was now more relaxed
and, generally speaking, got about more quickly (without breaking the speed
limit) than he had before.
I'm ashamed to say I did a speed awareness course a year or two ago,
as well as three times the Institute of Advanced Motorist course, once
for the test and twice a top up to check my driving.
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-28 14:14:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
lanes and clog it further.
I had one of those on my way to work. The two lanes were Left and
Ahead and Right Only. Traffic queues on the road to the left
meant that those, like me, wanting to go ahead were unnecessarily
delayed. If I spotted a long queue in time, I tended to use the
right hand lane, and go round 540 degrees.

More generally, it annoys me to find myself approaching a busy
roundabout where the traffic is in stationary lanes, but you have
not yet reached any signs indicating what the lane designations
are.

Rambling further, I gather that the rules now say that at the
give way line for a roundabout, you can't have a right turn
marking on the tarmac, so that nobody is tempted to actually make
such a turn against the traffic, onto the roundabout.

M1 J24 used to be on my daily run. They have just finished a
serious reorganisation which means that my muscle memory of
correct lane choice is no longer appropriate, I really have to
concentrate to get it right, and judging by the actions of
others, I am not alone.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 21:48:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
lanes and clog it further.
I had one of those on my way to work. The two lanes were Left and
Ahead and Right Only. Traffic queues on the road to the left
meant that those, like me, wanting to go ahead were unnecessarily
delayed. If I spotted a long queue in time, I tended to use the
right hand lane, and go round 540 degrees.
More generally, it annoys me to find myself approaching a busy
roundabout where the traffic is in stationary lanes, but you have
not yet reached any signs indicating what the lane designations
are.
Rambling further, I gather that the rules now say that at the
give way line for a roundabout, you can't have a right turn
marking on the tarmac, so that nobody is tempted to actually make
such a turn against the traffic, onto the roundabout.
M1 J24 used to be on my daily run. They have just finished a
serious reorganisation which means that my muscle memory of
correct lane choice is no longer appropriate, I really have to
concentrate to get it right, and judging by the actions of
others, I am not alone.
Chris
In our case the lights on the roundabout were out for some weeks and
there were no jams. Traffic flowed smoothly. We petitioned to say
leave the lights off. They put them back and jams resumed. There are
also 2 supermarkets off the roundabout and pedestrian crossings with
lights just off it! Plus a garage with a minimarket off another exit.
But all flowed well with no lights.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-28 18:24:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Vicky Ayech
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
looking after granddaughter. I also live close to a busy roundabout
that has unnecessary lights that clog it up and people get into wrong
[]
I find the approach roads to roundabouts often go too close to the
roundabout before spreading - sort of ===O rather than ==<O - with the
result that, especially if you're turning right, you have a sharp _left_
turn on entering. If traffic is light (bordering on none), so that I'm
not inconveniencing anyone if I do it, I sometimes get into the wrong
lane deliberately to reduce this; I'm wondering if I'm going to get
pulled over for it some day.

Another thing about roundabouts that I think does nobody any favours
(and is actually quite dangerous) is the lane markings on the roundabout
itself, which on most roundabouts are more or less parallel to the
centre island, with just different lettering in the lanes as you go
round, obliging you to change lanes. One that I know of (the "Army and
Navy" one in Chelmsford) has lane markings that spiral outwards slowly,
meaning even if you stay in lane (according to the markings), you're
gradually moved outwards. When I've heard it discussed, many seem not to
like it, but I do. (Did; I don't live there now.)

Don't talk to me about lights on them: the big one in Ashford has them,
and they don't suit my relaxed (and ecological) driving style at all: to
go round it from east to west without being stopped _twice_, I'd have to
put my foot down, which I'm sure is not good.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand
Penny
2018-11-28 19:09:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 18:24:25 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I find the approach roads to roundabouts often go too close to the
roundabout before spreading - sort of ===O rather than ==<O - with the
result that, especially if you're turning right, you have a sharp _left_
turn on entering. If traffic is light (bordering on none), so that I'm
not inconveniencing anyone if I do it, I sometimes get into the wrong
lane deliberately to reduce this; I'm wondering if I'm going to get
pulled over for it some day.
The Ray Glendinning theory of roundabouts states the roads should leave the
roundabout tangentially so everyone approaching needs to pretty much come
to a stop and steer onto them while those leaving just keep going straight.

My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should be
obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so traffic on
the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow on their
approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get the chance of
entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the swiftly moving vehicle
entering from their right.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another thing about roundabouts that I think does nobody any favours
(and is actually quite dangerous) is the lane markings on the roundabout
itself, which on most roundabouts are more or less parallel to the
centre island, with just different lettering in the lanes as you go
round, obliging you to change lanes. One that I know of (the "Army and
Navy" one in Chelmsford) has lane markings that spiral outwards slowly,
meaning even if you stay in lane (according to the markings), you're
gradually moved outwards. When I've heard it discussed, many seem not to
like it, but I do.
I like them too and wish more areas adopted that style. They're helpful in
unfamiliar areas and I suspect it is locals who still haven't got used to
this sensible change who don't like.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-28 19:52:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 18:24:25 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I find the approach roads to roundabouts often go too close to the
roundabout before spreading - sort of ===O rather than ==<O - with the
result that, especially if you're turning right, you have a sharp _left_
turn on entering. If traffic is light (bordering on none), so that I'm
not inconveniencing anyone if I do it, I sometimes get into the wrong
lane deliberately to reduce this; I'm wondering if I'm going to get
pulled over for it some day.
The Ray Glendinning theory of roundabouts states the roads should leave the
roundabout tangentially so everyone approaching needs to pretty much come
to a stop and steer onto them while those leaving just keep going straight.
I see what he's getting at, but I don't agree entirely: forcing people
to slow in that manner when traffic is light or nonexistent I don't
think is a good thing. And it certainly shouldn't apply when there are
traffic lights.
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should be
obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so traffic on
the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow on their
approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get the chance of
entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the swiftly moving vehicle
entering from their right.
I agree, that would help the minor road entrants. I think British
traffic planners are too enamoured of roundabouts altogether anyway.
(Your suggestion doesn't really work for those "miniroundabouts" where
the centre is just a white circle painted on the road, for example.) I
think they _are_ _beginning_ to realise their error - I can think of at
least a couple of places (actually adjacent to each other, in Newcastle)
where, according to the old map in my SatNav, there is (so was) a
roundabout, but now isn't.
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another thing about roundabouts that I think does nobody any favours
(and is actually quite dangerous) is the lane markings on the roundabout
itself, which on most roundabouts are more or less parallel to the
centre island, with just different lettering in the lanes as you go
round, obliging you to change lanes. One that I know of (the "Army and
Navy" one in Chelmsford) has lane markings that spiral outwards slowly,
meaning even if you stay in lane (according to the markings), you're
gradually moved outwards. When I've heard it discussed, many seem not to
like it, but I do.
I like them too and wish more areas adopted that style. They're helpful in
unfamiliar areas and I suspect it is locals who still haven't got used to
this sensible change who don't like.
You may be right. Certainly, in heavy traffic having to fight one's way
left is not pleasant.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

Today, I dare say more people know who starred as /The Vicar of Dibley/ than
know the name of the vicar of their local parish. - Clive Anderson, Radio
Times 15-21 January 2011.
Jim Easterbrook
2018-11-28 20:17:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I see what he's getting at, but I don't agree entirely: forcing people
to slow in that manner when traffic is light or nonexistent I don't
think is a good thing. And it certainly shouldn't apply when there are
traffic lights.
People should always slow down when approaching a give way marking.
Otherwise they may simply not see traffic moving at a different speed to
the majority.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should
be obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so
traffic on the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow
on their approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get
the chance of entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the
swiftly moving vehicle entering from their right.
I agree, that would help the minor road entrants. I think British
traffic planners are too enamoured of roundabouts altogether anyway.
Roundabouts only work as designed where there are competent drivers and
low traffic volumes. Neither condition is as common as it was when
roundabouts were the new solution to all problems.

Traffic lights on a roundabout are an admission that the junction is no
longer suitable for a roundabout. Reverting to a conventional light
controlled junction is safer and quicker for all.

If you want more insight into roundabouts try cycling round a few. Do not
follow the Highway Code's advice to stay in the left hand lane though.
Few motorists pay any attention to rule 187.
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/using-the-road-159-
to-203#roundabouts-184-to-190
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Nick Odell
2018-11-28 22:17:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I see what he's getting at, but I don't agree entirely: forcing people
to slow in that manner when traffic is light or nonexistent I don't
think is a good thing. And it certainly shouldn't apply when there are
traffic lights.
People should always slow down when approaching a give way marking.
Otherwise they may simply not see traffic moving at a different speed to
the majority.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should
be obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so
traffic on the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow
on their approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get
the chance of entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the
swiftly moving vehicle entering from their right.
I agree, that would help the minor road entrants. I think British
traffic planners are too enamoured of roundabouts altogether anyway.
Roundabouts only work as designed where there are competent drivers and
low traffic volumes. Neither condition is as common as it was when
roundabouts were the new solution to all problems.
Traffic lights on a roundabout are an admission that the junction is no
longer suitable for a roundabout. Reverting to a conventional light
controlled junction is safer and quicker for all.
If you want more insight into roundabouts try cycling round a few. Do not
follow the Highway Code's advice to stay in the left hand lane though.
Few motorists pay any attention to rule 187.
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/using-the-road-159-
to-203#roundabouts-184-to-190
Speaking as an ex-cyclist who always moved into the left-hand side of
whatever lane would be appropriate for a car intending to exit where I
was going, I always presumed the guidance about cyclists staying in the
left hand lane was simply to make it easier for the road maintenance
crews to scape up the mess afterwards.

Nick
krw
2018-11-28 22:31:49 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Traffic lights on a roundabout are an admission that the junction is no
longer suitable for a roundabout. Reverting to a conventional light
controlled junction is safer and quicker for all.
I can think of a number of local instances where there are lights at all
times but the traffic would flow far better off peak with the lights
off. In the peak times I agree the lights are needed to share the road
space around. But turning them off out the peak seems a difficult concept.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-11-29 00:07:05 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 22:31:49 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Traffic lights on a roundabout are an admission that the junction is no
longer suitable for a roundabout. Reverting to a conventional light
controlled junction is safer and quicker for all.
I can think of a number of local instances where there are lights at all
times but the traffic would flow far better off peak with the lights
off. In the peak times I agree the lights are needed to share the road
space around. But turning them off out the peak seems a difficult concept.
It does happen in some places.

The roundabout on the A249 at its junction with the M2 is weird in that
there are no traffic lights on the approach from the south so traffic for
the eastbound M2 can peel off onto the sliproad unhindered (the M-way
junction is back-to-front, I think they all are on the original M2) and
those continuing north, having entered the roundabout without any lights
are similarly unhindered. The muddle on the east side of the roundabout can
be hell if folk don't know where they are going as there is not enough room
between exits and lights to contain all those wishing to proceed south on
the A249 (you have to turn at the roundabout and go back for roads off the
east carriageway) so they block folk trying to get onto the M2 westbound.

Mind you, whoever designed the new sliproad after the northern part of the
A249 was turned into a duel carriageway should have been shot. The camber
was all wrong and we suffered months of lorries falling over on it and
generally bringing everyone to a halt.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2018-11-28 21:02:35 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 19:52:22 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should be
obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so traffic on
the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow on their
approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get the chance of
entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the swiftly moving vehicle
entering from their right.
I agree, that would help the minor road entrants. I think British
traffic planners are too enamoured of roundabouts altogether anyway.
(Your suggestion doesn't really work for those "miniroundabouts" where
the centre is just a white circle painted on the road, for example.)
No, I was thinking of those junctions of major and minor roads
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
think they _are_ _beginning_ to realise their error - I can think of at
least a couple of places (actually adjacent to each other, in Newcastle)
where, according to the old map in my SatNav, there is (so was) a
roundabout, but now isn't.
We used to have a large roundabout on the main road here which worked
tolerably well. It was removed in favour of (yet another set of) traffic
lights which are dire, giving too much time to busiest road while
short-changing the others rather than allowing them to interrupt the flow
on the busiest road as and when necessary.

The only time since the change when it really worked well was the one day
when the traffic lights had been installed but were not yet working
although all other controls had been removed. Traffic flowed beautifully,
all drivers being courteous and taking turns.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2018-11-28 19:56:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should be
obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so traffic on
the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow on their
approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get the chance of
entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the swiftly moving vehicle
entering from their right.
On the approaches to this roundabout:

http://goo.gl/maps/k1xYx

a barrier has been erected so that you can't see traffic already
on the roundabout until the last minute, presumably with the
intention of making you approach the give way line more slowly,
rather than speeding through if you think it is clear.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2018-11-28 22:33:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
My own addendum to this is that visibility across the roundabout should be
obscured by trees. On many roundabouts this is not the case so traffic on
the major road always 'wins' because they do not have to slow on their
approach and cars waiting in the road to their left don't get the chance of
entering the roundabout for fear of being hit by the swiftly moving vehicle
entering from their right.
http://goo.gl/maps/k1xYx
a barrier has been erected so that you can't see traffic already
on the roundabout until the last minute, presumably with the
intention of making you approach the give way line more slowly,
rather than speeding through if you think it is clear.
Chris
They have done something similar on a roundabout in Bracknell.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
krw
2018-11-28 22:29:29 UTC
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Permalink
you're gradually moved outwards
Which is the correct way of going round most roundabouts so that if you
are in the right lane it leads to your required exit. I do not
understand why people do not like it.

We have one local roundabout where the indicated marking slows the
traffic and if rethought would aid traffic flow.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-11-27 10:59:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:19:46 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
A new till opened when I was queueing in Lidl yesterday (I like the way
they announce the till numbers in Welsh here). I stayed put, even though I
hadn't noticed the person about to be served had placed their items one
behind the other on the belt so didn't have nearly as much stuff to be
scanned as first appeared.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-11-27 11:12:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 27 Nov 2018 09:19:46 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Every NG that I've subscribed to has become moribund . . . or is that
eggs?
It's a bit like the 'anyone who has ever eaten a tomato, dies' thing :-)
That's a bit like "Every time I join a queue at a supermarket till, it
grinds to a halt".
Or is that just me?
And us, though in Lidl, try to join a new till open queue and you’re either
still last in new slow queue or you stay where you were helplessly and see
new queue whizz through.
A new till opened when I was queueing in Lidl yesterday (I like the way
they announce the till numbers in Welsh here). I stayed put, even though I
hadn't noticed the person about to be served had placed their items one
behind the other on the belt so didn't have nearly as much stuff to be
scanned as first appeared.
We often find that they announce a checkout is opening in Lidl, customers
rush to that line and wait and wait as the assistant takes a few minutes to
arrive at the till - by which time our alternate queue has kept moving and
we are in the process of going through with our purchases.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-27 15:24:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
A new till opened when I was queueing in Lidl yesterday (I like the way
they announce the till numbers in Welsh here). I stayed put, even though I
(That does sound rather nice.
Post by Penny
hadn't noticed the person about to be served had placed their items one
behind the other on the belt so didn't have nearly as much stuff to be
scanned as first appeared.
Oh good - I'm glad to finally hear I'm not the only one who does that!
If asked why, I suppose it is partly because it gives me slightly better
control of the order I then pack my shopping box in, but I'll admit
mainly it's because I like to see the optics/belt mechanism working.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
Nick Odell
2018-11-27 17:56:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
"I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at
this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war. Get up in a crate,
Perkins, pop over to Bremen, take a shufti, don't come back. Goodbye,
Perkins. God, I wish I was going too."

Peter Cook, Beyond The Fringe, Edinburgh 1960


N.
krw
2018-11-27 23:40:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture be done
on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric "Otter" Stratton (Tim
Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John Belushi) - N. L's Animal House
(1978)
"I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at
this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war. Get up in a crate,
Perkins, pop over to Bremen, take a shufti, don't come back. Goodbye,
Perkins. God, I wish I was going too."
Peter Cook, Beyond The Fringe, Edinburgh 1960
N.
I am far from certain but I have a feeling that there may well be a
similar statement somewhere in a Goon Show.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
steveski
2018-11-28 00:51:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture
be done on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric
"Otter" Stratton (Tim Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John
Belushi) - N. L's Animal House (1978)
"I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at
this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war. Get up in a crate,
Perkins, pop over to Bremen, take a shufti, don't come back. Goodbye,
Perkins. God, I wish I was going too."
Peter Cook, Beyond The Fringe, Edinburgh 1960
Is that the one that ends (Jonathan Miller, I think [1]):

Goodbye, sir . . . or is it . . . au revoir?
No, Perkins. It's goodbye.

(?)
--
Steveski

[1] I'm sure that I also remember this sketch done with Cuddley Dudley
yes/no? [2]

[2] <kf> I met them and their wives on a few occasions (friends of a
girlfriend). Moore was, definitely 'cuddley Dudley. Cook was, MOST
definitely, not.
Sid Nuncius
2018-11-28 07:28:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"This situation absolutely requires a really futile and stoopid gesture
be done on somebody's part." "We're just the guys to do it." Eric
"Otter" Stratton (Tim Matheson) and John "Bluto" Blutarsky (John
Belushi) - N. L's Animal House (1978)
"I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at
this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war. Get up in a crate,
Perkins, pop over to Bremen, take a shufti, don't come back. Goodbye,
Perkins. God, I wish I was going too."
Peter Cook, Beyond The Fringe, Edinburgh 1960
Goodbye, sir . . . or is it . . . au revoir?
No, Perkins. It's goodbye.
Almost. The last line is just "No, Perkins."

--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
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